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The Pickens sentinel-journal. (Pickens, S.C.) 1909-1911, September 30, 1909, Image 1

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Tu E PiCKENS SENTINEL:JOURNAL
Entered April 23, 1903 at Pickeu , %. C. av second elas Uatger,aderact of Congress *f March 8,1879
39lh Y PJICKE NS, S. C., SE PTEMBER 30, 1909. Number 19
Women Could
Force Men to Give
Them Equal
Suffrage.
By Mrs. OLIVER H. P. BELMONT. New York Society
Woman and Suffragist.
ILAVE betni in favor of woman suffrage all my life.
I do not understand how any woman who respects
her'!f :- ! r women can feel otherwise. Have
e-r been through a Turkish harem? Those
or, inuid, ignorant creatures WANT NOTHING
IETTER THAN WHAT TIIEY HAVE. The
point of view of the 'nti-suffragist is little better than that of the
harem.
Persma! ! I <!t nt neeil the suffrage. I would, of course, regard
the right to vo as :m ho)li r an(l a diIlitv. I believ-e it is the dutv
of everyv w:i wh h leiaure and11 wealth to WORK FOR TIE
ALLO)T r t!.r -N1*1:c who will iever get justice without it.
MEN WILL NEV. GIVE SUFFRAGE TO WOMEN OF THEIR
OWN ACCORD. WHY SHOULD THEY? IT IS THEIR LAST STRONG
HOLD. YEAR AFTER YEAR WOMEN HAVE BEEN GOING UP, UP,
AND rEN HAVE GOING DOWN.
Thivrv i-, , ( ,e way in xhlielb women could get the ballot
all over th %r* a 1 igt1?n mon 'tls, but they haven't the courage
to atteUlpt it. Thf: i l be too m1uch afraid of losing their chances
of that " I, a JIUSB1\ND, which unfortuiatelv thev
THAT WOULD BE FOR EVERY WOMAN TO TAKE AN
OATH NOT TD MARRY UNTiL WOMAN SUFFRAGE WAS GRA TED.
As it is IL thia Ver woman~ suffragist should PLEDGE IIER
SELF N1. OTOF THE C1\USE, just as every
mi ~ o take i'nl oath i not to marry out
the armY.
Woman l)s always been enslaved tiAjigh her affections, and she
CONTINUES TO 1;E ENSLAVED.
"Hire, Tire, Fire!" Is '
Motto For Modern Ha_qne.
r,y the ;I.v. Vr. c- :t1 C. I IOUCITON of New York. Rector of ti.
I 'thrch Around the Corner."
HIS QUESTION CF DIVORCE HAS GOT BEYOND THE CC.'
T1-L CF THE CHURCH. IT itAS GOT BEYOND THL-.
CCNTRCL OF 0CCIETY. IT MUST BE MADE A NATIONAL
IScUE, AND THERE MUST BE A NATIONAL DIVORCE LAW.
There is l:: ly no inctance in life where divorce may be called
5 CSTIFIA;LtE. Th ,-ho get it for any cause whatsoever are
c gi. The remarriage of divorced persons is no
marriae.
There are ease-, I frankly admit, where a legal separatiou is al
lowable, wier, even perhaps inevitable. If murderous mania develops
- in either wife or lu-band, if either one is habitually under the influ
ence of liepor, if ei: or is too impure to associate with purity-in all
these instan:-es the cy liing to do is to LIVE APART.
AMERIC/.., MEN AND WOMEN TODAY HIRE THEIR WIVES
AND HUSBANDS AS THEY HIRE THEIR CARRIAGES AND HORSES.
*THEREFORE IF THEY ARE NOT SsUITED THEY PROCEED TO HIRE
DIFFERENT ONES. IT'S V'EsY SIMPLE! "HIRE, TIRE AND FIRE!"
THAT IS THE MOTTO FOR THE MODERN HOME.
