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The news and herald. (Winnsboro, S.C.) 1901-1982, December 21, 1922, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2012218612/1922-12-21/ed-1/seq-2/

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A A71L A & 6 TV %
SUCCEED ON FARMS IN SPITE
OF PESTS
How three Fairfield farmers have!
met successfully boll weevil conditions
in the third year of local infestation
is related by the county agent, R. H.
Lemmon.
Sixty-Four But i iu ky
"J. W. Brice, 64, has thu.s ar been
able to grow cotton succe:sfully Un
der boll wee% il conditions. ',r. Br'ce
is a small farmer and does most of
his work. This ye:ar he mnde one of
the best cottort crops that he has ever
made. He planted eight acres of cot
ton and made eight hales. One acre
made 1,620 pound.- of se'd cotton.
Mr. Brice did not u any poison, but
picked some square- and worked his
crop often. Only 300 pounds of fer
tilizer was used to the acre. The
kind of fertilizer used w:s a mixture
of one-half 16 per cent. acid, one
foirth nitrate of soda and one-fourth
k: ;t. This cotton v at: grown on
rather thin sandy soil. The cotton
was planted about the first of May,
the variety planted beirg Cleveland
big boll.
"Mr. Brice lives at home and hs
something to sell besides cotton. He
will have 100 bushels of corn to sell,
40 bushels of peas and also some
sweet potatoes. Has already sold S20
worth of potatoes.
Has Built Up His Land
"W. W. Turper, an eight horse far
mer, is making good under boll we.
vil conditions. Mr. Turner planted
95 acres in cotton this year and made
65 bales of cotton. Mr. Turner used
no poison of any consequence. The
secret of Mr. Turner's success this
year was good land, for he had a very
poor start.for a cotton crop on more
than half of his acreage. Mr. Turner
has built his land up principally by
feeding steers. His best field of cot-:
ton was a field of 46 acres in Cleve
land big boll that made 35 heavy
bales. The iertilizer used was a rx
ture of equal parts of 16 per ce,.
acid and cottonseed me,. using .5e0
pounds per acre.
"Mr. Turner is not an all cotton
farmer by any means. He will sel!
1,000 bushels of oats, and has 500
bushels of corn for sale. Has 2o1!
$200 worth of hogs and 8150 worth of
sour cream. Mr. Turner is still ship
ping cream and has more hogs for
sale."
Makes Almost Normal Crop.
"W. M. Estes, who operates a large
farm near Rockton, made almost a
normal crop of cotton under heavy
bool weevil fire. Mr. Estes plantedi
275 acres in cotton this year and made
223 bales of cotton. This cotton was
planted from the 15th to the 25th of
April. The variety was Wannamak
er's Cleveland big boll. The amount
of fertiliz er used was 400 pounds of
8-4-4 per acre. Three hundred pounds
was used in lap and 100 in drill at
planting time.
"No poison was used but all falling
squares were carefully picked up un
til second week in August.
"The land ' was carefully prepared,
and was cultivated from once to twice
per week. The secret of this fines
yield of cotton under weevil condi
tions was good soil full of vegetable
matter. Mr. Estes started several
years ago building his soil by leav
ing on the land all pea vines, both
broadcast and in rows. He was able
to leave these peavines on the land
by growing alfalfa for hay.
"Mr. Estes in not an all cotton far
mner, but will be able to sell abont
800 bushels of oats and about 2,000
bushels of corn from this year's crop.
He has also sold $400 worth of poul
try and dairy products."
County Agent L. S. Wolfe of~
Orangeburg writes that at least two
farmers in the Bowman section have
demonstrated that cotton can be
grown under boll weevil conditions:;
"J. C. Hydrick, viho lives on J. .
Shuler's farm, made seven bales of
cotton on 25 acres this past year.
"Marion Smith, who lives on the
adjoining place, made 15 bales on]
60 acres.
"While these yields are nothing like
what was madle by the same farmers
before the weevil came, it does show
that cotton can be made in spite of
the weevil.
"Only 300 pounds of fertilizers were
used to the acre.
"Both of these farmers destroyed
their cotton stalks before frost last
fall and cleaned up their (ditch banks,
fence rows, etc., and prepared their
lands early and well.
"The cotton was planted early and
was cultivated frequently and thor
oughly. Their lands being infested;
with cotton wilt, they used Dixie
seed.
"Both are confident that they would
Ae made much more c'o on if
weather conditions hadi not )cen1 So)
adverse and feel that. with oironer
Care cot on can be maide sas ce
under .weevil conditions.
"Alreamy they have cut their sta:
and have plaited rye im t'cem coan
"iddles and ar now. ceanin:.
of weevil wimer t:-r
Sexpedt to grow. a more r e
TOWN PESTS
4UES ALESS
o 0U vm -ro Co,
rhe kHenpecRed llusnaw: s a "
of the First Water hecuz he en n't I
Nuthin' ner Say Nuthin' without first
asking his Wife. If the Pure Fish'd
only Grow a Backbone. instead of
Bleating Plaintively about the Wife.
his Friends wouldn't feel So Much
like Knocking HIn for a Row of Ash
Cans every Lodge Night.
