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The intelligencer. (Anderson, S.C.) 1915-1917, May 04, 1915, Image 1

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WEATHER FORECAST
Fair today; gent?o to mod?rate
south to southwest winds.
The
COTTON MARKET
U>eal Spots.9 1-2 c
VOLUME IL
ANDERSON, S. C. TUESDAY, MORNING MAY 4,1915.
NUMBER 96.
MAY HOLD i
RESPONS
LOSS OF ?
WILL ANNOUNCE NO DEFI-j
NITE POLICY UNTIL RES
PONSIBILITY IS PLACED
U. S. HAS ORDERED
A RIGID INQUIRYl
Probably Demand Indemnity of
Germany if Proven Subma
rine Attacked Steamer.
Washington, May 3.-Ponding an of
ficial investigation into tile circum
stances surrounding the Wrecking of
the American steamer Gulf Light in
the English Channel, tho United States
will defer diplomatic representations
UH well us any pronouueement of
policy.
American ''on&ul Stephen^ at "Ply
mouth. England, cabled an official
notification that the Gulf Light was
torpedoed, her captain died of heart
rhilur?, und two Bailors drowned.
.Secretary Bryan said he would ask for
thorough, complete report from thc
consul, and would direct Ambassador
Gerard at Berlin to make a similar
inquiry of the German government of
such facts as it might have. Secre
tary Bryan announced he did not wish
to make predictions concerning the
American government's course until
nil facts arc in his possession. Should
the investigation corrorobate the dis
patcher claiming that a German sub
marine attacked the Gulf Light, the
United States will probably demand
indemnity sufficient to cover all losses
incurred by the ship and compensa
tion for the famille? of tho victims.
Washington, May 3.-Tho. United
States today awaited the result ?of-the
Inquiry into the reported sinking of
tho American steamer Gnlfllght by a
German submarine, with the toss of
her captain and crew. Pending the
development of official facts, no ac
tion will be taken.
Thc incident 1? regarded as serious
and calling for representations to Ger
many by the United States officials.
Tho officials would not discuss ttre^j
natu: . of these rem-esentatlons.
lt ji thought that the inquiry will
disclose -that the attack v/as not do
liberate, but accidental. If np the ouly
United States action would be a de
mand for damages.
The United SUtes has already
warned German that lt would . hold
her ut rielly accountablo for the loss of
American lives or vessels. It Is be
lieved that it will take se'-eral days to
complete thc Inquiry.
Captain Died from Shock.
London, May 3.-Thc American oil
tank steamship Gulfllght, which sailed
from Port Arthur, Texas, April 10, for
Itoucn, France, was torpedoed at noon
Saturda off the Scilly Islands, ac
cording to a Central News dispatch.
Tho captain of tho Gulf light, ac
cording, to tho samo advices, died of
heart failure aa ti result of shock.
Two seamen jumped overboard and
were drowned. .
Tho other members of the crew
wore taken off by a patrol- boat. Tho
- vessel was towed into Crow sound and
beached.
Tho Gulfllght was a steel vessel of
2,202 tons net and was built at Cam
den, N. J., In 1914. She waa owned
by the Gulf Refining company. Tba
vessel was 383 feet long, 61 feet boam
act 30 feet deep. She was equipped
with wireless apparatus.
1
Wilson Retaras.
Washington. May 3.-After Presi
dent Wilson returned to tho White
House today from William aton
Mass., ho Inquired about tho sinking
of the Gulfllght. It waa announced
that he has reserved judgment on the
torpedoetng until thc full official de?
tails are received.
CREW OF GULF LIGHT
LANDED AT PLYMOUTH
Plymouth,. May '3.-Tho Btcamcr
l-yonnesso brought to Penzance to
night thirty three members Of the
crew and toe body of Captain Gunter
of the American ?.?enmer < <. 'tght,
which war torpedoeu Suttk*ti;*>. Sec
ond Officer Bower of tho Gulf Light
said that Saturday at coon he aaw a
s??bmsrlne, which remained on the
surface th re? minutes, tuen disap
peared. Twenty-five minutes later he
Haid the Gulf Llcht waa struck by a
torpedo on the starboard aide with a
tremendous explosion.