Thec stat' muaKte tke warningt fo.r its own protection if for no
higher rc:aa'n. I .ee very little difference between the way in which
OURl DIVORCE SYSTEM is tending and the war of FR~EE~
First Class Type of Americans
Ecor Diplomatic Service.
By' Aso,s:a-nt Sec.retary of' State HUNTINGTON WVILON.
E d not want a high collar policy in our diplomatie service.
eycrtac i amount of COSMOPOLITANISM, good man
nurs, etc.,* is niecessary. On tihe other hand, there is ani
absohute ncessity for not carrying this too far.
EACH MAN SHOULD SE ABLE TO PASS MUSTER IN COSMO
PO'.~~AN SOC!ETY. LUT HE MUST, ABOVE ALL, BE A NORMAL,
FIRST CLASS TYPE OF PURE AMERICAN. IF WE CANNOT GET
BOTH WE WILL DO WITHOUT COSMOPOLITANISM.
Tuberculous Cows Spread
Disease Among Humnans.
By NATHAN STRAUS. New York PhiHanthropist.
CUBERCULOUS COWS BEAR HEALTHY CALVES AND STRAIGHT
WAY INFECT THEM WITH THIS DISEASE THROUGH THE
MILK THAT THEY GIVE TO THEIR YOUNG, AND WHEN
THE CALVES ARE WEANED THESE DISEASED COWS
SUPPLY THE GERMS OF THE WHITE PLAGUE TO THE HUMAN
SEINGS WHO USE THEIR MILK.
Thus vc ar inViiin: la he EXTEllMINA TION OF TIIE DAI
RY INI VTI'Y AND) OF TIIE HEIMAN RACE, for this
plaine is o:a-r.>cing b a a cattle 1(d among mnen, and it will
incraaZ lckc lihe Un-alh of a tire so long as the milk swarming with
1b r Thrii is used as FOOD) FOR CAINES
ui D i.vEs. There is a mathematical certainty
~~ ~ I ot w> law'l no' t sit down in stup)id helplessness
and~- '4give tubLcrculosis undl(isputed sway on the dairy
am n inth homec. W\e have the tuberculin test
tdert the infected an imals and the Bang method
o regating~ the dliseased cows and using those tihat
are nlyslihtl atieet ed to bear calves, which Cani
he. hr .igttI) upithouit conctratingc. the disease. b
a the c;ws cad feedingz them on PASTEUjRhIE
dILK T\ i sv the dairy he'rds. .\nd we have the perfectly
feasibl me d of SAVING( TIHE BABIES by pasteurizing all
WI VISI OLD ERIN
Irish Home Going Pigrimage tc
Mother Land Planned.
LEAGUE HAS BEEN ORGANIZED
Officer:: Electzd at a tceting Held in
Washington-Information Abcut Ire
land ar.d Its Industries t: Bz Gath
ered-Much Interest Shown In the
Movement.
The intended Irish home going pil
grimi::;e, which w *!:s -i-t ir msvd by
Franefi-; J. KI!Uen:ly nail which n
been discussed by loei::'i all oVillr
the Unite,d Stat*es folr several montihs
pa-;t. was Iinde a.1 mit at Carroll
Institute lil inl Washi:.Lon the other
fornd. and pi os wre o.:linied for
191ua.
The organ' .a tion s to 1. 1:nown as
the 1s I nw in: I
leOnu". Is oup. is to ";."her aill
infor:nin r2'::rding eventls in Ire
la d i":o semen'-:- t ar:: e ratc.
("I t!e t:i' sa:ii ti . t Irniship lines.
3Mr. Kilk,-nny andl Ier. 1'. .1. L.vnnox
werp ap.ili to visit rOhind this
sunmimr :":A pIrere 1he wvy to next
Since Mr. I~iiI! y :::I piiin: tp
(einterost iI' he b';ne movelent
'e h.s b!en!'": ::! :i'db c rep d
en. sinrr cit wasi.' fenal r:sar t.
hi 've a -;n !r 1. : iz;l i d to e:io the
'le ept of Ihelnv na . T!:w in
lu heir feeis :-ithou tn::r o::he
:im tae duv te l a nd :: - for rn
Ted min id::lin: yin. : h. o re
will to Irelard :nA :(i:i < is to -Ve
Ameriai ind The o'rtnvorers
chosenar, ahe t!ayi ye:
I'hwidllt g wen l rans .iE
keriy: fir(t.0 ds res&nt teke d'.
