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The Louisiana Democrat. (Alexandria, La.) 1845-1918, November 22, 1876, Image 1

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B~T . RACHAL) THE WORLD IS GOVEIRNED TOO MUICHI. (UPBLI$ESBJRI
TOL. 32.1 ALEXANDRIA, LA., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1876. 1NO. 14.
The Democrat.
TERMS:
TIHE DE1!OCR.T is published Week
ly, at Four DOLLARS per annum
Two DooLLARn AND FIFTY CENTS for
'ix months, PAY ABLE IN AD
VANCE! No subscription taken
for ra less period than six months.
ADnvsTISE~WENTS inserted at the rate
-,f O-E DOLLAR per square for the
first insertion and FIFTY CENTS for
each subsequent one.
EIGHT lines or less, (aREVIER) consti
tute a square.
OBITUARY Notices, Marriages, Public
Meetings, Cards of Thanks, etc., to
be paid for as advertisements.
.' PER.SONAL CARDS, when admis
tible, charged double the usual advor
aising rates.
MISCELLANEUUS.
D TY77'L- P E.ATT'S
- tPROVED -
"IRlF iVI G 1111" COTTOI III.
PATE NTED JULY 15, 1878.
Price Reduced to $1.50 Per Saw.
STHIS GIN HAS BEEN IN USE FOR
the past thlree seasons, and seve
ral recent improvements have been
added. It obviates all friction as the
ends of the cotton box, prevents the
roll from breaking, andl gives a LAR-.
GER FIELD OF LINT FROM THE
PSAME AMOUNT OF SEED THAN
ANY OTHER GIN IN U4E! The lIe
vulving Head lightens the draft and
calses the Gin to run faster with less
driving power, thns d.ing a great deal
more work within the same time while
eoneomizing team or animal pdwer
than any other Gin. The seed heing
ginned very close, the length of the
staple is increased, producing cotton
-on this accunnt of a greater market
value. This improved valne, given by
length of staple, with extra production
of liunt, added to increased aniotlnt of
work donlle; more thalll covers the cost
of the Gin in every 100 bales ginned.
Testimonials sent by mail on appli
eatiol.
JOSEPH B. WOLFE a CO.
GENERAL AGENTS,
No. 59 CARONDELET STREET,
NEw ORLEANS, LA.
John A., Williams & Co,
AGENTS.
Aug. 9, '76-6m. ALEXANDRIA
I. C. MILLER. JOS. FITZPATRICK
i. C, MILLER & CO.
FRONT ST.,
OPPOSITF TOWN WHARF,
.A L E EX A NDT DR IA
-DEALERS IN
C000KING AND HEATING
STOVSE
A FULL ASSORTMENT OF THE
CELEBRATED
- and -
BUCK'S BRILLIANT
ON HAND
80LD at CITY PRICES!
Ilouse Furnishing Goods
-- OF -
EVERY DESCRIPTION
GRANITE IRON WARE,
PRESSED WARE,
Coal Oil Lamps & Lanterns
PUMPS,
GAS PIPE
and FITTINGS
MANUFACTURERS Op
Copper, Till and Sheet
Iron Ware
--at-
WHOLESA.LE and RETAIL
TERMS CASIH.
MISCELLANEOUS.
FERIlSON & SCHINCKI
JEWELERS
-DEALERS IN
11IIS, PISTOLS AID CAlTlIDlES.
CUTLERY & YOlTIO 1S.
TOY S
and
FA NT Y CG-OODS
AGENTS FOR
S-ingaer t -
Wilscon I
Buc~.t-eye i
EWING 'ACHIH'S,
Leopold Gehr,
SECOND ST.,
UNDER THE TOWN HALLI
ALEXANDRIA, LA.
FAMILY GROCERIES!
FINE WINES.
LIQUORS and
FRENCH BRANDY.
111 Oll IIlU OI WI ISlIY I
om CONFECTIONERIES, CANDIES
and FRUITS of every
kind.
