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The weekly herald. (Newberry Court House [S.C.]) 1865-1865, June 07, 1865, Image 1

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THE WEEKLY NERALD
Devoted to the Dissemination of General Lnformation'.
VE
VOLUME LI. NqEWBEARY, S. C., WENESDAY, JUNE 7 .1865.' NUMBER 24.
THE WEEKLY HERALD
Is PUBLISHED AT.
NEWBERRY C. U.,.
TERMS, $2FOR SIX MONTHS, IN ADVANCE.
Payable in Cash or Provisions.
Advcrtisements inserted at $1 per square, for
first insertion, 50 cents for subsequent insertions.
Marriage notices, Funeral invitations, Obituaries,
and Communications of personal inter,est charged
a.advertisements.
Important Notice to Cottor. Owners.
OFFICE OF U. S. PCRcFAs,NG AGENT,
Savannah, Ga., May M, 1865.
The attention of cotton o vners is called to
the. following extract3 from the "Amended
Regulations for the purchase of products of
the insurrectionary states on Government ac
count,' issued from the Treasury-Depertment
of date May 9th, 1865, and approved by the
President. of the same date.
"1. Agents shall be appointed by the Sec
retary of the T:-easury, with the ap'-oval of
the President, to purchase for the United
- States, u.der special instructions from the
Secretary of the Ti-easury, products of the
'States declared to be in insu:rection at such
places as may from time to tieue be designated
by the,Secretary of the Treasury as markets
*r places of purchase.
!H. The operations of Purchasing Agents
shall b confined to the singie article of cot
ton ; rad they shall give public notice at the
place to which they .shall be assigned, that
they will purchase, in accordance with these
regulations, all cotton not captured or sban
doned, which may be brought to them.
IV. To meet the requirements <r the Sth
se-:tion of the Act of July 2, 1S62, the Agents
..shall secure all cotton so brought, .and forth
with return-to the seller three-fourths there
)f, which portion shall be an average grtde of
the-whole according to the certificate of a
sworn sampler or expense.
V. All cotton purchased and resold by pur.
chasing Agents shall be exempt fro-n til fine
and internal taxes. And the Agent selling
shall wark the sarie "'ree" ard furnish to the
pdrchaser i bill of sale duly and ccurately
deseibing the. character and quantity sold,
and containing a certificate that it is exemp.
froni taxes and fees at above.
LX. All agents are pruhibited from purcEa
sing any product of an insurrectionary State,
which shall have been captured by The inili
tary or naval forces of the United States, .or
which shall .have been abandoned by the law
- ful owner thereof.
X. "These regulatipns, which are intended
to revoke hd annul all othe s.on the subject
heretofire made, will take effect and be in
foree-on and after May 10th, 1865."
The undersigned has been appointed pur
chasing agent at Savannah, and hereby gives
notice that he is prepared to purchase, in ac
t cordance with the reguintions, of which the
above paragraphs are extracts, all cotton not
captured or abandoned, which may be brought
to him.
The war is now virtually losed, and to the.
end that the people may, to as full an extent
as possible, commence to reap the benefits of
- a state of peace, it is -desirable that the old
ani regular channels of trade be established,
-neq ones opened, and the oc;cupations of the
people, both in the city and country, be re
samed. It is expected that the purchase, by
the Treasury Department, in good faith of the
cottoti in the country now irn the hands of its
-owners returning therefor a. fair and honest
equivalent, will largely tend to bring about a
state of things so much to be desired by all.
-estictions upon trade are now virtually
abolished, and citizens may, with a few un
ipportant exceptions; now purchase and take
away whatever their necessities requiro, and
- I eelsatisfied that the dispositiohi to do all
that may be done to bring about once more a
normal and healthy condition of trade will not
* be wanting. .Cotton owners may rest assured
that it is now, perfectly safe (so far at .least as
any interference on the part of the Govern
nuent) for them to bring in and dispose of their
cotton. The f(ullest protection will be guaran
teed, upon its arrival, and such other protec
tion and safe conduct as,. the Agent may be
able to obtain for cotton in transitu will be
freely afforde4.
It is hoped that before long enterprise will
Qpen op better and safer means of comnmuni
*cation-with, and transportation to Savannah
than now exists. In the meantime, and until
that takes place, owners of cotton at distant
points desirous of- marketing it at Savannah,
*will doubtless be able to devise temporary ex
pedients-for accomplislgag that end.
U. T. P. ROBB,
- U. S. Purcha'sing Agent.
App,roed:
C.-GRovRR,
Brcvet Major Gcaeral Comman!ding.
Important Trade Circular from the Treas
nary Department.
Sivisiax, GA., May 16 18'5.