BRITISH LABORERS
WORK IN UNIFORM
London, May ' 3.~"The success
which has attended the experiment r4
placing workmen at Liverpool la
khaki ls very Interesting from a
psychologies! standpoint." writes a
college proteneo.- to one of the London
newspapers. He explains:
GERMANY
IBLE FOR
3ULF LIGHT
OR. JOHN F. VINES HAS
RESIGNED PASTORATE
OF FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
TO ACCEPT CALL TO
ROANOKE VA.
GOES JUNE FIRST
For Seven Years Has Been Pas
tor Here-Is Given Up
With Regret.
After a splendid service of seven
years, the Fj.n-. John P. Vines, I). I).,
has resigned aa pastor of the First
Baptist church, of this city, his resig
nation having beor placed before the
congregation folowing the morning
tservico last Sunday. Dr. Vines will
leave June I to take up the pastorate
o? the First Baptist ehure?t ot Roa
noke,- Va.
Some day? ago it was learned that
a call had been extended Dr. Vinca
by thc Roanoke church. Immediate
ly upon learning of this matter, mem
I bora of the local congregation set
ubout to prevail upon Dr. Vines not
to consider tho cher. Feeling, how
e\^r, that it was his duty to sever
the ties that bind him to the church
here and take un the work in the new
field, Dr. Vines could not be pre
vailed upon l? reconsider his d?termi
nation to accept the call.
To say that there is genuine regret
throughout the large congregation of
the Firat Baptist ohurch that this be
loved pastor is to leave Anderson, in
superfluous. No minister ever had a
stronger grip upon thc affections of
his people than Dr. Vines, and there
were few dry eyes in the large con
gregation when he made a statement
with reference to his having decided
to accept the Virginia call.
The resignation of tho bclcved pas
tor was reluctantly accepted, and even
utter thc question was put to a voto
there were members of tho congru*
gatton who insisted on Dr. Viucs be
ing requested to reconsider and reject
the call to the Virginia church.
Dr. Vines sevmon Sunday morning
was bne o'" the best that he has de
livered during his pastorate herc.
After/the Berman, Dr. Vines asked
the congregation to bc seated, when*
h said in part:
"Tho saddest hour, or one of the
very saddest that can come to B
minister is when he must sever the
.ties as pastor, leavo the friends mode
dear by. association and acquaintance,
and take up his abode among strang
ers. The hour, after some. weekB of
sincere thought, prayer and intense
pain, I must now confront. T live
In Anderson, where it has been ours
to love and serve you, to. know
your burdeus and sorrows and try to
help you bear them to give and re
ceive, to.endur? and bo endured, and
fer these relations to exist for more
than seven years, len assure you
this service has BO bound our hearts
to you that we can truly say:
"Kiest be the tie that binds our
hearts in Christian love. You will
never know how painful tho task to
tell you today that oar labors so
pleasant together must soon come to
aa end. These days ot love and
service have rapidly passed. They
seem more like "A tale that is told,'
because ot the joy we have found in
our work with and for you. We have
seen you in sorrow and success and
have tr._d in both states to help
you. Our work, aa I think of it, has
not been by any means all I could
wish, but lt must be so, since our
alms and , hopes. must ever be
larger than we shall be able-to ac
complish. Such an aim alono ir, a
worthy one. There ls much undone
that we wish had been completed, und
all we can Bay is' 'We -hope and be
Me7a we have done our best to ad
vance every obfect that has meant
the betterment Of the church or com
munity.'
"Yoi* have responded to thc work
we have attempted till today, you
nave one ot the most practical and
workable plants anywhere In the.
south. While it '.s not as beautiful aa
we would wish lt, ?yet untold work may
be done, aod tho moat splendid poasl
bilitwBV developed. .Atong almost
overawe. I feel sure, wo may ace
that progresa baa been -made. Vour
gifts have gro?A from lesa than $:>.
OOO, as reported at thc Sim associa
tion U waa my pleasure to attend,
till today I note th:-: our annuat offer
ings tc tho varions denominational
oMects for the seven years have aver
a*?* moro than 222,000. And for tho
last Hirse years the average has been
more than 230,000 per year. Last year.
