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The Pickens sentinel-journal. (Pickens, S.C.) 1909-1911, October 07, 1909, Image 1

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TiE PICKENS SENTINEL:JOURNAL
Entered A pril 23, 1903 at Plckeus, S. C. an second elass matter, under act of Congress ofMarch 8,1879
391h Year PICKENS, S. C., OCTOBER 7, 1909. Number 20
Prepare Every
thing Now For
Future Genera
tions.
By Senator ELMER J. BURKETT of Nebraska.
+ + 11E time has come for the United States to take up
some of the great work of internal improvement.
We are permitting our rivers, nature's great ca
n:11 of ouineree, to g1o UNUSED to the sea. Nei
....... i. 4i nr state can develop thefh, and the
e::+1rncnt So far has refused to do it. To be sure,
we have inprovil a few harbors and dredged a few rivers from time
to time, but Qdnl in a DESULTORY, UNORGANIZED SORT OF
WAY. We have paid for it out of our current revenues and have
done it onhl when we had a SURPLUS after paying our current
expense>.
No citize in in thi ' and age would handle his private afairs
that way. fle would iinaice his scheme, BOUZOW TEE MONEY,
do his Ailrovemits under some sensible and coniprehensive plan,
get Ii.s prje ct ilt4 peration and returning DIVIDENDS and then
pay for it (u11ri;. a -eries of vears.
THE UNITED STATES HAS UNLIMITED CREDIT AND CAN
CARRY ITS LOANS CHEAPER THAN ANY OTHER BORROWERS IN
THE WORLD, AND THERE IS NO REASONABLE EXCUSE FOR DE-.
LAYING ITS LEGITIMATE WORKS OF INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT.
It is a d theory for individuals and governments to keep out
of debt, hut neither mien nor nations achieve the most and in the
largest way that follow the theory. A MAN'S CREDIT IS AS
LEGITIMATE AN ASSET AS IIS CASH, AND JUST SO
WITI1 A NATION.
BUT, MORE,THAN THAT, WE OF TODAY SHOULD GET CON
DITIONS?_ 2 FOR THE MULTIPLIED MILLIONS OF TOMORROW.
WE "Of th O DE'ELOP TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES; WE
OUGHT TO',)TRUCT PUBLIC BUILDINGS; WE OUGHT TO BUILD
A PROPER SIZED NAVY, WE OUGHT TO CONSERVE OUR NATURAL
RESOURCES, AND THE PEOPLE OF TOMORROW IN TURN OUGHT
TO PAY THEIR APPROPR!ATE SHARE OF IT.
It iS neith(1le co,l(iudI ttldlay action nor just to impose ALL
THE OBLI(ATIONS UPON THIS GENERATION. The Pan
ama canal fr A lA ; ES TO COME, and we are to issue bonds
for its cost. the it! ervt of whi-h FUTURE GENERATIONS CAN
PAY TIlE SAMlE .\S WI: SHALL PAY IN OUR DAY.
American Women Bear
Tortures For Style.
By Dr. SARAH J. M'NUTT. Physician, of New York.
IE wIumeln of this country are becoming cripples and co
lquettes thirough Paris styles. Some WOMEN HAVE TO
P1ZACTICE FOR %[ONTIIS BEFORE TIIEY CAN
LEARN TO WALK IN TILE SIIORT WAISTED,
TIGHT Il IPPED CREATIONS. If they wanted to sit down while
wearing thei theV would need a force of three men to give assistance.
I AM SPEAKING NOW OF WOMEN WHO ARE CONTENT TO
BE SHOPGIRLS AND OF THE WOMEN WHO WOULD HAVE
BEEN SHOPGIRLS HAD NOT THEIR FATHERS MADE FORTUNES
in SOAP OR CANDLE GREASE AND OF TH.E WOMEN WHO BE
LONG TO WHAT I CALL THE FLOATING POP .TION-IN OTHER
WORDS, THE WOMEN WHOSE ~LIVES ARE SPEINT-=:<"%.~
AND RESTAURANTS. ---
But if women suffer phiysically for the style of clothes they wvear
it is largely MIEN who .are responsible, and their responsibility
spingms from two sources.
