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The Louisiana Democrat. (Alexandria, La.) 1845-1918, November 29, 1876, Image 1

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S. RACEAL) THE WORLD IS G-OVEIRNED TOO MNUOCH- (PUTLISIE
VOL. 32.1 ALEXANDRIA, LA., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1876. 1NO. 15.
The Democrat.
TERMSi
TIHE DEMOCRAT is published Week
ly, at Foiv' DOLuLARS per annum
Two Dor..ARS AND FIFTY CENTS for
.ix months, PAYABLE IN AD
VANC E! No subscription taken
for A less period than six months.
iA,vpRr';fxENtirs insepted at the rate
of O.~n I)OLLiAt per square for the
first inkertisn and FirrF CENTS for
each subsequent oner
EourT lines or less, (BREVIER) consti
tute 1a square.
o~riTv.~ur Niotices, 1Iarriages, Public
Meetings, Cards of Thanks, etc., to
;re paid for as advertisements.
!V PERSONAL CAuTs, Wlien admis
tible, charged double the usual adver
tising rates.
MISCELLANEOUS.
3 'A' ' id.P RAKTT'S
--IMPROVED -
"ll llTIG ll1" dIoT i I.
pATFEN'TED JULY 15, 1883.
Price Reduced to $1.50 Per Saw.
TrHIS GIN IIAS BEEN IN USE FOR
L the |pist three seasons, and save
r d recent improvements have been
added. It obviates all friction as the
ends of the cotton box, prevents the
roll from, breaking, antl gives a LAR
GER FIELD OF LINT FROM TilE
SAliE AMOUNT OF SEED THAN
ANY OTIIER GIN IN USE! The ie
vilvling tleu hlightens the draft. and
causesl the Gin to run faster with less
driving l)power, thus doing a great deal
more work within the same time while
ecieIonointizig tiam lll r animal power
than any otliher (ii. Thrie seed being
ginned very clo.se, the length of tlhe
Stapleh is llicreased, producing cotton
oil this aerelllt of a greater market
viilai. T'lhi iinplrovedi vuluie, given by
leigth of staple, with extra production
of lint, added to increased amounilit of
work done; more thaln covers the cost
of the Gin in every 1(N) bales ginned.
Testitn nials sent by mail on appli
catiolnl
JOSEPHI B. WOLFE a CO.
GENERAL AGENTS,
No. 59 CARONDELET STREET,
NEW ORLEANS, LA.
John A. Williams .& Co.
AG EN ''S.
Aug. 9, '76-6m. ALEXANDRIA
I.C. MILLER. JOS. FITZPATRICK
SC. MILLER& CO.
FRONT ST.,
OPPOSITE TOWN WHARF,
A I E X A , D I A
-DEALERS IN
00OKING AND HEATING
ST OVYS,
A FULL ASSORTMENT OF THE
CELEB3RATED
- and -
BUCK'S BRILLIANT
ON HAND
SOLD at CITY PRICES!
House Furnishing Goods
-OF
EVERY DESCRIPTION
GRANITE IRON WARE,
PRESSED WARE,
Coal Oil Lamps & Lanterns
PUMPS,
GAS PIPE
and FITTINGS
MANUFACTURERS OF
Copper, Tiu and Sheet
Iron Ware
-at
WHOLESALE and RETAIL
TERM1s CAsIL
MAllSCELLANEOUS.
FIGIUSON SCACIC 1I
JEWELERS
-DEALE S IN
GOIS, ISTOLS Lll Cll fl GIS.
CUTLERY & NOTIONS.
F A CN OY O ODS
AGENT. FOR
Binger I
VT ile nt
ES .ol-aleye I
"WING k ACHINES.
Leopol4 Gehr,
SECO1 ST.,
UNDER TIHE fOWVN IIATI,
ALEXANI RIA, LA.
FAMILY GiOCERIES!
FINE WINES,
LIQUOR and
F!RENCIIH BRANDY.
FIll flU JOlifI WIRIS IYI
tIP CONFECTION'ERIES, CANDIES
and FRUITS of every
kind.
