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The North Platte semi-weekly tribune. (North Platte, Neb.) 1895-1922, January 01, 1895, Image 1

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NORTH . PLATTE, NEBRASKA, TPESDMV EYMING, JANUARY 1, 1895.
it
M.S.
in,
IV re:
We thank you for your liberal patronage
1894 and hope to merit
portion of your trade
LuFing the
year
and receive
for 1895, .
JTouto , respectfully.
JULIUS PIZER,
TheiBoston Store.
OSTO. 3496.
NORTEC PLATTE, NEB.
Capital, -Surplus,
150,000.00.
$22,500.00
E. M. F. LEFLANGr, Preset.,
EARNEST DAYIS, V. P.,
ARTHUR McNAMARA,
Cashier.
A General Banking Business Transacted.
lie ilmii
it
Do
ar. i
:
Don't pay other people's debts.
Still Sellin
Is the ONLY Hardware
Man in North Platte that
NO ONE OWES. You
i will always find myprice
right.
Yours for Business,
A. L. DAYIS.
DEAIiER IN
Hardware, Tinware, Stoves,
Sporting Goods, Etc.
:
t
v -McOABB. Prop. J- E. BUSH, Manager.
j-ri. .
NORTH PLATTE PHARMACY,
Successor to J. Q Tbacker.
00RTH PLATTE, - NEBRASKA.
S7E ATM TO HANDLE THE BEST GRADE OF GOODS,
EIT,'THEM AT BBASQNABLE PRICES, AND WARRANT
?EVERYTHING AS REPRESENTED.
Order -from the country and along the line of the UnioD
Pacific Railway Solicited.
THE YM G.. L REPORT.
i . ,
L . "
THE WORK OF THE ASSOCIA
TION FOR THE YEAR.
Paete ud EvMirUoh Pitte that tke
Jjutitrntitibi'DeMrrN oir Sipport-
The North Platte Young- Men's
Chrislian Association held anniver
sary services at the -Presbyterian
church Sunday afternoon, a fair
audience being; present. After
selections by the Y. M.G. A. male
quartette, which' were' pleasing;
follwed by prayer, -Rev: Leonard
gave a very interesting talk on
,4Hbw to reach young Men and
Save them to the Church." The
speaker suggested a number of
ways in which young men could be
induced to attend church services.
They should be treated cordially by
the church members, should be
given an opportunity to assist in
the various branches of church
work, and should be given evidence
that such work is appreciated. He
had found it a good plan to prepare
and preach a . sermon occasionally
for the benefit of vouncr men. The
Elders remarks were particular per
tinent to the occasion.
Sec y Hollingsworh then read his
report for the year 1894vasummary-
workingi conscientwusjyoung man,
and since assuming tbcj .secretary
ship has failed tire posmon most
creditably.-ithtlie proper support
of our people thereis ho reason
why he' cannot make file associa
tion even more valuable due coming
HHX SAMPLE ROOM IN NORTH PLATTE
Having refitted our rooms in the finest of style, the public
- r.j"il an A cam no insnnnv r.nnrfjnn f.rpaf.mpnf.
M mVlbca Wiimii - o .
B
m :
.-Ail- X n -,
WineSp Liquors and Cigars at the Bar.
Oar billiard hall is supplied with the best make of tables
aai competent attendants will supply all your wants.
?KSITBi8'- BtOCK OPPOSITE THE UNION PACIFIC DEPOT
of which is as follows:
Total membership 310, active
members 70, number railroad men
belonging 186, number city men be
longing 124.
During the year there were 45
business meetings held, of which
.31 were committee meetings, 12
board meetings, and 2 association
meetings.
The reading room and library
shows up well. During the year
there were 2,842 books drawn from
the library, and 3,084 newspapers
sent out to section men and others
along the line of the- road. There
are l.bzo volumes in me iiorary,
and the papers and periodicals reg
ularly received consist of 14 maga-
mm m . " "1
zines, v aaiiy papers, 14 in-weeK-lies
and 23 weeklies.
There were 2,211 letters written
in the rooms during the year, 2,004
of the number being written at the
free correspondence table.
Fifteen men were -directed to
boarding houses, 24 were financially
assisted and positions secured for 4
applicants.
