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The news and herald. (Winnsboro, S.C.) 1901-1982, June 30, 1922, Image 3

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s~~i ~ * U OFBA
SKEC W o""
T.i~ w 4EIliI iP~IR S(
In fe f it Courier of June 22,
Rev. L 7'.'Bailey has presented 1
sketch tlife and service of Rev.
Philip Mulkey, a 'pioneer in the set
tiement of the territory -ub.e n
known as Fairfield county, and a
principal founder of the Baptist
church throughout the entire upper
section of this -state during the for
mation period of her history between
the years 1750 and 1776.
The special local interest attaching
to this account of the labors of this
Godly man so abundantly blessed in
the earliest settlement period is the
connection of Mulkey wit at least
two such nuclei of civilization in
Fairfield, ds the establishment of the
earliest Baptist churches in Fairfield
on Little River, and that now organ
ized at Monticello. In reality the
church on Little River was the source
of the great historic Fairforest
church of this denomination, whose
influence over the whole state became
such a powerful factor in its growth,
up to the present time. Mr. Bailey s
account of Mulkey sets this fact out
most interestingly and conclusively.
As his sketch informs us, Philip
ulkey, one of the prime instruments
as stated, in the establishment of
religion and planting of civilization
in upper Carolina, was born in North
Carolina in 1732. He was baptized
Christmas day 1750 in Steam's
church, Guilford county (N. C.), and
within a year became ordained as
pastor of Deep River church in the
same county, where he remained
three years.
That disposition' for "moving cn"
which possesses all genuine n.issi -
aries possessed Mr. Mulkey overpow
eringly, and his wh.>le. apostiezt
like that of Paul, was one journey
after another, planting churches ir
place after place. This zeal led hirr
as leader with a dozen of his congre
gation to migrate from Guilford an(
settle upon a location in South Caro
lina that a contemporaneous accoun1
states was at "Little River, off Broat
River," where they incorporated as
church in August of 1710.
Mr. Bailey states frankly his ina
bility to designate the exact localit:
of this obscure settlement, which re
mained, as will be seen but a scarc
two years, and too short a .while t
receive officially a name to designat
it; but to citizens of Fairfield it ob
viously has reference to Little Rive
in Fairfield county, and the peculia
designation given the place wa
doubtless to distinguish between th
curch pAggAhere anda thene e ,
l-ja xtery bo~t'Iefor 77 ful
t r west, called the church of "Lit
tle River off Saluda River."
Although the church increased s
rapily, from 13 to 104 memnber
within two year's, or, perhaps, for tha
very reason, and the pastor considere
his work there accomplished,, at an
Tate, the missionary zeal filled hir
again, and he trekked westwar
across the Broad and settled with hi
whole congreggon of the Little Riv
er settlement in what is nov Un~o
county. Thus he there replanted th
church first formed in Fairfiel a,i
December of 1762. which received th
name of ~airforest church from it
location upon the creek so named,
few miles west of Union courthouse
in the fork formed by Tyger River
Fairforest, thus originally planted b:
Mulkey in Fairfield, became a pro
lific mother of churches, with branch
es, a half-dozen or more, one hundrei
miles apart, a monument to the ze:t
of thie builder in the sen~'ice~ of his
Lord. The significarfee of it is, thai
It but adds one more to the roll of
great things in the state that trace
their origia back to Fairfield.
This, however ,does not include the
irnterest Fairfield has in cornection
with' the labors of Mice i.i his re
ligious work. Under tils siei'nii
ter was formed the organization that
became Congaree church in lower
Richland, which presented to the state
while served by Mulkey such distin
guished Baptist divines as Reese,
Dargan and Furman, under whom
largely the denomination in this state
owes its power for good and great
membership. T' e.,e t so form~er were
baptzed into the church as members
of Fairforest, while Furman came in
to it through the ~church at High
Hills of Santee, which was a branch
of Congaree..
Thus through the ministry of Phil
ip Mulkey it was that Furman Insti
tute became in aftertimes established
as a Baptist training school in Fair
field, which was eventually transe
formed into the Furman University.
But Mr. Mulkey's- connection with
the history of Fairfield has not yet
all been told.
In his journeying from Union down
to Richland county to his church at
Congaree Mr. Mulkey was accustom
ed to break distance midway, resting
uner the hospitable roof <-f Mr. Ja
cob Gibson, of' the we etera side f
Fairfield.
-His influence upon his host early
-led to conversion, and Mr. Gibson
.ubsequtently became p: er - of
.7 AN
own hous. 1ertis a
regular church, fi~t under the name
of Little River; aftQward, of Mon
ticello..
The last record of 0ilip Mulkey
is dated 1776; not ev b burial
place or date of his de1 is known
today. This paper is sint : be pub
lished in the county newojaper in
order to induce an effort to be rade
whereby perhaps some donemilts rel
ative to this pioneer of Fairfield may
be brought to light, or some traditions
in relation to the parent. Baptist
churches in Fairfield be recalled.
R. A. Meares.
ALLEN-WRIGHT.