Fine Tobacco and Cigars
'EXCELSIOR'
N. L. McGINNIS, - Proprietor
LIVERY. SALE & STAGE STABLE
Jackson, between 2d and Sd Sts.
HORSES, 'GIES, HACKS AND
Harness always on hand for sale or
hire.at reasonable rates. Horses board
ed per month, day or single feed. A
line of Hacks leave the above stable on
TUESDAYS, THURSDAYS and SAT
URDAYS for Red River Landing, via.
LECOMTE,
LOYD'S BRIDGE,
CHENEYVILLE,
EVERGREEN,
COTTON PORT
Moreauville and Simmsport, making
close connection with the Mall steamers
R. E. LEE, FRANK PARGOUD and
NATCHIEZ, up and down.
A comfortable Hack, pair ofhorses
and careful driver always ready at the
above stable to convey persons to the
Sulphur Springs, HIarrisonburg, Nat
dhitoches, M~:ny, Leesville or wherever
they wish to go, a:ad at rates to suit the
times. I GUtARANTEli SATISFAC
TION. Ii. L. McGINNIS,
May 5-ly. Proprietor.
PATUrUEAGE !
TrHE UNDERSIGNED HAVING
I rente the PASTURE
formerly kept by Mr. Ja
cob Irving, on thp Bayou
Robert Road, adjining the Corpora-1
tion line, respectfully informs those
interested that he is prepared to pas
ture COWS, HOR ES and STOCK OF
ALL DESCRIPTI NS by the Month.
TE MS:
ONE DOLLAR iPER MONTH for
grown eattle and ]fifty Cents foryearl
ings, PAYABLEj MONTHLY. For
Pasturage apply ap the TOLL GATE.
E"VERY POSSIBLE CARE AND
attention willi be paid to stock put
in the Pasture, b4t I will not be res
ponsible for them beyond that careand
attention. HENRY JONES.
April 12, 1876.
SUBSCRIBE IOR
T'E DEMOCRAT
THE A B C's OF GRANTISM.
Easy lessons for beginners,
Fitted too for older sinners.
A-is for Ames, the briber-inu-chief, r
Who led poor Colfax, smiling to grief.
B--for four scoundrels stands, dyed in
the grain, a
Butler and Babcock and Belknap and
Elaine.
C-is for Cameron, the ancient bell- t
wether,
And Casey and Conkling, two birds of
a feather. t
D-for the Devil stands, father of lies, t
And his servants, both Dawes and De
'ano, likewise.
E-is for Evans, whose pickings out 1
West,
Helped Belknap's two spouses to feath
er their nest.
F-for the rascally Fisher we find, c
And speaking of rascals brings Frye
into mind.
G-Is for Grant, at the sound of whose a
name
The check of the patriot reddens with
shame. C
II-is for Hayes, who, his perjuries t
showln.
No longer must rank as The Little Un- s
known.
t
I-is for Ingersoll--shades of Tom
Paine;
'Tis fitting this wretch should lead r
Hayes' campaign.
J-is for Joyce, whom Grant loved like
a brother;
A tried man was he; how is Jayne for I
another?
K-Is Kilpatrick, and Kilbourn as well, C
And Kellogg, the infamous "pard" of r
Durell.
L-is for Luckey, and Logan, and Leet,
Three patriots whose pulses in unison
beat.
1--Is for Morton, McDonald, McKee;
Only two have been clothed with the
stripes of the three.
N-for both Norton and Noyes, we will
take
Both Granites, both loyal, and both "on
the make."
O--stands for Orth; like a squirrel
' was he,
Who said, "Hold on, don't shoot; I'll
come down from the tree."
P-is for Patterson, Packard and Pease:
IIow many State Prisons are hungry
for these? . 4
Q-is for Quackenbosh; zounds what.a
name!
Yet 'tis music to Conkling, though un
known to fame.
R-is for Robeson, the navy's disgrace;
He does not confess, and so holds to his
place.
S--is so crooked it fitly may pass
For Shepherd or Sickles, those snakes
in the grass.
T-is the sorehead renegade Tuttle,
Townsend, the high or stepping con
frere of Butler.
U-is for Upson, the Buckeye dead-beat
Who will have a fat office if Hayes gets
his seat.
