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The sentinel-journal. (Pickens, S.C.) 1906-1909, July 23, 1908, Image 1

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Entered April 23, 1903 at Pickens, B. Q., as second class matter, under act of Congress of Mlarch 3, 1879.
VOL. XXXVII P1CK293. OUTH CAROLINA, THIURSDAY JULY, 23 1008 Q17
FARMERS' EDUCATIONA I.
AND
CO-OPERATIVE UNION
~=== OF AMERICA ----- I
a......nm.mmmme..j
Pickens County Union Colmnn
J. T. BOGUS, RIEV. W. C. SEAIBORN and
JOEL. MILI.CR, Committee In Charge.
Warehouse Echoes From the
Co-Operator.
"For thirty years the farmer
has hoped to see the government
-do for him what it has been do
ing for the banker, distiller and
others-take his produce into
government warehouses, issue
government certificates on it to
him and hold it 'till the con
sumer needed it.
"But, finding that all these
interests were combined against
*externding these governmental
privileges to any but themselves,
the farmers have set out to carry
a system of warehouse storage
f or themselves.
"The farmer, though drenched
by flood, scorched by sun, suck
od by every bug and eaten by
millions of worms while in the
fidlas, has found that he was
fleeced by every foul conibina
tion-of despoilers that beset the
land, -after his crop left the field.
He is now making a heroic ef
:fort to free himself from this
-condition, with a fair chance of
success, and every good citizen
should feel a sincere desire to
see him succeed. 'Warehouse,
warehouse,' is the cry."
"We are proud of the inspir
ing hosts-of united farmers and
the surprising growth of this
great Union, is giving increas
ing confidence and courage, in
stilling new hope and life every- ('
where. 1
The local Unions are the Pil- (
lows of strEngth of this mighty
movement and to strengthen a
them should be the desire of
every mnemiber.
Each local should keep in
touch with I he- heart of the N
movenient and feel the vibrat
ing influence of the Union inl
eery-state. it
This done, we can not be oVer
vWhe4lmed, but the machines ofi
evwil will be overwhelmed by us- I
,Join the Union and "'let us
march oni to victory."'
JOHN TV. Boaas.
Aiken Complimented.
Youj can never tell. Here, for
:istance, we have been thinking
that Hion. Wyatt Aiken, while
the best worker in congress, was i
'not much of a speaker, and yet 12
his spe ech -en the tariff <durig
the last session was the best a
that has been (delivered on that j
suhbject in recent years, and It 'l
has been giveni a place .in the
Democratic campaign book. Mr.
.Aiken has forged to the front '
an~d is nlOW recogizied as One1 of
the leaders iin congress, as an
effective speaker as well as an
"effective worker.. He has ap
plied himself to the work given
.himn to do and has succeoedd
tsplendidly.-Ander'son Mail.
Sufficient unto the day ave p
the twenty-four~i hours thocronL n
Eleotoral Vote for 1908.
Alabami ........................... 11
Arkansas............................. C
,alifornia.... ...................
3olorado.............................. 5
Jonnecticut......... ............... 7
Delaw are......... ...... ............ 3
Florida................... ............ 5
3eorgia............................... 13
Idah o.................................. 3
[llinois.....-----... .............. 27
[ndiana.....-... ..................... 1r
[ow a ................................... J.
Kansas........... ............... 10
Kentucky ....... ........ 13
Louisiana......... .................. 9
daine ....................... 6
dIaryland...... ......... ............8
Vfassachusetts-..................16
dichigan........................... 14
dilnnesota......................... 11
dississippi-.. -... ................ 10
dissouri.............................. 18
dontana......... ................... 3
qebraska......... ......... ......... 8
ievada.....---.---................... 3
q.ew Hampshire,................ 4
ew Jersey......................... 10
ew York......................... 39
qorth Carolina......... ........... 12
forth Dakota...................... 4
)hio......- .-..... .............. 23
)klahom a...... .................... 7
)regon..... . .............. 4
>ennsylvania.......... ... 34
thode Island......... .............. 4
south Carolina.... ........... 9
south Dakota...................... 4
ennessee......... .................. 12
[exas......... ............... 18
Jtah.................. .3
iT er ont........ ........ ........... 4
7irginia.................... 12
Vashington................ 5
Vest Virginia..................... 7
V isconsil........................... 13
V yom ing............ ................ 3
T otal .............................483
'lectorai votes ne,,cessa-ry to a
choice............ .......... 242
Here is the vote of tie7. next
lectoral college. Make your
wn figures. According to pres
nt indications Bryan has the
outh and Oklahoma, 166 votes,
afe.