Fine Tobacco and Cigars
'EXCELSIOR'
N. L. 1cGINNISY, - - Proprietor
LIVERY. SALE & STAGE STABLE
Jackson, between 2d and 3d Sts.
HORSES, BUGGIES, HACKS AND
Harness always on hand for sale or
hire at reasonable rates. Horses board
ed per month, day or single feed. A
line of HIacks leave-the above stable on
TUESDAYS, THURSDAYS and SAT
URDAYS for Red River Landing, via.
LECOMTE,
LOYD'S BRIDGE,
CHENEYVILLE,
EVERGREEN,
COTTON PORT
Moreauville and Simmsport, making
close connection with the Mail steamer3
R. E. LEE, FRANK PARGOUD and
NATCHEZ, up and down.
A comfortable Hack, pair of horses
and careful driver always ready at the
above stable to convey persons to the
Sulphur Springs, liarrisonburg, Nat
chitoches, Many, Leesville or wherever
they wish to go, and at rates to suit the
times. I GUARANTEE SATISFAC
TION. N. L. McGINNIS,
May 5-1y. Proprietor.
THE UNDERSIGNED HAVING
rented the PASTURE
formerly kept by Mr. Ja
cob Irving, on the Bayou
Robert Road, adjoining the Corpora
tion line, respectfully informs those
interested that he is prepared to pan
ture COWS, HORSES and STOCK OF
ALL DESCRIPTIONS by the Montb.
TERMS:
ONE DOLLAR PER MONTH fof
grown cattle and Fifty Cents foryearl
ings, PAYABLE MONTHLY. For
Pasturage apply at the TOLL GATE.
EVERY POSSIBLE CARKEAND
attention will be paid to st6ck put
in the Pasture, but I will not be res.
ponible for themn beyond that careand
attention. HENRY JONES.
April 12, 1876.
SUBSCRIBE FOR
TriE DEMOCRAI
THE BURIAL OF R. B. lI&TES.
Not a cheer was heard, not a jubilant
note,
As home from the polls we hurried:
Not a journalist stopped to count the
vote
'Neath which they our candidate
buried.
They buried him totally long ere night,
Our friends with their arguments
turning;
The caupaign supplements all despite,
And Ingersoll's speeches burning.
Old' Useless Grant meant well, no.
doubt,
When in Chandler's toils he wound
him;
But he lay there, a nominee flattened
out,
With his bloody shirt around him.
Nor few nor low were our "damns"
and '"derns;"
But we could not speak our sorrow,
As we silently gazed on the latest re
turns
And bitterly thought of the morrow.
We thought, "When they Tilden in
augurate
In March, and from office we go,
The foe and the stranger'll investigate
And we'll have to skip off to Vigo."
Lightly they'll talk of our candidate
now
And say Conkling or Blaine had been
better,
And It would-have been wiser by far to
avow
le had written that Know-Nothing
letter.
iu' half of our heavy task was done
When we found it was no use count
ing,
And we saw the bonfire-heard the gun
Told of Tilden's majority mounting.
Slowly aind sadly w. laid him down
On the field of the lost election,
And each wished, as gloomier grew his
frown,
We had made abetter selection..
A Disgusted Widow, d
Capt. W.-has just returned from -
the Warm Springs. The Captain is
a widower. At the Springs was a
widow who rather set her cap for the
Captain. The girls told him to look t
out, and the Captain replied, well, he r
was ready.
Sitting out in the portico one even
ing, the cool breeze fanning like a
ten cent palm-leaf, and thinking of
his daughters far away at school, the
widow moved up close by and opened a
conversation.
"I hear Captain, you have grown- t
up daughters."
"Yes, madam, I have."
"How I should like to see their
pictures."
"I will show you a picture of my
eldest daughter" said the Captain,
handing her one.
"Oh, such a sweet face" said the
widow; "'and such a fine eye! Isn't
she called like you, Captain?"
"I don't know madam that she is."
