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The Pickens sentinel-journal. (Pickens, S.C.) 1909-1911, March 11, 1909, Image 1

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TIIE PICKENS SENTINEI>J
Entered April 23, 1903 at Pickens, N. C. as second class matter, under act of Congress of March 3, 1879
3.8th Year PICKENS, S. C, MARCH 1, 1909.
Consumption
'is, by no means, the dreadful
disease it is thought to be-in
the beginning.
It can always be stopped-in
the beginning. The trouble is:
you don't know you've got it;
you don't believe it; you won't
believe it-till you are forced
to. Then it is dangerous.
Don't be afraid; but attend
to it quick-you can do it
yourself and at home. Take
SCOTT'S
EMLLSION
of Cod Liver Oilandlive care
fully every way.
This is sound doctrine, what
ever you may think orbe told;
and, if heeded, will save life.
send this ad samen together with name
of paper In which it appears, your address and
four cents to cover postage, and we will send
you a "Complete Handy Atlas of the Word."
SC07T & BOWNE. 409 Pearl St. New York
Fine Government Jobs,
Examinations will be held this
spring in all parts of the South
for the position of railway postal
clerk. These are well-paying
jobs, and the opportunity is
open to our young men to secure
the ugh competitive ex
which are given by
Civil S 'ce ineao n in
the various c ll .
The salaries
$1,60(Na&-year.
Fred Wannaker, who was for
11 years a U. S. civil service ex
aminer, has opened at Orange
burg, S. C., a school of corres
pondence to train young men
for these examinations. Any
one desiring to know the require
ments of the examination for
this position should write to this
former examiner, and the de
sired information will he given
by return mail. Address your
letter as follows:
FRED WANNAMAKER,
Editor The Sun,
Orangeburg, S. C.
The Lurid Glow Of Doom
was seen in the red face, hands and
body of the little son of H. M. Adams,
of Henrietta, Pa. His awful plight from
eczemwa had, for five,'years, de-fi' d all
remedies and baffled the best dociors,
who said the poisoned blood had affee
ied his lungs and nothing could Ba' e
him. "But" writes his mother. "seven
bottles of Electric Bitters completely
cured him." For Eruptior~s, Eczema,
Salt Rheum, Sores and all blood Disor
-ders and Rhenmatis:3 Electric bitters is
supreme. Only 50c. Guaranteed by all
Druggists
Disma1 Professions.
The question was recently asked In a
mzewspaper, "What is the most dismal
of professions?" Among those that oc
curred to us as having a claim to be so
-considered were gravedigging, scav
.enging, listening to parliamentary ora
'tions through an all night sitting and
tthe writing of poems or articles that
'nobody reads. The washing of dishes
anay be made interesting if done sci
entifically.-British Medical Journal.
What Ails You'?
Do you feel weak, tired, despondent,
have frequent headaches, coated tongue,
bitter or bad taste in morning, "heart
burn," belching of gas, acid risings in
throat after eating, stomach gnaw or
burn, foul breath, dizzy spells, poor or
* var'iable appetite, nausea at times and
kindred symptoms?
If yo' hve any considerable number of
Ibh above7 to S you are suffering
from jliousn s, bid liver with indi
gestion pi -D.er'solden
A' Medical Disverv a~made up of te most
valuable nedicial principles known to
2 1 medical science for the pemnt cure of
~ such anrma codions. It is a mos'
* efficient liver invigorator, stomach tonic,
bowel regulator and nerve strengthener.
The "Golden Med ical Discovery " is not
a patent medicine or secret nostrum, a
full list of its ingredients being printed
on its bottle-wrapper and attested under
oath. A gbtnce at its formula will show
Sthat it contains no alcohol, or harmful
habit-forminlg drugs. It is a fluid extract
k-~made with pure, triple-refined glycerine,
,'of proper strength, from the roots of the
f ~ollowin~g native American forest plants,
NVIz. Golden Seal root, Stone root, Black
Cherry bark, Queen's root, Bloodroot, and
*andrake root. mdclatoiis
~ong a host of others, extol the foregoing
ts for the cure ot just such ailments as the
ye symptoms indicate: Prof. R. Bartholow.
