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The intelligencer. (Anderson, S.C.) 1915-1917, May 11, 1915, Image 1

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WEATHER FORECAST
I Generally fair; moderate northwest
winda.
TI?e Intenigenref
COTTON HARKET
I>oeal Cotton.A lUc
VOLUME H. ANDERSON. S. C. TUESDAY MORNING, MAY tl. 1915. NUMSER lt?f
fl ?a ?asa?. * ?i?". ?.
If S. WILL HOT
DECLARE WAR
ON GERMANY
WILSON INTIMATES THIS
POLICY WILL BE ADHER
ED TO
AMERICA MUST
BE AN EXAMPLE
President Greeted by Applause
and Waving of American
Flag* at Philadelphia.
Philadelphia, May 10.--President
Wilson gave to a gathering foiV
thousand neutralized Americana to
night tho first Intimation of the
course the United States will proba
bly will puraure in the situation re
sulting fro mthe IOBB of more than a
hundred American lives on the Lusi
tania. He spoke by Implication, but
hiB hearers Interpreted his remarks
ns meaning that while the United
States would remain In peace lt would
seek to convince Germany ot the in
justice to mankind of the tragedy.
"America." said the president "Must
have consciousness that on all aid?s
it touches elbows, and touches hearts
with all nations of mankind. The
example of America must be a special
example and must be an example not
merely of peace because it will not
fight, but because peace ls the heat
ing and elevating Influence ot the
world and strife 1B not. There ls
such a thing tts a man being too
proud to fight. There is such ?
thing as being so right it doesn't
need to convince others by ?orce that
it ls right." These remarks precipi
tated a tumult of applause? and pa
triotic enthusiasm attended by thc
waving ot thousands of Americans
flags. The president made no direct
%?terence to thc Lusitania tragedy,
but the audience -didn't hesitate to
read the application of hts ?tate
men t.
President Wilson aroused much en
thusiasm when he said he felt he
ought not to be away from Washing
ton, but after coining he found the
gathering renewed his "spirit as an
American." He was given a tremen
dous ovation when be finished his
speech.
He afterwards returned to the sta
.Mon '?nd entered hhs private car. leav
ing, at midnight tor Washington.
Because of the present status ot
International affairs extraordinary
precautions were taken to guard' th'
president. Seven hundred and firry
police were detailed for this duty.
Seven detectives acted sa his personal
body guard and rode directly behind
the Pr?sident through the streets. The
president rode three miles along
streets almost solidly lined with
cheering people. He frequently rais
ed hbj hat and bowed. Automobile
horns sounded a steady chorus. Sev
eral thousand persons In the station
cheered him.
Natal Parade Nat i'aaeellea,
Philadelphia. May - 10.-Secretary
Daniels tonight denied .a New York
report that the president had ordered
cancelled the naval demonstration et
New York. Ha declared there was
absolutely nothing to the rumor.
Washington. May 10.-While official j
Washington waited today for word
from. President Wilson regarding the
United States' policy in the cri si fi
resulting from the sinking of th?
Lusitania, German ambassador Voa
Bernatorff called at the state depart
ment and expressed to ^Secretary
Bryan "Hts deep regret tfiat events
of the war had led to the loes of so
many American lives."
He did not comment-on his visit.
Bryan said he understood it was the
ambassador's personal expression. Of
ficials were silent concerning the sit
uation generally. As far as baa been
learned calling an extra session ot
congress does not seem to he a part
of the president'? plan of procedure.
(Te has given no indication of such a
course up to now. ' v
Washington, May 10. -The govern
ment officials and diplomats today
speculated as to what form thc United
States protest against the torpedoing
of Uta Lusitania, arith the loss of
mora than a hundred Americana will
take. It ta generally believed that
the president will express in the poli
cy h? pursues, tho administration's de
nunciation of the act ss inexcusable
nuder the laws of nation? and hu
manity. The extent of the president's
action is atlll undetermined.
