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The news and herald. (Winnsboro, S.C.) 1901-1982, October 27, 1922, Image 6

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2012218612/1922-10-27/ed-1/seq-6/

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BILLON DOLLAR BUG
Wellesley Hills, Mass., October 28,
1922. In view of the sensational re
ports relative to conditions in the
South, especially due to the boll-wee
vil, Roger W. Babson has been ask
ed to make an analysis of the South
ern situation as it now appears from
the view point of a statistician. Mr.
Babson's statement is as follows:
"In the so-called "cotton belt",
which stretches across many of the
Southern states, is produced 60 per
cent of the world's supply of cotton.
In fact, this cotton crop has been so
important that the South has practi
cally given its entire attention to cot
ton and thus become a "one crop"
country. The boll weevil is now de
stroying a large percentage of this
cotton crop, so that in many sections
only one bale of cotton is gathered
where two were originally produced.
Of course, great efforts are being
made to control the boll weevil, and
science will ultimately fiid a solu
tion to this problem. In the mean
time, however, there are several fac
tors to be considered.
"First, our supply of cotton will be
greatly reduced until this weevil is
controlled. The amount produced for
the next few years may not he more
than hay of the requirements of for
mer yedrs. This eans that high
prices may be expected both for raw
cotton and for all manufactured cot
ton goods for some time to come.
"Secondly, the South, which has
been a "one crop" country, will be
forced to raise other crops and be
come at least self-supporting. In
revious years tht South has import
ed from the Middle West nearly all
the corn and a large proportion of
the meat which it has consumed. This
year the South has raised sufficient
corn for its own use. It is also suc
cessfully ridding itself of the 'tick'
which is so detrimental to raising
good cattle. He-ds of fine stock are
rapidly increasing, and the South,
which has an ideal climate for all-year
stock grazing, should soon be one of
the most important stock raising sec
tions of the country. This means that
the Middle West will have a serious
competitor in corn and stock raising.
"The third factor to consider is
that the South will steadily increase
its manufacture of cotton into finish
ed goods. Already it is shipping large
quantities of these manufactured cot
ton goods into the northern states.
These southern mills can produce very
economically and are at the source
of the raw materials. This means
that the cotton mills of the easern
states will have serious competition.
Owing to the present immigration re
strictions, these northern - mills will
- soon be greatly handicapped as to lab
bor supply which fact should also
aid the South.
"A fourth factor is that the south
ern farmers are employing less labor
on their farms than under previous
conditions, many of them reducing
labor one hail. The reason'is that the
farmers are planting a larger acreage
in corn, hay, and other crops and less
acreage in cotton. These other crops
require less labor to work than cot
ton does. Today there is a very con
siderable unemployment of farm la
bor in thte South. This means that
there will be ample labor for cotton
mills and other fo-:'f mnufact
uring, and for the :lv'clopr.:ent of
natural resources.
"Fifth and finally, the South is re
alizing its need of effcrt and struggle
in order to hloldi its economic posi
tion. The ball vweevil is forc'ng upon
it a newv eccr omic cond~ition which it
I believe it has the willsto meet these
new conditions, but it 'needs capital.
The South has large undeveloped re
sources. It has coal, mineral depos
its and water grew br.s. It sc.weaort
cities have goodl harbors which are
stragetically located for commerce
With Latin America and Sou.thern
Europe. Thus, as the South more
finily iealizes aind grasps the oppor
tunities which it holds, it will grow
and dlevelop rapidly into commercial
importance. This means that during
the next few years the South will of
fer many very attractive opportuni
ties for the investor. Just at present
the South is hard hit by the boll wee
vil; but this very fact is bringing it
to a realization of its needs and op
portunities. Thus, within a few years,
a new economic condition should be
established and the South should be
more prosperous than at any time in
the past."
The Babsor.-aart indlex dIropped off
one point this week, standing now at
. 4 per cent below normal. This reces
. sion, however, has no especial signif
icance. Further advance should be
expected during the coming month.
FIGHT NEXT YEAR'S WEEVILS
NOW
Clemson College, Oct. 20.-Clean
ing of the fields, the destruction of
the stalks, and the planting of cover
crops constitute the most powerful
weapons for weevil fighting now in
the hands of the farmer, says Prof.
A. F. Conradi, Entomologist, who
says that by efficient fall farm man
great extent how many weevils shall
pass the winter on his farm.
Though much warning has already
been given by the entomologists, and
though the county agents are preach
ing stalk destruction right and left,
many farmers are apparently not
convinced of the need for immediate
stalk destruction, says Prof. Conradi,
and do not realize that this is practi
cally the most important single step
in any system of fighting the weevil.