D. of Jefferson Med. College. Phila.: Prof.
C., tWood. M. D., of U.niv.of Pa.: Prof.Edwin
ae.M. D., of Eahnemann Med. College,
oProf. John King. M. D.. Author of
rte n Disenoatory Pro no..Scd
1inee Johnson. M. D.. Med. DeDt. Univ. of
Prof. Finley Ellingwood. M. D.. Author
l*tra Medica and Prof. In Bennett Medi
erCole. Chicago. Send name and ad
on Postal Card to Dr. RI. V. Pierce. Buf
N.Yand receive free booklet giving
, tsfrom writings of all the above medi
,.Iors and many others endorsing, in the
tpossible terms, each and every in
a eom'osed.
rciee's Pleasant Pellets regulate and
te stomach, liver and bowels. They
used in con junction with "Golden
il very " if bowels are much con
zserire ting and sugar-coated.
Difficulties of Prov
ing Existence oJ
Life After Death
By WILLIAM T. STEAD. English Editor.
SHE recent applications of electricity in wireless teleg
raphy and wireless telephoning, while proving noth
ing in themselves as to the nature or permanence oj
personality, are valuable as enabling us to illustrat<
the difficulties of proving the EXISTENCE 01
+4+ + LTFE AFTER DEATH.
If Christopher Columbus after discovering America had beer
unable to sail back across the Atlantic, Europe would, after a time
have concluded that he had PERISHED IN AN OCEAN WHICII
HAD NO FARTHER SHORE. If innumerable other voyagers
had set out on the same westward journey and had never returned
this conviction would have deepened into an absolute certainty.
Now, let us transport ourselves from the time of Columbus to ou
own day. The terrors of the unknown world would not daunt forevei
the intrepid spirits of European explorers. A ship or ships would be
equipped to cross the Atlantic. When their crews and passengers
landed on the farther shore they would discover that those who were
thought to have perished had founded a great commonwealth in the
new world.
The newcomers would at once endeavor to UTILIZE ALL THE
RESOURCES OF MODERN SCIENCE to enable them to com
inunicate their great discovery to the old world. They would en
deavor to extend the use of wireless telegraphy. After awhile a
wireless message from Ameri- might by some happy chance be
caught on some seacoast Marconi station.
HOW WOULD - IT BE RECEIVED? IN ALL PROBABILITY IT
WOULD BE FR ENTARY, INCOHERENT AND APPARENTLY PUR
W. IT WOULD BE SET DOWN TO SOME PRACTICAL
JOKER OR REGARDED AS SOME RANDOM MESSAGE SENT OU1
FROM SOMEWHERE IN EUROPE. AND SO FOR A LONG TIME
THE ATTEMPT TO COMMUNICATE It, N"AATION WOULD FAIL
AFTER AN INTERVAL A MORE COHERENT MESSAGE WOULD AR
RIVE. EFFORTS WOULD BE MADE TO ANSWER, BUT THE RE
PLIES MIGHT BE 80 MUTILATED AS TO BE UNINTELLIGIBLE.
A few cranks who had never lost the faith, traditional and dim,
that there was a world beyond the seething waste of waters would
go on experimenting, wasting time and money and exposing them
selves to the ridicule of the scientific world.
At last, after innumerable disappointments, some method would be
discovered of dispatching replies and of receiving answers. At lasi
the scientific world would wake up to the recognition of the fact that
a prima facie case had been made out for the strange, almost incredi
ble phenomena that seemed to point to the possibility that there was
ANOTHER WORLD BEYOND THE "ATLANTIC and that its
inhabitants could, by meais of wireless telegraphy, communicate witl
Europe.
THE DIFFICULTIES THEY WOULD ENCOUNTER WOULD BE
THE IDENTICAL DIFFICULTIES WHICH CONFRONT US IN OUlF
QUEST FOR CERTAINTY AS TO THE LIFE AFTER DEATH. BUT
WITH PATIENCE AND PERSEVERANCE AND CPREFUL ALLOW
ANCE FOR THE OBSTACLES IN THE WAY OF TRANSOCEANIC lN
TERCOURSE, THE EXISTENCE OF THE OTHER WORLD IS SOOta
ABOUT TO BE ESTABLISHED BEYOND ALL QUESTION OR CAVIL.