V-stands for Veazy, a brick without
straw,
From the best civil service the world
ever saw.
W-is Williams, of law the sulbrerter,
And Whipper, and Wheeler the bloody
shirt flirter.
X-for ex-Senator Harlan must stand,
SWho was laid on the shelf at the peo
ple's command.
Y-for poor Yates-though he wrought
so much ill
We will pass him in silence-De mor
tuls nil.
I Z-the last letter In the pack,
Is the drunken old scoundrelly blood
Sletter Zach.
&c.-the patriots who grabbed the back
salary;
r And so we'll have done with the loyal
rogues' gallery.
-THE wua who wants to go to St.
Petersburg and enlist in the Russian
army to-fight the Turks, was at the
Central depot yesterday, and inquir
ed: "What's the fare to St. Peters
burg?" "Five hundred dollars."
"Too much; I'll give you four hun
dred." "We have but one rate,"
said the agent. "And you won't let
me go for four hundred dollars?"
"Couldn't do it." "Then I won't go.
I'm a patriot from head to foot, but
I can't let no railroad swindle me.
I'm the bloodiest kind of a border
wildcat, and Russia wants me bad,
but that hundred dollars opens a
great gulf between us." - [Detroit
Free Press.
A Most Wonderful Achlevemient.
WHAT FRANCE HAS ACCOMPPLIStIED A
SINCE THE PRUSSIAN
WAR.
At the meeting of the Social
Science Congress in Liverpool on o
the 17th ult., Mr. Shaw Lefevre, M. w
P., delivered an address, in the course ft
of which he said: "I cannot avoid b
remarking on one of the most extra
ordinary economic facts of modern si
times, namely, the revival of France k
from the misfortunes and losses en- 13
tailed upon her by her war with Ger- a
many. Never did a country appear at
to be more hopelessly crushed by the a
weight of its losses and by the large n
indemnity imposed upon it by the if
victors. Yet she has borne her bur- a
den with heroism, and has emerged ft
from her burdens with an elasticity I
which has surprised Europe. Tle b
contrast between France and Ger- ti
many at this moment is most re- h
markable. The defeated, humiliated b
and plundered country is, apparently tl
richer than ever. The victorious 5s
country, the 'Pays of Millards', the n
recipients of the indemnity, appears e:
to be not only none the richer, but d
absolutely poorer for the transaction. Ii
The feverish excitement caused by 1i
the influx of so much wealth has a
now given place to a reaction in d
which all commercial transactions s'
are involved; general gloom and dis
tress pervades the country. In a re 1E
cent comic paper, published at Ber- tl
lin, it was suggested as a remedy for a
the general distress in Germany, as "
compared with France, that Germa- It
ny should again declare war against "
France, that it should again march E
its armies to Paris, again defeat those a
of France, but in making peace, in "
lieu of imposing an indemnity of "
200,000,000 on France, it should n
agree to pay that amount to the con
quered. [Cheers and laughter.] By tl
that means alone, it was humorously P
suggested, would Germany secure to s
itself the prosperity which France
was enjoying. What, then, is the n
economic explanation of this great 1'
difference in the condition of the two c
countries? Why is it that the loss of'
two milliards has not made the one
country poorer or the gain not made 1i
the other country richer? Is not the r
explanation to be found in this, that b
the true and only source of wealth is f
production and saving? The French i1
people are the most industrious and e
saving that the world contains. In C
no other country is wealth so widely a
distributed. In none are the habits C
of industry, economy and thrift more t
universally exercised. After the l
war these people from the highest to C
the lowest, met their losses by even
greater industry and greater econo- 1
mies than ever. Now, when they c
have retrieved their losses and over
come their difficulties, this habit is
still continued. On the other hand C
the influx of money to Germany led I
to a general expansion, not only of
trade, but of the habits of living.
