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Deseret farmer. (Provo, Utah) 1904-1912, September 19, 1908, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218520/1908-09-19/ed-1/seq-2/

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H 2 THE DESERET FARMER Saturday, September i9 1908
I HOOSIER DRILLS
H I m '
H RUNNER PRESSURE WHEEL '
DISC PRESSURE WHEEL PLAIN DISC
PLAIN DISC with GANG WHEEL ATTACHED
SHOE DRILLS PIN HOE DRILLS :
M Wt have any of the above styles
I MILLER-CAHOON CO.
M Pioneer Implement Dealers
1 L. C, MILLER, Gen'l Mgr. MURRAY, UTAH
I IVOBELER SEED AND PRODUOE CO.
1 WE SELL ALL KINDS OF 1
I J GRAIN, SEEDS, POUETRY
I I SUPPLIES BERRY GUPS,
FRUIT BOXES AND BUR-' '
I 1
P LAP SACKS eJ e I
H 1
I ( Wc buy Grain of all kinds. Write us 1
I - when you have anything to selL I
1
I YOGELER SEED AND PRODUCE CO.
X SALT LAKE CITY, - UTAH I
( 1
I AGRICULTURE 1
"MIRACLE WHEAT," ITS OBIT
UARY. A few weeks ago an article, clipped
from the Saturday Evening Post, ap
peared in this paper under the hcad-
' fng, "A Miracle in Wheat." The edi
tors have been busy since trying to
explain to cverybodly how it hap
, pencd. The week after the article
' appeared wc came out and apologized
in the most humble terms, and the
week following that wc apologized
again, for fear you would forget wc
had apologized the first time, Ever
sinci the appearance of the offending
article wc have clipped and run every
thing wc could find in current agri
cultural literature in an attempt to
undo our error,
The subject "Miracle Wheat" is
possibly growing tiresome. Wc plead
for only one more hearing. Every
agricultural paper, virtually, in the cn
t re -country, has in a more or less
perfunctory way, taken a rap at "Mir
acle Wheat." Wc d'o not think that
any of them have got directly at hc
cause of the whole trouble. The
trouble is not so much the wheat, i
is the advertising the wheat got at
f the hands of the "Post" man. Wc
I hav-: forgotten Iris name; it is possib
t ly just as well. There is nothing in
i a name anyway, but there .would be
f a great deal that is interesting in sce-
ing that fellow's pedigree. The Dci
' crot Farmer stands ready to wager
anything from its stenographer dowi
to its overdraft that if you would run
', that fellow's pedigree back a few gen
erations you would find Ananais
' tacked on somewhere. Ananais need
not be at all ashamed) of the rclation-
ship cither. Of course the young
man cannot acquire the amount .of
distinction his noted kinsman ac
i quired, there is too much opposition
thcic days, but wc would feel sorry
i for the old gentleman if his grand'
I offspring had the same oyportunitiii
L he had. Put the two bide by side and
f you would think Ananias was tongue-
tied and had a hair lip. A long time
' ago and even occasionally now, wi
1 hear in song, not necessarily music,
' about somebody referred to as "Bon
i nic." It ran something like this, "My
Bonric lies over the Ocean, My Bon
f nic lies over the Sea," etc. You may
have heard it. Geographically "Bon
nie" was not a bad liar, but we stand
ready to put our friend of the "Post"
up against even "Bonnie."
Wc publish herewith a reply to the
"post" article by a man as capable
of handling the subject as any one in
the West. The following article is
from the pencil of Mr. F. D. Farrcll,
Government Expert in charge of the
Epcrimcnts in Plant Breeding and
Dry Land Agriculture, at the Ncphi
Station. With this article, The Dcs
crct Farmer humbly begs leave to
pas3 on to the undertaker, something
wc hope is good and dead. We .faith
fully promise to never regurgitate the
subject again. The following isMrv
Farrcll's article:
"The article entitled, A Miracle in
Wheat, appearing in the Saturday
Evening' Post, is but another of a
large .number of agricultural fairy
talc3 which arc published from time
to time in the popular magazines of
the (country. The author, like other '
persons guilty of what has been
dubbed 'agricultural yellow journal
ism,' writes entertainingly enough,
but displays an amazingly reckless
disregard for scientific truth.
"In the first .place, all sane wheat
producers .know that whest is not m j
the habit of producing 'miracles.' j
They realize that, while many good ,
things in agriculture are obtained
moro or less accidently, yet the farm
er is usually wise if he adds the pro
verbial 'grain of salt' to stories of a
'miraculous' nature.
"The author of this, particular bit
of sensation states, as one of the
'miraculous' powers of 'Alaska' wheat,
its ability to produce 222 bushels per
acre. Let us consider this one state
ment; First. This wonderful yield was
calculated, or is said to have been
calculated, from the yield of seven
pounds of seed. In the arid section,
1
seven pounds of seed would cover
about one-tenth :acrc if planted at the
ordinary rate. If planted at a lower
rate per acre it would cover more
ground, each plant would have a
greater space in which to obtain food
a;id water, and the yield would, -of
course, be somewhat greater. Wheat
plants given a space of 12 inches each
way have been made to produce as
high as 60 heads per plant; but "the
same wheat planted at the ordinary

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