Shelton, June 26.-One of the most
beautiful weddings solemnized in this
neighborhood in recent years was
that of Miss Mae Elizabeth Allen to
Henry Grady Wright on Wednesday
afternoon at 4 o'clock in the Univer
s'alist church. The church was beau
tifully and artistically decorated in
green and white, large baskets of
daisies being used profusely and ef
fectively on either side of the altar
and arch, the glow of candles soften
ing the effect of the lovely scene.
Just before the ceremony Mrs. D.
P. Crosby and Miss Euce White
sang a duet, "Beloved It Is Morn,'
followed by a solo, "At Dawning,'
by Miss White, accompanied on the
piano by Mrs. D. P. Crosby and Mr
W. B. Wright, Jr., on the violin, wh<
also played the wedding march.
First to enter were James Wrigh
and Roe Coleman who spread th(
white carpet up the aisles. Thencame
the little ribbon girls, Mary Wrigh
and Mary Welch, in dainty white an<
yellow organdie dresses. The brides
maids and groomsmen, Miss Varin
McDaniel with F. W. Rutherford
Miss Clyde Coleman with Sam Wol
ling, Miss Della Wright Palmer wit]
W. B. McDowell, Miss Edith Ro
Coleman with John Fpster Colemar
Miss Nancy Coleman 4ith.Andy Fau
cette, Miss Mary Faucette with Joh
A. F. Coleman, Jr. The bridesraid
wore pretty yellow and green orgar
die dresses with maline hats t
match and carried crooks tied wit
maline bows and showers of daisie
Next came in the matron of hono
Mrs. J. R. Shelton, mother of tI
bride, attired in grey crepe-de-chir
with touches of blue, and~carrie
daisies. The dame of bone, Mr
Etta Finnstrom ,the bride's only si
r ter, wore wisteria organdie, aud lei
horn hat and carried. daisies. Litt
Sara Frances Crosby m whiteOrgs
die earf-ied .a pretty basket of fioi
! ers,
the aisle.
Immediately preceding the bri
was little. Edith Clayton Wright,
sieogandie, carrying the ring
tthe heart of a daisy. The bride, w}
.came in on the arm of Mr. J. R. She
.ton, looked lovely in a handson
Sgown of soft white lace and geo
gette, her bridal veil being caug]
back with' sprays of orange blossom
She carried a bouquet of brides' rosi
and maiden hair 'fern. The bride we
:t.t t the aite r by the groom~ an
his best man, Mr. J. Earl Wright.
Th e ceremony was impressivel
p.erformed -by Rev C. WV. Salter. la
mediately after the ceremony th
happy couple left in their autonmobi]
for the mountains of North Carolim
*Mrs. Wright is a graduate
Limestone College and a graduate c
Winthrop in the class of Ld22. Ma
Wright is a prosperous .otrg far
mer i~nd their many friends are ver
gladi that they are to make their honm
in Shelton.
COMMUNITY HOUSE PROGRAM,
Friday--"Hair Trigger Casey,"
big 5-reel Western that you have bee
lodking for. Also Ben Turpin in
tivo 'reel coniedy. Renieniber th
night, and it is here only one night
July 2 and 4-Our big Fourth o:
July picture, "The Great Impersona
tion,"~ by James Kirkwood, Ann For
est. A great cast, a bigger story an<
the great director who directed The
Sheik and other superfeatures.
Remember it's the Fourth of Jula
and we are giving you a big holida)
picture at popular prices, 10 and 20c
Tell your friends and bring youl
children.
WednesdayAnother holiday picture
Wesley Barry in "Dinty," the second
Jackie Coogan.' HIe played in Huck
leberry Finn and other big pictures
produced by Marshall Neilan. Just
think what this picture brings to us|
Wesley Barry, the great kid star with
a big story that everyone will enjoy.
NOTICE TO FARM WOMEN.
The Fairfield County Council for
Farm Women will meet at the Corn
munity House in Winnsboro Saiturday
July 8th at 9:30 o'clock. All are
urgedl to be present..
Mrs. R. A. Patrick,
President.
FOR~ SA LE-i sheet steel bath tub,
gtood as n.ew. Apply to James M.
S rn th 13_14A
NOTICE OF ENROLLMENT OF
DEMOCRATIC VOTERS.
Notice is hereby given that the
books for the enrollment of the dem
ocratic voters in Fairfield county have
been placed in the hands of the sec
retaries, or Enrollment Committees,
of the respective Clubs of the Coun
ty, and that all voters in the county
who desire to vote in the ensuing
Primary Election, must enroll their
names on said enrollment books, in
accordance with the Rules of the
Democratic party of this state.
Each applicant for enrollment shall
in person write upon the enrollment
book his or her full name, age, occu
pation and post office address. If the
name be illegible, the secretary shall
write the name beneath the signature
of the applicant. In the event of
the inability of the applicant to write
his or her name, he or she may make
his or her mark on the roll, which
shall be witnessed by the secretary,
or other person having charge there
of, and the secretary shall fill in the
other requirements.