One lecture, 3 practical talks and
three receptions were given during
the year.
The total baths taken were 6,108.
r rr 1 . i
or an average or per weeK aay.
A well organized ladies' auxiliary
has contributed materially to the
success of the association.
Forty-six gospel meetings were
held during the year, the total at
tendance at which was 1,858. Eigh
teen special prayer services were
held. Thirteen persons professed
conversion and 31 united with the
several churches.
About 3,500 pieces of printed
matter were distributed during the
year.
The secretary made 255 calls 'to
the railroad shops and yards, made
23 calls on sick and injured persons,
49 calls on business men, and 108
on members of the various' committees-
Twelve letters of introduc
tion were given and 10 received.
The grand total attendance at
the rooms for all purposes during
the year was 39,069.
The receipts for the year were:
Baths $23.70, membership dues
$444.95, subscriptions $549.50,dona
tion $104.55, ladies aid society of
the Presbyterian church $25.00,
ladies auxiliary $43.10, railway
company $558.00 grand total receipts
$1758.85.
The expenses, including rent,
fuel, secretary's salary and the
many incidentals, amounted to
$1755.05. There is, however, about
120.00 due on the salary of the pre
sent secretary, to meet which there
is uncollected dues and subscrip
tions amounting to about 200.00.
Under ordinary times this might be
collected, but at present it is com
ing in very slowly. The condition
of the association, considering the
dull times of the past year, is very
gratifying. That the association
is doing good work is evidence by
the attendance at the rooms. That
its influence religiously has been
an unqualified success is attested
by the conversions and the men
who have joined the churches
through its instrumentality. The
Tribune is a firm friend of the Y.
M. C. A. and believes the good in
fluence it has exerted during the
past year cannot be estimated by
dollars and cents. North Platte
could not afford to do, without the
association throught its cost was
three times as great,
Secretary Hollingsworth is a hard
year than aririgtheMtjkf Majce
tfesolutiohl tada tha-wm
work for the interests of tterasso-':
r
ciktiori during the coming dsfty -two
weeks.
STILL TALKHG S0H00L HOUSE- "
. Editor Tribune:-! wish to make
known a few facts prior-to getting:
out a petition to vote bonds for a
High school building.
The high school located in Keith's
hall has an attendance of 120, three j
teachers. The High school build
ing is now used as an intermediate
between the ward schools" and the
High school, children attend it from
the three wards, three rooms are
occupied and has three' teachers.
There are "three ward -schools with
three teachers each.
There is one school house south
of the river well fitted up and seated
for thirty pupils but only eleven
attend and one school house west
of town about Jive mile's; Cbnse
ouentiv our schools are very "much
scattered and ought to b?cMicen-
trated for various reasons p3.
It would be well to set jgp sbuth
of the river into a separa'district;
it is six miles east andes and
contains about sixteen sections of
land which with the personal prop
erty is assessed at about$25,000,
which at two per cent raises $500,
which is just about the. cost per
year of the school, consequently it
would be no pecuniary benefit to us
to hold it. Then they wouldhave
the benefit of the school money.
They might have some capable
young lady who could iHeach the
school for them, but now they 4iave
' to pay taxes sufficient to run - their
school, out nave not a wora to say
in reference to the teacher. Our
board sends them a teacher who is
entirely independent of them. And
when irrigation ditches are in work
ing order they will have a great
deal more wealth and people. tVheu
ever our superintendentvisijts that
school the city schools losfe his ser
vices for one day. . jV '
NOw 'asfTEgardV tip scww5ff?ne
city, if we could conc&ntfhteHill the
children at one pla"ce,"excepting the
Third ward primary (the railroad
being a barrier) the vl16le school
system wduld be right "under the
eye of Professor Barber, ; when he
could use' his fcead to conduct the
schools instead of his legs.as he is
now compelled to do.
The First and Second ward school
houses might be closed temporarily.
The cost of operating tone large
building would not be near as much
as now operating three, for one
janitor would be sufficient, and slack
coal could be used to make steam
with.
We ought to have a school house
that would accommodate 700 child
ren, which is not large, as in cities
east they have school houses which
hold twice that number.. We must
f anticipate and not commit the blun
der that was committed in building
the Third ward school house.