FIRST I HAVE ALWAYS THOUGHT THAT MANY OF THE
FASHION EXTREMES AND ABSURDITIES THAT COME TO US
FROM PARIS WOULD NEVER HAVE BEEN LAUNCHED IF MEN
HAD NOT BEEN DIRECTLY RESPONSIBLE. THEY WOULD NEVER
HAVE BEEN THOUGHT OF BY WOMEN.
Th:e second! ground upon01 wicih I would hold men responsible for
wvomen's dress absurdities goes deeper into human nature. The
BARBARIAN iN MIAN ADM1IRES EXTREM1ES IN DRESS,
what one iuhit call "STRIKING" COSTUMIES, ON WOMIEN.
After all, practically every wonman in the world is dressing to make
herself ati iactive in the eves of at least one man.
Dance Halls Are as Much
Needed as the Husking Bee.
By Dr. LUTHER. H1. GULICK. President of the Playground Association of
America.
ONE of the greatest factors in constructive philanthropy is the
PROVISION FOR P~UBLIC RECREATION-not the
revivals of ipast recreations, but the intelligent interpreta
tion of tihe p)osibilities p)resenlt in modern life, such as the
constructive use of lecture halls, parks, art workshops, libraries, p)ub
u ba.Ihs, splendid streets and buildings.
We> have blgun to do this in the use of the library. To make the
best use 'f this requires CO-OPER ATION IN LARGE GROUPS,
for we are h Ielpes as individuals even to prevent the bad. It is not
enough tha:t we have restrictive legislation in regard to dance halls,
mving~l p)ietnre shlow-, and the like, or that wve prevent our children
from going to ten
WE MUST DO SOMETHING TO PROVIDE ADEQUATELY FOR
THE NATURAL AND RIGHT DESIRE FOR EXERCISE, AMUSEMENT,
MUSIC, DANCING AND ASSOCIATION WITH FRIENDS.
THE PRO3LEM OF THE CITY DANCE HALL IS FUNDAMENTALLY
TYPICAL. THE DANCE HALLS HAVE GROWN UP TO MEET THE
NEED OF YOUNG PEOPLE TO COME TOGETHER, THE NEED ONCE
MET BY THE HUSKING BEE AND THE BARN DANCE.
This need is explo ited by saloon keepers and dance hall managers
on the worst pasible muuercenary basis largely because no one else has
cared to take heed. It is pooi~r economiy to exploit these wholesome
desires for FINANCIAL P'URPOSES in such a way as to impose
almost cer'tain~ isaster upon the young people. The miatter of the
dance~ halli is 'Ine of many problems requiring COMDIUNITY AC
TIOC .\N!) CONSTRUCTIVE AS WELL AS RESTRICTIVE
HOUSE FOR, CHILDRE,N,
Families Without Them Will Not;
Be AdmittCd.
SPECIAL OFFER FOR BIRTHS.
Landlord of St. Louis Apartment
Building Will Give a Month's Rent
Free to Parents For a Girl and Two
Months For a Boy-Several Novel
Features.
Plans were recently fil(d with the
building deiartI::vnt of St. L.puis for
an apar'tienIlit bW1u0 ex..-isively or
fIamilies with childron. The d1;;i,rs of
this house. wiib is to cost *400.01--0,
will be shut anialist bachelors. old
maids adul cli;d4less cou;ples. Olne
child will be , b::e of adlittace,
but the fam1ily w% it a dozenl children
will be wevlcomed \ with opell a1rm1s. It
is tle first l.ii-tMnliL h ou r f its kiind I
inl the UnIitel St:ls. aiil it will rise
he! vu I I o a1 ir: aill fIl.ashiolable
house"s wviuh f"orbdid chiAhcli.