Confirmed Bachelors Are a Dan
gerous Element of Society.
By Mrs. OLIVA SMEDLEY, Sociologist. Seattle, Wish.
CONFIRMED bachelor is a DANGEROUS ELEMEN'J
~3IN THE COMMUNITY. What we want is more home!
for children instead of boarding houses; more home cook
ing for wandering men instead of cafe and restaurant food
more wives and less work'mg women; less selfish bachelors and more
unselfish married men.
A bachelor is generally one large bunch of self conceit wh<
NEEDS THE SERVICES OF A DOMESTIC ADVISER strong
enough to show him where he is at, intelligent enough to indicate t<
him his general cheapness and good enough to elevate him to a highe:
regard for the seriousness of life.
The bachelor ought to be thankful that he is not arrested as
PUBLIC NUISANCE.
WHO SERVES ON THE CHAIN GAN'G? THE BACHELOR. WHC
FILLS THE PATROL WAGONS? THE BACHELOR. WHQ HOLDS
UP THE MARRIED MAN ON HIS WAS? 1-OME AND RELIEVES HII1v
OF THE PRODUCT OF HIS WEEK'S WORK? THE BACHELOR. HE
AND HIS KIND OUGHT TO BE EXPATRIATED TO PATAGONIA OF
SIBERIA.
Fleet's Cruise Has Given
Us a Better Navy
By Rear Admiral CHARLES S. SPERRY. Commander of the Atlantic Fleet.
CHE cruise of the fleet around the world marks an epoch i1
our naval annals, for the FLEET HAS FOUND ITSELF
been WELDED INTO A UNITY.
AN AGGREGATION OF BATTLESHIPS, IRRESPECTIVI
3OF THE POWER AND EFFICIENCY OF THE IN
DIVIDUAL UNITS, IS NOT A FrLEET IN THE
HIGHEST SENSE OF THE TERM UNTIL BY LONG,
FAITHFUL AND HARMONIOUS WNORK 10N THE
PART OF THE PERSONNEL THE SPIRIT OF THE
FLEET HAS BEEN DEVELOPED. THAT NOW HAS
BEEN ACCOMPLISHED.
The American people have come to appreciate
the importance of sea power as ONE OF THE
MOST POTENT FACTORS IN THE PRESER
VATION OF A JUST PEACE, and they should appreciate wha
it means to have a fleet like this one, which has made so extrao!
dnnevra trin. ---' *
Lewis Loyd Out Agin.
Notorious Marlboro Negro Escapes
From Pickens Jail.
An advertisement in the State cc
a few days ago offered a reward fc
of $25 for the arrest and deten- di
tion of Lewis Loyd, who boke
out of the Pickens jail on Jan. d(
26, 1909. le
This recalls some of the in
teresting history of this daring
and notorious negro. He has it
been convicted here several e
times for buglary, and has sev- 0
eral times broken out of the at
Marlboro jail and chaingang. a(
Some months ago he was
serving a term on the chain- cc
gang' and escaped near Clio. i
The next heard from him he t
had broken into a store at Pick
ens, and the Pickens authorities hi
offered $25 for his capture. Su- b]
pervisor Frank Manning also Y
offered $10 for him.
Joe Hinson went to work and ct
captured Lewis at the house of
a woman whom Lewis was vis
w
iting in this country. He was t
put back into the chaingang,
and Mr. Manning paid Mr. Hin
son the reward he had offered.
Mr. Hinson notified the Pick
ens people that he had Lewis
w
and would deliver him to them
and claim the reward as soon as
n4
he served out his time here.
The Pickens authorities then
went to work and got an order
from a Judge to take him out
of the chaingang here and car
ry him to Pickens for trial, and Cl
the Pickens sheriff came and
got him. Mr. Hinson was not
paid the $25 reward, however, b
and he has not been able to hear U
ny ning f rom Pickens in re
gard to it.
Now Loyd has broken out of d
dl
the Pickens jail, ved they are be
offering $.5 reward for him
w
again. of
It is said that no jail or shack- 0r
les will hold Loyd. He always 0r
manages to get away, but he to
goes right on and gets into more
trouble and gets caught again. P
He has been known to go into
bed rooms and steal clothing to
and other articles without wak- o
ing the occ'upants.
