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The ranch. (North Yakima, Wash.) 1894-189?, January 20, 1894, Image 9

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2007252175/1894-01-20/ed-1/seq-9/

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ATTEND THE SPOKANE2CONVENTION.
If you are a fruit grower or expect to be
come one, be sure to make ready, and
attend the fruit-growers' convention to be
held at Spokane February 14. You can
represent a society, or yourself if you like.
We must all make a strong pull for that
reduced fare, and reduced hotel rates at
Spokane. We can see the persons who
will market our fruits, representatives of
companies hauling it, to make rates, and
learn the experience of those who shipped
last year. Fruit growers will come in
contact with one another for general con
ference and can have a talk with the
nurserymen who start young trees. This
convention is one of the ..*ost economical
measures yet proposed to our fruit
growers.
THE PALOUSE LESSON,
By Prof. K. W. Lake.
Wheat is not always king. When na
ture in her wisdom saw fit to pour forth
last fall an over-abundance of western
Washington "mist" our farmers began to
realize that other crops than wheat muht
be made to do good turn on a Palouse
farm. While regretfully watching for
months the steady destruction of a mag
nificent wheat crop many a soil-tiller saw
the need of change.
While the rains have been temporarily
disastrous to local interests I am convinc
ed it has been for our ultimate good.
Nature does all things for the best. Dur
ing October there was a greater precipita
tion than for the same months for the
four previous years—about seven inches.
This so delayed harvesting that hundreds
of acres of wheat are yet uncut in the
fields, the greater part pastured by stock,
while much of the threshed grJn was fit
only for feeding hogs.
It is impossible to estimate, even relat
ively, the loss to the farmers through this
streak of "bad luck." Had the acreage
of wheat been 50 per cent less nearly all
might have been saved. For nearly all
E. F. BENSON. GEO. C. MITCHELL.
BENSON & MITCHELL,
NORTH YAKIMA, WASHINGTON. HOTEL YAKIMA BUILDING.
AGENTS FOR THE SALK OK
YAKIMA VALLEY IRRIGATED LANDS.
NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD LANDS.
We have sold nearly 3000 acres under the Runnyside Canal during the past two years, mostly in small tracts,
and to actual settlers. THEIR SUCCESS IS O( TR BEST ENDORSEMENT.
♦ ♦ Our Treatise on the Profits in Hops, Fruit and Alfalfa *. *
Containing pictures, statistics, cost of setting out orchards by contract for non-residents, and map of
the Sunnyside Country showing ten-acre tracts, mailed on application.
THE RANCH.
would have been fall sown, and this
ripens from two to four weeks earlier than
spring sown, and since one-half the area
would have taken only one-half the time
to thresh, the crop might have been
largely harvested and marketed before
the heavy rains came, the expense of cul
tivation saved and the land devoted to
other crops. Stock could have consumed
any small amount caught in the rain.
And instead of buying hogs to eat up a
large quantity of partly ruined grain at
a high price, the farmer might have had
hogs to sell.
The final outcome points to the breed
ing of stock during the next few years.
Cattle, pigs and chickens will take im
portant place in the farming of this sec
tinn during the next few years. Already
inquiries for high bred stock are being
received at the agricultural college. Like
wise the matter of feeding, feeding stuffs
and their growth and curing are receiving
attention by the average farmer, never
before dreamed of.
1 Jeem the agricultural outlook of our
section brighter than ever before, and
this largely due to the ruined wheat crop
of 1893.
ORGANIZING HORTICULTURAL SOCIE-
TIES IN YAKIMA COUNTY.
The organization of local horticultural
societies is now of the utmost importance
to Yakitna county because fruit-tree
planting, and fruit crops are assuming
large proportions. A meeting of the fruit
growers surrounding Zillah, under the
auspices of the state board of horticulture,
is announced for Tuesday afternoon, the
23dlnst.,and fruit growers will meet at
North Yakima, Wednesday, 24th inst.,
at 2 p. m., in the Yakima Club rooms. It
is proposed to organize local horticultural
societies at that time, and form a nucleous
for more important work to be done later.
Tt is very important to have every tree
which is planted this spring free from
any injurious insect pest. Each society
must have an inspec or so all trees can
be closely watched. Rule 0, under the
regulations of the state board, reads:
"Horticultural societies are requested to
work in harmony with this board, and
may, without expense to the board, elect
from their number some person to act as
local inspector or advisor, who shall report
to the commissioner of the district in
which such society is located, or to the
secretary or inspector of the state board,
cases where trees or plants are infested,
and the owner or person in charge refuses
to obey jthe directions of the society in
carrying out the rules of the board; also
any other matters of importance to the
interests of said society."
Under the present law the board has no
power to appoint inspectors, but they de
sire close co-operation, which can best be
done as above directed. Each society
should also send many representatives to
the convention at Spokane. The best
chance for telling work yet given for the
fruit industry of the Pacific northwest, by
any body of men, is here presented, and
this county must make its mark. Com
missioner Maxey, of this district, and the
secretary of the board, will be present at
both the Zillah and North Yakima
meetings.
A. S. PAUL,
UK A I.Kit IN
LUMBER,
ROUGH AND DRESSED.
SIDING, FLOORING AND SHINGLES,
KENCE POSTS, PICKET 3. HOP POLES
AND LATH.
Estimate') made on buildings. Glass cut to any
side to order.
Office and Yard: B street, next to Chappell «i
Cox's warehouse, North Yakina, Wash.
9

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