S. ). Ledervr, n (al c:Ze 11roker.
is the "i,rnao If h,- id.".. :1:d hie
found reidylv backin- for tie scho:ne.
-ie has a whole ch.i o f nivelties.
With every girl bwrn i, tlhe lhouse he
wi;i presen1t a reocipted bill for 4lje
moiith's rent to t:e pnrvnts. edvrer
pllos tVice .s1 ligh a v:lu!e (7i bui'ys.
pa ren I re iplt bili for two
iloliths' r(-Ill.
1nd tere will bt, lifoy-!1ur1 ::r,
mlenits. Lach prretvilhva
specia lly eiii 'i: e't.:. in :l
ditil tlhre will ie a Ilrc iISyroh?i
inl the :em n , n:dl 1:% :e : m
the eb;hir.:wll :Si't t n':ls;'.S
on the roof. .\ d:tw* ri wvi iA.
rided'~.. :1:d1 i8:iw'4 81 81 will I'
struct tlie chiidren without chaoe ti
the harents. Tli:i also will be in
struct-or in. pIhy*i.-::! ,tl re. :!:d it is
" I m :n 1inced tae a it meit
house for chilliirn w\il liil a real
want." said Lederer. "It will lie the
only one (it its k-ind inl the coutitry, buil
I expect to see in:y 111more like it.
Why, aS 00 :IN 1 v 1 out y p1:11S
half a4 dozen nii!l1ilnires w:1:0ed to
I;Ick the venture single hani:vdei. Thiy
swthe pmssibilities in; it. :Ind the(y
womvlred it hadn't beeli tried hefre.
"Lvery applicilat wil hae to trot
oilt tihe youligs"ers before I rent him
a llal:zrtmelt. (%iidren wi:' he tile
re<quirement. one child will d, bit
the more the inerrier. If : mn comes
along with a1 .worc of chiltrei le will
be ly rize teniat. and ill put I
brass plate on his door.
"It's easy to Lgutre it out from the
finanil stalldloihnt. With Children inl
every amily I there will be lio ((omll
plailts oil the ScITe (if noise. Thlen
mar,i-ri(d coiples w.-ith childreni are the
Iost stable tetanllts and are less likely
to move. Thi-y are the best rent liay
rs, too. as all statIstics show."
One of the featurets of thle house w'
be a general nursery ini char . J a
nurse. Mothers going out oppig,
afternoon calling or to thi~e ater' may1
leave their baieis 1.. en~ire of the
nurse..'
;li RUTS IN A ROAD.
How the Work of Repairing Therr
Should Be Done.
With earth roads there is a pro
nounced tenidency to rut. anid wheL
ruts begin 11o applear (il thle surface
great earl' shiotuili e uised ill select inl'
neUw mat11erialIs w ih which they should
be imme;dl:ately 1Eled. says a bul!etint
of the depatmen 811t oif agrilult ure
Every hole or rut ini the roaidwayl it
not tampedls full ofI somle gliiod mateiall
and( wi:l he' malde delier andi widler b1,
each passtig vehilel. A hole whlih
could have bieenu tilled wVithl at shoivelful
of mat Ierial wil 8oo ne'iii ied ai (artful.
Thle riut or hioie to lbe repaired should
be (clere of dust, 1mud( or waltr and11
i'u4St urlicint goiod freshi1 earth placedl
ini it to) lie even withl the su1rrounlding.
surface after having been thoroughly
RutS rTnAT NIVED To) BE FILLED.
coslOidaited withi thel poundeil(r. S(id
should no' t be placed on tihe surface.
Neit her shold tl:te surfacue lie rin ted
by throwing up1on1 it the wornout ma
terial from the gutt"rs atlontgside. Rluts
and holes shoul d toit be filled wi th
stone or gravel untless at conlsiderable
sectionl is to be so treated. for if such
material is dtunpled ilto) tihe holes or
ruts it dioes not wealr uniformly withl
the rest of the road(, but produces
lumpis and ridies andlin many!11 cases
results In mnakinig twio hoiles for' every
01n1 repair ed.