"It is a wonder to me, Capt. W-,
you do not get married."
"Well, ma'am, I never think of it;
for the woman I'd have might not
have me, and then, you know, vice
versa."
"Yes, but what kind of a lady
would suit you?" and the widow
looked her sweetest.
It was right here the Captain's
wonderful nerve never forsook him,
but setting his eye steadily at the
widow's, he hardened his heart and
replied: "Madam, she must be nine
ty five years old to a second, and
worth two hundred thousand dol
lars."
"It is getting so chilly out here I
must go for my shawl, said the wid
ow; and she looked frigid zones at
the Captain as she brushed him by
with a toss of her head.-[Raleigh
Sentinel.
A Ricn Disn.-One of the earliest
Ministers to this country from
France brought with him an experi
enced French cook, and when the
former returned home the latter per
sonage remained in Washington,
where he became eminent as a cater
er for the public. And this man had
a daughter. About the same period
in our fashionable history an Eng
lish Minister brought with him a
very capable servant, and when that
Minister departed he established his
young friend in the grocery busi
ness. Anon he saw and fell in love!
with the ceek's daughter aforesaid,
and they were married, and that
cook's daughter is to-day one of the
successful leaders of fashionable life
in the Metropolis, living in style,
dressing in purple, and driving a
superb carriage.-[Washington Cap
ital.
The St. Gotihrad Tunnel. º
THE GREATEST TUNNEL IN EUROPE
THE DIRECT ROUTE FROM
ENGLAND TO INDIA.
While at Goeschenen I had an op
portunity of seeing the St. Gothrad
Tunnel, which is now being bored
through the mountains from Goes
chenen toward Italy, and frbm Ario- -
lo toward Germany. The approach
to the tunnel on the Goesehenen side
is in the midst of the wildest anti
most picturesque scenery. A num
ber of workshops, sheds, canttnes
and various small buildings cluster
about the mouth, and give to an oth
erwise wild spot the busy hum and
noise of enterprise, for the clicking
of machinery, whistling of the en
gine, and hammering from the black
smithing is incessant, as the work is
continued day and night by 2,000
men, who, under M. Favre's direc
tion, prosecute the work. These
men have been at work, in varying
numbers, however, just four years
the present month, and it will take
all their energies, united to-the work
of those on the Italian side, to finish
the undertaking by 1880. This, of F
course, if the money does not give
out, and there is a good deal of trou
ble in securing all that is needed.- F
At present the entire route is sur
veyed from Luzerne and Zurich to
Milan, and parts of it cut. In the F
tunnel two and three fourths kilome
ters have been completed on the
German side and about four and F
one fourth on the Italian. The tun
nel will be ten miles long. The
workmen employed are almost all
Italians, and work eight hours out of
twenty-four. Dynamite is used for
the purpose of blasting, and all the F
drills are the ordinary chilled steel,
the diamond drill being unemployed.
The usual machine for driving the F
drills is employed; and works en
tirely by means of compressed air,
which is brought from the reservoirs F
by means of a large iron pipe. The
reservoirs are supplied by a number
of condensing engines, turned by F
water, for which purpose a mountain
stream is, some way above the north
of the tunnel, diverted into a sluice- F
way. A strength of ten to twelve
atmospheres is always maintained.
Compressed air is also used to work C
the engine, which carries its reser
voir behind, like a tender on an or
dinary engine, only it is about sixty
feet long, and of the cylinder boiler
shape. It runs easily and smoothly
and, being without any heat, is much
pleasanter to work. It is used main
ly for hauling the stone than the in- b
tesior to a side-track, after it is b
brought away from the.immediate d
vicinity to the blast by means of t
horses. Although this tunnel and
route will take a long time to com
plete, it will unquestionably be of
the greatest service when time is f
considered, as the route is from Eng
land to Cologne, aloiig the Rhine to
Frankfort, then Basel, Luzerne and e
St. Gothrad, and you are in Italy. I
The engineers in charge prove suf
ficiently that the high grade to which
the road attains before passing into
the tunnel will in no way impede the
hauling of freight, and that with I
good speed. It will, unquestionably
be a part of the direct route to India 1
"from England, and decidedly the
shortest to Italy. A competitive 1
route through'the Rhone Valley and
by the Simplon Pass to Italy is pro
jected in France i~keep this travel
through France, but is still in em
bryo. It woald have the advantage
of having the railroadflnished as far
as Seisse and builtas far as the foot
of the pass.--[Leipsic Cor. Boston
Herald.