J. Mormn: tinr vbv p:-,hidn: :nnor:0.
John J. Crnbih: AMr h viv oreAident
eneral. 1'. J. v-oalsigh oothe pros
it poral. e -sentativv Tr.
.'Tlsrry of hilo: ;gello roerasire-.er.
oW i:n t. Ieturney; tu ;ene sefrt ary.l
J('ehilI) . Iun ivem. r 1 he
wIn' Iiutldin thi l::1r l .mIn for thO
I! in:.:e h iM r. en!1 n -' r s ti:
"'w ;np!vT re0iz today the
(1(1 :ie s r ht I in 1reba: for te.
trntapd ul!!!ning of its IK"Ide.
Td i. ie id :i inonsure toi the
reformO iShation neeal.:nd vspe
cially to fihe 'tthe tn. sa inl
Irei la lth u h~h ha l ,11 f ! .
tatlin t1lem toown ti: ir own farm:.
he peo,ple (of Irland are ow ilprov
In- their :(Ildinlgs without ft-1 of be
ing 'taxed hy the landlords for improve
Illt".
"Teminh Idea undornying the home
goin;g to Irehind moveeintrs is to ;ive
the v1sitors :an opportunity for observ
Ing conditions as t!w3 really exist in
Ireland. Aneb has been written and
'crptous ar nt ha li a vvi ftrorm
pressi afs ten auall sigh~t of he co
opprtuityt the sonsll(' and' d:aughters
ofEin to retuaiarn ti sce nti ther
cidhoo. t giv'e a wir of chluie
thsewh sillus reai to dawnveth
L ite 'ld ad 'f'urf-ash rs. on ts
Baeballt Alos ah s Muicha syclog-an
ictist al am Atheliri.noth
Iid pope om .11ay . lI1. that
Acj'the :nries ws d ":n:i- tod
kre:ltII : '' ib'uIn re: the' conar. e
lVhc::r1( umber ries :111 fZ t lonitI'liLn
lilu:' iie a ee. T hie '12 Iish mer
orl fimel 22] i. :1epres' 1ntati Irish
conrer.ak ha nswiththiscoun
"rish stores. Iri' linens laie, wooles
bench suddenly stiffen and prepare for
action.
"Two balls!" Two players jump for
bats and begin swinging them; the
coachers, who have yelled only be
cause It was their duty, suddenly be
gin raging, screaming and pawing the
dirt, and the manager, who has ap
peared half asleep, makes a trumpet
of his hands and leads his men, bawl
ing loud orders and wild taunts.
The spectators do not understand
anything has happened. Other batters
have had two balls called many times,
and it looks the same to the spectator
who is beyond the mysterious "break"
sphere. In two more moments the
players' bench is a madhouse, with
twenty men shouting, screaming, or
dering. moving. "Three balls!" and a
iadian rushes out to the "deck."
"Four balls!" and the spectators join
the players in the demonstration. The
madness is spreading. Crack-a base
hit, a bunt, a wild throw; another
base lilt, screams, shouts, Impreca
tions, a roar of frantic applause, a
final long fly. The manager reaches,
for his glove, spits into It and says
quietly. "Four runs-we've got 'em.
The "break" is over, and the players'
bench is again the quietest part of
the grounds. The surge of enthusi
asm, confidence and noise subsides.
and the game is won.
1aseball is almost as much psycho
logical as athletic. Why one team can
beat a stronger one regularly and lose
to a weaker with the same regularity,
why one batter can hit one pitcher
and is helpless before another, why
one pitcher is effective against a
strong team and at the mercy of an
other that cannot bat half as hard,
are psychological problems.-AmerIcan
Magazine.