I eversible ro ad macbitnes are 'often
,,-1ed ,tI ..r -in- tile mlt'ai . out of
ititches to the center of the roadway,
which is left there to be washed again
into the ditches by the first heavy
rain. A far more satisfactory method
when the roadway is sufficiently high
and where a heavy roller cannot be
had Is to trim the shoulders and
ridges off and smooth the surface with
the machine. This work should begin
in the center of the road, and the
loose dirt should be gradually pushed
to the ditche.s and finally shoved off
the roadway or deposited where it
will not be washed back Into the
ditches by rain.
TOWN IMPROVING IDA
Suggestions Fe'r Arranging Home
Grounds Attractively.
HOW TO PLACE LARGE TREES
Not in Straight Lines, but In Groups.
Pleasing Method of Separating Back
and Front Yards-Best Place to
Plant Shrubs and Flowering Annuals.
Before building a nouse most persons
recognize the necessity of having a
detinite plan of the structure. Compar
atively few people, however, realize
the desirability of planning the home
grounds. And yet the latter may have
quite as much to do with making a
home as the former.
Well laid out grounds also add to the
attractive appearance of a town.
In a short article it is impossible to
give more than a few general princi
ples. These if considered In their
proper relations to the situation of the
building and the character of the sur
roundings may lead to pleasing results.
The location of walks and drives
should be made a matter of conven
ience. Neither the walks nor the drives
are ornamental in themselves; hence
they should not be more numerous
than the uses of the daily life call for.
Curved walks and drives are often
more pleasing than straight ones, espe
cially where the grounds are large.
The curves, however, should be easy
and natural, not short and kinky.
TDe home grounds may be compared
with a picture in which the lawn
forms the canvas, with the house the
principal center of interest. Viewed in
this: way the house should not be hid
den behind too many trees. but should
at least have the front facing an open
stretch of lawn. Trees if planted near
the house are preferably placed at the
sides and rear so as to form a setting
anu a baekgrouud for it. The usual
practice of planting several rows of
trees running the front of thl
house to the. T. conducive
to monoton inl effect, further
more, t very difficult to lsh
and na .tain a lawn under sue
cum sees
emost appropriate places for
ojI trees are along the boundaries of
tne -3rounds. The miost pleasing way
to place them Is nut in straight lines.
but ini groups. with lower growing
kinds in front and toward the center
of the grounds. It is usually desirable
partly to sepatrate the back of the yard
from the front. This is miost p)leasingly
accomplished by placing one or two
masses of low growing trees and
shrubs at the sides of the house and
extending them to meet the masses
planted at the sides of the yard. One
or more openings should be left be
tween the dividing masses of trees and
shrubs for free p)assages and for the
glimpses of the farther p)arts of the
grounds. A stronger massing of trees
and taill shrubs may be used in the
proper position to shield the house
from the prevailing winds. By using a
variety of trees with tall shrubs next.
smaller ones in front, a most effective
windbreak may be formed, and by
planting the latter in irregular groups
a imore pleasing effect is possile than
where all are placed in formal rows.
Wherever fine views of the distances
are in danger of being shut off open
ings should be left or made to retain
them, especially such views as may be
seen from porches and living room
windows. Ev-ergreen trees are most
desirable on the north and wvest, be.
cause of their effective windbreaking
qualities in winter. They are not suit
able trees for the south side of a house
or in front of wvindows. In winter the
sunshine should be given a free chance
to enter the windows and thereby
greatly adld not only to the cheerful
ness of the rooms, but also to the low
ering of the fuel bill.
The snmallcr shrubs and flowering an
nuals are best placed in the corners by
the porches, along the base of the
house wall and in front of the larger
plants at the sies of the lawn. Groups
of such p)lants on either side of the en
trance gates are usually very pleas
ing. Avoid planting single shrubs or
bushes or other plants promicuously
about the lawn. The pleasing, distinc
tie character of a place can be secured
only by leaving large, open places
where nothing but green grass is al
lowed to grow. If the whole place is
dotted full of single specimens and
small clumps the effect is patchy and
fussy where it should be dignified and
natural. Specimen plants, if used at
all, should be planted sparingly and not
set in the most conspicuous places.