He goes thia afternoon to Philadel
phia to address a aeetlng ot 4.000
s natu ra? tsed Americans. The meeting
was planned week? ago by the depart
ment of commerce's naturalisation
bureau to Inaugurate a systematic
course of teatjruetlon of altoaafa tho
(CTMyTttf?gD OH FAQS TWfA>
Lusitania Leaving New York Harbor Before She Was Sunk Off Irish Coast
Captain Turner.
The steamship Lusitania, the fast
est vessel on the ocean, was sunk
tr the Germans threatened before
she left New, York on her last trip
across th Atlantic. This photograph,
shows the steamer as she WUB straight
ening out In the NprUi River with
the help of tugs before she pointed
her noue down the channel on her
last voyage. In the air above her
ccprcs ot ?es gulls, which follow
every ocean liner many miles into
the sea. arc seen flying.
The Gorman Embassy at Washing
ton published an advertisement a
day before the Lusitania sailed that
BI?C might be attacked and that
travel on her was dangerous. Many
prominent passengers got telegrams
while they waited on her decks ss
ahe remained at the pier before sail
ing that tholr lives were in danger.
Tho question ha? not arleen if the:'e
waa not some communication between
Qcxraau agenta In the United States
and the German naval office to war
1 rant these announcements. If so there
will be an Investigation to see whether
or not the wireless was not improper
ly used between Berlin and the United
States.
The Lusitania was Ute one big ship
which had been kept in service since
the outbreak of the war. On every
trip east and west bound ahe carried
large crowds of passengers and on al
moat every trip newspapers headings
read:
/'Lusitania's passengers laugh at
submarine peril."
On her last saUlngJoesidcs tho .1.310
passengers bopkiotfrSr the'ship she
curried 200 passengers booked for the
Anchor llnor Cameronia, which was
suddenly requisitioned bv the British
government aud did not sail a., sched
uled for Liverpool and Glasgow.'
The Lusitania was 785 feet long
and came out in 1907, with her sister
ship, the Mauretianka, both intended to
make twenty-six or twenty-seven
knots and to wrtui thc .*me?*d laurels
of the sois from the German fliers.
For a !bng time the L t it'anla
held tho ?meed championship, making
a crossing .'rom Quocnsiawn ?..Sandy
Hook In a little lesa than-4 days 10
One-of Mr-vmoai popuhrr Hnere^-Srit?
ever carried gay tnrougs of tourists
LO Europe, -.he Lu? tan? i numbered
anions h>- pas-lungers, ot '?ve (?me
or another, almost al: Ute prominent j
lol!; who made a habit of crossing!
the Atlantic.
The Lus MUM came into promuitut j
notice about two months ago wiica,
on a voyage trom thie port to Liver
pool, sh'.* rle wt'ae American flag wben
entering rhe laV.3r port
Capt. T'irn?r had been lu lhe|
Cunard ?ervic? thirty ycar?.and had
command ?d its shlp.viroir. crrgo boat*
UP. He n'ai regarded ar. a vory ikll
ful navigator, ana when the giant nw
Cunarder 'Aquila a lo came out In-jTrmV
of last your he w.xs af pointed her
commander.
GERMANS G
WHOLESAl
SAYS COR
ASSERT SINKING OF LUSITAN
NATIONAL LAW AND COI
"NATIONS-CAPTAIN TI
TORPEDOS'
?i ~ .........
Kinsale; Ireland, May 10.-The ver
dict of the coroner's' jury which In
vestigated tho deaths resulting from
the torpedoing of the Lusitania fol
lows; 'iWc find deceased met death
from prolonged immersion and ex
haustion (ln the .sea Friday, May. 7th.
?wing to the ?inking of the Lusitania
by torpedoes fired hy a1 German sub
marine, , . .
We find that this appaling crime
waa comtnltted contrary to interna
tional law and the conventions of all
?i%tlized*hattans: We also charge tho
officers ."of said : submarine, the em
peror of jhe government of Germany,
ander whoae orders they acted, with
th? crime of wholesale murder before
the tribunal of the civilised world.
Wo desire to express sincere condo
lence and sympathy fi th relatives pf
the deceased, the Cunard Company,
ind the .United States, many of whose
citizens perished tn this murderous
ittack on the unarmed liner."
Only One Torpedo Struck Ship.
