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The Louisiana Democrat. (Alexandria, La.) 1845-1918, May 20, 1874, Image 1

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O2L N M 28.
A- B. PAC-ALI, THE WORLD IS GOVERNTED TiO MUOCH- (PU BL IsHE
VOL. 29. . ALEXANDRIA, LA., WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 1874. INO4.
ctje iemocrat.
TILE 1)EItt)CR IºI' is (,iitlli-idi:i1 WVeek
Ir, at F.PLK 1)tLt..ºca h p.r anlum
'l'wn I)oI!.AR4 AND* FIFTY (:f:N-r for
rif nmointha, PAYA BLE IN Al)
V A a C E! !N)o shscriptio n taken
for a less peuiml4 than six nmonths.
AIv~vtIITIE'sr r. inserted at the rate
o()fO l)OI.A.R per Puar.r for the
tirst inserrtioi antl FIFTY CEl'rl for
f -341h subsequelcnt one..
b:I·;i r linesa or less, (Rium .t:) c nsti
nrltc :t square.a
IJITL( %RY Niitiiee, farringReR, Public
)Iertuings, Carnis of Thankr, etc., to
be p:uidi for as hdverti.Ienbents.
r' PF.IIAONAL CARL'S, when, arlnir.
mihie, charygedI dtoutble thue ntual adver
tising rotes.
ALEXANDKIA.
FERGUSJN & 80HNACK,
( 'ORMERRY LEVIN & FERGUSON,)
Watchmakers and Jewelers,.
,tu.LE AGENTS FOR
The Howe Sewing Machines,
May ", 173-tf.
ilIl l lllTHL,
DEA LER IN
I)RY GOODSI)
FAMIY GIROCEIRIES!!t
E arcdWar6
Oc zooI.ery
Corner of Second and Murray Ste.
ALEX ANDRIA.
Rapides Agricultural Fair 1ssocia
tion.
.TIIE REGULAR ANNUAL MEET
ing of the above Association was
held on Salur:l:ay, April 4th, for the
purpose of electing l)irectors to serve
for tle ensrinl,, year, and the following
.euntlemen were c'l " :111|:
%V. V. Bllackmlan. Joint W. Prescu.t,
.JlllL eviin. ,J. S. Butler.
WI. K. Johnson, .J.tT.rsoll Wellk,
J. 9). I'ickens, F. Sip.
R. IP. nnter, l. I. 'arnial.
L. %V. Hlynson, .1. S. Fiih,
R. L. Luckett.
L meeting of the above Directors was
hlld accortdinu to the charter of the As
suciation, on Monday, April 6tth, for the
p'urpose of electing its officers for the
conilng year also, and the gentlemlni
namled below were elected:
W'. F. bi.ck aln , ............ President
.1. 1'. l'r'-cott, ....... Vice-President
J. ;. l're,lch, .............. Secretary
$. uilei ................. ''reasurer
Jamoes G. White, ........... Attorney
. true copy. J. C. FREN('Ff,
April 1--1im. Secretary.
3loses Rosentlha:
DEOAL.R IN
DRY GOODS, GiROCERIES,
HiOSIERY,
HARDWARE, CUTLERY, ETC.,
FRONT ST.,
Ai 8. PI.YCLS' OLD STAND,
ALEXANDRIA, LA.
J. LEVIN
CONFECTIONER
(UIlDER TOIWN HALL,)
AL, EXANDRIA
Dr. A. C i0BRILL -
PIAOFICES HIS PROFESSION
-IS
SoreCz :
i f..l St., Between Fish and Elliet
I CI!OE T 0 THE PUBID I
- O-s.s, -
. .elib s the ECLTPSE STA
. "":: F~L~ TAYLOR.
Fub. I I1' I
IS('EiLLAN EOUS.
NTE3W OiRLEn NS
-and
Grand Ecore Weekly Packet
FOR ,RANDT) EC'ORE. MONTGOE'r
R Y, ALlXANI)RItA, PINE
VILLE. NORMAN'S,
BARII1N S
and
AILL lW:1" L.d.,DVIGS!
The Al Maanitlcent and Fast Rnn
ning I'asscnger Steamer
BART. ABLE:
DIDI'K SINN\oT'r. ...........M.\STER
GEO. C. IIAIII,'ON ,.......... Clerk
SEAVES NEW ORL.EANS EVERY
i Sartlday at 5 P. Ml. Returning
leaves Grand Ecore every 'I'TESI)AY
evening, and Alexandria every WED
NE>)DAY at 12 M. For l'Frpiht or
lPassage. APPL' Y ON HOARI).