Boll weevils multiply in cotton un
til frost kills it. Many thousands of
weevils may occur in each acre of cot
ton. Weevils hibernate-that is they
pass the winter, only in the full grown
stage. Hibernation usually begins
with the coming of the first killing
frost. They hibernate principally in
cotton fields, and standing stalks
make for them splendid winter homes.
The most favorable condition, there
-fore, for the successful hibernation
for the boll weevils is found in fields
where the cotton stalks, grass, weeds,
dead leaves, etc., are left during the
winter. Under such conditions the
farmers may expect the greatest num
ber of weevils to survive the winter.
There is little prospect for success
ful growing under such conditicns.
The earlier the cotton stalks are
destroped, the fewer the weevils that
will survive the winter, and conse
quently the smaller the damage to
the next crop. As far as possible, th
stalks should be destroyed two weeks
before the first killing frost.
In some sections the stalks are up
rooted, piled and burned. This meth
od is a very serious disadvantage in
destroying a large amount of vege
table matter which should be turned
under. Whenever the farmer is e
quipped with plows and mules so that I
the stalks may be turned under five
I or six inches after they have been cut
down with the chopper, it is a very
effective plan. A less effective ineth
od is to graze off all green cotton
within a period of a few days. What
ever nethod one employs, the destruc
tion of stalks must be thorough.
The following are a few of the
many advantages secured from clean
ing the fields and destroying the
stalks.
1. A great many full grown wee
vils are killed outright.
2. Many yo'ung stages in the plants
are killed.
3. The full grown weevils not kill
ed are weakened by starvation if the
stalks are destroyed two or three
weeks before the first frost and these
GALLEY EIGHT
will not have sufficient strength to
pass the winter successfully.
4. The removal of the stalks facil
itates fall plowing and the planting
of cover crops.
5. This fall cleaning program is
also. of the greatest benefit generally
in destroying the winter homes and
the winter food plants of other in
jurious pests of the farm.
TA X NOTICE ,
In accordance to law, the tax books
will open on October 15th for col
lection of taxes and remains open to
December 31st without penalty, and
'for the month of January one per cent
on delinquents; for the month of Feb
ruiary. one per 'cent additional on de
1in quents; and- for 15 days in March,
1t to 15th, five per cent 'additional
on liinquents; on all real and per
p3roperty.
Mills
tate nur poses........................... ... 7%~
Ordinr-y county...............................5
Me cial county .................................2
C a s;'. ional school .........-......
S: ecial Tax for Schools
District No.1... ....6
'Disdic' No. 2.......
District No.3. . . 6
IDistrict No. 4.... .
District No. 6.... .
District No. --9 1
District No.86
District No.9 - - -9
D i ti t N . 1 ...................... .. ....6
2itit N . ..................................
Di3it N . ................................
Ditit N . ....................... . .........
D5tit N . .......1....................
Ditit N . .......................... 13...
Ditit N . ........................... 10....
D i t i t N . 1 .............................
District No. 18...........................9
District No. 10................... ... ..........
District N o. 20...................... . . 7...6
Dis tr ict No. 12.....6................ .....
District No. 13....................... . . 7...
District No. 14..............................1
District No. 15.............4.................3
District No. 26........................1
District No. 27............10...................
District No. 28...............................1
District No. 29............................... 2
District No. 30........................... ........
District No. 31......_. ........ . 8...
District No. 22......................... ......7
District No. 3...........3.............. . 4 j
D istrict N o. 234..............................
D istrictg districts...............................1
Ditrict No. 13 ......-............2...........
District No. 30.......................... ..........
District No. 31................................
District No. 32...................................
District No. 13 .. ...... mills
.\l: no t.-c B .inilla poll tx- nn
all male citizns from the ag of 21
to 60 years old; also a commutation
road tax of $3.00 on all citizens be
tween the ages of 18 and 55 years,
except duly ordained ministers and
teachers actually engaged in school
work, and payable from Oct. 15th,
1922, to March 15th, 1923; also a cap
itation tax of $1.25 on all dogs, pay
able only during the month of Jan
uary, 1923.
Office will be kept open during le
gal hours for the collection of same.
A. LEE SCRUGGS,
Treasurer of Fairfield County.
COPY SUMMONS FOR RELIEF.
(Complaint Served)
State of South Carolina,
County of Fairfield.
The S. M. Jones, Plaintiff,
vs
Caesar Mitchell and W. M. Patrick,
Defendants.
To the Defendants Above Named:
You are hereby summoned and re
quired to answer the complaint in
this action of which copy is herewith
served upon you and to serve a copy
of your answer to the said complaint
on the subscribers at their office in
the City of Chester, S. C., within
twenty days after 'the service hereof,
exclusive of the day' of such service;
and if you fail td answer t6e coin
plain within the time aforesaid, the
plaintiff in this action will apply to
the Court for the relief demanded in
the complaint.
