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Sacramento daily record-union. (Sacramento [Calif.]) 1875-1891, December 07, 1880, Image 5

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DAILY RECORD-UNION--SUPPLEMENT.
DAIIT UNION SERIES -VOL. HV--.0. 92C0.
DAILY BECOBD SERIES -VO_. YIII-RO 4264.
SIX-PAGE EDITION
THE DAILY RECORD-UNION.
——rod at the Post Office al Saoa men— as second class matter
PUBLISHED BY THE ;
Sacramento . Publishing Company.
WM. _. MILLS, General Manager.
« Pwbl Icatlon Office, Third St., bet. 3 and _.
THE DAILY BF—OBD-17NION V
a published every dor of the week. Sundays excepted.
for one fear .................. ................*IJ 00
For six m0nth*......... ....••••••........... *> 00
wot three moot— 3 00
tan ooptes one year, to one address 80 00
Subscribers served by Carriers at I Twiim-Frva
I Cists per week. In all Interior cities and towns the
taper can be hod of the principal Periodic— Dealers,
'" newsmen and Agent— ■
" " Advertising Bates In Dally Becord-Tnlon.
One Square . 1 time ............... .............tl 00
. One Square , 3 times. 1 76
One Square. 3 time*. 1 60
Co— — time. 60
lWee _ J Week*. 1 Month
Half Square, Ist page 92 50 $3 60 $5 00
Hut" Square, 2d page 3 60 00 8 00
Rolf Square, 3d pace....... 3 00 4 60 6 00
Half Square, 4th pace 100 8 00 4 00
• One Square, Ist pose 150 6 00 TOO
One Sqnore, Id po«* 6 00- 100 10 00
One Square. Id page 4 00., 00 800
One Square, 4th page 3 00 4 00 6 00
Star Notice*, to follow reading matter, twenty-five
tents a Use for each Insertion.
Advertisements of Situations Wonted, Houses to Lei,
Society Meetings, etc, of five lis es on less, will be
Inserted in the Daily Re cord-Un ion a* follows :
Onetime ...- 25 cents
Three timet 50 cents
One week 76 cents
■even words to so ate a line
<
. THE "WEEKLY UNION :
• [Published In semi-weekly portal
It Its—— on Wednesday and Saturday of each week,
comprising Eight Paget in each issue, or Sixteen Pages
each we- ond It the cheapest and most desirable
Rome, News and Literary Journal published on th*
pacific coast.
terms. On* Tew $3 —
Semi-Weekly Union Ad vertUlng Bates.
' B_fßkraare.lt__.. $100
Boob additional Urn* 60
One Square, 1 _**. ■ * 00
■tnh *__■_■_ Urn* 1 00
WANTED. LOST AND FOUND.
Advertise men— of five lines in this department are
. inserted for — cents for one time ; three times for 50
gat* or 76 gents per w— k. -
ANTED— A GIRL.— AT NO. 1806
Ii street. : d 2 tf
FURNITURE WANTED. -I WILL PAY ONE-
third more for Household Furniture, Stoves,
Carpets, etc., than ony other cash buyer. S. POSKA,
No. 717 J street, between Seventh and Eighth, Sac-
ramento^ ' illlplm
WANTED— COOK, WASHER AND
Ironer. Apply from 10 to 2 o'clock, at No.
1806 II street. n29 tf
EMPLOYMENT office.
WANTED— ALL KINDS HELP, MALE AND
YY Female Particular attention paid to Furnish-
tag Hotels, Private Families and Farmers with Help,
Free of Charge to employers. HOUSTON & CO,,
one door south of Fourth and X streets, Sacra*
mento city. ' n!3-lptf
TO. LET OB FOB SALE. "
- Advertisements of five lines in this deportment are
Inserted for _ cents for one time ; three times for 50
tents or 75 cents per week. .--._■ •
IRST-CLASS ROOMS, SINGLE OR IN SUITE
. Prices to ROOMS, SINGLE OR SUITE.
Prices to suit the times. The accommoda-
tions of this new house are unsurpassed, and will
be kept strictly first class. aviso, Unfurnished
Rooms. CLUNIE BUILDING, northeast corner of
Eighth ami X streets. lis lplm
FOR SALE.— THE HANDSOME AND/^%
Commodious RESIDENCE (new) of P. §§;;;
S. LAW. ON. tor-ether with ilB SplendidJ___
Furniture. Situated on 0 street, between Fifteenth
and Sixteenth, No. 1511. Will be sol . at cost price.
Inquire on premises ; or at shop, No. 415 X street.
