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The news and herald. (Winnsboro, S.C.) 1901-1982, August 18, 1922, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2012218612/1922-08-18/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE F
PUBLISHED BY THE PROPST COMPANY
WE ARE UP WITH THE MILKMAN
Showing Fall Hats Already
On your toes, Men, for on our word a more welcome
announcement was never broadcasted.
We're ahead in hats as usual-so you can put your
straw in the barn 2 weeks in advance and put on your
head the biggest advance in light hats ever made-a
tonic that will send the balance of your Summer up
$1,000.
You know the kind we sell? Yep-Schoble-you're
right. When better hats are made we'll sell them.
The new fall shapes have a decided dash of pep about
them. See- them now-no charge for trying them on!
Schoble Hats $4.50-S5-$5.50.
Other makes $2 Up.
"The
The News and Herald. are going to have strikes. There a
WINNSBORO, S C. going to be a good many of the
______________________They are going to be called for rea,
P.ons other than the ones that back
Editor and Publisher wn nsrk o oepy h
Entered in the post office at Winns. hywr ue fsces h
boro, S. C.. as second class mail mat-wreslo diapnt.Int
ter.fuuejsahateargon
$2.00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE tmt orl u h nos h
BABSON SEES END OF te eei h a iesrks
LABOR DISTURBANCES. 'ncosqeeoftith re
Wellesley Hills, Mass. August 19, t h rm fmn hc ao
1922. In view of the newspaper spacegontohv.ncnratwh t
recently taken by the coal strike, boatcniec ftewrya
and certain textile strikes, we are snfl eegfl htte
prone to think that strikes are veryacopihbinretmn.Aa
general at the present time. Roger wocno e i a asdc
W. Babson, however, refutes this salo h o.H a e h e
opinion in a statement issued todayofhsbsbyalknsfnsttrc
as follows:intefcoy
"As a matter of fact, we have very Thsarsot-ite poce
few stirkes at the present time. Ever I h ogrnte okt h i
since the war the strike curve hasavntgofLbrSilhea
been below the point which was 'thenthusarecreofLbrwn
called "normal". The fact that weismtbosacetht(0ntie
have had three strikes of large dimen- "ih eei h rbe ft
sions blinds us to this basic truth epoe ftenx e er.H
Two of these strikes, the coal strikeshlhemttenwtmproLa
and the rail shopmen's strike, are inor Inm opinthtulte
industries which have not been de- prms emtb pndaig
flated, so far as war time wages go.setnbfoeLorheacsu
The other, the cotton, textile strike,dewhcbuisssdoeadya
has been partially deflated and the mtigLbrporsieyt
trouble is about going the rest of thegraesheinmaeetoft
distance. The difficulties in these eeet fteidsra eai
three industries are then cases of be- wihms ietycnenLb
lated hostilities. Ta st a:tetm odvl
"For the most part labor is notpesnldpatnsetuprf
striking, wages are being graduallyshrnogizsopcmte
let down to lower levels and the dis-analoftersofhehigth
position of men is to keep at work.beogtthscasintwnLa
There is always a rise in the strike o si h adeadhlsag
curve during the summer. We are a h mlyrshabtwe
having that rise now. Nevertheless, epoe isl si h adea
we are not having the number or the i ntepsto odcaetrs
wide distribution of strikes which we "Tempordesnthv
had last year or at any time since jtk hsraoal ore fl
1915. We will not have a repetitioriosntwatt.H cnuete
of those conditions this year. Thenetyasopieutrblfrhn
strike curve is nearer normal thansefadhsucsorinay
almost any thing else in industry,. oe f oeeteepoe
"As to the future, the answer is to wsh iltk datg fh
be looked for in conditions. What psto ostu h etkn
made the tremendous wave of str'kes mciey ihwiht ee
which marked the years 1915 to 1920? hisln i nuty ti
The simple fact that there were moreaqusinostkeinhemeia
jobs than men; that the cost of livingfureItwlbeausijfsb
was going up; that labor was in a tg.SbtghwvrT wr
position to force the issue. No suchthnsrk.Itdmnsiso
prospect is in view for the years tetet
right ahead. Therefore, we need not "nve fteecniini
look for a repetition of the strike vsossol iemr huh
condtion of hewrdas.T ons othe lbr thanite oe that bmanE
daysarepassd. evethelss.efuinuhic juthed purhae aritgi
IROPST WEEKL
WINNSBORO, S. C.. AUGUST 18th, 1922.