Luxury of all kinds increased. Fool
hardy speculation multiplied. Un- '
productive employment was stimula- I
ted. In the subsequent collapse the
people as a whole have lost more
than they gained by the indemnity,
while it is no easy task to divert
so much unproductive labor into its
old channels of production. The
great recuperative power shown by
France has again turned the atten
tion of economists to her social con
dition. What is it that constitutes
her strength? What is it that cre-1
ates this universal habit of thrift I
and industry? It cannot, I think, be
doubted that the answer is to be
found in the wide distribution of
property which is so distinguishing'
a feature of the French system. Up
ward of seven millions of persons own
property in land or houses, and of
these five and a half millions are
owners of agricultural land. Up
ward of four millions of persons own
between them the public debt ofi
France. The passion for land has
not only created five millions of pea
sant proprietors, the most industri
ous and thrifty people in the world,
but it has spread through the whole
population, from the highest to the
lowest, the feeling of individual own
ership, the desire to become inde
pent, and the habit of thrift and sa
ving which enables them to become
so."
UR NICKLE PLATED SPOONS
and FORKS WE WARRANT for
FIVE YEARS.
FERGUSON & SCHNACK
The Demon of Drink.
A FEARFUL PICTURE OF THE LATE REV.
J. J. TALBOT' S STRUGGLE pr
AGAINST IT. di
- se
The following is an extract from
one of the lectures of J. J. Talbot, A'
who died lately at Elkhart, Indiana, A
from the effects of a drunken de C(
banch: D
But now the struggle is over, I can F]
survey the field and measure the G
losses. I had position high and ho- In
ly. The demon tore from around K
me the robes of my sacred office, and Li
sent me forth churchless and godless M
a very hissing and byword among M
men. Afterward I' had business M
large and lucrative, and my voice in N
all large courts was heard pleading N
for justice, mercy, and the right.-- N
But the dust gathered on my open S(
books, and no footfall crossed the 'r
threshold of the drunkard's office. I T,
had moneys ample for all necessities V
but they took wings and went to feed W
the coffers of the devils which. pos
sessed me. I had a home adorned
with all that wealth and the most
exquisite taste could suggest. The C,
devil crossed its threshold and the C
light faded from its.' chambers; the 11
fire went out on the holiest of altars, Ic
and leading me through its portals, K
despair walked forth with her, and A1
sorrow and anguish lingered within. M
I had children, beautiful, to me at J1
least, as a dream of the morning, and M
they had so entwined themselves N
around their father's heart that no N
matter where it might wander, over N
it came back to them on the bright 0
wings of a father's undying love. 0
His destroyer took their hand in his P,
and led them away. I had a wife R
whose charms of mind and person V
were such that to see here was to re- '
member, and to know her was to
love. * * * For
thirteen years we walked the rugged T
path of life together, rejoicing in its
sunshine and sorrowing in its shade.
This infernal monster couldn't spare
me even this. I had a mother who
for long, long years had not left her
chair, a victim of suffering and dis- D
ease, and her choicest delight was in
reflection that the lesson which she
had taught at her knee had taken
root in the heart of her youngest
born, and that he was useful to his A
fellows and an honor to her who bore w
him. But the thunderbolt reached b
even there, and there it did its most
cruel work. Other days may cure
all but this. Ah! me; never a word
of reproach from her lips; only a
tender caress; only a shadow of a
great and unspoken grief gathering d
over the dear old face; only a trem
bling hand laid more lovingly on my
head; only a closer clinging to the ih
cross; only a piteous appeal to hea- b
ven if her cup at last were not full.
And while her boy raved in his wild
delirium 2,000 miles away, the pity. 1
ing angels pushed the golden gates d
ajar, and the mother of the drunkard
entered into rest.
And thus I stand, a clergyman
without a cure; a barrister without
brief or business; a father without a
child: a husband without a wife; a
son without a parent; a man with t
scarcely a friend; a soul without hope b
-all swallowed up in the maelstromn
of drink.
(UR NICKLE PLATED SPOONS g
and FORKS WE WARRANT for
FIVE YEARS.
FERGUSON & SCINACK t
-------****- Ic
WOMEN CAN'T UNDERSAND POLI
TIcs.-Dunbar's wife listened to a
long political discussion while riding
deown town yesterday morning, and at
dinner she remarked to her husband:
"Woll, eight or nine days more t
will decide this election."
"In a measure" was his guarded t
reply.
"I'm awful glad" she continued.
