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The intelligencer. (Anderson, S.C.) 1915-1917, May 26, 1915, Image 1

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l'ai tl y cloudy WedaCKdsj mid TIiuis
day.
Local Colton.8 7-8?
VOLUME II.
NUMBER 115.
FORESTALL GREAT CRUSH
ING MOVE PLANNED BY
VON HINDENBERG
AUSTRIANS FORCES
HAVE RETREATED
Movements Indicate Italy is Well
Prepared for Campaign-Two
Great Movements Start? d.
'4-: /
London, May 25.- Austria struck
. first .with her navy and air craft along
the Italian jeast coast. Italy count
ered quickly by throwing troops across
th? northeastern frontier, occupying
Austrian territory along thc ?fvts
Isonzo.
Thus Italy has apparently fore
stalled Gen. Vor. Hindenburg who ls
commanding the Austro-Germnn
troops on the new frout. Rome offi
cially announces 'hat Italian troops
have occupied*a number of towns and
compelled the Austrians to retreat.
??^ie Italian army's rapid stroke ap
parently indicates long preparation.
r The first Italian bulletin Indicates
ttl.-1 two great movements have been
inaugurated, one northward toward
tho Carnie Alps? the other through
. Trlull toward Trt?irt. on the Istrlan
Peninsula. Severe fighting ls ex
pected .
Austria cdlls the Italian military
operations on the border skirmishes.
No Notice of Call.
.Washington, May 8f>.-After n con
ference with thc Italian consul gen
eral at New York, Italian Ambassador
Count Coller? announced he hud re
ceived no information relative to the
calling to colors of Italians abroad.
\ * -Loirmrfrr^ar'^^
?, vaded Austria." The officiai an
\nouncement, made today by the Ital*
uan war office In Rome is that the
At ul lan forces . penetrated ^Austrian
\rrltory along a forty mlle front, oc
.fpying Casporctto, the heights bo
yen the Judnio and Isondo rivers
? tho towns of CormonB, Cervlg
and Terzo. All Hie places are
r three miles from the Italian
. The railroads, running both
id west, run through Cornions
erzo.
Italian destroyer raided the
an port of Buso, near tho fron
?estroylng the landings, rail
station and barricades. Two
/ jans were killed, the first casual
/ facially reported in the new
{_,/.<Jlgn.
-It ls regarded here as probable that
the Austro-(?orman army will make
Its first Important move by striking
at the Italian confer In the direction
'of Verona.
It is generally understood that
Italy haB reached as agreement with
her uew allies under which she will
sign the existing treaty between
Prance. Russia and Oreat Britain not
to make a separate peace with tho
com.non enemies.
ACTORS HONOR .MEMORY
OF LATE CHAS. FROH MAX
New York, May 25.-The funeral
services for the lato Charles Froh
mau, tho theatrical manager and
producer, who waa one of tho vic
tims on the Lusitania, were held
here tod^y.
Funeral services in his memory
liavo also been arranged for In Ta
coma, Washington, by Billie Burke,
in Los Angeles by Maude Adams, in
San Francisco by John Drew, In
Providence, R. I., by Julia Sander
son, and others. All have starred
under FroUman.
PRESBYTERIA1
MISCELLANEl
AT MEETIb
Newport :!ews, May 25.-The
Southern Presbyterian general as
sembly today deferred final consid
eration nf the committee recommenda
tion that the assembly repudiate tba
action of the federar council of
churches In America and advocating
the vote by states on constitutional
prohibition amendment, and also sug
geRtlug to President Wilso? the for
mation of a world peace teague, with
an agreement t* enforce it's decisions
by armed interventions.
The assembly voted to continue re
lations with tho council another year,
hoping the latter's attitude will be
somewhat modified and that assem
bly action von ld be unaecessary.
Newport News, Va., May 25.
Evangelism ia tho school* and col
leges was discussed by the delegates
MOVE SW
? AUSTRIA
ITALY GIVES
EXPLANATORY NOTES FOk
WARDED TO NEUTRAL
NATIONS OF WORLD
CLAIMS AUSTRIA
IGNORED RIGHTS
As an Ally She Should Have Been
Consulted Bet?r? Austria De
clared War on Serbia.
