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The sentinel-journal. (Pickens, S.C.) 1906-1909, May 14, 1908, Image 5

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IE SEFNTINEL RN
Entered April 23, 1903 at Pickens, 8. 0.. as seoond class matter, under act of Congress of March 8, 1879.
.GLO 'UVUi, PICHIM, SOUTH CAROLINA, THURSDAY MAY, I 190B 7.
-ADDITIONAL LOCALS.
Miss Hattie Earle is visiting
in Williamston.
Cwo fresh.young cows for sale.
JAIES M. GILLESPIE, R. F. D. 2,
Pickens.
Another typo will be with
us Monday next, and then
'we will be able to handle any
ad-all business that comes our
way.
The cool wether,or something
else, is keeping the candidates
from budding fast this spring.
Maybe th6y are'afreid of being
"hoycotted"-by the voters.
A team from Clemson crossed
bats with the Pickens boys last
&Bturday on the latter's dia
nond. The game resulted in a
signal victory for the visitoi
-The second quarterly confc
vice for the Pickens charge wat
Ivild Monday -last at Bethlehem.
Presiding Elder Duncan being
present and preaching an excell
etu sermon.
Presiding Elder Duncan
preached an excellent sermon in
the 'Pickens Methodist church
Sunday night. Rev. N. G. Bal
longer filled his appointment in
the above church that morning
and had a large congregation.
Mrs. J. T.. Prtridge and sister
tiss Mattie Finley, who. have
ken on a visit to relatives in
Anderson, returned to their
omenr3 in BP'ten3:,Tuesday. Mr.
Partridge .went'down on Satur
day and came back witi them.
Rev. Leo D). Gillespie, and
lide, of Edgefield, are visiting
hp..parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. M.
dillespie of fckens, R. F. D. 2.
1ex) is receiving the congratula
tions of 'i k apy tfiends and
many I V i nkt*' re being
hauded him as to his good judg
ment.
"IsNiidanT1oEii,~daughter
of E. B. Lathem, was married
rl the 3d in .! Isaac Wil
iinis lof eirs Creek sec
tion of the county, J. M. Jame
son,. .:N' P:;, -:fficiating. The
happy young couple have the
best wishes of their many friends
for a long, useful and prosper
ous life.
The. Buchanan - Henderson -
scott Co., of GOreenville, a firm
that is up' to the times and
reaching for trade, have secured
a pagevis qfg. .--J. to tell its
readers -6f0 the' "plums'' they
baye 5inistocka $orry to say we
-cold not possibly reach, them
this Week,^ bot in the meantime
when you visit-the' horse show,
dlon't forget them.
Liberty, Norris, Central, and
Calhoun all report that trade is
holding up remarkably well with
them; that for the time of the
year it is remarkable, and that
the trade 'this spring Is the best
It has been In many years.
Greenville. merchants say that
they have sold more goods and
larger bills, this spring, to Pick
ens county people than in many
years. The merchants of these
towns are taking advantage of
the columns of this paper to ex
ploit their wares, give theii
prices, and bid for your trade.
Moral: Trade with the merc'h
ants that advertise in this paper,
tell thorn you read their ad. and
prmcnr real bargi.
Miss - Ferguson is visiting
her aunt, Mrs. N. A. Christo
pher.
Mrs. Lourie iallaham, of Iva
visited her brother, Rt. L. Davis
in Pickens, this week.
Sunday was a good day al
Peters Creek. church. This is t
fine community of substantia
citizens.
LOST-Between Easley ani
Pickens, a pair of spectacles, ir
case. Return to this office ant
get reward.
Pickens Chapter U. D. C. wil:
meet next Friday and arrange
the programme for the celebra
tion on June 3d.
Mrs. C. E. Robinson attended
a reception given at the hom(
of Mrs. Lewis W. Parker, o1
Greenville, Tuesday evening.
R. L. Hames, the market man
of Pickens, 1i also handling a
nice line of fancy groceries and
seems to be building! up a nice
trade.
Louis Copel is still doing busi
ness in Pickens at the old stand,
but the stand has been rolled
back and ground has been broken
where it stood fo' a nice double.
front brick store.