In the face of the panic, you gaVa
ti Imo;, t 230.000.
Compliment Sunday School.
"I belie-n we have a Sunday school
second tc few, lt any. Numberlug la
all departments we have more than
MINE WORKER GUILTY
OF KILLING DEPUTY
RESULT OF FIGHT BETWEEN
STRIKING MINERS AND
GUARDS IN COL.
GETS LIFE SENTENCE
Convicted Man Charged With
Leadership of Mob Which
- Attacked Deputies.
Trinidad, Col., May 3.-Joan Law
son was today found guilty of murder
in the first degree for killing John
Nimmo, a deputy sheriff, in a battle
with strikers October 25. 1913. The
jury's verdict fixed the penalty at
life imprisonment.
Lawson was charged with the mur
d3r of John Nimmo, a deputy of 1-ns
Animas county, who was killed in a
bat?le between deputies and striking
coal miners near Ludlow on October
25, 1913. Lawson is the member of
the international executive board of
the United Mine Workers of America
for district 15. Ile was one of the
prominent leaders in the recent coal
miners' strike in Colorado, which was
one of tho most notable labor con
flicts in the history of the United
States.
The strike was called for September
23. 1913. On that date thousands of
miners laid down their tools. Those
living unon the property of the coal
companies loaded up their household
goods and moved out. most of. them
settling in tent colonies established
by the union. The la-gest of those
was at Ludlow, a few miles north of
Trinidad and in close p.-oximlty to the
Hastings. IJelagua, Tabasco, Berwind
and Forbes mines.
Violence began carly lu the strike.
There was a series ot clashes tn the
Ludlow and Forbes nelgbberhood. and
on October ..29 the national guard of
Colorar^, -oh orders from Gvernor K.
M. Animons, took psscssln of the caal
mining district?.
li was in one of thc Ludlow fights
before the arrival of. tba State mili
tia that John Nimmo was killed. Nim
mo was one of a force of deputies sta
tioned at thc Ludlow section house
under command of K. E. Linderfult.
Llndorfelt, a witness for tho prose
cution, said the deputies were order
ed by tho then sheriff. James S.
Gris lian i to preserve order and pre
vent trouble between strikers olid
mine guards. Early in the afternoon
of October 25, 1913. a fight Btartcd
between these deputies and a large
body of strikers. Firing raged In
the arroyos and railroad cuts until
evening. Sometimes during the bat
tle Nimmo was shot through thc leg.
bleeding to death.
i Lawson was charged with the homi
cide on the theory of tho prosecution
that he was in charge of the tent
colony and in command of thc strikers
during thc battle Less than two
days were occupied in the selection
Of a jury.
Lawson, who is a member cf the
International Executive. Beard of
United Mine Workers of America,
said his attorneys wouldn't stop un
til everything possible had been done
to eave him and "they may get mei
but they cannot defeat the cause of
labor."
Presiding judge announced today
that Lawson be released on bond
pending action of motion for a new
trial. _\\_
1,200. The teachers and officers have
rendered service marked by Intelli
gence and consecration that ls seldom
seen. ?
"I shall never to my dying day for
set your assistance when it se med
accessary for me to serve the ii us-j
tees of Anderson College as ac:!nc '
president for more than a year. No I
ano Will ever know with win?* fear
ind trembling I took up tW? rask for
which I know how imfittcd l was. but.
with nothing but a uesire to serve the
people I loved to tl-o b,?st of my-abili
ty. I went because you, thc enurch
made lt possible and said tito word.