Discription: Weight about
150 pounds; height 5 feet 8 or 9
inches; color, ginger cake; age',
about 30 years.-Pee Dee Advo
cate, Bennettsville, S. C.
It Saved His Leg .
"All thought I'd lose my leg," writf s.
.J. A. Sxens e, War ertown, WVis., "Ten
years of eczema, that 15 doctors could pi
not cure, had as 1dt laid um~ up Thtn y
Bucklini's .unica Salve cured it sound
and well." Infallible for skin Eruptions, g
Eczema, Salt Rheum, Boils, Fever Sores.
Burr;s, Scalds. Cuts and i neo. 25c at
all Druggists.
- c]
Advice to a Young Man.
Remember, my son, you have sa
to work. Whether you handle t]
a pick or a pen, a wheelbarrow
or a set of books, dig ditches or
edit a paper, ring an auction y
bell or write funny things-you c<
must work. If you will look ci
around1, you will see the men n
who are the most able to live.
the rest of their days without it
work are the men who work the ii
hardest. Don't fear of killing si
vourself by overwork. It is be
Ivond vouir power to do that on
the sunny side of thirty. They
(lie sometimes, but it's because
they quit work at 6 p. mn. It's
the interval that kills, my son.
The work gives you a perfect a
and grateful appreciation of a si
holiday. There are young men' p
who do not work, but the world
is not proud of thenm: it simply ~
speaks of them as old So-and So's h
boys. Nobody likes them; the
great busy world doesn't know
that they are there. So find out ,
what you want to be and do,
and take off y-our coat and make
dlust in the world. The busier
you are the less harm you will I
be apt to get into, the sweeter s~
von will sleep. the brighter and
happier your holidays, and then
better satisfied the world will be f'
with you.-Bob Burdett. T
Kills Would-Be Slayer.
A mlerciless murdlerer is Appendicitis
with many victims. But Dr. King's
>%,w Life' i'ilis kill it by prevention, a
They gently stimulate stomach, liver L
to.l howels. preventing that clogging C
hat invites appendicitis, curing Consti-a
utiei' BilitusneSs, Chuils, Malaria,
deadache ani Indigestion. 25c at all I
'nergists.
Thoughts for March,
EDITOR SENTINEL-JOURNAL:
This is for the benefit of you
,rmer readers for the month c
arch. Gentlemen, "doff you
ats" and march into the wor]
r the month like the brave sol
er marches into the battle.
Do the work necessary to b
ne on time, if possible, an,
3s work will bring better rE
Its. "Speed the plow"-spee
now. Bed your bottom lan,
.ly as possible, so it will dr:
it and pulverize. Well, hoi
)out your thin upland? M
[vice is to plant it in corn an,
ase. Don't plant any land ii
tton that will not produce 50
unds of seed cotton to fh
re by using 200 pounds of fei
izer and with good seasonm
it put it in corn and peas-ev
y other row in corn-plante<
r the 15th of the month. Plan
ur peas in May. If land wa
itivated in either corn or col
n last year, no need of break
g it. Take a four-inch ploi
ith point on the side (not i:
.e middle of the plow. Don'
rget my adyice on how t
ow.) If any one gives you
ow with point in the middle
by him like Mike Kennemor
as by Andrew Hunter abou
ving him Phil. Phil was
lgro belonging to Hunter an
ike asked Andrew to give hir
ail that he might enjoy th
ide and pleasure of owning
gro as he had never owne
e. Hunter objected as h
imed that Phil was a ver;
luable negro. Mike replie
.at he would not lose anythin
r the deal as he would giv
all right back to him. So, fc
tying business give back th
ow with the point in the mi
e. In laying off go out an
wk in the row-go down bot
ays-that will give two inchE
loose land to drop your see
i, then make a narrow ridg
i the seed, and then drive ou
other work as your corn is a
oroughly planted as you coul
ant it with twenty furrows t
Le row. Best seed corn at ti
p end of the cob, nub th
her end for best result:
fore about corn in my next
I have given fifty-odd years c
te best of my manhood"b
veen the plow handles" and a
e hoe handle-all the time em
~rimenting and studying lik~
student in school, to obtai
e best possible results. ]I ai
ving you the benefit of my e:
rience with best wishes fc
>r success.