Pointed Paragraphs.
Women (o not admire the line
vork of Father Time.
Girl; are partial to automo
iles because they have spa rkers.
Don't forget that a thing
mr't done becauseh you intend1
1> do it.
in af ter years women~l discover
hat mirrors are not wvha~t they
sed to be.
Spa indly to the cook if
ou are wise as to the require
ints of yom:~ stomach.
So many queer things now
appe~n every day tha~t people
ave lost faith in miracles.
It doesn't maitter if a father
oes know less than his son
List so lie is able to support
mi.
The eyes of a man looking for
wife rest longer on the girl
'ho can manufacture a pie
han on one whose long suit
4 piano thumiping.-Ohicago
A boarding-house keeper in
few York tried to kill herself
secause her boarders all left her.
)h, pues T1he mills of the
;odls grind slowly, but they
idexcednzy fine.
Liberty-R F D 3.
This community is now enl
joying tip-top health.
Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Smith re
contly visited the family of A.
B. Howell.
S. Powell and granlson, Ho
mier Davis, of Greenville, visited
Mrs. W. M. Perry recently.
Mr. and Mrs. M. ). Boldibg,
of Anderson, visited friends and I
relatives in this section recently.
J. D. Nations had a fine hog
to get killed by lightning on the
4th inst.
Your scribe had the pleasure
of visiting the little place of Ca
teechee last Thiursay.
S. J. Nati>--. hld the misfor
tune to lose a fine milch cow on
the 14th inst.
Miss Minnie Nations is visit- 1
ing Miss Nora Nations this week.
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Satter
field visited the family of J. D.
Nations, Sunday.
Miss Essie Elliott, an accom
plishied young lady of Beam's
Mills, N. C., is visiting at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. M. N.
Goudelock. She will begin her
school at Norris on the 20th.
Mrs. Ida Reid and son, of Pel
zer, arrived Tuesday to spend
the summer at Mrs. L. C. Gas
saway'.
Martin Crenshaw, of Pendle
ton, worshiped at Praters on the
19th. Come again,' Martin;
there is always a hearty wel
come.
Miss Ada Goudelock and her
brother, Brown, have just re
turned from a pleasant trip to
Charleston.
Frank Boroughs, who has
been very sick at Hot Springs,
Ark., has just returned home
with his brother John. His
many friends are glad to wel
come him Iia again.
FA RMIt G I a.
1t
--- .- ----' t
Mariette--R F D 2. (
Everything c(heerful and live
ly, and health is good in this
conmmunity.
Tom Rigdon dined with Clyde
and Tom Griffin last Sunday,
and en.joyed the savory viands
with nich gusto.
Hello, ' Dreamer," has "Cle- Y
vie'' laken your son, the reason
you have quit wvriting
Miss Margaret Holder visited
Miss Lillie Lynch last Sunday.
She reports an enjoyable timell.
Elford Roper has treat ed him
self to a new top buggy, and is
now readly to carry his owvn or
aniy other feller's girl around.
Miss Laura Burns visited Miss e
Leila Jontes this week. C
Rev. Marion Looper filled his
appointment at Oolenoy last ~
Sundlay.
"'Clevi e," Ii would like to see
you. WVhy haven't you been ~
to see mie?
"'Oourdhead,"' have you quit t1
wvriting, or' have you changed
your name?
Comec again, "Oh!4 Riddle;'' I
love to read your items..
I would like to know when
the Ambler school will start.
The order of the day is pre- t
preparing fruit to dry and -to
can. MAYvBNILE. f
The Nuplials of Jim and Bet,
In Sum ner county, Tennessee,
lih es an Irish magistrate, a man
f liberal education an1d a full
juota of that iother wit for
which his people are noted. A
short time ago a negro pair
iamed Jim an(d Bet called upon
the 'Squire to be uniited, "for
)etter or worse, "probably the ilat
;er. Having had soie notice of
heir coming, he prepared and
tctually .used this unique cere
liony:
Jim, will ycu take Bet,
Without any regret,
To love and to cherish
Till one of you perish
And is laid unider the sod,
So help you God?
Jim having given the affirm
itive answer, the 'quire turned
o Bet:
Bet, will you take Jim
And cling to him,
Both out and in.
Through thick and thin,
Holding him to your heart
Till death do part?
Bet iodestly acquiesced, aind
he newly-married couple were
lisiissed with this " topper
)ver all:
)o up life's hill till you get to
the level,
Aind salute your bride, you
dusky devil.
-[Knoxville Jouirnal.