The books of enrollment shall be
closei on the last Tuesday in July,
I which shall be the last day of enroll
ment, and thereafter no names shal
be added to said roll, except by au
thorit of the County Democratic Ex
ecutive Committee, as provided for ir
I the Rules. Within three days afte
the ediong of the Enrollment books
each Chi* secretary shall transmi
the ori ,:oll to the County Chair
Iman at s=boro.
Each cant for enrollment shal
I enrol i .ame on the roll of thi
Club his place of residence
and jiOa- , shall be permitted to
votei ' rimary election whos
- Jnamen enrolled as herei
L pro-44d - *o* t any polling piac
P except tt h91e Club in which h
- or she t" olled.
The . ecutive Connitte
hrs appo iet followig en &
oient *' for the respe'tiv
I club .OP
- e secretary and V
B. e Frazier, Jr.
o Cenb secretary ai
h Mor" .T. Branhax
ubsecretat
r, and * ,Y1 S.E
e eretaty
E.a B Bai
.- . 06
rner an
Jenkins'vfle-The Club ry al
le W. B. Yarborough and J. F. Ya
in borough.
in Longtown-The Club secretary a'
o A. W. Matheson and T. H. Jones.
- Mitford-The Club Secretary ar
e . B. Keistler and W. S. Keistler.
>Monticello-The Club secretary ar
tAlber-t McMeekin and Clarke McGi
Mossy Dale-The Club secretal
andl H. H. Mann and Mrs. C. H. Lei
nier.
New Hope-The Club secretary an
C. J. Stevenson and Y. G. Lewis.
R Iidigeway-The Club secretary an
e S. P. Thomas and J. Blake Boy.
e IShelton-The Club secretary and.
G. Wolling, Jr., and W. B. Wright, J
fSimpson-Tbc. Club secretar-y ar
.C. B. Taylor and T. H. Richardson.
. E ateree-The Club secretary an'
Rev. J. P. Isenho~wer and Claude Glac
.den.
e Winnsboro-The Club secretary an
T. M. Jordan and Mrs. A. Lee Scrugg
Winnsboro Mills-The Club secre
tary andI G. H. Lokey and 'Tev. Ge<
C. Gibson.
White Oak-The Club secretar
and T. D. Moore and Mrs. M. W. Pat
rick.
'Wdodward-The Club secretary an
iJ. L Brice and Robert Mcllroy.
The attention of the enrollmen
committees is called to the fact tha
democratic ladies of the county ar
entitled to enroll their names- on th
Club rolls if they so desire, but the
need not be required to state thei
ages, except that they are of the ag
of twenty-one or more years, or wil
be of that age prior to the day of the
next general electioh.
The County Chairman particularl:
dlesires to urge all proposed voters ii
the ensuing primary election to en
roll as promptly as possible, and h4
further calls attention to the faci
that the books close on the LAS'I
TUESDAY IN JULY, NEXT, ::rN
that unless the voter enrolls on or be
fore that date, he or she cannot vote
in the primary election, unless fo'
good cause shown before the County
Democratic Executive Committee. I
therefore urge all persons who desire
to participate in the primary election
to go at once to the enrollment com
mittee of the club nearest to his or
her place of residence and enroll their
names.
The candidates for State offices
will add~ress the voters of this county
at the Court House, Winnsboro, S. C.,
on the 3rd day of August next and
it is hoped that as many voters as
J. E. McDONALD,
13-1. - County Chairman.
Winthrop College
SCEO4RSHIP AND ENTRANCE
EXAMINATION.
The examination for the award of
vacant scholarships in Winthrop Col
lege and for admission of new stud
ents will be held at the Couty. Court
House .on Fday, July 7, at 9 a. m.
Applicants must not be less than six
teen years of age. When scholarships
are vacant after July 1 they will be i
awarded to those making the highest
averag -at this examination, provid
ed they meet the conditions govern
ing the award. Applicants for schol
arships should write to President
Johnson before the examination for
scholarship examination blanks.
Scholarships are worth $109 and
free tUition. The next session will
open September 20th, 1922. For fur
ther information and catalogue, ad
dress Pi-e D. B. Johnson, Rock Hill,
S. C.
University of South Carolina
ENTIANCE EXAMINATIONS
Entrance examinations to the Uni
versity of South Carolina will be held
by the unty Superiitendent of Ed
ucation ,at the County Court House
Friday, %uly 14, 1922, at 9 a. m.
I The 4iiversity offers varied cours
es of st in science, literdture, his
tory, la and business. The expenses
are m rate, and many opportunities
for self pport are afforded. Schol
V
arships je available.
e For R particulars. write to
Pic* jkNI W. S. CLLKikLL
e U ity of South Carolina
--Columbia, S. C.
atin
eAM O Y with
Th ets .f a
rsoea, oe the
and
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-JHCH is the big mil eetol
W tire of today? All over the
country men are talking right
now of the remarkable wearing
quality of Fisk Tires. The rea
sons are -obvious. Look over
ny Fisk tire and judge for your
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There's a Fisk Tire of extra value in every Sie
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6Akron, Ohio

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