"You commenced going out nights
about the 1st of March, and you've
Skept it up ever since. "I'll be one
Shappy woman about the 8th of No
Svember. We'll have cheerful fires,
games, comfort and-"
"Charlotte." solemnly interrupted
the husband, "can't you understand
Sthis thing? The election will occur
Son the 7th proximo, of course. Af
ter that date I must help count up
- the returns, verify them, put our
clubs in training for the next cam
e paign, examine the lies of the oppo
sition, and so forth, and it may be
next April before I get through.
3 You must have patience, for every
r thing is working all right."
What could she do but barst into
Stears.--lfetroit Free Press.
The Popular Vote.
The following are figures on the i
popular vote cast on Nov. 7th, accor
ding to the majorities reported by the
several States:
FOR TILDEN,.
Alabama .................. 30,000
Arkansas ..................25,000
Connecticut................. 3,000
Delaware.................. 2,500
Florida ................... 1,000
Georgia. ...................75,000
Indiana'............ ....7,000
Kentncky ..................60,000
Louisiana .......... ...10,000
Maryland ..................18,000
Mississippi .................30,000 .
Missouri ...................50,000
New Jersey ................ 9,000
New York .................. 35,000 a
North Carolina ..............15,000 t
South Carolina ....... .... 2,000
Tennessee .................50,000 i
Texas ............ ......80,000 c
Virginia .............. ....30,000 E
West Virginia ......."...... 7,000
449,500
FOR HAYES.
California ...............65,000
Colorado ..... ........... 1,000 ,
Illinois .................. 30,000
Iowa .....................".45,000
Kansas ...................15,000
Mlaine .......................15,000
Massachusetts .............35,000
Michigan ................20,000 t
Minnesota ............... ..15,000
Nebraska. ................ 5,000
Nevada .................... 1,000 t
New Hampshire ............ 3,000
Ohio...... ................. 6,000
Oregon ................... 500 t
Pennsylvania. .............15,000 1
Rhode Island................ 6,000
Vermont ..................25,000 1
Wisconsin ............... 3,000
:245,000
Tilden's majority .........304,500
NTEW GOODS AND LATEST DE- I
SIGNS IN: SILVER PLATED
WARE JUST RECEIVED.
FERGUSON & SCHNACK
Dining With a Turkish Pasha.
The correspondent of the London
News, writing from Philippopolis,
August 10, describes a dinner whieh
was given Mr. Schuyler and himself
by IMutte-Sarif, the Governor of the
place. le says:
The dinner he offered us was a co
lossal one. It was a sort of combi
nation of a Turkish and a Frank din
ner, multiplied by about ten ' We
did not sit in a circle on the ground,
and all eat with our fingers from the
same dish, but around a large table,
in the middle of which` was a large
bouquet of flowers, and we ate With
silver knives and forks. But it was
a most unlooked-for dinner, never
theless, fuill of surprises, of pitfalls
dug for the feet of the unwary, of
ambuscades and traps laid for the
rash and the heedless. There were
some twenty-five or thirty courses,
and three times did the fruits and
the sweets come in, leading me to
believe we were approaching the end;
three times did I attack them only to
be surprised and oferwhelmed by
more roast beef, more boiled mutton,
more ragouts, more chickens, more
game, more partridges, more fish,
more pilaoff, more cabbage and pota
toes, that came down upon me in
crushing and unexpected quantities.
It was more than man could bear,
and I finally gave up the contest.
The dinner commenced about 8
o'clock and continued until mid
night, by which time everybody re
tired from the assault, and there
were still whole companies and bat
talions of dishes of roast beef, of
boiled mutton, of game, of chicken,
of ragouts, of all sorts of Turkish
"fixins," fruits and sweets, ready to
charge down upon us in irregular,
disorderly masses had we shown the
slightest sign of resistance. This
dinner had no sense of the ridicun
lous. It would have gone on repeat
Sing itself over and over again all
night, like a stage army, had we al
lowed it. I must say, however, that
everything was very good, and could
we have had about ten days to eat it
r in, the dinner would have been a very
great success.