Szf:-To correct misunderstanding, and to se
cure tniform.action by agents of the Treasury
Departnmnt in collection of capture.d and 'aban
doned property, .all agents 'will be required to
observe the following directions:
No property owned by individuals, and nowt in
their possession, will be treated as captnred, ex
ecpt such as. has been taken by the National
fotees from hostile possession, and has beei or
shall be turned over to the agents of the Treas
ury Department under military orders.
N o property will be treated as abandoned ei
capt such as has been or shall be found actually
d*erted and out of the custody of the- lawful
owners, and no household goods, appurtenances,
or furniture will be touched by agents of the
Treasury Department under any circumstances,
except for the purpose of keeping the same care
fully stored, subject to directions from' the See
retary of the Treasury.
Any property which there is satisfactory rea
son to believe' has belonged to the so-called.Con
federate Governient, will be treated as aband
oned when found by Agents of the Treasury .Dc
partment, or will be treated as captured, when
takened and turned-over under military orders
No authority whatever can be given to purch
ase products in Staths 'eretofore de.clared in in
surreetion, except for account of the United
States until after the President shall declare that
th; insurrection has been suppressed, or shall
otherwise make such purchase lawful, or the A*t
of Congress, approved July 2d, 186C, shah be
changed.
You will, by ever proper means, encourage a
rettrn to industrial pursuits in your agency.
All products of free labor, heretofore pro
duced within the national lines as there designa
ted, or hereafter produced in the States of Ten
nessee, Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Flori
da and so much of South Carolina, Alabama and
Mississippi, as shall be declared within the lines
of occuiation by the Department commanders
thereof, may be-taken or sent to market in the
loyal States, by the producers on the* own ac
count, without sale to the United States, or any
charge, except the internal revenue tax. and the
intercours~ fees prescribed by the Secsetary of
the Treasury.
All products, other than of fr.ee, labor, pro
duced in-esurreecoe-try tiatee, prior to the or
der of the Secretary of war, extending the lines
of military occupation, dated April 17, '1865,
may te'sold to agents appointed by the Secreta
ry of the Treasury to puechase for the United
States. There agents will be locate at all the At
lantic and Gulf ports, immediately, and will pay
for such'property three fourths of the New York
market price.
Arrangemeats will be immediately made- in
your'agency for-unrestricted trade in the sale of
all supplies not coatraband of war.
All persons who take the oath of loyalty will
be permitted to bring such supplies, in any quan
tity desired by them, to all military posts in your
agency, and there to sell the same to all loyal
persoas in unrestricted amounts.
The purpose of the governments is to estab
lish in all districts where good order is maid
taic:ed by the inhabitants as nearly an unrestict
ed trade as nossible under the preser law; . and
you will be careful to see the above directions
are carried out in your agency, and that all tech
nicalities are avoided which are not absdiutely
required under the law.
I am very respectfully your obedient servant;
Wx. P. MELLEN,
- Genersl Agent Treasury Department.
Ai,BT G. BRowN%1 Sopt, special Agent 5th
Agency Savannah, Ga. -
BRvR-It is a br,ve, story, that of L:
tour D' Auvergne, and one worthy of notice
DoW-a-days. He was a native of gretagne,
and early embraced the profession of arms.
He distinguished himself as the commander of
a coinpany of grenadiers at the outbre~ak of
the great revolution of France. He was fre
quently offered higher appointments, but al
ways declared himself only fit to coramand
his grenadiers ; and so great a reputation for
heosmad success had these grenadiers that
teweetermned the Infernal Column, and
usually constituted the vanguard of the army.
The celebrated Massena was-one of D' Auver
gne's warmest admirers,and it was under h.im
that he fell in battle:while the French were
endeavoring to drive Smyarrow from Switzer
land, in 1800. Napoleon, then First- Consul,
had just nameds him "First Girenadier of
Frafhce." The Recpublic erected a monument
to him on the spot where he fell; while his
heart was. ordered to be embalmed, and en
closed in a silver bo:, was carried under the
flag of the corps, with superstitious reverence.
flis name was always called, and the honor of
answering to it was assigned to the bravest
grenadier : Lathour D' Auvergne. Didd on the
field of honor !
To MAKE XINGAR.-Fill large glasg bottles
with woak tea, which may be what is left af
ter drinking, add a smnall quantity of sugar or
Imolasses, and set theni in a warm*'place, say
in the window where-the 'sun shines: In a
~fortnight it will be fit for use, and is as good
Late Northern Items.
We are indebted to Mr. L. J. Moore, for a
file -of late New York ppperq, including the Her
aldef 26th. From these we gather the follow
ing ite,m.3 of news:
A t9ue bill of indictment for treason has been
found against Jeff. Duvis by the grand jury of
Washington, and it is said that as soon as the
attendance of the witnesses for the prosecutih.n
can be procured he will be takeu frohi the case
mate in Fortress ionroe, where he is now 'in
close confinement, and conveyed to Washington
for trial. .