■»- d2-tf - . -..
FOR SALE-CHEAP, 4«» SECOND *"-.-_>»»
hand FORK BARRELS, at C.I_FW-i
SCHAEFER'S, No. S3 Front street, I— -,*_S__t__
tween X and L, Sacramento. dl-lm -
NATHAN'S BUILDING, CORNER SEVENTH
J3l —id I streets— Pleasant furnished rooms, with
or without board. . - - n26-tf
FOR SALE— A BARGAIN, TWO VALUABLE
" PATENTS. Two Thousand Dollars can be
realized from them each year on this coast alone:
Little money required. Address "PATENTEE,"
. Rkcoro-Usion Olflce, Sacramento. 7-1 hi
EOR SALE-A FIRST-CLASS RE- eSS~^m
stan— nt ; old established and well *_>' J l
am paying business, with h>dgings* i *&]jJ*|*C
attached Furnished in first-cla«s style. **S-"
Can be bought at bargain. Address MRS. M. DA-
VIDSON, Woodland, Col. n!2 -4w«
AMERICAN LAUNDRY.
IN CONSEQUENCE OF PUTTING IN NEW
mod— lory , 1 will Bell on the premises cheap
fur cosh : :
One Portable Roller and Engine, one-horse power;
three Wot*. -B ,cks or Heaters, all in good condition.
dl-lplm" 18. Cl S. B. COPLEY, Proprietor.
" ™~ ""for RENT.
A RANCH ON THE COSUMNFS RIVER, gMJ
___ V 18 miles from Sacramento, containing s**pf
*00 acres ; will be let ts a w hole or divided to _
suit ; goexl house and barns. Apply to A. J. VER-
MILYA. 410 J street. nSO tf
RANCH FOR SALS,
AT A BARGAIN.
THE WELL-KNOWN SAULSBUR Y___
X RANCH, on line of S. V. R. R., contain- W
Ing 3.-.0 acre*. A failure of crop has never" "
been known upon the place. The soil is deep, and
of sandy loam character ; produces from 25 to 85
bushels of wheat, and SO to 45 bushels of barley to
th* acre. Terms made uitlsfarlory. Apply to
«.!> s:i.i *i:it — ALSIP. "
Rati Estate and Insurance Agents, No. 1015 Fourth
St., between J and X, Sacramento. ull-lmlp _
WATOHES, CLOCKS, JEWI_---
3. B. BLIi.VE.
(Late with Wachhorst,' and successor to Floberg,)
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER, f — * "
TV No. 60 J street, between Second and |^#*<v
i Third. Dealer hi Watches, Clock*, Sllver - # K-'*
wore, Jewelry, etc. Repairing in oil i-t__lo
brooch ea a specialty, under MR. FLOBERG.
■ foS-Iplml ..----•-"■', ' "
WILLIAM B. MILL E B i .^7
(Late with Floberg),
190 J STREET, NEAR SEVENTH, y»*
j_S Watchmaker and Jeweler. ' Importer %T7"k
and Dealer in Watches, Silverware, Jewelry, ft-« «
etc. -Repairing a specialty, under Robert (__!__
More— All country orders promptly attended to.
■'"-■.'. - - [sa-lptf] . . '"'"'
.DENTISTBY. "~"
W. wood,. .'..'. /■;..'-
-f-VKNTIST. —(REMOVED TO t_UlNN*S____
\y Building, corner Fourth TO OI'INVS ____
' IJufldin^-, corr.er Fourth ai,,i J .'.rair'.s) *flf* l 'f'l'—
Artlflcial Teeth inserted oo all base*. - Improved
Li I— d Nitrous Oxide Gas, for the Painless F-xtrao-
Uon of Teeth. ■-'- : - >-- ' -'-- -■'" ■'- " " - ' n244f V
~ BAB- A MOAD. ,
DENTIST", NO. 605 J STREET, RE ___»
tween Sixth and Seventh, Sacramento. ("___jS
- ■-■- -'-"■"- ,t *' V '- n!8-lptf -'■" -■ -' ' ■ ' ' ' -"'*'■ ;
DBS. BBEITEB - SOTTBWOBTH, V "; ;
DUNTISTS, SOUTHWEST CORNER OF ____,
S.ve-iit'i ond J street*, in Bryte>'B new 'S'^'fl!
jidldlng, up stairs. V Teeth extracted without pain
bs- tlie use ot Improved Liquid Nitrous Oxide Gas.