As far as I am concerned it is a
matter of indifference where the
High school building is constructed,
oniy'place it in the most convenient
'place for the children.. I would favor
;thei Third ward ifjisas.conyenient
as south of the railroad track, for,
the preponderance of public build
ings is on the south "side,. Only let
us have the building;
Jt behooves the people to take an
Interest in the matterfor something
PRAISE, ONLY,
raOM ALL WHO USI
AYER'S
Hair Vigor
o;
O!
Oi
"AVer's preparations are too
well known to need any commen
dation from me ; but I feel com
pelled to state, for the benefit of
otners, trat six. years ago, 1 iosf o;
nearly half of my hair, and what gi
was left turned gray. - After gi
usincr AVer's Hair vieor several o
months, my hair began-to grow o
again, and with the natural color J
restored. 1 recommend it to an 5
my friends." Mrs. E. Frank- o
iiattser, box 305, Station C, Los o!
Angeles, Cal. 5
U.lf.AAnS
HTtnSIIAIKilulinSj
MnrPAHF.n bt of
M. J. C. AYER ft CO. LOWELL, MASS. 1
poooooooooooooooooooooocl
WE
PAY CASH 100 CENTS ON THE DOIiLAR AND SELL,
CHEAPER THAN ANY HOUSE .IN THE CITY. .
1
SLAUGHTER
1895
SALE -
THE NEW TARIFF
On All Imported Woolen Goods and Silks
18 IN OPERATION JANUARY 1ST.
We must close out our stock of nice fine goods and make room for our new stock
under the new tariff regulations. : : : $1.75 Silk Henrietta at $1.10; $1.50 Silk
Henrietta at 85 cts.; $1.00 Henrietta at 65 cts,; $1.25 Bedford . Cords at 85 cents; $1.25
French Serges at 85 cts.; $1.00 French Serges at 65 cts.; all wool 1 yd. wide $1.25 Broad
Cloth at 75 cts.; 65 ct Flannels, 46 in. wide at 50 cts. : : : In our Shoe department
we offer the choicest line in the west, C. D. and E. widths, in fine new goods. : :
Call and see for yourself the Wonderful Bargains at Rennies for January and February in
1895. : . ; Amoskeag Ginghams at 5 cts. per yard, Lawrence LL Muslin at 4 cts.
per yard, Lonsdale Muslin at 6 cts. per yard, at RENNIE'S.
must be done the coming summer.
Either a High school house must be
built, or there will have to be three
rooms added to the Third ward
school house, and one each to the
First and Second ward school
houses.
There are 168 children attending
the Third ward school, and only
three rooms, and a large number at
tending the High school house. It
is safe to put the school children in
that ward at 250:
Quite a number of our people
think it would be wasteful to pull
down the old building, for which rea
son they arelukewarm about voting
bonds. A committee of ourarchi-
tects-and builders could be employed
to examine the building, and if they
pronounce it safe,"thcrr -ther-main
building could be made to face
Fourth street, and make three
fronts tc the buildinir. The base-
ment of the present building would
be just the place to locate the boiler
for heating the buildings. Without
anv instruction I would be willinir
to leave it to the school board to do
the best possible in the premises.
In the article week before last
which put Mr. Finn's extra tax at
eight cents, should have been eighty
cents. There should be no misstate
ments. James Belton.
HtEIGATION H0TE8.
At Greeley Col., it will take five
months to ship out their crop of
potatoes and they are loading and
shipping eighty car loads every
day. We can do better than this
at North Platte in another year.
Articles of incorporation of an
other irrigation company in Daw
son countv have been filed in the
office of county clerk Lantz, The
new company will be known as the
Cozad Irrigation Company with an
authorized capital stock of one hun
dred thousand dollars, and will
practically use the route known
as the MacColl ditch, which was
abandoned in 1891. Gothenburg
Independent.
Desirable as it is that the stars
and stripes should float respected
from the mastheads of numerous
$3,000,000 ironclads, there is no
good reason why one-third or one
sixth of the cost of one Avar vessel
should not be devoted to purposes
of peace in investigating the under
ground flow and methods ot water
salvage in the semi-arid regions.
Sideney Telegraph.