W. C.. Garrett has bought the
farm of W. E. Alexander, on thE
Keowee. Mr. Garrett says h(
will rent the farm and pay hi,
attention to his poultry yard.
Mr. G. is a prominent merchani
at Six Mile.
The Methodist District Con.
ference for this district is in ses
sion this week at Clinton. Th(
preachers of this denomination
in this county, are in attend
ance. Rev. N. G. Ballenger, of
the Pickens circuit went down
Wednesday.
Hobbs, Henderson & Co., of
Greenville; that claim to be the
fasteettgrowing--house in the
state, have engaged a Large
space in the colunis of this pa
per for "Straight Talks Without
Frills" to the people of Pickens
county. We regret that owing
to insufficient office force we
could not get their very read
able ad. in type for this issue.
Keep your eye out for them next
week. They want to meet you.
W. R. Anderson, who lives on
Pickens R. F. D..No. 1, has a
son who is a progidy. Lemuel
Richardson is his name and he
is only three years old but hE
can count to 100, tell how.many
months there are in a year and
name them, tell how many days
there are in a week and name
them, repeat the Lord's Prayer,
and knows the alphabet wher
he sees the letters. He is quit(
a'smart little fellow and is dos
tined to develop a wonderful
mind.
A good many people frorr
Pickens and vicinity, and in faci
from all over the county, attend
ed the "May meeting" at Sb
Mile Sunday. This is a greal
dyfor those people, when kin
dired and friends gather together
'to worship, and after worship
to exchange friendly greeting:
and break bread together, and I
~is a day that is always looked
forward to with anticipations o:
great joy when friend and kin
dred meet,probably for the onl>
time in the year.
For Sale--A good horse, buggy
and harness. Liberty Hard
ware Co.
Supt. of Education R. T. Hal
lum, who has been sick for the
past ten days, is now able to be
out.
T. L. Blvens, of Pickens was
called Thursday to the bedside
of his father at Waxhaw, N. C.,
who is critically ill.
Sheriff Jennings is collecting
delinquent taxes; and subpoena
ing jurors this week, and inci
dentally electioneering some.
Dr. A. C. Spain, dentist, from
Greenville, will be found at Dr.
Bolt's office on the 19th, and
will remain a few days in Pick
ens.
R. L. Davis, proprietor of the
Pickens Bottling Works, is ar
ranging to build a house on his
lot in Pickens, in which to do
business.
Mrs. W. W. White and chil
dren, of Anderson, are on a visit
to her mother, Mrs. N. E.
Thornfey, and other relatives
in Pickens.
Mrs. A. J. Boggs entertained
her Sunday school class yester
day afternoon, at her residence.
Ice-cream and cake were served,
and an enio able time was had.
Special elections held recently
in Six Mile and Dayton school
districts for an extra levy of 2
mills for school jurposes were
voted and carried.
R. A. Hester, who for the past
three weeks has been in Dr.
Black's sanitarium at Green
ville, for a surgical operation, is
home again, and ra'pidly im
proving.
Married, on Sunday, the 3d
inst.,' at the residence. of the
bride's father,. Thos. Hart, Ca
toechee, Elisha Prdutt and Miss
Hattie Hart, A. B, -Brown,
N, P., officiating.
Mrs. M. F. Hester is very
proud of her large flock of young
Minorcas, which. aye sure .beau
ties. She also is of the opinion
that her garden is about the
earliest-now potatoes, lettuce,
etc., gracing th''e tables.
Wednesday night Hovey
Nealey, Miles Allgood, George
Corbin, Ernest Freemanu, Dick
Freeman, and Willie ' "Boggs,
wvent a-fishing. There is nqth
ing remarkable abotitt it except
the catch and the storya.. Dip
ping their nets in the waters of
the Twelve Mile river, they pro
ceeded to make a haul. The net
dragged so heavy they conclud
ed they had caught a log or was
fast in the mud, but soon there
ai-ose to the surface strange' ob
jects. Corbin shouted, "It ' is
the devil, I see his horns" and
fell over in the bushes in a dead
faint,while Nealey and Allgood
broke over the hill at a 2.10 clip
leaving their hats behind. As
Nealey caught hIs foot in a vine
anid wvent headlong down an
embankment he was hoard to
cry out, "Good Lor'd forgive me
for that last horse swap." The
young men stood their ground
and landed the net with three
large turtles weighir'g some
thing less than a hundred
- pounds. All we can say Is,
what a- o - t of turtles.