Because you so splendidly stood by me
it waa possible fm- mo to relieve the
college of some bills, to never charge
i dollarV. expense for traveling, etc.,
and to place a few "books in tho lib
rary that I hope may bc of some ser
Mee. The church went on In growth
and power while lt was impossible
tor me to do the work for. you as I
Wished, and it did so because you were
loyal and served with me. My. heart
la grateful for such love aa you gavo
me,
"After moro than aoven years of tho
happiest service with you permit me
to aay from my heart you will never
know how Very, very much I love you.
r wish it wore best for me to live with
this church an* serve tn thin town and
state a? loni; as I live. But lt is
not mino to do. For sonne timo I
hare somehow felt my labors were
drawing to a close. A man should
leatjo a church when all la har
monious and in good shape and not
?ult'to mar the church's life by re
maining too long. . 1 have alway?
reit death would be ptete.rabld tb bc
Inffc nestor' In: a place so long Uiat
OVER
NEGRO CONFESSED
KILLING DR. FERRELL
ADMITS FIRING ON MINE OP
ERATOR'. WITH SHOT
GUN AND FLEEING
FARREL FIRED FIRST
Accused Negro and Murdered
Man's Family Tell Contra
dictory Accounts of Killing.
tHrtningham.'. Ala.. May ."-.--Jesse
White, a negro, was arrested yester
day In connection with tne killing of
Lr. c. C. Ferrell, a wealthy coal op
erator and widely known author, made
n statement toda'y, according to the
police, in which he said he killed For.
rell after the latter had fired on him.
According to authorities. White
said he and another negro were re
turning from Plat Creek and had
stopped for a moment at the commis
sary building of the coal company, ?if
which Ferrell -fas president, .when
Ferrell appearedBwith a reviver, mid
began firing. Tile police declared
White confessed ?tiat he fired In re
ply with a. shotgun and then fled.
Members of the Ferrell family told
tho poiico. laut night that Feiirel
whose home IB near tue connu Issu ry
btldlngu, had^beejcj, killed in a fight
New President of Venezuela.
Caracas, May 3.-National conn ross
tod:iy elected Ger-.err* Jua:; V!. i-n;.
Comes president of Venezuela.
ENGIfi??nilniOT
SATISFIED ITH AWARD
Final Settlement of Present Case
Means Much to Adjustment
of Future Controversies.
Chicago May 3.-The Brother
hood of Locomotive Engineers aid
Firemen, after analyzing for three
days the arbitration awarding the
western wago dispute issued a state
ment today contending that the wage
td vance granted is inadequate. Tho
Increased aggregate according tn
their figures is |820,4U8 annually.
These figures far wages alone do not
Include value of compensatory rules
jr overtime allowances granted.
Congressional . investigation of tho
appointment of -Charles H. Nagel,
former secretary of commerce and
labor, as a neutral member of the ar
bitration board which decided the
wage dispute between the engineers
md firemen and ninty-elght western
railroads, waa demanded in resolu
tions adopted tonight by delegates re
presenting the railway-men's organi
sations. Thc resolutions assert that
?n investigation is necessary if future
eontroevsles between capital and
labor ta to be adjusted amicably.
Ffisll?sTilTS
ON SUPREME COURT
'* ? >4t
Can't be ftcaentenced Till Su
, prent?. Court Mandate
Reaches Arian ta.
I Atlanta. May 3.-A petition flied in
superior court today by the State for
the re-sentencing ot Leo Frank,
won't be acted upon until the case la
restored to tho Jurisdiction of the
?tato from the federal court, .iccord
ng to an announeomenf by-Presiding
ludgo . Hill. The mandate or ute
[hilted States supreme court, whlcb
?cfused Prank's appeal for a babea*
corpus, ls expected to reach the Unit
ed States court of Georgia, by May
19. Arter that Prank will be pro
duced in superior court, and sentenc
ed to die for the murder of Mary
Phagan.
_ i ? , .- ..
I<?rd Justice :<Vsd,
LoS?ioth May 8.--)it. Hon. John
Francis Moriarty, lord justice of ap
peala In Ireland, ia dead. Mr. ? Mori
arty has boen aolicitor general and
also attorney general tor Ireland.
IS ANNO!
ON TRIAL FOR LIFE
CHARGED WITH MURDER OF
MRS. LOUISE BAILEY AT
FREEPORT LAST JUNE
EXPECT LONG TRIAL
District Attorney Says May Take
Week to Present State's
Side of Case.
Mine?la. May 3.-Five Jurors were
chosen for the second trial of Mm.