The United &ar es gunbeat Tuscarora, from
Fortress 1'rroe, with Alexander H. Stephens
and Postmaster Reagan on board, arrived at
Boston on the 2dth of May. The rebel party
will be loged in Fort Warren.
It has been directed thas Mrs. Jefferson Davia,
her four children, her brother and sister and
Mrs. Clement C. Clay be sent baek to Savannah
loiom Fortress Monrce. -
James A. Seddon, rebel ex-Srcretary of War,
and John Letcher, formerly rebel Governor of
Virginia, were arrested in that State a few - days
ago,' -pursuant to orders from Washington.
Letcher has arrived in Washington and been
committed to the Old Capitol Prison. Seddon
was put on board the gunboat in James. river
whereon are also imprisoned the rebel exSena
tor R. N. T. Hunter and Jtndge Cam'bell,
pre"iotds1y arrested. It was believed in t:ieh
mord on Wednesday that Gen. Lee would soon
be placed in custedy of the authorities.
The Ne-w Orleans Tinee of tie Oth is very
positively informed that Kirby Smith ban net
teen killed. Mrs. Kirby Smith is reported to
have arrive d at the mouth of Red river, and
represented the positien of her- husband as ex
tremely critical, as one party threatened to'kill
him if.he surrernders, and another threatened to
forsake hin if he continued the'stru gle.
Information has'bcen received at Washington E
from New Orkaus that, notwithstanding the.
easconad'ig of Kirby Smith, it- is his intention
to march his ar m across the Rio Grande and
tender its services to the imperialist govern
meat. This contemplated motement . will be
p-evented. Generals'Sheridan, Custar and Mer
rit, of the splendid cavalry corps of the army of
the Potn>ac, hive airyady started for N:ew Or
leans. .'
on the 23d tie grnd r?riew of !00,f"00
'troops'comcm;en;ced in - Washingtjon city. The
Le'afdpruneriees-" tbe grandest military dis
play in the world." The weather was niost fav
oraale for the occasion. The columnr, consist
ing of the army,of the Potomc and Sheridan's
ervalry, commeced moving at 9 o'clock. Gen.
eral Meade and staff ri;ng at its bead. The
line of march of the entire force was .frorn the
Capitol through Ponns lvania Avenue and past
the White House, where it was .reviewed by the
President and Cabinet, General Grant, General
Sherman and a large numnber of other disting
uished military men, members of Congress, the
Diplomatic Corps, and other emineut persona.
On the ,4th there was a similar review .of Gen.
eral Sherman's soldiers, consisting of the army
of Tennessee and the army of Georgia.
Don't borrow your neighbor's paper. Don't
stand around his door and watch for the car
r:er to drop it, and then consider yourself en
titled to the first chance. 'en who pay for
their paper expect to read it first,. notwith
standing the opinion to the contrary. A man
who is able to substribe for a paper and de
pends-on some one else for, the 'news, ought
to be w:itched. Hle is always very keen after
the ntoose atnd it will get' hing one of- these
days. He is a doubtful character, says an
exchange, and will do a great many mean
things. He will drink persimmon br;ndy;.
eat cold victuals.;'kill -his daddy for a six
pence; cut off hi's wife's hair ar.d sell it to
make up wvatch guards ; rob a preacher ;
drink garbrb:h; wrestle with a nigger en Sn
day; fish with a pin book; break into a-1
~jail ; kill a cat; steal a rnile post ; pick up
little things permiscous, a:nd, abc.ve all thizgs,
if you *do not keep your eye on him; he will
hook your papet.
ORANGEs AND LEMONgS IN CALIFoRNIA.
The atternpt to grow oranges and lemons in
California is every year becoming more spec
tessful. The principal groves are at LosAnm
gelos, where there are half-a dozen meon -en
Igaged in the business. Oranges are, grown in
other places in tihe State, but mainly 'in pr
den.s, and for private usn. There were about
60,000 oranges and- 30.000 lernons grownr last
year at LosAngelos; this year, nearly 100,000
oranges and 4Q4000 lemous have ,been raised'
inare icnt.T oranges grown thins year
aelarger and in every way better than Inst
year's crop, and sold at the' grove at $S per
huindred. The largest growers are two Frehch
men at the Mis.sion' San Gabriel, whose crop
last year armounted to atbout 25,000 oranges,
beside a quantity of ienwns.