NOTICE
All persons are notified not to tres
pass in any manner on the lands
owned or controlled by the undersign
ed, either by hunting, fishing or re
moving straw or allowing cattle to
roam on said lands. Violators will be
prosecuted to the fullest extent of the
law./
(W. R. Doty, Jr.
;OT ICE
All persons are notified not to tres
ps in any manner on the lands
owned or controlled by the undersign
ed, either by hunting, fishing or re
moving straw or allowing cattle to
roam on said lands. Violators will be
prosecutel to the fullest extent of the
law.
D. W. McCarkts, Agent.
W. R. GRACE AND CO.
NITRATE OF SODA
Imported direct from
SOUTH AMERICA
Use it on your
COTTON-GRAIN-CORN
And grow a crop
Get latest prices from
F. M. Wooten, Camden, S. C.
or
Nitrate Agencies Co. Agents
'Sayannah, Ga. .
FOR SALE-A few pedigreed Hamp
shire pigs at $7.50 each. Beauties.
J. M. Jennings.
NOTICE
A meeting of the stockholders of
he Citizens Investment Company of
innsboro, S. C., for the purpose of
onsidering the advisiability of liqui
ating said company, and for the
ransaction of such other business as
ay come before the meeting, will
e held at the office of Barik of Fair
field on Saturday, December 30th,
1922, at 10 o'clock in the morning.
J. M. Jennings, Secty-Treas.
Vinnsboro, S. C., Dec. 1st. 1922.
NOTICE OF ELECTION
UNotice is hereby given that an e-'
ction will be held in the Town of
tidgeay on the 16th day of January
1923, upon the question of the issue
f coupon bonds of the Town of
Ridgeway to an amount not exceeding
$8,000 to complete the Electric Light
system~ of said town, andl that the
books of reritration for registering
the electors of said municipality will
e open on the 16th of December
1922, and closed on the 4th day of
January 1923. Said election will be
held in the Council chamber at Ridge
way, S. C.
By order of Council.
W. G. Whitlock, Mayor.
Attest: J. S. Edmunds, Clerk of Coun
ii N~
? p"
,~ i~*?r~ -
L 7 "
STONE'S METHOD IN PLANTIjG
PECAN TREES
Dig holes at once -o trees can be
planted withouti delay.
Preparation For Planting
Break the ind thoroughly wkith
Lwo horse plow, stake off for grove
by using regular four foot pia.
i111.4. 0-et :S of the takes four
feet; Lhis :iews the diggeC by u'In
a 'our foot measure to di- 0he hole
where the tree s. to st:la
a LhirL inci eb.Ay n
;m:hl of coo lot ":0 -.0
.o e mixe t ooud wt
ch tree. Horst lot
he:.,t g ind wi I o do. Y'. i
use one pound of sheep manen:
bone ievn! but (10 n0ot Ue LA.y rt
e rtilizer, c:ot'. .see' e l :' .
In absenC'c of ierilzer.: u.-.
Prti.g ecan Frees
'rune bruised roots to sound:
especially ip roots, un-il well
Pre.s the outer eige when piarted.
thi: \ ill cause the moist L.rth to coW
in CkOse contiat witr the uLder.s
of the roots. Throw on more so"
,ear the tree and a little pressure
.1i cause the moist soil to come in,
close contact with the top side of the
roots. A l'til extra soil around the
collar of the tree will take care of
the settling. Never leave a packed
surface. A fine mulch of coarse ma
terial like cane pomace, pine etraw.
>r oak leaves will finish the tree so
that over ninety per cent will live.
[t pays to plant carefully.
If you do not use 'water in plant
ing be careful to keep roots weli
spread out. It is best done vit
:rooked end of umbrella handle, then
ack firmly; when finished cover ViL
oose soil mulch or coarse muleh.
Care Of Trees On Arrival
If received in freezing weather.
'lace them in a cel,-r or cover
chole p ,ckage in v.et -iass, stra
>r such nvterial and walt for a w .
r day. I: not ready to plant at once
rench the trees in moist soil thi.iy.
Do not expose the tree roots to either
sun or wind.
Wanted peas. ' Very attractive
rices. DesPortes Mercantile Co.
WANTED-Men or women to take
orders for genuine guaranteed lyos
iery for men, women and children.
Eliminates darning. Salary $50 a
week full time, $1.00 an hour spare
time. Experience unnecessary. In
ternational Stocking Mills, Norris
town, Pa. Y f 30-39
NOTICE OF SALE OF LAND
State of South Carolina,
County of Fairfield.
In the Court of Common Pleas.
American Wholesale Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
L. S. Henderson and T. W. Henderson,
Defendants.