,Notice!
'T A.I.L WHOl ARE .AFFLICII:D Wlli CRIIIONIC
DI5.EASFS.
D R. JAMES PORT"ER. MAGNETIC
and Medical Physician, will rrmatq
in New Orleans, at No. 1;7 St. Charles
street, until the coiming June, and all
who are suffering from Chronic Rheu.
nm;tistn, or a n y Chronic complaint,
should imlme:liately place them-elves
under his treatment, as, from my own
experience, he is sure to afford relief
if the disease is not too far advanced, a
ernlnlellnt cure.
lfi3 charges are very moderate, and I
am glad to certify that, after nearly
eight years of constant suffering from
Chronic Rneumatism, (the last three
years of which time the torture both
day and night has been exerutlating,)
and after being treated by many of our
most eminent and skillful Physicians.
I placed myself under the treatment of
)R. PORTER about the 1st of last Feb
railry, and remained about five weeks,
,luring the whole of which ttme I con
tinuled to improve, and n111 ow have good
reason to believe he has effected a per
imn;en,,t cure. 1. LEGRAS,
''Tax ( ,llector of thle Parish of Ralpides.
The Cresce'nt SIwctacles.
IMPROVE YOUR '.IGImIT.
r1IIE CKESCENT SPE(CTA
cles now offeired to the
P'blie arm; guaranteed .uper
for to all others in the rn:,k'.t
For clearness anid disti:,rnevss
O'f vision they are utnrivalted. ale r
the total absence of pris p:n icrde .Vr
I11 l0nt and refra, tory rats all r tys fmlud in
Pebhhles renhdrs them 'esl.'eially devsirable.
teing ground w tlh great arie, they are
free from :tll! imuperfectiouns and impurities
They are mnunted in gold, silver, shell,
rhbeth : and steel frames and will last many
yearv without change. For sale only by
oalr Agentts.
Fergoson & Srhnark,
Jewelers and Opticians, are Sole Agen a in
Alexandria, La.
rrNone gennine without the trade
mark stamnped on every pair. Manufac
tured by
FELLOWS, HOLMES & "'LAPP,
NEW YORK.
LOOK for TRADE .MARK. No PED
DLERS EMPLOYED.
WVA,. R P AT HI!
VILL MAKE TinS
season at "Wellswood"
at *25 the season, payable thile First oi
December next, and $1 to the groom.
Due bill for thile season to accompany
the mare. Mares kept in fine gras.
pastures with water, uder good fence,
free of charge. If desired, fed on grain
at $2 per week, payable when taken
away.
EINESfT II ARDTNEI,
-13O OT
-and
Shoe Maker
PINEVILLE, LA.
A LL WORK DONE NEAT AND
DURABLE, AT REASONABLE
RATES.
vIC0K'S FLORAL GUIDE
FOfR 1874.
T-WO IIUNDRED PAGES;: FIVE
'hundred engravings and Colored
Plate. Published Quarterly, at 25.!.s
a year. First number for 1~74-1 just li
sued. A German edition at the same
price. Address;
JAMES VICK,
Rochester, N. Y
Special Notice . :
I HAVE APPOINTED Cot. N. L
McGinnis, my Agent to attend to
my business at this place, and betseen
rhere and Red River Landing. - flapk.
A. M. Osgood eontinaps my Auent
trom Monette'e Ferry to Shreveport,
La. B. B. PETERSON.
March 91), 1874.
JO1B PRINTING , '
. NEATLY -.- A,',.',
AT THIS OFFICE
ON MOST REAbO S.BRLE 'I'ERMS,
OUR CIIILDioob.
BY G( ORGE D. PIH NTICE.
Tis.sead, yet sweet, to llsten
To the soft wind'F gentle swell.
And think we hear the muniic
Our childhood know so well;
To gaze out on the even,
And the hornhless fields of air.
And feel ag-tin our boyhood's wish
To roam like angels there.
There are many dreams of gladurss
Thitt cling ;rouidl ithe pasit,
And from the tomb of feeling
Ohld thought~s come throngin g tast;
The fornis we lave so diearly
In the happy days now gone,
The heautifutl anil lovely,
So fair to look upon.
Trhose bright and gentlle maiden.