Flower beds cut out of the lawn are
best avoided. They break up the
stretches of green, are difficult to keep
in good condition and leave unsightly
bare sp)ots in winter. Such flowering
plants are not suited for planting in
the front of the shrubbery borders
and about the porches, but are best
kept in a flower garden at the rear or
side of the house.-B. 0. Longyear in
Ameicn CuOltivator.
COME 10 GREEN)
Railroad Fare Re(fJnded Within J
Fare One Way
Here is T
Buy $25 wvorth for cash, all c
and part- at another, within thr4
chants named below. Not nec
Get Rebate Booh with first pi
corded and whcn ',25 worth is
book to Secretary of Retail Me
of Railroad FarC.
Buy Fom A
China, Glassware, Etc.
Gilreath-Durham Co.
Drugs and Sundries.
Bruce & Doster Drug Co.
Dry Goods, Notions, Etc..
J. Thos. Arnold Co.
Barr's Dry Goods.
R. L. R. Bentz.
Hobbs-Henderson Co,
Hovey Smith.
C. D. Stradley & Co.
Fura-iture, Etc.
L. A. James.
Symmes-Browning Co.
E. S. Poole.
Buggies, Wagons, Etc.
Markley Hardware & Manufacturing Co.
R. N. Tannahi!l Co.
If you doni't understan
Information Cl
flieegIJiIIO Retail .I!II
JOHN WO(
O01o ovor 9mfitli & Bristow,
Cordon Countyt
lie better, have better sub-soil
than your lands. The reason
a piractical farer in the cour
200 pounds of fertilizer to the
Many of them use only acid.
for sale. Some rare bargainsi
year. Delays are dangerous.
come and see for yourself. W~
Cdlhoun, (County Seat of
ing town of 2,000 people. Lc
ta. I refer you to the followiu
showu them the goods.
J. R. Keith, W, M. Chasta
CHARL
Musical and
OCTOBER 2!
RussiaN Symphi
The biest organize
in talent iq the Unit
by a splendid chorus.
and female voices.
SpeCil Rates from Al P
Ask the Doctor.
Ask the Banker.
ILLE [0 TRADE!
?adius of 40 Miles;
Paid for distance Over 40 Miles.
he Plan:
t one time, or part at one time,
1e months from any of the mer
essary to buy all at one store.
Irchase, have each purchase re
entered in Book take or send
rchants' Association for amountl
ny of These:
Clothing.
Hall Brothers.
J. 0. Jones & Co.
L. Rothschild.
Smith & Bristow.
Stewart, Anderson & Merritt.
Jewelry, Etc,
Bruns-McGee Co.
Lumber, Etc,
Oregon Lumber Co.
Office Supplies.
Seybt-Lanford Co.
Millinery, Coat Suits.
TThe Ayers Co.
Shoes.
Americus Shoe Co.
Henderson-Ashmore Co.
Pride, Patton & Tillman.
d, write the Secretary.
eerfully Given.
1111colts (Issodlt1),
)D, SEC'RY.
or. 19u aud WRsk tn Steels.
DR SALE!
Ceorg ia, Farm
nd ep per
of the lat i'~ it
ty. They don't lwde and
acre would scare rrost of them.
I have all kinds and size farms
f sold before rented for another
Don't take time to write
ire me when you start.
Gordon County) is a fast-grow
cated 8o miies north of Atlan
gmen of your county. I have
in, Pickens, S. C., R. F. D., 4,
3OAZ, i.W. "AQU,.
ESTON
Festival Week.
5--30, 1909.
)nY OrchestrA !
1 and most uniform
ed States, supported
of two hundred male
pints in South Carolina.
Ask the Preacher.
Ask the Lawyer.

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