Pursuant to decretal order made in
he above entitled action, I will offer
for sale before the Court House door
in Winnsboro, S. C., at public outcry,
to the highest bidder, on Monday, the
1st day of January, 1923, the follow
ing described lands:
All that cegtain piece, parcel or lot
of land, with the storehouse and oth
Best Line
Goc
ORANGES, APPLES, BAN.
GLISH WALNUTS
REASONAE
SPECIAL DURING(
NO. 3DESSERT PEACHES
A.B. C
KlANI HIS F
Mow I. SLJPPosE You'
zfl TELL TMAT 0L' COMIC
You PULLWfTRE CA"
'P iT START&D Tra 8
er improvements thereon, comtainmng i I
one half acre, more or less, lying, be
ing and situate in the County of Fair-!
field. State of South Carolina, at
Blairs, S. C. Bounded on the North
by Northern half o; the lot here de
scribed, East by tract of Southern
R::ilway Comnany. Sout' by lands of
C. 1. Ragsdie. ane We-;' b lan:-;
of L. S. Hendei-on, bein:; he outhS - o
er half lot )o: land conveedi to
L. 'S. Hende'o ind T.~ '1 MeX - V
son by John K. Rag!d by deed
dated Augu. t ;th. 1910.
,Tern:- the
t i blance 1o :i t ev u e 1
a;ua isa;eI f oput i:g :'ron
nui, to be se-Cure'd b: ' : bmi1 I..:.
t'- purchaser and n morty~ige 9n.
the premise; 'old, or fr all c:...
the opton of the pure:.: ihe r
ch:a-er to pay tor aI s.: pap
stamps, and recording.]
John W. .- i. . *C. ..
Dee:mber 11th 192.
THE WATKIN- ST
On road leading by the rr!oa i -
tween Winnsboro and the ( otton M .
TOILET ARTICLES FR X:iMs
GIFTS
F'avoring, Extracts, Spices, Face
Cream and Powder ...
Blood Medicines, Laxtone, Liniments,
etc.
Candies etTobacco!
HAROLD E. DOUGLASS
Retailers in Wat-n's Prod-uct
Give us a call
People are urged to have sunshiny
characters, but many prefer moon
shiny ones.
Severe
Indigestion
"I had very severe attacks of
indigestion." writes Mr. M. H.
Waae, a farmer, of R. F. D. 1,
Weir, Miss. "I would suffer
fcr months at a tire. All dared
eat was a little bread and
butter. . . consequently I suffer
ed from weakness. I would try
to eat, then the terrible suffer
ing in my stomach! I took
medicines but did not get any
better. The druggist recom
mended
* Thedford s
BLACK-DIAUGHT
and I decided to t rit, fo, a I
or more years without any im
: provement in my health. [soon
fund the Black-Draught was
acting on my liver and easing
-the terrible pain.
-"In two or three weeks, I
found I could go back to eating.
l Ionly weighed 123. Now I
- weigh 147-eat anything 1 want
to, and by taking Black
|I do not suffer.'
-Have you tried Thedford's
Black-Draught? if not, do so
Stoday.
-Over 8 million packages sold,
a year. At dealers'
of Xmas
ds
(NAS, BRAZIL NUTS, EN
AND PECANS AT
LE PRICES
~HRISIMAS WEEK:
.35c Per Cqn
ath cart
RI ENDS
e GOinGr To
OKE, TilAf NAW!
Av/AV iT WASN1
us~ AT AL
15
CHRISTMAS
Suggestions
Boyce Motometers
Ever-Ready Flash
Lights
Alumimum Running
Board Mats
Pedal Pads
'Tires and Tubes
or
Give a Ford
Fairfield Motor Co.
AUTHORIZED FORD, FORDSON AND LINCOLN
SALES AND SERVICE
Winnsboro,.S. C.
Christmas
Groceries
ARRIVING DAILY THE MOST TEMPTING THINGS
FOR CHRISTMAS SUCH AS
CRANBERRIES /FRUIT CAKE
GRAPE FRUIT PLAIN CAKE
ORANGES CHOCOLATE CAKE
APPLES POUND CAKE
NUTS OF ALL KINDS
BANANAS, RAISINS, GRAPES, FIGS, DATES,
CANDIES
LETTUCE CELERY
ASK TO SEE THE LARGEST MACKEREL EVER
BROUGHT TO TOWN
DON~T WAIT FOR THE RUSH. BUT COME AND SEE
THEN DO YOUR ORDERING EARLY. PLEASE RE
MEMBER TO GET YOUR ORDERS IN BEFORE SAT
URDAY, XMAS EVE, AS WE WOULD LIKE TO HAVE
THAT DAY TO WAIT ON THE COUNTRY TRADE.
C. A. ROBINSON
__________ -By JACK WILSON
capn,t ,,22 by.:! eMNppeSy&Ee
,~IA'r IT? TO SLEEP AND
LTef ITS eNGPIE
,% RUnNING!.
\

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