FOUNDER OF THE G. A. R.
Major Stephenson and the Memorial to
Him Erected In Washington.
President Taft put off his trip with
his family to Beverly. Mass., in order
to be present oil July 3 at the unveil
il: of the lnuomunieut which has been
erected In Washington to the memory
of the founder of the Grand Army
of the Republic. Major Benjamin F.
Stephenson. The site of the monu
Ient is a1 triangle, and near by is the
herole statn&e of General Hancock.
The three faced; monument bears
four bronzv tablets.; The front hag the
tab11et "-ra illnty.'. a soldier and s -Wor
under the -a. "Charity" is repre
sented y a woimn giving a eup of
cold water to a child, who is under
C
THEl STE'PHENsoN MONU31ENT.
her protecting cloak. "Loyalty" is rep
r'esenlted by a1 w~oman of noble propor
tions, who holds a sword In one hand
and the great seal of the United States
npon a shield in the other.i'
The three words represent the motto
of tihe Grand Army of the Iepub
lie and of the WVoman's Relief corps.
the auxiliary of the G. A. R., It is
also the motto of the Ladies of the
G. A. IR.
,Just below the bronze tablet "Frater
niity" is a fine bas-relief of Major
Stephenson ini uniform. The cost of
the nionument was $:;5.000, the major
portioni of which was raised by sub
script ion, the remainder having beenm
ap propria tedi by congress. General
Louis Wagne-r of P'hiladelphia conduct
ed the work of collecting the funds.
The mieimorial is the work of the noted
New York sculptor J. Massey Rthind.
Th le origin of the G. A. R., dates
bac-k to the p)eriod when north and
south w-ere still engaged in struggle.
Major Stephenson w~as born in Wayne
county, ill., in 1822 and was a grad
unate of Rush Medi-al college, Chicago.
class of 1849-50. Upon the organiza
tion1 'f the Fourteenth Illinois infan
try May2-. 1861. Dr. Stephenson was
elected its surgeon. Another man was
imu.ter-ed into the position, though
G-neral Stephenson had been unani
mously elected by the officers and en
listed meni of the regiment under the
laiws of Ill'inois.
Later' Dr. Stephenson was appointed
regimental sur-geon of the reiment.
and he was mustered in at Pittsburg
Landinig April 7, 1802. He served his
termn of three years and was mustered
out Junie 24, 1864.
The F'ourteenth Illinois was a part
of toe Meridian expedition. In the long
wtches of the nights, upon the march
and in the bivouac Chaplain W. J. Rut
ledge and Major Stephenison discussed
tile fact that soldiers w~hen mustered
out of service naturally desire some as
sociation to p)reserv-e friendships and
memories of comm:on.trials and dan
gei-s. As they talked together theIr
thoughots expanded into the widest
lls of conjetuire as to the capacity
for good in such an organizationi of
vete-ranls, and they agreed that if they
wer'e spar'ed they would together work
ouit somre such project. It was in this
way that the order which has since
come to be such a notent one arose.
SCHOOL'S_GOOD ANGEL
J. W. Harriman Aids Old "Prep'
Institution With $150,000.
SOUGHT TO HIDE HIS GIFTS
New Yorker Revealed as Mysteriout
Donor to the Cheshire School Ir
Connecticut-J. P. Morgan Wa
Trained There-His Pranks Recalled
Mr. Harriman's Peculiar Experience
Many a millionaire has remembered
his college alma mater in substainti:i
endowments, but It remained f,r Jo
seph W. Harriman of New York vity
to remember his "prep" school with
several thousands.
For months it has been a nys,ry
where Cheshire schoo!. the Episco:1:l
academy of Connecticut. was reeiv
ing the large amounts expended en
new buildings and in renovation of
structures standing since its fou.:a
tion in 1794-an amount upward of
$150,000.
It was learned the other day that
the entire sum was from Mr. llarri
man, who entered the school at the age
of nine and left in 1880. A reporter
taxed him with it at his oiice.