Calculate for only ten acrese
i best land you have in cotto
>the mule, or one-horse croi
ilance in corn and peas with
-o of forage for your stock.
A half acre of sandy soili
veet potatoes will fatten you
iousand pounds of pork. Mal
>mething to eat and feedi
our stock as you cannot mal
tton, cannot make anything
mnot live without supplies'
take it instead of having to bu
,and enjoy the pleasure of h
ig independent-having yor
1pplies at home one time.
Yours truly,
W. G. FIELD,
Feb'y 20th. Elberton, Ga.
The Tail to His Name.
"What's your name, my poor man
ked the benevolent housewife
ie brought out a saucer of stewe
runes.
"Sandy Pikes, F. F. V.," replied tJ
ttered wayfarer, doffing his brimle:
"Gracious, and does the F. F.
-and for 'first family of Virginia?
"No. mum. It stands for 'fast freigl
eteran.' "-Chicago News,
Near Death in B!g Pond.
It was a thrillin ; experience to Mr
a Soper to face death. "For years
vere lung trouble gave me intense at
ring," she writes, "and several tim
early caused my death. All remedi
~iled and doctors said I was incureab.
en Dr. King's New Discovery broneg
ick relief and a cure so permane:
lat I have not been troubled in twel
ears." Mrs. soper lives in Big Por
a. It works wonders in Coughs at
ad Colds, Sore Lungs, Hemorrlage
aGrippe, Asthmna, Croup, Whoopir
ough and all Bronchial affections.5
2d $1 00. Trial bottle free, Guara
'd by all Druggist8.
T.
Of
rS
ssf
Thirty Y
CA STOR
1u3 osIAnUU eMma. 33W YoRK enfT.
in any quantity on account of high
trust prices. If the present Repub
Be Ucan congress had revised the tariff
so that the protected monopolists
would feel the competition from
rts abroad, the farmers, at least, would be
un- saving millions a month which is now
ear absorbed by the trusts. If you want
rry to know what is going to happen keep
ms your eyes fixed on the weather man
ids and the farmers.
Botai
the Bno
Blood Balm
S(L L B.) Cures Througb the lood
*o Blod Poison,
in BONE PMS,CAN
nd CER,S LY SKN,
to
za- PIIPLES,
** Rheumatism, Eczema,
.Itching Humors.
vol- B.B. B (Botanic Bloo I Biood) is th~e
m.only Blood Remedy that kills the poison
in the blood and then puzrifies it-send
ing a flood of pure, rich blood direct to
ew the skin surface, bones. joints, and
in wherever the disease is located. I" this
er. way all sores, ulcers pimples. eruptions
uc- are healed and cured. p tins and aches
20 of Rheumatism cease, swellings subside.
tes B. B. B. completely changes the body
mtoa ceanhealthy condition, triving
at BOTANIC BLOOD BALM-BBB
ing pl3eaantgand sae to take; compoae o uenr
as he buod B. B B. trenthenste nerve
3ss gists $1.00 P ER L ARGE BOT TLE with diree.
;he tions for home cure.
am Sold in Piceus, S.C. by Bolt & Co.
he
ry Professional Cards
iat
er- J- E. BOGGS W. E. FINDLEY
in- BO2GS & FINDLEY
[ng.
m. Lawyers
of Pickens, S. C.
Office over Pickens Bank.
Sts 48tf
~en,
a Dr. F. S. Porter,
ice
uld Is Now Located in Pickens for
.the practice of his profession.
rtyOffice Upstairs in Freeman Bldg
re, Residence Johnson St.
alf
e Notice of Final Settiement and
eir Discharge.
alf NOTICE is hereby given that I will
and d~ake applicatien to J. B New berry
Esq .Judg- of Probhie f r Picker s
iat courdy, ?. 'h- Sd *.-f ' . t~ -r.n,
Lng on th-'1dav -f A . 1~9i l t 1c 'k e
on- said application cau be~ beard, for leave
dat to made final settlement of the estate of
the Mahaley C. Kemp deceased, and obtain
ns. discharge as adcnmistr-.ter of said estate.
tdi- P. D. Dacus.
nAdministrator.