Broadcasting==
Good News
OUR BUYER
MR. PROPST IS NOW IN
NEW YORK CITY
SELECTING ADVANCE
FALL MODELS
OF
DRESSES, COATS AND SUITS
FOR
LADIES AND CHILDREN
Store You Hear So Much.
e An examination of corporation earn
fl- ings shows that the labor policy is
s- the great determining factor between
,d profit and loss during normal times.
nf This especially applies to various
y concerns in the same line of industry.
t- They all pay approximately the same
y price for raw materials; they all have
le practically the same hours of work,
:o but one company succeeds and the.
t- other fails. Statistics show that the
y difference is very largely due to their
1.s labor and financial policies. There
fore, conservative investors will seek
il securities of companies which have
s a broad-minded labor policy, and
s which companies are now developing V
e plans which will be of use when the
~, next period of prosperity comes. Ice
-cannot be gathered in the summer, - X
G but must be put up in the winter
n when it is not needed. The same
nl principle applies to Labor. Labor F r
t troubles are very difficult to settle
s when they occur. Wise manufact
urers prepare, during such times as
.these, preventative measures so that
~- ! abor troubles will not occur when
times are good." Jo
t General business is holding its own
-. according to the index of the Babson-Re Gos
e chart. It shows activity today at 7
vpercent below normal as compared Rpeetn
~- with 9 percent last week and minus
- 18 percent a year ago.TH ENR1
-LOCALS.
I- Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Robinson andCEW IH
a Roy Robinson kft Saturday for a two E O SR
e weeks trip to the mountains of North SO ST A"
n Carolina. N TA LL.
r. Mr. J. G. Wolling, Jr., was in towu
P on business last Friday.IFY UH V
-Mr. and Mrs. Riciard Cathcart ar
s rived Sunday to visik Mrs. Cathcart'sTOL KOV
.t parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Robinson.SH E AR C
-Miss Nettie Sitgreaves returned
nl from Columbia Sunday,
e Mr. and Mrs. Clifford iladden visit
d ed Mrs. A. W. Brown th~e past week
end.
0 Mr. and Mrs. Elliott Caldwell left
e Saturday to visit, Dr. and Mrs. Cald- t
e well, in Charlotte.te
nJFOR THE RELIEF OF
- Pain in the Stomach and"ITae Le
Bowels. Intestinal Cranp
Jnoo..DIRRcE
-SOLD EVERYWHERE
Y NEWS.
VOL. 1I. NO. 21
Look more slender-have real'
comfort in
COSE TS
H ERE is a corset that will.
make you look 10 to 15
pounds lighter, make your
gowns and dresses always look
charming and fit right-yet
give you comfort and support
that is really a delightful sur
prise.
GRACEFUL STOUT
CORSETS can be had in
either front lace or back lace.
They fit right and feel right
from the very first hour you
wear them.
A skilled corsetiere will be
glad to let you try them on and
explain the splendid features
of this remarkable corset, with
gut any obligation to you.
P~
Have Your Corset Fitted
-Our Mrs. Bell, who is a graduate Corsetiere, will be
glad to give you a private fitting and advise you as to the
proper style for your particular figure.
Madame Grace Corsets are priced
-$2.50 to $6.50
New Style in DeBevoise Brassieres
bout"
Horne
Brothers
LSIVE AGENTS FOR FAIRFIELD) COUNTY
he All-Leather Line of
SHOES.
3. Ioberts and Atlauic Mens' Fine Dress Shoes
Pacific and Fine Dress Shoes for Women
Shoes for Growing Girls, Boys, Misses and Children.
n organization of 38 Shoe Factories besides the tanners.
OUS PRODUCTION OF "ALL-LEATHER" SHOES
iT SELL OUR TRADE AT REMARK(ABLV LOW PRI
COGETHER WITH THE FACT OF THEIR SOLID LEATH
CTION, MAKES IT POSSIBLE FOR US TO SELL YOU,
'ARE ALL LEATHER AS LOW AS THOSE THAT ARE
THER.
N'T TRIED A PAIR OF OUR SHOES, WE INVITE YOU
|R OUR LINE WHEN IN WINNSBORO. OUR FALL
DMING IN.
'.OO And a New Pair of
pCASH Soes w Dl e given to
wearer who finds Paper in the
,counters, insoles or outsele
y shoes made by us bearing
rademiark,
ther to Stand the Winter Weather" 4

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