"I guess I'll have to admit that I am
the 'angel,'" he said, "although I
hoped to keep in the background. I
know bow much I owe to the training
I had in that dear old fashioned 'prep'
when my father took me there years
ago, a motherless 'kiddie.''
A natural next question was why Mr.
E[arriman had taken the unusual
course of looking after the welfare of
his preparatory school instead of his
college.
"I found they were drifting because
they lacked funds and equipment."
said Mr. IIarriman. who is a nephew
of Edward 11. fIarriman. "It seemed
to me that a school that prepared for
college men like J. I'lerpont Morgan.
General Alexander Perry. the late
General Joe Wheeler, James B. Dill.
Bishop Lines, Ernest Flagg. Dr. IIol
brook Curtiss, Dr. William G. Vibbert.
Clinton Peters and C. La Mue Munson
should not be permitted to go to de
cay. I never gave any money that
brought more satisfaction than seeing
the old school re-established, and I
guess they know I propose to see the
thing through."
"Joe" 11arriman, as he is known
tmong the Cheshire alumri. j.st as
Mr. Morgan is known as "Ponty." had
a peculiar experience at the school. ie
was taken in after his mother's death
at an age several years below the
minimum. There was one other "haby"
there-C!inton Peters, the artist. who
has since ben honored by the acad
emy in Paris and who has a studio in
New York.
The older boys would not play with
them, and Peters and Harriman had
to make their own amusement. They
became chums, only to drift apart
when Peters was sent abroad to study.
They discovered each other a few
ears ago, and out of the reunion camne
a renewed interest in the old school.
hey went to Cheshire. and Mir. HIar
iman's decision to rehabilitate the In
titution was made onI tihe spot. A
few days ago they returned to cele
rate the one hundred and fifteenth
ommencement of the institution.
here were 300 of the old boys in at
endance.
The most notable event was the re
urn of the old bell which had served
n a Spanish miission andl had beeu
eized in Connecticut fronm a Spanish
essel. The school got a ntew bell in
180 when Trinity coilege, at IIart
ford, was being improv-ed, and the old
elt was given to a church at B:':an
ford, Conn. Thence It went to another
hurch at Southington. Herbert I)
loyd, treasurer of the school, traced
he bell, and WX'iliam C. lie'gerest of
he class of '75 provided the funds for
ts recovery.
A number of stories about 3Mr. Mor
an's schooldays were retold at the
ommencement. iIe was alt in his
tudies. bunt he had a kna<k of mtn
>rIginal trouble for he:nd manster's anad
heir assistants. One night M 'organ
tarted a big round store r-ol!ing dvown
a stairway a tutor was mounatingI. No'
oe "squealed," and as a1 resuti the'
whole school wans put "en puni iuett."
-New York Amnericani.
ORCHID HUNJTING.
The Terrors and the Dangers of a
Tropical Forest.
It is not a pretty. story, this narra
tive of a trip up the Orinoco. butt you
ay understand or-chid pop.ile betitel
if you read it.
"It began unluckily," saoid lhe. "'I
took a partner becanise I'd learned thbat
he dark places of enarth are hardio upon
a man by himiself. I mtet hin t ir ' rt
f Spain. and1( he was eage'r for Ll
dventure beecause he had jnst a bscond
d from a Biitish tra::tile iho use in
[Invana anmd the Orinoco soun lded( tc
im like a haven.
"We lired a few negroes. Our- real
guides we would pick up at Angos.
tura. One day while waiting for the
stores to be packed I took my pairtnter
ut to show him what an orchtid was.
"Near the Pitch lake I saw otne in
a tree and ordered one of thG nuegre
boys to shin up and get it. ile would
not. A deadly snaike dIwelt in tht
tree, he declared. He was afraid
afraid of snakes: Nice. effichint. help
ful boy to take into trop)ical forests.
wasn't he?