Ixrodon, May 10.-The Cnarder
Lusitania was struck by only one
torpedo. Captain Turner, her com man
ier, testified at the inquest at Klnaale
today. The deadly missie found a
rite! spot and sent the liner to th?
Mast Hot tJse Force.
Atlanta, May 10.-The police hav?
t>een instructed to ?top the Decatur
itreet merchants from their time
honored custom of standing on thc
ildenralk and "persuading" cUatotner.
Into their stores, either ' by verbal
blandishments or m stn force.
The doing away of thin custom will
take awa^. ?me of Gie picturesque
reatures of Atlanta's "JBowery."
Reco/?jar- Johnson has ruled that
lt ls contrary to the public welfare
Tor a merchant to sall ont on the
ildewalk and yank customers le by
the arm or the ear. He holds that If
t merchant doea want to try to talk
& man Into entering bia store, he
Might at least to Uko mt a can
raster's licensee in addition to bl?
store Ucease.
OMMITTED
E MURDER
IVER'S JURY
IA WAS CONTRARY TO INTER
VENTIONS OF CIVILIZED
JRNER SAYS ONLY ONE
fRUCK LINER
bottom in loss than twenty minutes,
killing more than a thousands per
sons. The evidence of Turner and
members of the crew led the Jury to
a verdict of "wholesale murder"
against the German emperor, his gov
ernment and the officers of the sub
marine directly responsible for the
sinking. Turner said the second ex
plosion waa Internal. It was disclose
ed bv Turner, an Winston Spencer
Churchill In a statement to the house
of commons, that Turner received
wireless advices from the admiralty
warning lim of submarines in the
liner's course.
' Turner, testifying, said he had fol
lowed this advice to the best of his
ability. The character of the advice
Was hot revealed.
New York, May 10.-Although a
number of additional names of Lusi
tania survivors were given In a latest
revised Hat issued todsy by the Cunard
Company, there was little to cheer
anxious rs "?uti vi's and friends, because
the Hat of Identified dead contained
the names of some previously report
ed among the survivors. The friends
of Alfred Gwlnne Vanderbilt are pre
pared to abandon hope that tho young
millionaire survived.
Italian Troops Go- te the front.
London, May 10.-The Copenha
gen, correspondent of the Exchange
Telegraph says:
"A private meaasge from Berlin
.tates that Italy yesterday called to
the colors all Infantry classes from
1876 and that many trains loaded
with troops are proceeding to the
front."
8?q?lsttie* Honored For Three.
Columbia. May 10/-Governor Man
nlng today honored extradition pa
pers for the return to -Georgia of
Bill Willis, wanted on the charge of
assault with intent to kill. George
Feasley and Bea F?ieec alisa Bon
Frasier, wanted on a charge og gam
bling, The trio will be taken to
Hartwell, Ga., for Wal.
PEAGE PACT I? -
ORIENT BRINGS
GREAJ_RELIEF
CHINESE ACCEPTANCE OF
JAPANESE DEMANDS CLOS
ES CRITICAL INCIDENT
GENERAL RELIEF
AT PEACEFUL END
London Poper Gives Credit for
Settlement to Japanese
Diplomats.
Tokio, May io.-Premier Ok ti ID a
is -quoted. aa having ?tated that
Chinas acceptance of Japan's de
manda has removed "the roots of
much trouble." He voiced 'satisfac
tion in thc success that was gained
by diplomacy as a result of which
Japan found lt unnecessary to go to
war.
- The press rejoices at the policy and
the conclusion of the negotiations but
expresses the fear that additional
trouble may be brewing because of
the dissatisfaction ot Japan's oppo
sition.
The foreign office denied Ute state-,
ment that during the negotiations
Japan declined China's request to be
Permitted to tako minutes of the con
ference on tho Japanese demands.
Denial also was made that China had
never demanded the restoration of
Kiao-Chow.
Loddon Relier ed.
London, May 10.-The British press
expresses relief at the peaceful ad
justment of tho c b?nese- Japanese |
difficulty and congratulates Japan on
the. settlement.