Who seeled so fstormelll for bliss,
Too glorious and too heavenly
For snuch ai worhl as this;
Whose dark sott eyes seemed swimming
In a sea of liqllid light,
And whose locks of gold were str.:amini
O'er brow . o aii unny bright.
Whose smilei were like the su:lhine
in the spring timle of the year,
Like the chan;gefril ghlains of April,
They followedl every tear!
They have passed, like hopes, away,
Andl their loveliness has fled
Oh, man:tv a heartti'3 mourmning
That they are with the dead.
Like the biightest buds of summer,
They hav faliilen with the stem;
Yet, oh! it 4 a lovely death
To ti.le from earth like them!
And yet, the thought is saddening
To nlluse oil such as they,
And feel that all the beautiful
Are passing fast away!
That the fair ones whom we love
Grow to each loving breast,
Like the tendril of the clinging vine,
a Wrhen perish where they rest.
And we can but think of these,
in the soft and gentle spring,
When the trees are waving o'er us,
And the flowers are blossoming;
And we know that winter's coining
With this cold and stormy sky,
And the glorious beauty round us
Is building but to die.
Relative Rank of United States
Cities.
The St. Louis times has the fol
lowing interesting comparison of the
present rank of twenty of the lar
gest cities in the U'nited States, with
that which the same cities held in
18ti .: . -
The cities of Ne.w York, Philadel
phia and Brooklyn maintain the
same reilti-ce rank as to population
that they tid in 1860. There has
been considierable shifting of pllaces,
however, among those that now con
stitute the remainder of the twenty
foremost cities of the Union.
During the last decade, St. Louis
has ascended the scale from the
eighth to the fourth.
Chicago, in a similar proportion,
changes places from the ninth to the
fifth.
Baltimore, which in 1860 was the
fourth, retrogrades to the sixth.
Boston pursues the same direction,
from the fifth to the seventh.
Cincinnati retires a step, from the
seventh to the eighth.
New Orleans falls back from the
sixth to the ninth.
San Frtncisco, taking 'a notable
forward leap. vaults from the fif
teenth to the tenth.
Buffalo lags behind from the tentih
to the eleventh.
Vashington makes a stride from
the fourteenth to the twelfth.
Newark. New Jersey's thriving me
tropolis, drops from the eleventh to
the thirteenth.
Louisville. twelfth in rank in 1860,
is now assigned to the fourteenth.
Cleveland, fo r steps forward,
mounts from the nineteenth to the
fifteenth.
Pittsburgh alone retains the same
relative rank now as then, the six
teenth.
Jer~ey City rises from the twenti
eth to the importance of the seven
teenth.
Detroit recedes from the seven
teenth to the eighteenth; Milwaukee
from the eighteenth to the nine
teentb; and Albany, which wis ten
years ago tile thirteenth, now takes
-ie old place of Jersey City as the
as the twentieth.
TIUU'LATEST SNAKE vTOrT.-Mr. J.
R. Brockington, of Black Mingo, Wil
liamsburg county, is responsible for
the ?ollowing snake story: A dog be
longing tA a colored man, while try
i~g to catch a large and ferocious
hog,rs etat or bit by the hog on the
left side, just below the ribs, and out
of the oriice mad by the hog's teeth
tai4r tl tro large snakes. One was
slivej~ a Apparentlyj in perfect health,
tBebther was severed or cut in two
b thbog's teeth, and, of course, was
d  le color was bright, red
bt ..h blue intermixed. They
ein eterf particular: The
log is living. and in-its isuar condt
tion..--Charhoton (. . ) (. nurier,
AN ORIENTAL PARADISE.
A Yankee Woman's Experience in a
Turkish Bath.
flow Women Pass the Day in Constan
tinople,
Perfnmedl Luxuries frnm Which Men Are
Excluded.
TIHE MYSTERIES OF TIlE BATH.
C ox STANTINOPLE,4
4!b. 1(. j
I have read certainly not less than
fifty times elaborate descriptions of
genuine Turkish baths by Bayard
Taylor, Ross Brown(- and others, and
I had always had my imagination
filled with combined ecstacies of be
ing Ncrubbed with hot water and per
fumed soap. and iced sherbet, and I
:made up my mind not to leave Tur
key without having had that delight
ful experience. You know that I be
long to the softer sex. andl they do
not bathe promis~cnuously here as in
Baden Ba den, Lon g Branch and
many other fashionable watering
places.
