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Pages Available: 8,148,101

Title:
Weekly industrial record. : (Jacksonville, Fla.) 1900-1909
Alternative Titles:
  • Industrial record
Place of publication:
Jacksonville, Fla.
Geographic coverage:
  • None, Southern States, None  |  View more titles from this: City County, State
Publisher:
Industrial Record Co.
Dates of publication:
1900-1909
Description:
  • -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
  • Began in 1900.
Language:
  • English
Subjects:
  • Lumber trade--Southern States--Newspapers.
  • Naval stores--Southern states--Newspapers.
Notes:
  • "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
  • "The exponent of southern progress."
  • Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
  • Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
  • The newspaper was the official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association, carrying the mottoes "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests" and "The exponent of southern progress". The newspaper carried a wide range of stories, mostly dedicated to the economic health and well being of northeast Florida. At the turn of the Century, Jacksonville was becoming established as Florida's economic hub. The Weekly Industrial Record published during the decline of the shipping industry and the rise of the railroad. Jacksonville's seaport, opened in 1903, was then, as it is now, an important gateway to Florida and the southeastern United States of America. The Port of Jacksonville challenged the Port of Savannah (GA), then unrivaled in the American south for trade in shipping. The St. Johns River watershed that drained through Jacksonville and its Port was fed by the vast areas of northeast and central Florida. Turpentine industry products that flowed through the Port also supported a wide range of other products. Railways entering Florida from the eastern seaboard passed through Jacksonville and formed a vector of agricultural and human traffic. The railroads transported tourists into Florida and carried woodland products and vegetables out.
  • The United States Postal Commission of 1907 listed the Weekly Industrial Record as a newspaper; and, it reached a fairly broad and wide-spread audience throughout Florida and the southeastern United States. The turn-of-the-century battle over the peonage system, sometimes referred to as the second coming of slavery, is played out in opposing camps in the pages of the Weekly Industrial Record on one side and Jacksonville's Florida Times-Union [LCCN sn83045831] on the other. [Clyatt v. United States, 197 U.S. 207 (1905) - Argued December 13-14, 1904 - Decided March 13, 1905]. -- E. Kesse, University of Florida Digital Library Center.
  • The Weekly Industrial Record [LCCN: sn00229571] began publishing sometime around the turn of the Twentieth Century in Jacksonville, Florida. Following the Great Fire of Jacksonville (FL) in 1901, the newspaper was published in both Jacksonville and DeLand (FL). The Weekly Industrial Record was continued by Florida's Financial and Industrial Record [LCCN: 2006229550] in October 1909.
LCCN:
sn 00229571
OCLC:
45459418
Holdings:
View complete holdings information

Weekly Industrial Record and Florida’s Financial and Industrial Record

The Weekly Industrial Record first appeared around 1900 in Jacksonville. Following the Great Fire in 1901, the newspaper was published in both Jacksonville and DeLand.

The Weekly Industrial Record was the official organ of the Turpentine Operators’ Association, carrying the mottoes: “Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests” and “The exponent of southern progress.” The newspaper offered stories on a wide range of topics, mostly related to the economic health and well-being of northeast Florida. At the turn of the century, Jacksonville was establishing itself as Florida’s economic hub. Its seaport, opened in 1903, became an important gateway to the rest of Florida and the Southeast. The watershed of the St. Johns River that drained through Jacksonville incorporated vast areas of northeast and central Florida. Turpentine and forest products from this region flowed through Jacksonville, supporting a wide range of ancillary industries. Furthermore, railways connected Jacksonville with the rest of the eastern seaboard and formed a vector for agricultural and human traffic.

TheThe Weekly Industrial Record reached a fairly broad audience throughout Florida and the southeastern United States. The battle over the peonage system of labor in the state’s turpentine camps was played out in the pages of the Weekly Industrial Record on one side and Jacksonville’s Florida Times-Union on the other.

In October 1909, Florida’s Financial and Industrial Record continued the Weekly Industrial Record. In November 1910, it began publishing semimonthly. It remained the official organ of the Turpentine Operators’ Association and the Interstate Can Growers’ Association. The newspaper’s motto was: “An unvarnished tale of Florida as it is”. Both the limited nature of the news it carried and increasing competition from other Jacksonville newspapers caused a decline in readership. The Weekly Industrial Record ceased publication in about 1912.

Provided by: University of Florida