An Object Lesson
The story below, which has
been going the rounds of the pa
rers, preaches a powerful ser
ion in a few words:
"Teni years ago an Allen coun
y (Kar-sas) farier put his ini
ials on a dollar bill. The next
lay he went to the nearest town
md111 spent it with a merchant.
Xefore the year Was out he got
he dollar back. Four times in
ix years the (ollar caine back
o him for produce an( three
imes he heard of it in the pock
is of his neighbors,
"'he last time he got it back,
ve years ago, he sent it to a
iail order house. He has never
een that d Sla since, nor never
01ll. Tha t 1dlar will never pay
my more school or road tax for
lim), will never build nor bright
n any of the homes of the comi
iiiniiity. He se.1t it elit-irely out
*f thle circle of usefulness to
Not Necessary to Hire Him.
The art photographer had vis
be'd the farm. "'I want to make
ni exhaustive study of this par
icular bit of landscape.'' lie
aid, "and would like to have
'our hired man retain his pres
nt position on the fence there.
!an he sit still?"'
"For days at a time," repliedl
he farmer. --I Cleveland Plain
ealer.
"oyou know that your
hickens come over into my
arden?"' "I thought they must
e doing that."' "'Why do you
hink so?'' "Because they uever
omeo back."'-[Judge.
Mr. Editor: I wish to thank
ay I riend1s through the columns
If your paper for kindness
howvn met during the sickness
mud death of my husband1. May
he Lord watch over and protect
a(ch one is the desire of their
'riend. MRS. .I. T. HTONr.
Some Queer Facts Concerning Past
Presidential Elections,
The near approach of the next
presidential election and the dis
Cission concerning the .candi
dates recall to mind various
rather strange facts regarding
previous presidential candidates.
In reading over the nominees
of the various cosiventions per
haps the most striking feature
is the uncertainty of predicting
beforeha nd the result. For in
stance, in the Democratic con
vention of 1852 Cass received 116
on the first ballot, Buchanan 93,
Marcy 27, Douglas 20, Lane 13.
Pierce, who had not received a
vote on the first ballot, received
282 votes and the nomination on
the 40th ballot.
In the Republican convention
of 1876 Blaine, with 291 votes
on the 1st ballot, was finally
beaten by Hayes on the 7th
ballot. Hayes only received 65
votes on the 1st ballot.
In the election which followed
Hayes was defeated by Samuel
J. Tilden, Democrat, by '250,935
majority, and yet was counted
in by a specially constituted
"Electoral 3ommission" created
for that purpose. A strange
fact is that in spite of his bril
liant victory, Tilden failed of
renomination by his own party
in 1880, receiving only 38 votes
on the 1st ballot and 6 on the
secon1d.
Clay, Calhoun and Webster
that great trio of statesmen of
the first half of the nineteenth
century-though all were aspir
ants at various times in their
careers, never reached the presi
dency. Calhoun was twice
vice-president and Clay was
thrice nominated for the presi
dlency, but was always defeat
ed. Webster was %ne of four
Whig candidates for the presi
(eciy inl 1836, receiving only 14
electoral votes.
In 1896 Bryan was not even a
presidential possibility until he
made his famous " Cross of
Gold" speech-free silver being
the main. issue and Bland the
leading, candidate.".. On the 1st
ballot Bryan received 119'T votes
while Bland had 235. Bry n
was finally nominated 0. the 5th
ballot. In this convention Till.
man received 17 votes for the
presidential nomination.
Once in a while it conmes with
a grea t shock to a girl to find out
that a man never notices the
differences between a 49-cent
shirtwaist and one that cost $27.
B5.-Indianapolis News.
New Table Rock Hotel Weekly Arrivals
Mr. and1 Mr's. Gower, Green
ville; Messrs. Norman Holder,
Richard Freeman, Roy Grandy,
Holder, Beard, Ernest Freeman,
Pickens; Miss Bright, Easley;
Miss CJureton, Pickens; Mr. Hun
n1icutt, Miss Hunnicutt, Seneca;
Messr's. John Carey, Tom Allen,
Ben Parsons, Prof. and Mrs.
Swvittenburg, Misses Riser and
Sawyer, Pickens; Mr. Van Free
man, Cross Roads; Mr. and Mrs.
B. D. Lenhardt, Easley; Mr.
Jerry McMahan, Charleston ;
Mr. George L.athem, Miss Phil
pott, Dacusville; Mr. Welborn,
Miss Grandy, Pickens; Dr. and
Mrs. Horton and two children;
Messrs. C. D. Bolt, 0. B. Mc
Loskoy and Morris, Picno.

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