Florence Coukllu Cannan, charged
with killing Mrs. lionise Halley, which
opened hero today.
Mrs. ('arman, who has been out
on ball, wu s remanded to the sheriff's
c.ustody tonight by orders from the
presiding Judge.
Min?la, May 23.-Mrs. Florence
Caiman was placed on trial here to
day for a second time on an indict
ment chargliiR her with the murder of
Mrs. Louiso I). Hailey at Freeport.
Tho Jury In lbs first trial disagreed.
.Mrs. Cannan has been nt liberty un
der bond. The defendant, accompan
ied by her husband. Dr. Edwurd Car
man, appeared In court, pale but smil
ing. She seemed to be in better
health than at thc first trial.
DlBtricl Attorney^Smlth said that
lt iniflht rsqaliMi a week..to pwesaiit?tlx
state's contention that Mrs. Carman
was tile unseen assailant who shot
Mrs. Iiallev to death in Dr. Cn noa n's
Office inst June. The selection of the
Jury proceeded slowly.
ENGLAND FACILITATES
U. S. FOREIGN TRADE
Issues Statement Designed to
Guard Against Interference
With Cargoes.
WASHINGTON. May 3.--Tho British
embassy issued a statement tonight
for thc information of American ship
pers, designed to faclllate the trade
of tho, United States with neutral
countries -by pointing out the way to
suard against interference by ullled
warships with cargoes not under the
b'm of Great Britains blockado order.
The statement was sent to all British
consuls tn thc United States to whom
shippers arc advised to give notice
of the character ot cargoes so the
British government can be advised
before the ships reach European wa
ters.
PRISONERS OF BOTH
SIDES TREATED ALIKE
British Officers Accorded Same
Treatment as Crews of Ger
man S?mannes.
London, May 3 -The treatment of
the crews of captured German ab
marlnea by England and that of Brit
ish officers imprisoned in Germany is
virtually the sante, except some Bru
tish prisoners are in solitary confine
ment American Ambassador - Bago
has so informed thc Brittan foreign
office. The Information was obtain
ed through investigation or the pris
on camps In England aud Germany.
Noted A roll eulogist Bead.
Christiania, May 3.-Dr. Gabriel
Gustafson, thc leading Norwegian
archeologlBt ls dead at bis' borne hero,
aged 62.
Dr. Gustafson was born In Sweden
but came to Norway In ISM and be
came head of the Antiquarian section
of tho Bergen Museum, which under
hi- direction developed Into en im
portant institution. iJUee he waa ap
pointed professor In the University of.
Christiania, where he completely re
organized the museum and conducted
numerous excavations, making many
Important discoveries. He waa regard
ed aa th? world's greatest authority
on thc civilisation ot the Viking Ages,
. i
ICE VICTORY
oNS IN GALICIA
MOST CRUSHING DEFEAT ADMINISTERED
BY EITHER SIDE SINCE WAR BEGAN
-ENTIRE RUSSIAN CENTER
IS SMASHED
AUSTRO-GERMAN VICTORY EXTENDS
ACROSS WHOLE OF EASTERN GALICIA
Berlin Believes Russian Advance is Positively Checked-Number o?
Prisoners Taken Small in Proportion to Forms/ Battles, Bat Vic
tory More Important-Berlin Wild With FnthmUarm fifty Be
decked With Flags by Order of Military Authorities ansi Entire
Populace Joins in Celebration?
London, May 3.-According to Berlin and Vienna, the German
and Austrian armies have achieved a notable victory in West G.-.iicia,
smashing the entire Russian center along a front of.many miles,
't he Herlin official statement claims the victory entends across the.
whole of the eastern tip of Galicia, from near the Hungarian border
to a point where the river Dunajec joins the Vistuai on the eastern
frontier of Poland.
Although the eight thousand prisorters the Gertnans and Austrians
say they have taken doesn't ccunpare. with the number which some
of Field Marshal von Hindenburg's rushes netted him in the north,
the achievement, if subsequent reports substantiate ii, nica us ?al feast
a temporary check of the Russians who have been hammering htelr
Iway westward since the fall of Przemyl.