The dinner will be given tonight.
Fon SALE-Nice building lot,
93x239 feet, on Main street of
Pickens. (t2*) D. F. PACE.
Don't forget that I am here
to do any kind of repair work.
Bicycles a specialty. R. E. Good
win, at H. A. Richey's store.
CARE OF HOME TOWNS
importance of Building the Use.
ful and the Beautiful.
HOW A SCHOOL CAN BE USED
Should Be the Very Heart of Publio
Effort and Thought-Need of Tre.
Planting Societies-Value of Com
bined Efort.
The ambition of a good citizen should
be to create a completely furnished
town. In this way the civic and po
litical unit is kept sound. In fact, ev
ery town in the United States should
be made not only beautiful by its citi
zens, but wealthy as a political organ
lam, says the Independent. If wealth
is scattered or donated to an institu
tion at a distance the donor cannot as
sociate his benevolence with the home
sentiment. The town Is the home and
should be as sacredly considered as
the smaller homestead.
What can one do for his own town?
He can certainly do something far bet
ter than fighting evil-he can build the
useful and the beautiful. Among the
farmers' best pioverbs is, "Hoo the
corn, and the weeds will take care of
themselves." Prohibition has no value
besido permission und encouragement.
A good ball ground donated by a kindly
spirit and looked over by the donor
can he made the very expression of
manly sentiment among the boys of
the town. We know one man who is
called the town father, although he Is
not yet in middle life. He gets his title
from his determined effort to give the
young peopl what their youthful spir
its call for, while by his kindly zeal he
Is- able to suppress the evil assocla
t*lons comm'orly con'neted with gam
Ing fields. -'That mnu's spirit quietly
governs and -educates all the young
people of the town. le Is a force by
blimself-'a sort of superintendent of
education without :.lieng a nominal
teacher. . :I n
.'A town school. gathering to Itself.all
the forces that have'heretofore been
scattered among a dozen district
schools, has fortunately become the
rule all along thlo pioneering p'ath. of
the Puritans wiestward. Such n# hnild
Ing. if placed in the center of several
acres of .grojnd, where the garden
tl-hool idea dn he.developed, does for
the ttown -whut the old school system
was incapable of accomplislhiig. - It
not only develops a new spyt of spirit
In the Y<oung people. Miakinig them.
Workers 'as well as thinkers, but the
commodious bilding becoies a cei
ter of town thought and effort. Those
who create town libraries, should in
variably associate them with the.
schoo. It. is .nwise .to dtuplicate ex
penses, but it is still worse to fail in.
creating a town center. The school
building should be the very heart or
publice effort and thought.
A . town tree planting association is
needed everywhere. The first organi
zation of this kind on record was in
Clint~on, C~onn. This was followed by
a second in Clinton, N. Y. These or
ganizations have been in existence for
nearly fifty years, and they ha-ve (lone
a vast deal in the way of m: king their
towns center's of refinement, They are
constituted of the more enterprising
and cultured people, who meet once a
month, rotating In succession to their
several homes. After luncheon upon
such fruits and vegetable products as
the season affords and after discussing
these the afternoon or evening is occu
pied in consideration of town improve
ment. Both of these towns have be
come notable not only for their ad
mirable avenues, but for their well
planted homesteads. The best methods
of culture and the introduction of rare
trees and shrubs are always prominent
topics. An association of this sort, if
composed of men only, should be sup
plemented by a co-operativo associa
tion of women for household Improve
ment. The annual fe should be small,
but it should be sufficient to make
possible the testing of the value of
now plants and trees. The town should
turn over the care of street trees en
tirely to such a trained band of citi
sqna or, more ptoperly, to that one who
is selected by them as best qualified.
Town authorities are rarely qualified
for $udicious work of this sort.