-The Paris journal state that the delay of
twed.~y years imposed lit P.ri'e Tra;ic"nod
before pt;hlishing ii me 'e -uk heii
THE CAMEL MD DROMADAY.-The -camel
and the~ dronedarv- may be studied to the
greatest advantage~in F;ypt, Arabia, and part
of Asia Minor. In those <countries there is
no anmtnal so useful as the camei, and nowhere
is there a - wore beautiful object than the
dromredary, wh n _addled and covered .rith
ts-fantas.ie t . Tie latter. is not a
creature with two humpS, such as the Bac
train camel is supposed to be, but an animal
of the same kindas the camel, of more "slen
der pr'oporti'ons, and e.clusivcly;used for ri
din. Tne camel, on the contrary, is a large
and powerful creature, used' for carrying heavy
burdens. The dromedary may be appropriately
compared to the race hors?,- the camel to'- the
draught:horse'-the most beautiful dromeda
ris belon& generally to the pachas and men
of, wealth. They are then- well fed and kept
thoroughly clean and they have been known
to run from sdnrise to sunset, with little'or
norrest. Draugbt-camels are ffequentlV joined
together i'-a line, the head of one being at
tached to the tail of the one before.it. Twen
ty or more thus joined together rhay often'be
seen crossing the desert,, laden with merchan
dise and other burdens. .The time for herd
ing camels is in tlhe months.of l3ebruiry and
March. During-this season they are >oth
vicious and dangerous, biting even their. own
masters, and not letting go 'their hold unless
some one is at hand to beat them off.
THE SCIxstass ArND TE SEWING MACHINE.
-The following comparison of times reqtgred.
to do different kinds of needlework is the re
sult of practcal experiments instituted by a
sewing.machine c'omiany in the United States ':'
The fineness of the work must be presumed
to be equal in,the two- processes. Whereas
it took 14 hours and 2 minutes to complete
a gentleman's shirt by band, the same was
fluished by nachine in 1 hour and 16 minutes.
A frock coat took I6 hours and 30 minutes
by hand labor, and I hours and 3:8 minutes
by machine. A lady's chemise required 10j
hours to be produced by hand, and. one min
ute over an hour for i%' production by the
machine. A satin a aist cdat was made in 7
hcu-s and1 19 minutes by hand, in 1 hour
and 34 minutes.hv machine. . A pair of cloth
trousers required-5 hours and 10 -minutes by
hand, and only 51 minutes by machine. A
lady's silk dress which cost the labor of 8
hours'aud 27i minutes by hang, -t6ok 1 hour
and 13 nmirutes by'm.:chine; in a merino dress,
the comparative gain in time was greater by
nine t iuutes in smaller matters, a sillr apron
was-produced by the machine in 15 minutes,
which required 4 hours and 16 minutes by A
ordin.Ary wt>rkmanship; tvhile a plain apron
was made in 9 minutes by machine, which
consumed 1 hour and 26 minutes by 'hand.
In afl the above work, the machinery was
driven by the treadle.-Once t Week.
CetrEsE NGENnTY.-The Chinese are des
terous menders of broken iron vessels; Their
method is described by Dr. Lockhart. The
,surcee of the broken vessels is tirst scraped
clean. A portion of the cast iron is then mel
ted in a crucible no longer than a thimble, in
afturnace as large as the lwe half -f 4 co'
mon tumbler, The iron malted is dropped
en a piece of'felt, coyered with chircoal ashes..
It is filed up, and as' it extendes on the othefr.
side it is str'uck aVid.pressed with a smnall rod
of felt covered with ashes. The old anid new
suvface adhere, and- the surperBuous mnetak
teing removed,*the vessel.s is'as good as new.
C.umEW CURNENi.-We learn, from the
Camden Journal, that the fathersof that town,
in council, are about to effect arrangeinents'
for-issuing -s paper currency on a specie basis,
for the benefi.t of that precinct. They wiiigiver
town certificates of indebtedness, receivable'
in taxes and mnunicip4l dues. This~ will, no
doubt,'suffie witbin the-.corporate limits,.and
possib!y in the precincts immiediately aroond.
We are fold that, under the peculiarities of
the charter of Columbia, this town ctanot.
borrow money, and cannot, therefore, issue'
notes paybble. The capital city' is, i fact,
measurably under tbe imnmeAiate governmaint
of the State, and will need a spdcial Act whiett. .
it would do any darin.g thing in financial mat
An order from.Gen. IIalletk allows all per
sons, without regard'to rank or -eniuployment
in the civil or military.scrvice of the; hte reb
'el Grovernmnent, to take- the amnesty oath, and
will -receive the. corresponiding certificate.
Those excluded from 'the bentefit -of such art
oath can, make applicationfor padlon and res
.oa tion to civil rights, which appliestioni will
be received and forwarded to proper chaiaels
fer the action of the President of the United
Stattes. -Thc fact that such persons have vo
untarily comec forward and takcn the-oath of
alle-ian~e t'.i1 be evidence of their i'tentioni
to resunie thbe swrua of loal citizeni, and c~
.eitute a chgu for E.Wt;t dealeecy.

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