Washington, May 45-Italy has ad
dressed a long communication to the
world's neutral governments explain
ing her reasons for declaring war on
Austria. The Italian ambassador to
day presented the note to Bryan. It
reviews negotiations between Italy
and Austria, revealing that these be
gan h?mediately after Austria sent
Serbia an ultimatum. Italy then
claimed Austria's action ^'.aturbed the
equilibrium of the Balkans and
Europe's peace, vitally affecting Italy.
As Austria's ally Italy claims tho
right to have been consulted beofre
the ultimatum was sent. Failing to
obtata satisfaction- of Ucl - ItimStW
and national aspirations Utrough dip
lomacy, Italy asserts her declaration
Of war was necessary to safeguard
her position. The Italian note was
filed in the state department with
other notes and messages received at
the war.s start, explaining the posi
tions of other governments Uten. None
have been published.
AGREEMENT SECURED
ON MEAT PRODUCIS
?By Packers and Representatives
of British Government tn
Conference) Yesterday.
Washington, May 25.-It is Indi
cated here tonight that American
packers nrc about U secure action by
the British government on claims for
detained meat prc i'.ucts cargoes con
signed to neutral countries. Packer's
representatives, state department of
ficials and the British ambassador
conferred hero this afternoon'. The
packers withdrew their request to Ute
state department to help expedite the
caaes in British prize courts pending
further conferences with the British
Ambassador and. Sir Richard Craw
ford, commercial representative, to
morrow.
IT. fi. May Inerrant) Anny.
Portland, Oregon, May 25.-Senator
Chamberlain, chairman of the mili
tary affairs committee said tonight
unless conditions changed materially
before the next congress, the l aked
States army would be increased.
VS CONSIDER
JUS MATTERS
IG YESTERDAY
- f
to the Southern Presbyterian assem
bly here today. Rev. lit 13. W. Bran
ned or MiUedgevllle, Ga., presided at
the morning Bession.
The growth in all branches of thc
Sabbath schools of the church will be
shown'In Ute report of Ute executive
committee on publications and Sab
bath school work, to be submitted to
the 'general assembly tonight. The
Increase will apply both to the enroll
ment and contributions.
Inspected Asylum. .'j
Columbia* May 2f>.-Governor Man
ning and thc state board of churitles
' ma 1P aa inspection of the State hos
pital for the insane today. They
were accompanied by i*.ie l?gislative
committee and Superintendent Wil
liams, Tonight the trosid will elect
aa assistant secretary.
IFTLY;
oN TOWNS
GERMANS CLAIM
GAINS Ai YPRES
AND jWEMYSL
BRITISH ADMIT INABILITY TO
REFORM LINES DENTED
BY GERMANS
BLOODY FIGHTING
ON DARDANELLES
Nineteen Hundred Australians and
Three Thousand Turks is
Reported Losses There.
London, May The Germans to
day claim successes In the' east and
west, notably around Yores and north
of Przemysl. The British war ol?lce
admits the English hav\> been unable
to reform the lines dented by the Ger
mans east of Ypres. The British
statement announced that German gas
attacks can be met anti defeated "with
duo precautions," but does not ex
plain how.
Fighting on the Dardanelles has
boen sanguinary. Niue hundred and
nineteen casualties among thc, Aus
tralians were reported tonight". The
Turkish losses apparently are great
er. Three thousand were buried
Sunday.
Lo*d*>tf. May 2Cr-*?eavy- 4ighttog
.is in progreaV once more in the west.
The British, German and French
forces are attacking at various points
between Arra? and the coast. There
Is as ye{ no sign, however, of a gen
eral assault by tho alites, such as has
been predicted.
On the eastern frontier, thc sigas
of a check to wVH at ono time seem
ed an overwhelming Austro-Germnn
offensive are becoming more and
more apparent. Even the flving
wedge which was driven into the Rus
sian center alon?: the river San, has
been compelled to give some ground
by the energetic counter attacks of
tim Russians.