"It was insubordination before the
expedition had even started. So 1
uffed lm and handed him my hunt
ng kenife. 'Bring down that flower
and also the snake's head.' I ordered
and, whining, trembling, he went ul
the trunk. He was detaching the or
chid from where it clung when a
thing like a spear, as black as his owr
skin, suddenly struck at the boy'4
wrist. He screamed with terror and
toppling down, writhed with pain. H(
died, and I felt a gloom settle on m.
spirits.
"Well, at Angostura we took rafti
and six guides upstream. First on(
guide died of fever; then another wa
bitten by poisonous insects. One fel'
in with-or into-an alligator. W(
needed meat, and the skin was wort]
a good deal, so half in revenge. hall
in curiosity, we went out and plugged
holes in the monster. When the guides
cut it open they stooped and dreu
things out-the bones and the cottol
clothes of the guide this cannibal rep
tile had swallowed. The very knot
was still in his sarong. Oh. don't
squirm! This is orchid hunting.
"We had three guides left at the
end of the second month. when, pad
dling along one day where the vines
otreached and let snaky tendrils
dra-gle down. we came to a fifty yard
clearing. We saw there the sides of
three canoes, half smothered with rap.
id growing vegetation. and 1.500 allI.
gator skins well salted, but decaying.
Ilaiging to the roof of what had been
a kind of lean-to yere 100 orchid plants
-withered and dead. On the door lay
two rusty rifles and two skeletons.
Out by the ashy place where the fire
had been was a third skeleton. Up
between the ribs -;ere cheerfully grow.
Ing some gay weeds." - Everybody's
Magazine.
MILLIONS OF BOOKS
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS A STORE.
HOUSE OF KNOWLEDGE.
Greatest in World with Exception of
British Museum-Fascinating
Spot for Visitors to Na
tion's Capital.
The library of congress is the most
fascinating spot in the United States
for tourists. More than 1,000,000 peo
lile visit it annually. The vast ma,
jority of these are only sight-seers,
but thousands come seeking informa,
tion, for this institution has grown un
til it has come to be the greatest
storehouse of knowledge in the world
with the exception of the British mu
seum. Everything that has ever been
printed on any subject may be found
there. It is an institution of which
the whole country should be proud,
and evidently is proud. The national
capital makes comparatively smal
use of the library, 'for it has its own
public library-one of the most com
plete in the country-from . which
books may be taken.
While congress treats the library
with liberality, it does not treat it as
liberally as Great Britain treats the
British museum. It Is the ambition of
Herbert Putnam, the librarian of con
gress, to make the American library
as great an institution as the British
museum. 'Such eminence can only
be reached," says he, "provided the
general outlay, shall as in the case of
the 1iritiEh museum, be supplemented
by individuals. Local institutions
have the first claim to private contri
bution for land, for buildings, for the
material for popular education. But
the national library should have the
first claim with any citizen of the
United States who owns material of
Interest to the highest scholarship,
particularly if it relate to the origin
and progress of this country."
There is one division of the 'library
wl'ich is distinct in character and has
no parallel In other libraries. This is
the copyright office. It is under a reg
ister of copyrights who, under the di
rection of the librarian, performs, with
a special force, all the duties relating
ro copyrights. The nu.nber of entries,
and with them the volume of the
copyright business in general, grows
at the rate of ten per cent, a year.
The copyright office earns a revenue
to the government. It is the privilege
of the library proper to make requisi
tion upon the copyright office for any
copyrighted material which may be
useful to its purpose as a library.
What it does not draw remains in the
files of the copyright office in a die
tinct portion of the building.
The material ini the special divisions
of the library is preserved and
handled according to its special needs.
For the manuscripts there are not
merely specially locke't cases, but
steel safes for the collection, which,
while not a large one, includes ma
terial of inestimable value. The col
lection of the Marquis De Rocham
beau, for instance, including 300 man
uscript maps of the revolution; the
papers of Paul Jones, in 12 volumes;
the records of the Virginia company,
from 1621 to 1682; the journal of
Washington on the Braddock expedi
tion, his diary of the federal conven
tion, his orderly books and military
journals, and various other manu
'cripts, including the original mate
rialfor the Force archives, in 365 folio
volumes. Among other manuscripts
of special note are 36 volumes record
ing the testimony as to royalist
claims, taken before the commission
ers at Halifax, after the revolgtf on.