This bath where I went is for la
lies alone, and not even the common
herd being admitted, for the charge
is very high. I have made a few
friends among the natives since I
came here, and can speak a few words
of Greek, (the predominant tongue,)
and owing to my acquaintance with
them I got a glimpse, or rather a
whole day's sight, of a paradise
where man is excluded. The exter
ior of these baths is of the usual
style, or no style, of Turkish archi
tecture-but the interior fully re
compenses for the lack of beauty
without. It is in the upper part of
Galata, and yon go in sedan chairs,
which wait for von, as you muet take
the extremest care of yourself in
coming out of the bath, particularly
at this season of the year. A cold
taken after a Turkish bath is always
fatal.
Four of us went. to_,ethcr with two
servants. who carried our towel,.
hathing dresses andi lunch. It is an
all day's job, and the ladies all take
lunch with them. I had a number of
very handsome and curious things
given me at the exposition by the
Egyptian and Turkish commissions,
and among them were large hathing
towels with borders of gold woven in;
also a bathing dress similarly deco
rated. My friends insisted on my
taking them, and they made of me
while in the bath a person of no or
dinary importance, for as it happens,
no one but royal ladies are permit
ted to wear such in public baths;
however, nobody interfered with my
right to wear them, only admired me,
not always from a distance.
FIRST CHAMBER.
On entering we were conducted to
a large room, where we must un
dress and leave our things. I think
there fifty women there in all stages
of undress, who all paused to regard
us with curiosity while we disrobed.
Men can pull of their most sacred
garments, toss them in a heap and
run about as if nothing were amiss,
but somehow I felt as Eve did when
she made the discovery that she was
a little too thinly cl:ad for that time
of the year.
A servant caugh) up our bathing
dresses and left the room, beckoning
us to follow. We ran the gauntlet of
a hundred pair of eyes, before we
reached the divan where I was laid,
like a defunct, srjll with no clothes
on. I raised my head to see if I
could not find a friendly towel or
anything, but tile attendant ducked
my head back on the pillow again, as
much as to say "lie there." I did,
but rolled my eyes around a little,
and saw that there were at least
twenty more women lying around in
.spots like myself; but they seemed
to take it very easily.
The room was very warm an d
grew warmer perceptibly, though
how I don't know, until I began to
feel as if I should suffocate, until my
heart beat painfully and I grew very
faint, when one of the women gave
me some lemonade, of which I drank
two glasses. Then, all of a sudden,
I began to perspire, and I looked like
a pumpkin that had lain out all night
in a heavy dow. I felt as if I was
dissolving, and waited patiently till
the end should come, and I should
be but the transparent essence of
what was one a very s4atantial
body; but that time had not come.
T ~a's , sleepy that T fell like clli
ing very hard names, when the wo
man came in and made me get up af
ter she had rubbed me down like a
race horse with a pair of very scrat
chy gloves, which left my skin as
red as a lobster. Then we. all being
in the same state, were led into an
other great, vaulted, marble-floored
room, where the divans are made of
marble, which is not at all soft to lie
on. This room was warmer than the
last, the more vapory, and the vapor
was more strongly perfumed with
saddal wood. After lying a few mo
inents the marble grows soft, and a
sense of the most delicious repose
comes over you. You feel a soft
languor and a dreamy content, and
your eyes close, and you lay with a
smile of exquisite laziness on your
lips, and your imagination flies off in
every possible direction, when the
sweet repose is again very rudely
broken, and you have again to
"move on."
LED INTO PARADISE.
Now. indeed; opens the door of
paradise; you are lhlt. till without
other covering than nature gives you,
into a large circular room, with mar
ble pillars supporting the blue dome
that is spangled with stars. All
around the room are marble divans,
and in the centre is an immense
fiuntain, in the basin of which are
sixty or seventy girls and women
playinig in the warm, perfumed wa
ter. or lying in all attitudes on the
marble edges of the basin. The wa
ter rises in one grand column over
fifty feet, and falls back into an up
per basin, while the lower one is un
disturbed, except by the beautiful
white forms that it most delights to
receive.
On all the divans lay women of all
ages and complexions, even to some
negresses, who only served to make
the white bodies and polished limbs
to appear more lovely than ever.
Small fountains were placed at regu
lar intervals around the large room,
and from these the attendants pour
ed continuously over the bodies of
those who lay on the divans warm
water, which w a s carried off b y
pipes.