Domestic politics contine JB to nb
aorb the attention of England. The
membership of thc new cabinet has
not yet been announce!. The delay,
according to thc Manchester Guar
dian, is due to the InBiBtance of the
unionists on eight places in the cabi
net. A clean sweep ls looked for In
the admiralty, where lt is expected
that Baron Fisher as well as Winston
Spencer Churchill will go.
WILL BE NO CHANGE
IN MEXICAN POLICY
As Result of Report Made by
President's Personal Rep?
resentative.
Washington^ May 2&-President
Wilson does not contemplate any
change in the Mexican policy of the
administration aa a result of the re
port by Duval West who recenUy
visited Mexico as a special represen
tative of the state department. The
president told his callers today that
West had not suggested- an embargo
on the export of war munitions to
Mexico.
West it ls understood reported pes
simlstlcallv rv to the ability of any
of the various factions to bring peace.
As he impressed th? Mexican lead
ers arith the necessity for safe
guarding th.e^llves of foreigners and
their interest'!, the disposition of tho
high officials now ls to allow tho mili
tary situation to develop further be
fore putting Into effect any possible
change of policy. '
Ci A. MATES OF GREENWOOD
ASST. DIRT RIOT ATTOfltNEY
GrsmvtllO, May 2i>.-Calhoun A.
. Jayes, ? young lawyer of Greenwood,
. ia expected In Greenville this after
noon to be sworn In aa assistant Unit
ed States District attorney. Thc oath
of office will be administered to him
by United States District Clerk of
Court J. B. Ffaitght. William J.
Thurmond of Bdgefield was sworn in
ns district attorney for the western
district at the recent term of Federal
court In thia city.
Britishers in tin
KING OBJECTED TO WALSH'S
METHODS OF CONDUCT
ING INQUIRY
WALSH INSISTED
UPON ANSWERS
Chairman of Industrial Relations
Committee Refused to Expit ia
Mode of Questioning.
Washington, May 2&i-The -Federal
Industrial Halations Commlsion to
day finished its investigation of the
Colorado coal strike. It will hcn>r ot
Porto Rico labor conditions and ex
amine Rame witnesses on 'miscellan
eous matters tomorrow, then close ita
general hearings and inquiries. It will
meet in Chicago on June 1st, to frame
its report to congress.
Washington, May 2T>.-W. L. Mc
Kenize King, a director ot the indus
trial relations deportment 'of tho
Rockefeller foundation, clashed re
peatedly with Chairman Walsh today
during the latter's questioning him
before the federal Industrial relations
commission. Walsh sought to make
a record of what King had' done In
American labor. Both King and the
rotnmlsslon wanted to know the ob
ject of that line of questioning; Lut
the chairman refused to explain.
"I am not on the stand and I must
decline to be questioned," said Walsh.
Walsh questioned King as to his
Investigations in the Colorado coal
strike region, bul tho . witness in
sisted that his investigations were
confidential and that he . could not
make public the .information. lie In
sisted that he had bean representa
Uves of both sides in the Colorado
struggle In an effort to bo absolutely
fair.
Tho chairman insisted: "The people
must have the facts." King asked
what Walsh meant by the -people.
"I mean tho American peoplp.'"
Bald the chairman, "whoso public*
opinion would be the greatest factor
In improving thc conditions in Colo
rado.
Several verbal clashes immediately
followed between King and Walsh.
.
Embargo WHiidrawn.
. . ..... A,-- f vi-v..- . ?.<*:" ? ?.. ?
Ol < av, a, Ont., At ay 25.- Canada has
withdrawn the embargo against the
exportation ot wool to the United
States, it was announced tonight
z Cabinet Crisis I1,
CASE OF VERMILLION
AGAINST* WOMAN'S COL
LEGE OF DUE WEST
SUING COLLEGE
FOR $15,000.00
Result of Death of W. T. Vermil
lion Who Was Killed When \
Balcony Collapsed.