A CAr IN A NswsPArPE PRESS.-A
novel accident occurr8d in the press
room of the Mercury last night. The
second page was laid on the cylinder
a few minutes before 12 o'clock, and
the crank turned that put the press
in motion. The cylinder made a few
revolutions and suddenly stopped,
and the pressmen Were horrified on
seeing the papers and machinery
covered with blood. The first im
pression was that some person had
been crushed in the press, An in
vestigation showed that. a cat had
crept under the cylinder, and, seek
ing to escape after it started, was in
,stantly beheaded. The compositors
Swere over an hour in repairing the
mischief done to the type.-[N. Y.
Mercury
THE ELECTION - RAPIDES,- OFFICIAL.
" "-., , -. , PC 0
0 o" , " - , .
S 4  ,
Fc 6 1 , , . «. 0 4 I .. ,
B c . ., . , . , . . 1 ... . 1
For PreLdent-
Samuel J. Tilden...... 157 167 144 141 64 40 58 43 66 57 170 110 96 112 194 1619
R. . Hayes.........344 294 147 202 246 39 00 3'3 1 1 276 4 43 16 135 1751
For Governor-
Francis T. Nicholls .... 158 1691 148 149 1 64 40? 59 43 66 `'57" 170 111i 97 '9 12 196'1,39
S. B Packard......... 335 294 147 202 245 39 00. 3 1 1 27 4 4 416 132 1729
For Lient. Gov.