One attendant stood at my head,
holding my gold-embroidered bath
ing apparatus, one lathered me with
perfumed soap till I began to imag
i:ne myself a gigantic rose, and all
these beautiful beings laughing and
singing and gliding around me but
other specimens of flowers. Another
attendant rubbed with gloves made
of sponge, and another poured warm
water over me incessantly, not dash
ing it, nor letting it trickle, but just
emptying the beautifully chased sil
ver ewer over me with the gentlest
motions, till it seemed like a caress.
Then soap of bitter almonds was
rubbed on my face, and another kind
was rubbed in my hair, all done in
that caressing way that made it a
positive ecstacy; then more perfumed
water, till I felt drowning in a sea of
all delights, in which I could distin
guish perfumes, flowers, sweet sing
ing voices, and forms of heavenly
beauty. Time and the outer world
were lost in this delightful trance,
and I desired nothing, nothing else
in the world to make my life content
forever.
LIVING STATUARY.
To lie there on the marble and
dreamily watch the glorious white of
the living statues, with the long
black hair and the rich, dark eyes;
to see the soft, undulating motions
of those swimming in the warm, de
licious water; to look at the lovely
forms stretched at full length on the
divans and on the edge of the foun
tain; and others laughing, sporting,
singing, mingling with affectionate
glances and wrestling in the water or
upon the marble floor, dripping from
every limb the perfumed water that
glistened on their bodies, and the
trickling of the fountains, and the
rosy. subdued light that stole in
through the jealously-guarded win
dows, were enough to send one of an
imagination like mine off into the
realms of fancy, and make one be
lieve it the promised land, and cause
the whole soul to be satisfied with
the enchanting picture, which need
ed no imagination to embellish.
For after all what is the heaven we
have been taught to believe in but a
place where all is light and perfume
and love and beauty; where every
sense shall be satisfied, and every
desire filled with a pure and exqui
site fullness? It is true that in this1
heaven of mine there were not any
mei. hdt I did nont mi~s them in my
supreme content, nor, I think, did
any of the women who were lying
about clasped lovingly in each oth
er's arms, or laughing and sporting
in the water, and I think now, as I
have before, I had just as lief have
my paradise one where no ·en could
come.
Just as I arrived at this very sen
siblejeonclusion my attendant aroused
me from my dreams of perfect peace
by pointing to the fountain and sig
nifying that I also was to get in.
ly four friends then made their ap
pearance with the servants and our
luncheon, and nobody can tell of the
comical look of us five sitting round
the baskets eating, and without any
clothes on. I have seen so many
sights in my life, but we women
around those baskets, with chicken
legs in our hands, and glasses of wine
and other things, were too perfectly
ludicrous for anything, and I laughed
till I couldn't eat. If I had only a
napkin to cover my face I think I
!hould have laid down and died on
the spot.
P.LAYFL SPIRITS.
All my dreams" 'of a luxurious,
sleepy, sensuous paradise, filled with
ndclulating figures of transcendant
beauty, were gone, and I was fully
possessed of the `demon of mirth,
and I provoked the others into my
awn state of mind-a capacity which
has never deserted me at any time or
place, or without any person, in my
life--and we were sood the maddest
>f the crowd in the perfumed waters.
I would be afraid to tell all the freaks
we performed and the antics and
pranks we ent. Although it did not
in the least startle the natives, it
might some who have imagined me
to be the model of perfection. -
But then you remember that Mrs.
grundp does not live in Constanti
nople, and she has no one to tell tales
out of school except mo own self,
and I never tell more than suits me,
Ft was two full hours before' our wild
sport ended, and we slid of the water
and sat talking in little knots of four
or five, while the attendants were
ilrying our hair, and seperating it
till' it stood' out in a light puff' all
around our herds. Not a tangle was
left in it, and no comb or brush was
used. Then we wrre laid on the
same marble divans, though with a
thick bathing towel this time under
us, while the attendants punched and
pulled, and rubbed all our joints, and
cracked all our knuckles and elbows
and shoulders, till I thought I should
be always even more unsteady than
ever. They don't give you the least
chance to make protest to this sort
of thing. They roll you and rub
you, up and down and rounid and
round, till you only want a chance to
get your hands free to "punch their
heads," when- all at once, panting
and perspiring, they grin at you and
say pekkeys which means "all right."
-[Correspondence Alta California.