The creation of a town p, tano.
ing the evolution of a. lov'e for nature,
can be greatly advanced by individual
effort. Seize on every waste public
spot for the creation of the beautiful.
Individual members of the Clinton
Rural Art association were stimulated
to promote the blanting of the village
green and later a smaller park for the
display of flowers and shrubs. The
association itself planted around the
railroad depot a welcome to strangers,
and an unsightly canal bank now ap
pears as a fine wall of Norway spruces.
The appeal is not so much to the mil
lionaire as to those who can only give
to the people a modest share in the re
membrance of prosperity. There should
be a combination of effort, so that
while one man gives the school park
another constructs the building and a
third contributes the garden and or
chard. We know a vUlage brought to
the front rank as a residence home by
a man who transformed a wild glem
into a thing of beauty and a joy for
over. The idea caught, and all about
him the farmer folk began to cultivate
the beautiful. That town today Is
known throughout the land for Its
loveliness.
At all events, cultivate the town
spirit. It is our social home. State
authorities should be compelled to
keep their hands off local fights. Keep
up the town spirit. Let town tradi.
tions be recorded for the children,
memorable trees be guarded and beau
tiful glens or groves, with springs ot
sweet water, be adopted by the public.
DANTE'S HUMOR.
it Is of te Wholly Unconscious Kind
and Woefully Grim.
The humorous side of Dante Is ana
lyzed in the Westminster Review by
George Trobridge, who is a great ad
mirer of the famous poet and who has
in previous writings expressed his ap' -
preciation of Dante as a nature poet
and as a novelist.
Although Dante's great poem is a
"comedy," In the sense of being a
drama working to a happy ending, we
do not look for ridiculous situations in
it. such as we usually nasociate with
the Idea of comedy. Ridiculous situa
tions occur nevertheless, and there is
no lack of humor even in the poet's de
scription of the sufferings of the lost.
Dante's humor, however, is of the un
conscious kind, arising from a total
lack of perception of the ludicrous. It
is said that he was never seen to smile,
and we can quite believe. it, 'since he
never forsakes sober seriousness.in his
writings, and it Is his deadly earnest
ness that betrays him into occasional
comicality.
The sinners in hell, the. poet tells us.
are -relegated to their proper quarters
on the judgment of Minos, who indi
entes the particular circle to wbich the
culprit is consigned. by wrapping his
tall so many times around his bestial
body. Fancy the trembling sinner
waiting tocount the coils that he may
know hls-fatel
It is a horrible puninhinent which is
assigned to those giulty'of simony, to
.be buried-head downward in a.circular
pit, .with o.Ily the legs. and feet pro-.
trudiig, wlille' flickering flames glide
over the '861bs -f the latter, inflicting
exquisite torture, yet our sense of hu
mor Is.provoked by. thoe description of
Dante standiig ovet one of these holes
and holding a conversation with its oc
cupant, "reversed, and as a stake
driven in .the soil," while numberless
legs wriggle in eontinual motion
around him.
Flsh Spearin~g by Firelight.
In the sunny south in the blue wa
ters of the Mediterranean one may fro
quently behold the strange sight of
fishermen reaping a rich harvest witta
the aid of a .long forklike instrument,
which Is used in place of a net. There
the ancient "peche aux Blambeaux,'' a
singular custom of Aishing .at night by
the light of a blaming fire, still exists,
enabling hundreds of hardy toilers of
the deep to gain a livelihood.-Wide
World Mdagasine.
On. Goed Twu4 Et.
Third Floor Tenant-Se here! I'm. I
one of a committe, of : pon in this
apartment, and I've called to ask yen
to sell your flute. Second Floor Ten
ant--Delighted to see you. I'm one
of another committee and was about .
to go up and ask you if you'd sell
your baby.--Lippincett's.
Truth Net Partisan.
A fallacious doctrine, whether found
ed on a false opinion or sprung from a
bad intention, is only designed for spe
cial circumstances and consequently
for a certain time, but the truth is for
all time, even though it-may- be .misun
derstood or smothered for ~ awa e.
Since it has not originated in th& Ax
terests of any party every superior
mind will be its champion At any time,
-Schopenhauer.

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