The effect of the state irrigation
convention at Kearney is already
felt in our county. Irrigation has
thereby received new impetus, and
everybody who can is preparing to
go to work, and construct irrigation
works of some kind. This part of
the state by the time the state con
vention meets in Sidney will no
doubt have something to show in the
way of irrigation enterprises.
Ibid.
Mr. Stapletoa, of Omaha, repre
senting a great deal of land in the
counties west of us, as well as in
Holt, was in town and tells us that
he wants water for all their land
under the plan of the irrigation
company. He thinks this is going
to be a great thing for the loan
companies that were forced to take
land, and instead of losing on their
holdings, as they anticipated, they
believe that with a water right and
a chance to get water on the land
they will realize a profit instead of
a loss. O'Neill Frontier.
An irrigating canal that will
prove of benefit to a number of
Lincoln county people is thus men
tioned by a Gothenburg paper:
"The 'Williams ancf Marcqtt irriga
tion ditch was 'started last Monday.
Mr. Lee Arnet put a New Era gra
der to work for them last Saturday
and Monday the boys went to work
in earnest, Rumor has been cir
culated that the parties contem
plating the building of this ditch
were working to sell out and it would
never be built, etc. Such stories as
these are always put about by op
position parties and should not
have any credence whatever. This,
today, is the most practical ditch
in Dawson county and when com
pleted will have more fine land
under it than any other irrigation
enterprise in the county. The men
who are at the head of this enter
prise are rustlers, good and strong,
financially, Mr. Williams alone be
ing able to construct the entire
ditch. Every citizen in this town
should do all he can to further
this enterprise, for the completion
of this ditch will be worth thou
sands of dollars to Gothenburg.
"Every citizen should appoint him
self a committee of one to do all in
his power to help secure the right
of way for these gentlemen and give
them a chance to push the work
toward completion as fast as pos
sible." At the late meeting of the Ne
braska Dairymen's association J.
H. Rushton, superintendent of the
Fairmont creamery thus discussed
"Alfalfa as a Forage Crop for Ne
braska Dairymen." He thought
that alfalfa was the "something
green" that everybody-was looking
for during the drouth. The neces
sity for a new forage crop is more
marked in the middle of the state
thatf-m'the eaaternv Thraiyowii-?
to the distribution of rainfall or
rather to the way in which it is con
served, and would be sufficient to
raise crops even in a dry year. By
deep plowing he thought the pre
sent rainfall in Nebraska could be
conserved, and would be sufficient to
raise crops, even in a dry yean
Alfalfa has a tap root which pumps
up both moisture and plant nourish
ment from a considerable distance
below the surface. The average
distance penetrated by a plant in
one year is a foot. In planting it
for hay sow as much as twenty to
thirty pounds to an acre, less for
pasturage. It must be of put down
about two inches. Drilling in both
in directions about four inches
apart is recommended. Too much
must not be expected the first year.
As hay, three to five tons an acre
and five to ten bushels of seed
should be secured. The uplands
raise alfala well. The Beaver val-
Ipv Tine co fn-r nrnA 11 rfA 4-Ti r Viocf f
'suits. - '
IS YOUR TONGUE
Coated, your throat dry, your eyes
dull and inflamed and do you feel mean
generally when you get up in the morn
ing? Your liver and kidneys are not
doing their duty. Why don't you take
Park's Sure Cure? If it does not make
you feel better it costs you nothing. It
cures Bright's disease, diabetis and all
kidney complaints. Only guaranteed
cure. Sold by North Platte Pharmacy.
The Woman's Era.
Within Her Sphere She Reigns Supreme.
Woman claims her' own. Her field widens constantly;
Every day brightens her prospects.- Her progress fore
shadows the greater triumph at hand. Emancipation and
equality will be hers in the years to come.
Prophetic of final victory were her achievements at the
World's Fair. At her shrine there erected the nations bowed.
The lesson taught at the "Woman's Building" will last "till
time shall be no more." Their enlightening influence will
be felt around the globe throughout the dawning century.
Oniy less memorable were the honors gained at the Fair by
Dr. Price's Cream Baking Powder
The highest award conferred on this peerless prepara
tion, is a fitting accompaniment of the laurels won by the
women of America.

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