~ts Notice of Final Settlement and
on Discharge.
~ad NOTICE is hereby givin that I will
.elr make application to J. B. New berry
ext Esq.. Judge of Probafe for Pickens
ad, coumtv. in the State of South Carolina,
the' on the 2 day of April 1903, at 11 o'clock
in the forenoon, or as soon thereafter as
the said application can be heard, for leave
to make final settlement of the estate of
her W. M. Smith deceased, and obtain dis
Ing charge as administrator of said estate.
ne March 4, 1909J.
cne J. P, Smith,Admrt, .
r
lf
............ ................ .
e 'I
ALCOHOL 3 PER CEN
a AVegetaeferm
simiatfing danfl
V
PromotesDigestionaute
nessand~estContaisn
0 Opmi.Morphinenor Mi
eNOT NARc OTIC.
~'i anW/ka
AperfectRemedy for Con
tion, sour StolnaciDiar
W WormsCormlSions'Few
fleSSandLOS0FSL1
t Fai signanre or
0
a NEW YORK.
At 6months old
e ~ 35)0s]ES -35c EI
t
d Exact Copy of Wrapper.
1
e
d BUSINESS CONDITIONS.
e
The Whole Country Is Leaning
the Farmer.
' There are, according to the repc
e to the railroads, 360,000 cars and h
dreds of engines idle, whereas a y
ago there were not enough to ca
the freight offered. Such an enorm
shrinkage of business on the railro
d is a pretty good barometer of busin
h depression elsewhere. Another ij
S cation of business stagnation is
d iron trade, which only produced a
tle over 1,000,000 tons of pig i
in January compared with 2,3
I 000 tons in October. But as
.s trust controls the iron industry it is
d longer as reliable a trade barome
0 as it used to be. The steel trust,
spite of the falling off in the demE
e for its products, has determined
e maintain prices. Before the organ]
~. tion of the steel trust the price of 1F
) and steel was gauged by supply
demand, and In times of business<
tress the price of steel products:
Slowed closely the price of other C
t modities.
.Importations of merchandise at N
York have dropped 12 per cent.
.January as compared with Decemt
II There is also a curtailment of prod
11 tion in nearly all industries of from
to 25 per cent., and declines in vali
of 10 to 20 per cent. in many ma
)1 factured products. Economy is pre
lent and many workmen are out o:
job.
These are not pleasing facts, bul
SIs no use to conceal them in looki
), forward to what will come. Busin<
acannot much revive until the proci
of readjustment is completed from1
changed conditions from the bo
fl times to~ the present liquidation. ']
agreat trusts are figthing against t
readjustment and are straining ev
nerve to hold up the price of th
;o products. They probably know t1
this effort retards a return to prosy
ity, for lower prices are needed to
~duce greater consuinption, but be:
-protected by the tariff they can C(
pel the people to still pay the price
prosperity without participating in
The managers of the great tru
11' are all Republicans; they have b4
fostered by Republican tariff legi:
tion and they desire to keep the:
publican party in power. To red1
the price of their products they wo
have to lower wages, and that just
fore a national election would be Ii
ly to lead to disaster to the pa
?" which protects them. They, therefc
is prefer to run their furnaces on k
dor one-third time than to incre;
their output and reduce prices
1e wages. They hope to control th
ss workmen by keeping them on k
time better than by more work
V. reduced pay.
There is one redeeming feature t)
aappears to offset these discourag
facts. The price of farm products c
tinues fairly remunerative, so t:
whereas there is much poverty in
S. cities there is plenty on the fari
a It is appalling to think of what coi
f- tions would now be if there had bI
es a crap failure the past year of any
es the leading agricultural produ<
e. The whole country is now leaning
ht the farmers and those who look ahl
nt for signs of the times are fixing ti
we gaze on what the promise of the n
dcrops will be, both here and abrc
for good or bad crops will decide
business future of the country for
~next year at least.
S Meanwhile, the trusts and ot
Oc tariff-protected Interests are bleed
n- the farmers at every pore, for no
e.s ,ac an affrdn to buy trust mrod.

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