Columbia. May 25.-Tho appeal, tn
lhc ?ase of J. W. VermilUon. as ad
mihistrutor of the estate of W. F;
Vemitllion. deceased, against thc Wo- \
mans College of Dm- West, wa? ai g nc J \
in tho supreme court today. Thc i
?aso* comes. u p from Abbeville coun- \
ty, where it was tried tn October. (
li)H before Judge Soase who granted a I
non suit. Damages in the sum of i
il."?,OOO wen- asked for the death of
W.. F, VermilUon. i
The com plaint alleges that on April
IT. 1014. the late W. P. VermilUon ,
attended ai entertainment given un
der th? auspices of tho Womans i'oi- ?
loge of Duo West, which took nineo
In tho auditorium of the college. The
complaint contends ?bat Mr. Ve:tn!l
lion had a right to attend the enter
tainment because he had bought and j
paid for a ticket a"d gained admission {
on lt. j
The complaint further staten that j
tho lote W, P. VermilUon was given .
a scat directly under the balcony.
This superstructure was laid upon i
timbor resting ia the wall and support
ed by *ron chains fastened In tho
roof. Tho balcony during tho cn
^(?ivimi KI) FROM PACE SIX.)
FLORIDA MEN
NOT GUILTY
Were Accused of Conspiracy in j
Connection With Failure <
of Pensacola Bank. . i
" 1
Pensacola, May 2.%.-The trial of 1
the four bankers here on the charge ?
of conspiracy In connection with ?he '
failure of the Flrat National Rank 1
here a year. ago. et,Oed today in ii
vflctory for the defendants. The cases
against Thomas W. Prent and William
S. Knowles wore nolle prosied in
United States court. Judge Call di- 1
rooted the Jury, to return a verdict I
nf not guilty for William 9. Keyser I
and W. iv. Myer. ?
ENGLISt
NEW C
BECKER'S HST
HOPE LIES WITH
GOV. JILIN
M. Y. COURT OF APPEALS AF
FIRMS VERDICT OF SU
PREME COURT
SMALL CHANCE
FOR CLEMENCY
Petition Would be Acted on by
Man Who Twice Prosecuted
Ex-Police Lieutenant.
Albnny. May Unless Governor
Whitman or the United states Supreme
i'ourt intervenes. Charles Becker, thc
ronner Neu York police lieutenant,
must bo electrocuted at Sing Sing
tv! th In the ncx tweek.
The New York court of appeals to
day affirmed the verdict of the su
plente court jury convicting Becker
at his second trial for the murder ^1
the gambler, Hermon Rosenthal, on
July 16th. 1?12, by four gt^men.
. Executive domeney for Becker ls
believed to be remote. The present
governor, as district attorney, prose
cuted Ilecker both times, There ls
speculation whether Becker, facing
death, won't try to save his life br
revelations regarding tho so-called
policy svstem to tho governor. Aside
from the rosenthal murder, it ls be
lieved necker has Information >rhich
wottM iswiavalun ble.; to atate -and cRyJ
officials.
Albany, N. Y.. May 25.-rThe sec
ond conviction of Charles Becker for
instigating tho murder . of Herman
Rosenthal was uphold bv the court of
appeals. Becker now must die un
less ho can obtuln the executive clem?
ency from Governor Whitman who aB
district attorney of New York pro
secuted him or can obtain a reversal
by the Cnlted States' supreme court.
KING GIUT?I?E
IN SERIOUS CONDITION
Viennese Specialist Summoned- -
Another Operation Being
Considered.
Athens, May 25.-King Constan
tint 's condition, nccordlng to Monday
night's report, was less satisfactory
than the people were led to believe, al
I hough the attending physicians now
-.ay he is in no Immediate danger.
They are considering nnother opera
lion, nnd a Viennese spcclalHt has
been summoned. Ile ls reported
more restful. Prayers for tho king's
recovery are being said in all the
shurchea bore.
FLOOD IX A Hiv A X SAS;
PEOPLE LEAVING HOMES
Tulsa. May 25.- Hundreds of peo
ple living along thc Arkansas rivet
ire leaving their homes ton!jht be
fon- flood wnrnlngs. Flood condi
tions prevfatl at Fort Smith, Arkan
sas and Fort Gibson, Oklahoma.