e -THE latest instance of "married
in haste" was that of a couple united
in matrimony on an Erie express
o train while it was hqmming at the
rate of 40 miles an hour,
The Younger Boeys
LETTER FROM T'HEtI A~itv, bRBS FANNIM
C. 'rWYMAN&
--ww
[From the St. Peter (Minn.) Tribune.P
Mrs. Twyman, an aunt of the
Younger boys, sends us the following
letter in acknowledgment of the kind
ly account given by tudson Jones, it
our issue of October 4th, of his in
terview with the Youngers at Fari=
bault.' The sister of the boys, Miss
Henrietta Hardin Younger, who was
at the time at Faribault, makes her
home with Mrs. Twymana t
BLUE MILLS, JACKSON Co., Mo.,
October 24, 1876.
Editor St. Peter Tribune:
KIND SIR-I received a copy of
your paper, for which you will please
accept my heartfelt thanks; and
through you I would love to express
my gratitude to Mr, Jones for the
kindness expressed in his communi
cation toward my unfortunate neph"
ews, the Younger boys. I shall evet
feel grateful totlihe people of Minne
sota for their christian charity.
Only the brave know how to be mag,
nanimous to a fallen foe. My neph=
ews have broken the law, and I am
willing for themt to abide by the law,
believing, as I do, that the people of
Minnesota will give them a fair trial
and allow theiti counsel. No one re
grets more than I do the unfortunate
circumstance. Never did I believe
they were engaged in anything of the
kind, and I am forced to believe.it is
a late thing with them. You may
take almost any -man and accuse him
of crimes 6f which he knows he is
innocent, and persecute the man un
til he becotmes almo t a demon:-]
Would to God the people of Miine
sota knew how those poor persecuted
boys have been treated, I do not
approve of the way the boys have
done, for "Vengeance is mihe and t
will repay," saith the Lord, but were
tiey'deoubly guilty, they would still
be my dead sister's children, and I
love them dearly. Notwithstanding
all that is said about, them, they
were kind and. affectionate to every
one. May God. forgive and bless
them, is the prayer of their aunt,
FANNIE C. TTWMAN,
How Brigham. Fascinates Thei.
Adjoining the grounds of the Bee
hive House, is the yard of the Lion
residence, also guarded by high stone
walls. There are gothic peaks run
ning up in lines along the sides f"
the Lion residence, and each peak is
occupied by a window. There is a
crouching stone lion on the roof of
the portico. Only five wives live in
this tumble-down old building. Next
this house is Brigham's office. Aft
ter I passed the door of this office, I
turned back, ascended the steps,
rang the bell, and sent my card, to
President Young by a man who
opened the door. After it was done
I was frightened at my own temerity
in going thus alone to beard the lion
in his den. Our party had already
sent a polite request to Brigham atk
ing the pleasure of an interview at
his convenience, and had received a
polite answer declining the honor.
Idon't know what possessed me to
go into his office that way. It was
done under the impulse of the mo'
ment, with the knowledge that now
or never I must see this man. I
couldn't think, now I had got in there
what on earth to say, when a tall,
pleasant old gentlemdh came in, lean'
ing on a cane, and greeted me politely
by name. I had no excuse in the
world for coming there except curi
osity, and I laughed and told him so.
He was perfectly self-possessed,
and soon put me at ease. I don't
I know when I have had a more agrees
able convereation, and the old gentle
man was so agreeable, so polite, so
entertaining and witty, so opposed tE
I all my ideas about him, that for 4
while I was noopjpssed. "lHe is a
,man of whom any woman might be
Sproud" I thought,bautthe sound of
I the workmen's ha mers on Amelia's
- house smote upon mine ears, and th@
- sight of the two harems and the neg
I lected children came before me, and
. the sight of the gray-haired old com
t panion of God, and the prophet of
the Most High, as he is called, sit
" ting there complacently looking at
t me with his wary, .teel eyes, and
v talking like a man of the world; smi
ling his hypercritical smile, and pat
ting his white hands complaceintly as
d he plans new schemes of devilment.
d As those things came over me. I said,
"He is a man of whom even the fiends
Swould be ashamed."--ISalt Lake
e Letter from a Lady Tourist to the
L'ouisville Couirier-Jou~i ali

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