LouisA. Wiltz........ 157 168 145 144 64 .40 59 43 66 57 170 111 97 112 19541628
C. C. Antoine........342 293 147 199 246 39 00 3 1 1 276 4 43 16 133 1743
For Secretary of State
W. A. Strong.......157 168 145 143 64 40, 59 43 66 57 170 111 97 112 193 1625
E. Honore........... 345 293 147 202 246 39 00 3 1 1 276 4 43 16 136 1752
For Auditor
Allen JLmoel........157 168 145 143 64 40 59 43 - 66 57 170 .111 97. 11 194 1626
G. . B.Johnson .......344 293 147 202 246 39 00 3 1 1 276 4 438 16 133 1748
For Atty Genl.-
H.N. Ogden....... 157 168 144 143 63 40t 58 43 66 57 170 111 97 112 194 1623
W. H. Hunt..........344 293 148 202 246 39 00 3 1 1 276. 443 16 136 1752
Supt. Public Education
R. M. Lusher..........157. 169 145 143 64 39 59 43 66 57 170 111 97 112 196 1628.
W. G.Brown.........336 292 147 000 246 39 00 3 1 1 276 4 43 16 ]33 11537
For District Judge
W.F. Blackman.......136 138 108 145 63 37 26' 41 66 37 173 102 92 101 189 1454,
R. A. Hunter...........356 311 176 196 249' 38 39 1 1 21 273 12 47 25 1314 1876
For District Attorney
E. G. Hunter- ........150 146 126 136 62 37 30 29 66 54 171 110- 60 103 160 1446
Jae. Andrews .........350 311 160 205 247 38 8 10 61 '4 276 4 75 22 167 "18886
For Senator
Lewis Texadao........156 163 139 142 63 36 46 ~ 8 66 54 170 110 97 105 199 1584
G.Y. Kelso...........334 285 144 201 247 38 00 1' '1 1 273 4 42 16 124 1710
For Representatives
K.M. Clark........156 166 140 172 68 38 57 43 65 58 171" 110 97 106 198 6,4
James Jeffries .......159 168 154 145 65 38 57 43 66 33 i71 110 97 106 195 1607
G. W. Stafford ...... 147 140 104 132 64 36 33 42 66 33 168 107 96 100 190 1457
W.J. DeLacy......... 336 288 147 194 245 38 00 .1 1 1 273 A4 43; '16 131 1718
E. J. Barrett ........3..39 301 181 199 247 39 00 2 2 40 272 7 48' 26 135 1833
BaptisteDrew ........342 285 143 180 246 39 00 3 1 1 275 4 43 16 132 17it
For Parish Judge-
W. W. Whittington,Jr143 131 107 109 61 31 18 41 65 41 159 03 98 92 190 1TO 9
John Clemeuts........350 323 179 228 '249 42 38 3 2 17 287 8 42 33 134 1035
For Sheriff-
D. . Paul ............175 185 154 166 58 45 32 45 66 51 194 104 102 115 128 1620
l. M. Robinson.......326 273 136 173 244 30 .8 00 1 1 247 6 :38 12 201 1696
For Clerk:
J. G. P. Hone.........139 122 .65 119 58 33 26 49 66 44 l1'V 76 108 82 192 1293
J. H. Rausdell ........349 312 154 218 247 33 36 1 1 5 304 6 81 23 136 1856
For Recorder:
Mires Rosenthal .......154 160 141 141 64 38 52 39 66 57 170 109 96 111 194 1592
V. W. Porter..........335 287 148 198 247 38 00 00 1 00 276 6 43 16 130 1725
For Coroner:
Isaac Roberts.........139 143 134 138 63 • 38 31 40 66 54 170 103 95 101 196 1510
W. H. Slnadburue.....343 294 150 199 247 39 00 3 1 00 276 4 4 19 132 1750
Coloring Human Hair by Eating
Eggs.
The much-vexed question. How se
to get gold hair? is solved at last. in
While the German shrindk from being ey
held a fair-haired nation, who knows,
but the'sufferers, what other nations tii
have gone through to win the hair g,
despised by Prussia ? Ladies have th
borne, unheard-of-torments in pur- gi
suit of this fictitious gold. One who t1
had to be turned round in the sun
cc
for hours during the process bore i
with stoic fortitude the terrible
headaches involved each week, nor
ever complained of what she had to i
pay, though, after all, she wus scarce- el
ly even electro-plated. Some run p
other risks in robbing Teuton corp- t1
ses of their long, fair locks ; and all a
is ineffectual while eyes and skin re
main to give the lie to hair. Now
no more dyes, migraines or wigs will d
be neccessary. Every body may
sport the "glad gold hair"-nay, t
blue eyes, too, and snowy skins. All
you have to do is to go and live on
aq island and eat penguins' eggs-
and the more you eat the fairer you
will get. None need despair, for
hair too dark to turn to gold turns 1
red, and red hair, being more the
rage than flaxen, tant mieus. The
isle in question is one of the Crozet
group, on which the survlvors of the
unfortunate Strathmore were wreck
ed last year, and only rescued after
six months' durance vile. They had
little to eat but penguins' eggs (and 1
doubtless the eggs without the island
would be of no avail), but the slight
inconvenience of a sameness in food
would be readily encountered by the
r votaries of fashion. A survivor
writes: "The eggs did every one
a great deal of good. * * * A
y most remarkable thing was that every
one had fair skins and light hair,
a dark faces and hair being quite
changed, black hair turning brown
d or red and faiter people quite flaxen."
If some enterprising Englishman
i- does not immediately set up a hotel
,s. on this enchanted spot, we shall
e never give John Bull credit for know
. ing how to make his fortyqe,-[Lon
don Echo,
Glass'Eyes.