Tba Times saya editorially that lt
doea.particular credit to the Japanese
ministers and that ft justifies once
again the worldwide reputation of tue
elder statesmen.
Tho Dally News considers the re
lief as great In Japan as among tbe
western nations. It says there ls little
danger of Japan overriding the Euro
pean or American rights In China, be
cause aha must obtain capital from
tbe white nations for whatever ahe
undertakes.
ITALY IS Pl
TO ENTER
AUSTRIAN
HALF MILLION ITALIAN TROOP
VICE MASSED AT VERONA, (
FROM AUSTRIAN FRODi
AUSTRO-HUNGARIAI
Qeneva, Switzerland. May 1U.-An i
Italian army of 600.000 fully equip- I
ped and readv on the fiold. has been
concentrated at Verona. I
Verona is a fortified Italinn city i
at thc base- of tho Tyrolean Alps, 25. t
miles from thc frontier of AuBtria- i
Hungary. ,
Austro.German* Fleeing Italy.
Parla. May ? 10.-A Bolllnaona.
Switzerland, dispatch to The Temps
says: ' I
."Austrians- and Germana aro flee- ,
lng from Italy. All trains tn the di
rection of thc frontier are packed. ! (
"Special tra?na have brought 3.000 ,
Germana from Rome, Florence and .
Bologne. Lugano is filled with ro- ;
fusees. ,
"Notice has been given of tho awi- <
pension from today of telephone
aervlce across the frontier and of .
the suppression of many passenger ^
tra?na.
"All German and Austrian Journal- t
lata have left Italy."
. London. .May 10.-The altuation In <
Flanders ant the Carpathlana, where
critical battle? of tho present phase
of thc Europ?en war sra being
fought ls still obscure. On the weat- i
ern front both the Germans and their t
opponcnta claim considerable gains.
Ie the Carpathians a altnllar situa- i
tlon exists. While the Russians admit i
remorses, they concede no such I
serlnua defeats as indicated by state-; 1
men ts from- German and Austrian t
^.^??JJ-U-JJ.->U0U.qjJU~..l>_^X~."t^!~^~?~^
Belgiern Annxed te German Km pire.
?
London, May 10.-The Dally Mail's .
correspondent st Rotterdam says a
proclamation has been posted In Ant
werp declaring that Germany baa'an
nexed Belgium. The proclamation ls (
dated May 5.
La Tearalne la Safe. I
New York, May 10.-The French t
liner La Tooralee, which left here c
April 27, arrived at Bordeaos Satur- r
day. according to a cablegram re- r
calved by' the New York offices for |
the line. | t
?EPAREt>
THE WAR;
1S_LEAVt$?G
S FULLY EQUIPPED FOR SER
)NLY TWENTY FIVE MILES
m ER-GERMANS AND
? LEAVING ITALY
sources and aBaert that the Teutonic
forres are now being checked.,
Italy is expected to reach shortly
Its decision for or against war. Rome
regards as significant a visit-to the
capital of Signor Oiolfttl, former
premier and member neutralist group.
lt is reported that if Italy decides for
Intervention she will first declare
'var against Turkey. ..
Russians Again. Defeated.
London. .M-r- 10..-Further, victory
[or Austro *;*? .nan torces'In. Galicia
was reported today in a dispatch from
austrian headquarters. The Rus
sians are aald to have . been' driven
SH ck between Lupkow and Uzsok
sasses. It was estimated the num
ber of Russian prisoners taken in
Western Gallcia will be increased to
?00,000.
German advance In Russian Baltic
provinces ls reported to Copenhagen
:o have been checked. Russian
Orces operating from Mttau are said
o have compelled the Germans to ra
rest 100 miles.
French official communication Indi
cated no decisive action In the west
Call Vor Troops Issued.
London, May 10.-Copenhagen cor?
'cspondent of the Exchange Telegraph
lays:
"A private message from Berlin
itatea that Italy Saturday called to
the colors all infantry clssses
rom 1876 and that many trains
oaded with troops are proceeding te
he front." -
STOP SWEDISH SHIP
amllna Takei le ( barge by Brit
ish.