With a few exceptions,- thee entire
collection relates to the eighteenth
century. A great many of the indi
vidual manuscripts, being frayed and
delicate, have to be repaii'ed and re
enforced. Two repairers are constant
ly at work j~n"hese. The material
used ip.chiefly crepeline, a transpar
ent sdik, which i pasted over the face
ef the manuscript, front and back,
stifffning and protecting, without ob
scu1jn It.
About Some
Personages
In-Prit
T3HE successor of
John G. Capers
as United States
commissioner of in
ternal revenue is R.
C. Cabell, a New
York man. The de
partment of internal
revenue is in the ju
risdiction of the see
. . retary of the treas
UrY. Its importance
may be increased in
case of the passage
I. C. CABB. ' of a law taxing cor
porations, as it has
been proposed to place the duty of col
lecting such a tax upon the internal
revenue commissioner and his as
sistants.
Commissiober Cabell Is a son of a
noted army officer and was himself in
the army, serving as an inspector gen
eral and on other duty during the
Spanish war.
Miss Katherine Elkins, whose affair
with the Duke of the Abruzzi attract
ed so much attention awhile ago, finds
it very difficult now to keep out of
print. When she sailed for Europe a
short time since she took every precau
tion to avoid publicity on the trip, but
to no purpose. Although her name and
that of her mother were kept off the
passenger list, those on board the Lap
land, on which she sailed from New
York for Antwerp, were soon aware of
her identity. They evinced consider
able curiosity regarding the relations
existing between her and Mr. William
Hitt, son of the late Congressman Hitt
of Illinois. It has more than once
been rumored that young Mr. Hitt
stood higher in Miss Elkins' affections
than the Italian nobleman, who is now
In the Himalayas nursing the wounds
to his heart and trying to forget his
American romance In the wild life
of the highest mountains of the world.
On the way across the Atlantic Mr.
Hitt was so devoted to Miss Elkins
that fellow passengers were convinced
rsS HERmn(E LI.N
there must be an engagement between
them. On the other hand, some ad
vanced the theory that Miss Elkins' be
havior to Mr. Bitt was only a Wgind
intended ., uistract attention from real
plans to meet her royal admirer some
where in Europe. She was dressed
very simply on board and seemed In
the best of health and spirits. She
took with her to Europe her own mfo
torcar and an American chauffeur to
run it for her in trips a,bout the coun
tries she will visit in her journeyings
across the water.4
When Napoleon was the enforced
guest of England at St. Helena a his
torian wrote that If the long surtout
and hat of the exile should be placed
on a stick anywhere in England the
people of that nation would be fright
ened into the sea. What is there in
the castoff garment, or one that has
not been cast off,
for that matter, of
a man who has at
some time been a
power that scares
or enthuses, accord
ing to the point of .
vIew? When young
C ar t er Harrison
was mayor of Chi
eago four terms he
wore when in the
street a brown fe
dora shaped hat. It
became as familiar
as the black slouch cAE'rER HARRISON.
which the elder Carter wore when he
was mayor and when he was a menm
ber of congress. Ever since young
Carter quit being mayor there has
been contention in his party over the
prospect of his again becoming a candi
date. When he returned recently from
a protracted visit in California talk
was revived that he had come back to
make another run for the mayoralty.
He was wearing a black hat when he
returned. This was taken as an indi
cation that he would not be a candi
date again. Other., however, said that
the old brown fedora was in storage
and that it would be brought out in
time. .One would think that a great
city like Chicago had enough to do
without getting nervous over an old .
hat. But the whole town-that is, as
much of the town as is Interested In
politics-Ia on the qui vive over theabat
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