A novel exhibit in the German I
section of the Exposition main build- Arl
ing is a large collection of artificial full
eyes, representing all sizes "and The
shapes, from the pale blue to the sev
black and gray. A careful examina- stei
tion fails to discover any that are ten
green thus setting at rest forever Th
the conundrum, "Do you see any mo
green in my eye ?" For it follows if der
there are any green eyes among th 1 ]
people they would have found their des
counterpart in the artificial. Judg- bet
ing from the large stock of eyes on get
exhibition, the business must be a p
good one in the old world. Taking vol
it for granted that one person in ten
every 5,000 in the Centennial is the the
possessor of a glass eye, the number for
thus far would amount to an army of rec
about 1,000. eai
The eyes on exhibition are gotten gr
up in new style, and could hardly be rai
distinguishea 'fsm the original when pr;
placed in the socket, were it not that yo
they keep up a continual stare. They TI
are made up of a light, durable he
material, and considerable skill has ty
been exemplified in the preparation. ir
Fyes are divided into quite a number wI
r of classes, and among them are de
laughing eyes. These generally con- gi
a sist of a light-blue iris seem to dance at
e around in the aqueous fluid. Then tb
tihere are languid eyes. piercing eyes, m
e dull, heaving-loo!ng eyes, and bright fr
sparkling eyes, all of which have T
r their counterpart in the human race. ai
d As a mere piece of mechansism, l
4 the world nowhere furnishes such a n
d beutiful and complex piece of ma- -
it chinery in so small a space as the
d human eye, and as an optical instrn
to ment it is perfect beyond imitation. c
r It it bad enough when an individual t
ie loses both of these instruments ; but v
A there is comfort in the fact that when
y one is gone, the hand of the optician t
rs has made another, which, while it
e cannot give sight, yet it can help re I
rn store marred beauty. 1
an --PRovxDENCE either made a terri
at rible mistake, or disguised a good
all, purpose in a most impenetrable mys
W- tery, when he made the man who
iI- chews a toothpick on the street,
{Racbhunge,
Saved by s Prayer.
At the time of my visit to Baz*tr
Ark., a court of Judge Lynch was ft
full session, just outside .tte town.-'
The culprit, a young man of twenty.
seven, was proven guilty of horse
stealing. The jury-the mob-- sen
tenced him to be hanged forritlth
The rope wras procurred, and he was *
mounted on the rear of a wagon ln
4er the branchei of a black oak.
Everything was ready for his
death, when a philanthrepic man
benign appearance-he was -sa~ tani
ger in that community-requeted t4
6 pray in secret with the prisoner. A4
vote was taken, and he was allowed
ten minutes to work on the soul of
the doomed man. It was the most
r fortunate grant the youn iman ever
f received. When in the midst of an
earnest supplication to the throne of
grace, three of the prisoner's comr
B rades entered the crowd, tumbled the
n praying man over, and gave the
t young mad two loaded revolvers,
y The four desperadoes 'broke ; for
e horses held by another of their 'par
,s ty, which they mounted and rode off,
firing into the crowd. So 'quick
r were the movementseof the des era
'e does that the members of the san
1- guine cburt were taken by surprise,
e and before they recovered the horse
a thieves had a good start. There was
s, mounting of steeds in hot haste, pro
It fanity and pistol shots In profusion.
re The outlaws had the fleetest horses
e. and escaped. The jury dispersed"
n, sadly to their homes, intending to'
a make surer work of the next cnlprit.
a- -[Reading Eagle.
he - -
n- THEY NEVER Do.--Trials never
in. come singly. It was only last wReek
gal that we learned that the coal supply
ut would be exhausted in a Ilttloq over
en 9,000,000 years, and now news comes,
an that the planet Vaulin is lost. We
it can hardly think any one would be
re so mean as to steal Vulcan, but the
nights have been dark lately, and '
there are a good maany tramps about.
rri- If Vulcan has fallen in the hands of
)od an honest person, it will probAbly be
ys- returned ; but perhaps the best way
rho would be to offer a liberal reward and
etf, no question asked..--Norwich V]-e.
letin,

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