COL^?I?BI?N^DI
SAYS THIS Hi
SHOULD BE F<
Washington, M*y 25.-Dr. S. P.
Triana, a delegate from Colombia,
nade a dramatic speech to the Pan
\ me rican Financial conference today.
Hie waved an American flag and de
bared this hemisphere should" be for
%merjc?ns. At today's group confer
ences delegates explained to repre
sentatives ot tlie United States ?om
nerclal and financial interests their
pereuliar needs, and Indicated bow
capital and credit could most ad
vantageously be used to strengthen
rade relations.- ,
Hamlin Addresses Conference.
Washington. .May 25.-Oovernor
Hamlin, of the federal reserve board,
oday declared to delegates attending
tbe Pan-American Financial confor
m?e here, that the Uaited State? bas
COALITION CABINET . AN
NOUNCED-HAS APPROV
AL OF KING GEORGE
LORD KITCHEN
RETAINS POST
Will Remain Secretary of War
Winston Churchill No Long
er Heads Admiralty.
I .omion. May 25.-it was announc- .
?d tonight that Lord Kitchener re*
talus lils post ns secretary of war
in the new coalition cabinet which
King Ocorgo has approved. Arthur
J. Balfour will be first lord of ad
miralty; Winston Spencer Churchill,
the former head of tho admiralty, be
comes Chancellor of the Duchy of
Lancaster; Herbert H. Asquith re
tains the premiership. Sir Edward
Grey continues SH minister of foreign ,
uffulrs; David ..loyd George, former
chancellor of .chequer will be min
ister ot muni' is; reginald McKeu
nn will bo ch. mellor ot exchequer;
Andrew Bonnar Law will be secretary,
for the colonies. Lord Landsdowne
is minister without portfolio, and Sir
Stanley O. Buckmaster is Lord High
Chancellor. These are the principal
portfolios.
SUPREME COURT
HEARS APPEAL
W. H. McCall, of Abbeville Ap
peals From Verdict ol "In
voluntary Maudaoghtar."
Columbia, May 25.-Tho appeal in
the case of the Stato against William
Henry McCalla, who waa convicted tn
Abbevtlle tn February cf ? iaawrtsaisbt
er and sentenced to two years in the
penitentiary was argued before the
supreme court this morning. Tba ap
peal ls taken oh two points:, first,
whether there ls any such crime in
South Carolina as "involuntary man
slaughter," and, secondly, if there is
auch crime, what does it take to con
stitute it.
Representative Graydon of Abbe
ville appeared* for ' McCalla, and As
sistant Attorney General Dominick
for the State.
SAYS JAPAN AND
. U. S. ARE FRIENDS
Baron Kato Says Attitude of This
Country Toward Japan
Has Changed.
?Tokio. May 25.-In an interpellation:
n the diet today, concerning the at
titude of the State of California to
ward Japan, Baron Kato, the foreign
minister, said that the attitude of the
United States toward J upan bad
changed greatly and now was most
friendly.
Baron Kato added that Japan be
lieved in relying in the sincerity and
good faith of America to find a sov
lution for the California question.
MAYOR 0" TREESVILLE
NOT A CANDIDATE
Greenville, May 25. -Mayor John
R. Marshall will not be a candidate
for re-election: This was the mean
ning he Intended to convey in hi?
statement to the voters ot Greenville
last week, although it probably waa
flBConstrued by some. He stated ex
plicitly yesterday that he would not
run again.
^LEGATE """"
mtSPHERE
JR AMERICANS
never been in the position lt occupies
today to extend its trad** by granting
credit to nations who wish to be Its
Customers. The present conference
was declared by Governor Handln to
be of deep significance to the whole
civilised world.
"I bellevb," said Governor Hamlin,
"that the world reallies today that
the prosperity of the people of one
nation in the long run tends to pros
perity of other natlns. Wohile adver
sity of one people must ultimately tend
to adversity of others."
The speaker briefly referred to the
new federal reserve banking system,
and predicted It wvH be "one ot th?
strongest system in th? world." Ha
believed lt will aid greatly in
development In the south And c*n
American trade with -*?? Un
State?.

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