If the Austro-German contentions relative to the Galictau situation
are correct, according to some military writers, lt will mean the whole
whole Russian compaign in the Carpathians is seriously affected. ' lt
would make extremely precarious thc position of the Russians troops
pressing down the southern slopes toward the plains of Hungary.
England and Prance don't claim
any gains In the wesi. The Germans
maintain they are pushing forward to
tho northwest of Ypres toward St.
Julien which they captured.
In tho fighting in the Baltic prov
inces Berlin flnda cause for rejoic
ing. So far as claims go it was Aus
tro berman, day. A number of ves
sels, neutral and otherwise, fell vic
tim to Gurman submarines, Norway
beiug a particularly heavy loser.
Berlin, May 3.-Reports announcing
a great victory in the Carpathians to
day caused the entire city of Berlin
to deck itself with flags. The tele
phone stations, newspaper offices and
hotels were beselged with crowds
seeking the details which were not
announced. The excitement began
whe nthe authorities received orders
to fly ftaga "on account of a great
victory tn tho Carpathians."
London, May 3.-The week-end was
marked by a relatively mild war
acUvity in the North Sea and a re
sumption of the submarine blockade
by the German craft, which destroyed
and damaged three vessels off tho
Scilly Islande.
No further official announcementa
have been made, concerning the Dar
danelles fighting, but unofficially the
despatches agree that the allies are
progressing to WP rd the narrows under
The latter are reported as Inflicting
cover ot the fire ot their naval guns,
great damage to the Turkish defenses,
including th j total destruction of the
town of Dardanelles.
The late Turkish official announce
ment dalma a victory in the retreat
ot tho British colonial troops to Ute
shelter of their warships. This ac
count, however, does not agree, with
the British official report, published
ROOSEVELT TO GO
ON STAND AGAIN
Saturday, which declared that the
British are resuming the ' Offensive
ofter a stubborn r?sistance on the
part of the Turks.
Airship Driven 0?.
London, May 8.-A German aero
plane, coming from the direction of
Ostend, scouted over Dover sad
Kolkestone at noon today sad was
driven off by gun fire. It is reported
that a Zeppelin airship Ja travelling
In the direction of England from the
island ot Vlleland which la on the
northern coast of Ute Netherlands,
The airship passed over the Island
at 10 o'clock this, morning.
AUSTRIA SENDS ANOTHER
PEACE UNTO* TO ITAL*
Rome, May a.-The Tribuna says
that reliable Information from Vien
na to the effect that Count Agener
Goluchowskl, the former Austro-Haa
garlan foreign minister, leaves tar*
mediately for Rom? on a special gov
ernment mission. It ta believed here
that the announcement preaages a
?enewal of efforts to prolong the ne
gotiations with italy.
SIX VESSELS SUNK BY
SUBMARINES'. IN NORTH SEA
London, May 3.-One Swedish, three
Norwegian freight learners a "Vi two
British trawlers have peen aunt' in the
North Sec by German Lubmarinss. ac
cording to dispatches received to Lon
don today. The crews of all were
rescued. The Norwegian vessels
sunk were, the Lalla, America and
Baldwin. The Swedish steamer was
the Ellida. While the locations of the
sinkings was not given, the trawlers
are said to have been sunk: fifty
j mites oft Aberdeen, Scotland.
Barnes Will Probably Testify Al
co Today-To Read More
Letters.
Syracuse, May 3.-Theodore roose
velt will resume the wltaess etand
tomorrow io William Barnes" $r>0,000
libel suit.
The prospects tonight are that
Barnes will also testify tomorrow, I:
la expected that more Platt-Roosevelt
Barnes letters will bo read.
NO CONFIRMATION
ZAPATA VICTORY
Claims to Have Entered Qotaro,
Catting Off Obregon From
Hb Base at Vera Cram.
Washington, May g.-Th? reposed
capture of Queretaro by Zapata forces
co-operating with Vitia, while u?e*?
flrmed in state department advices
today, proved of great Interest to offi
cials beru. According to vitia agenta
statement the Zapata forces efttor'ng
Qeretaro cut off Oregon from his base
at Vera Cruz.

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