London, Ma 10.-The Swedish
iteamer Carolina. Charleston. B. C..
br Stockholm, with a cotton cargo,
las been brought Into G'tasby by
british naval authorities. Another
Swedish steamer, tbe Marie from
lal reston for Halmo last Wednesday
las arrived at Clyde la charge ot r
laval crew. The Marte waa stopped
>y a warship on ?n^sicton regarding
he destination of her cargo..
DECLARES PLAN FOR STARV
ING GERMAN CIVILIANS
CAUSED ACTION
OFFERED TO STOP
SUBMARINE WARI
_. .' J? ri
Regrets Americans Chose to Trost
England Rather Than Heed '
Warning.
Berlin. May 10.-The German
foreign office sent the following- dis
patch to the German einbasay at
Washington : "Pleaae communicate
thc following to the atete department:
The German government dcslretj .to*
ezprens its deepest sympathy In th?
losa of lives aboard .the. LuBl?aafj?.
The responsibility ?**aiB. npweVftV
with the British government'., Whfo?h
through lu plan of starving the elvi;
Han population of Germany ' fbr?otf
Germany to resort to retaliatory niega
uros. In spite of the German offer .to
Btop the s uhm a rino war ih caac the
starvation plan waa given up, British
merchant vose?la, being " generally,
armed with guns, repeatedly .tried 'to
ram-submarlr," , so that pr?tions
search was Impossible" ' "'^
The statement adds that t'ti* Lusi
tania carried, ammunition and. .aays
if England, after w*jrMng>( chatt
ered herself able to. declare the. Lust- .
tania didn't run a riakv.tho German
government in spite of tte sympathy
for lost American lives,''Ce-mot but
regret Americans teU gio re inclined
to tr nat Gin Tn|llgh i^illQiae.5|fcthcr
than pay ^U^ni^f^t?^???^m^fiika
the German aide." . ;.;
Washington. May l&^j&wnt-'. von
Hornstorff. thc Geragt) nsrafgaador
calhd on Secretary J?r|^/t^W,8.nd
expressed 'deep regret tttat th? ev
ents of the war had led to.the loss
of so msny American Uves." Attar
a half an hour's conference between
the ambassador apd the secretary, a
statement to that ' effect waa given
out by mutual agreement, I
While the statement ;?.?.". nuv spfct
flcally mention the; Lustrants rtlsaJter
lt waa known tbst th? two ofBcikls
talked of it. It waa the stabasaag^rls
first visit to th? ?tate. department
since the disaster. The secretary
received him Immediately, He greet
ed him cordially.
When the ambassador came from
Secretary Bryan's O?C? &?? partied
ull questions by saying that he coul<L
not Ulk. being under a promise ?'. io
the secretary that no statement ot.
tbe object should be made,/by him.
The ambassador's only^response rraa
that he had made no.appointment with
President Wilson. % v
- Both the secretary and ambassador
steadfastly refused to comment on or
Interpret the state department's an
nouncement; but lt was. interpr?t?'
by the officiais generally., as meaning
that the ambassador had for tris gov
ernment expressed deep regret' not
only fdr the loaa of life on the Lusi
tania, but for the Americans lost tn
the torpedoing of the American
eteamahip Gufllfht abd for the otu
American lost on the Falabo.
HOSTILE AIRCRAFT
Valuable Probert? Deefooye? 1
Several Injured U> Aerial
***
wm
London. May 10.-iTha' passengers,
arriving on trains from.Bottthend and
Essex, seaside resorts, report a seri
ous air raid there. Veintwle property
waa destroyed and atna? lives lost.
Southend received the warning of
the hostile sir craft's approach early
this morning. Several machines par
ticipated in the raid, lt was too cloudy
to tell whether they were Zeppelins or
air planea.
The bombs struck houses tn vari
ous parts ot the CpWnV One man aa?
his wife were badly baned ?hen aa
incendiary bomb fired their, recide??a.
It 1? reported that several ; shops
were burned at Lstgb, near Southend.
Four Zeppelins ar? reported to have
dropped GO bombs lhere. Two Zappe
lina a ? reported to hara dropped
bombs on Westcliff sn the sea, near
Southend. No fatalities ?re reported.

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