GLENN & GLENN,
Plaintiffs' Attorneys.
Chester S. C., October 21, 1922.
ro the Absent Defendant, Caesar
Mitchell:
Unless you appear and answer the
Complaint herein, which has been filed
in the Clerk of Court's office for
Fairfield County, State of South Car
SATURD.
Geraldine Farrar.i
With al
Opportur
seldom to
.waits. Wh:
it now?
Our policy
you mone;
thorough.
certainly c
you.
One you
lieve, but
to save moi
can help yc
WINNS
olina,'within' the time allowed by law,
the Plaintiff will apply to the Court
for the relief demanded in said Com
plaint.
GLENN & GLENN,
Plaintiffs' Attorneys.
Chester, S. C., Oct. 21, 1922. 31-33
Severe
Indigestion
"I had very severe attacks of
In 'i hadon," writes Mr. M. H.
Wa e,afarmer, of R. F. D. 1,
Weir, Miss. "I would suffer
for months at a time. All I dared
eat was a little bread and
butter... consequently I suffer
ed from weakness. I would try
to eat, then the terrible suffer
Ing in my stomach!I I took
medicines but did not get any
better. tc druggist recon
mended
Thedford's
BLACK- DRAUGHT
and I decided to try it for, as I
say, I had triedothers for two
or more years without any Im
provement in my health. I soon
und the BIack-Druht was
acting on my liver easin
the terriblepan
"in two or three weeks, I
found I could go back to e-tng
I only weighed 123. Now I
~wih147- eat anyhngjI want
to and bytakinBlac-L= m ht
I do not suffer.'
Have you tried Thedford's
Black-Draught? if not do so
today.
Over 8 million packages sold,
a year. At dealers'
E 96
kY, OCT. 25th
n "The Riddle Woman,"
all-star cast
ity comes
him who
r not grab
is to save
y, and, a
trial will
:onvince
don't be
t is easy "
iey. We
~u.
FC
,BORO 1~
TABLETS
-SOLD EVERYWNERE FOR
CONSTIPATION
B3IIJOUSNESS
Headache
IND"GSTO
Stomac-h Touble
Clipper B
Anyone having a No. 2 Old
will be glad to allow them $7
a No. 3 Lacer, making the p
send your check for $17.50 W
a No. 3 for $17.50.
COL1"MBIA SUP
823 West Gervais Street
Warehouse
WE HAVE AMPLE STO]
TON IN LOTS OF TEN I
WILL MAKE
LIBERAL I
cor
STORED WITH US.
The Winns
NE3DAY[ AND.) THURSDA
House Peters in "Hum.
The one big story the whole wo
-ou, fcr your children, for your f
tihe whole world. DON'T MISS I']
S
mng
shoe
bone
bring
U3IU6FI~call
.--3..- and:
a a Shoe
- ... ,feet.
theI
tars
rectfl
'a freed
tend<
f ee t
shoul
shape
Made1
04efsd '/
R MEN, WOMEN Al
IILLS -S']
NOTIC9 OF- LT CEtIA1UR 'M
Notice is hereby given that an ap
plication will be made to Chas. P.
Wray & Co., for the issue of new cer
tificates of the following lost certif
icates: Certificate No. 7, for 20
shares in the name of Jno. M. Cozart;
Certificates No. 11, for 70 shares n.
name of Estate of Chas. P. Wray;
Certificate No. 2, for 100 shares in
name of Chas. P. Wray.
27-32 JNO. M. COZART,
Individually and as Executor.
eLt Lacers
Style Clipper .Belt Lacer, we
.50 for it on the pirchase of
rice of the No. 3 $7.50. So
ith the Old No. 2 Lacer, par
re will give you in exchange
PLY COMPANY
Columbia, S. C.'p
Vour Cotton
RAGE R'OOM FOR COT
3ALES OR MORE, AND
,OANS ON
FON
boro Bank
Y, NOV. 1st and 2nd
in Hearts."
rld loves. A story for
atheu and mother, for
ep YOur
ris Feet
hapely
H-OOSE her shoes
ti. lit her feed-rat her
than follow the
I method of crowd-.
toes into pointed
s that bend growing
s ; and eventually
corns, bunions,
uses, weak arches,
ingrowing nails.
t us fit Educator
s tyourdaughter's
Have her slip on
Educator oxford
red below. Educa.
ire built to the cor
ot shape, with full
o~n for toes and
s. They "Jet the
grow as they
ld" -straight and
By Rice & Hutehins. I..
Boston. Mass.
ec & uw-canm
ICATOR
WD CHILDREN
[ORES

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