THE MOST PLEASANT DREAlt.-A
Scotchman and an Irishman hap
pened to be journeying together
through a most interminiable forest,
and by some mishap lost their way
and wandered about in a pitiable
condition for a while, when they for
tunately came across a miserable
hovel, which was deserted save by a
lone chicken. As this poor biped
was the only thing eatable to be ob
tained they eagerly dispatched and
prepared it for supper. When laid
before them,# Pat concluded that it
was insufficient for the support of
both himself and Sawney, and there
fore a proposition was made to his
companion that they shouald spare
the chicken until next-mborning, and
the one who had the most pleasant
dream should have the chicken
which was agreed to. In the morn
ing Sawney told his dream. He
thought angels were drawing him up
to heaven in g basket, and he was
never before so happy. Upon con
cluding his dream, Pat exclaimed,
"Och, sure, be jabbers, I saw ye go
ing, and thought ye wouldn't come
back, so I got up and ate the chick
en myself."
59A wag went to a railrodd
station one evening, and, flqding the
best car full,'he said in a loud voice,
"'Why," this ear isn't going." 01
c~ourse this caused a- general am
pede, and the wag took the b seat,
In the midst of the indignation the
wag wrs asked: "Why did you sa
is nnw." s.iil ilic ws.
Ihprovemeat .`f Oar Lire S.ock.
In order to make stock-feeding
more profitable, we must continue to
improve our live stock till we have a
class of animals that will bring the
highest price in market. The better
the animals, the greater will be the
product of our feed and higher the
price for the meat. A well-fed ani
mal will be a source of profit in eve
ry way, while the profit and the meat
on one of the lean kind will be poor.
Some will say that it takes more
feed for blooded animals, and that
they won't hunt a living like the nu
tives.
That is just what is needed where
we have so much feed, and an ani
mal of quiet disposition will take on
flesh, but one with the agility of -a
fox-hound will adapt itself to the
circumstances in which it lives.-.
Another will say that our feedifig
won't pay, and that many(f the best
animals are destroyed by it.
It is a fact as plain as day, thatif
our stock were fed till one-third.bf
them died, we would make miore
money out of the balance than from
the whole number in a half-fed con
dition. By better breeding and bet
ter feeding we increase size and qual
ity of the meat producing animals,
and if we can send to market the
same number of pounds of rbetter
quality in three animals, it will cost
less freight than to send it in five of
less value. There will be less shrin
kage, less offal, and less room occu
pied.
We do not wish it understood that
we desire all farmers to become
breeders of thoroughbred stock:this
could not well be: the breeding of
any race of thoroughbred stock re
quires more care and attention than
the farmer can well give it: but what
we do urge is, that our western far
mers select the kind of stock beet
suited to their locality, if it be either
for meat or for the dairy, and use
only thoroughbred males of that
breed. Feed well and feel tillmatii
rity, and not dispose of stock at a
time when it is just becoming valu
able.
We have the facilities and the
feed, and there is no necessity .for'
paying freight to eastern feeders on
poor stock, and also on the grain tb
feed it there. We are robbing our
selves, robbing our soil, and enrich
ing the railroads. We must have
the railroads and the railroads must
have us, and by working together for
our own interests we will convince
them that it is their interest to deal
fairly with the farmers.
----
AW*HIGHEST CASH PRIXC
PAID FOR OLD GOLD AND SIL
VERWARE.
FERGUSON a SCHNACK.
CALUMxr.-The rules of politenees
are never at variance with the pris
cipies of morality. Whatever is r
ally impolite is immoral. We have
no right to offend people with our
manners or conversation. We.ha~te
no right to deal with orbe influenced
by gossip about the people we meat.
Their private affairs amre none of our
business. If we believe a man to be
unfit company for us, we must not
invite him; but if we meet where he
has been invited by others, we must
treat him with. civility. If we know
a man or woman to be a grave of
fender, we can not use that knowl
edge to injure him or her, unless it
is-absolutely needful for the protec
tion of othei The greatest and
best man in the world have been as
sailed by cakumny. The purest and
noblest do not often escape it. We
cannot investigate-as,,.s rule we
must disregard- all slanders.
Where great offenses-become ioto
rious, the offenders must be excom
muniated. In all other eases me
must give every one the benefit -oft
doubt; apply charitable construction,
hope for thebest and, and consida
every one innocent until he is proved
guilty.
WoxnA's Narua.-A young lady
just from Europe remarked to a'at
eran policeman the other day, i.:
S"It is of very little-coas.qience,!'
she said "whattkind. of meneyou send
out as Foreign Ministercs.Th
thing of real iaqortance jtthey
Any iian o. sign th i u
pose, if you
yo e4i P *l'
rIvit~.

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