-./'.;: : (nl6-lplml ■=■-..■•.■■■-.■■
l«. 'a. piebson,
r_ENTIST, 415 J STREET. BETWEEN g___
If Fourth and Fifth, Sacramento. ArU-CSHSfI
Ida! Teeth inserted on Gold, Vulcanite and 01. bases.
Nitrons Oxide or Loughii ig Gas administers d for the
o__e«3 extraction „ Teeth. " nlt-lm
DENTAL DEPOTS
____ M._ONIC TEMPLE, COR. SIXTH g_m.
HH -- pn; X street*. -"" -"BBS
WO THRAILKILL, D. P. 8., Editor and Publishes
of 'the -octal 'Jaime, a Monthly Journal of Dental
Science. ; - --: - . ■ .: o--lptf
V. a. »SaT«_SO'S mtsst.
$2.00, S2 ' 50 AND " 00,
BUYS THE RHEST SPECTACLES IU EXISTENCE.
Adjusting Sperlneles to "*« ail Ihe vwrt-
an. candlllons or the sight our specialty. ;
tT The only opticians on this ooaat who make
ipectaele' lenses to order. A large assortment of the
finest ARTIFICIAL HUMAN EVES constantly on
band. . ---... ■--■..„-■■ ----- ■• :; .■-,..'-:" 7*
BERTELING & WATRY.
; >. Set esllflc Optician*, :
' No. 427 Kearny street, between Pine and California,
near California, San Francisco. -„
Calde* for scleetinc spectacles free. Coun-
try order* promptly attended to. ;, - V
BEWARE OF FRAUDS *-_.__
you they moke epeoUcle lenses, a* we are the only
op_e_ns oa this who do. dS-lptf
'business cards, /-v.'.,
J. A. CCNSINGHAM.
SACRAMENTO BOILER AND IRON WORKS,
I street, between Front and Second, Sacra-
mento. - Manufacturer of Steam Boilers, Sheet lion
Work, etc Also, all kinds of Repairing. Chang ng
Portable Boiler* from Wood to Straw Burners o
Specialty. ' __
WM. ELLEBY BBIGGS. H. D.,
OCULIST, AURIST AND PHYSICIAN FOR
Diseases of the Thi oat. Office, 429. J street,
comer of Fifth, over Sacramento Bank, Sacramento ,
Col. Hour*— 93o to 12 A. M.; Itol p. - Sundays—
0:30 to 11 a. at.; Ito4p. M. '-- - -'"■" dl-tf -.
MISS _»''■ J. . KELLOGG. M. D.,
HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN— OFFICE AND
residence, Nathan building, comer of Seventh
and I street*. Office hours, 8:30 A M.. 2 to 4
and 7toB P. M -. dl-4plm -
8. SOLON BOLL.
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR-ATLAW,
Co— iXft Sixth and I Strbbtb, Sacrauhnto,
Cal. " -- ■-■-•-' '~ dl-4plm
W. A. HTGHSO!., M. D., 7
HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
■ Office, southwest cornet of Seventh and J
streets In Brye's new building, up stairs. Reel
dence, southeast corner of Seventh and N street*,
Sacramento. Office hours : Ito 8 and BtoBP. m.
" - " - ' - n25-4pl_ .---■-,- -" .
E. L. BILLINGS A CO.,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS
In Fine Brandies, Wines and Liquors. I Agent*
for Dr. Jaffc's Celebrated Cinchona Bitters ; also,
agents for Litton Springs Seltzer Water, Sonoma
county, California. No. 11l X street, between Fourth
and Fifth. . ■ - ■' n25-4plm "
REMOVED. -
CHARLES T. JONES AND ED. M. MARTIN,
Attcrneys-ot-Low and Notaries Public, have
removed their office to No. 607 I street, betwoen
Sixth and Seventh. - - - n24-4plm
H. r. ROOT. ALEX. KKILSOS. i. DaiSCOL.
. BOOT, NEILS ON A CO.,
UNION FOUNDRY-IRON AND BRASS
Founders and Machinists, Front street, be-
•ween N and O. Castings ana Machinery of every
description made to order. n24-4plm
MADAME «It ABLOITE BOBEBT,
FROM PARIS, DRESSMAKER, NO. 900 EIGHTH
street, corner I, Sacramento. Ball and Party
l-ri-ssts a Specialty. New Patterns imported for
Win n!7-4plm
I. CAUL*. * i. COOL..
CABLE A CBOLY,
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS, ARE PRE-
pored to do all kinds of work in their Ine, in
city or country. dial place of business, Sacra-
mento. Shop, 82 Second street, between X and L.
Po3t-office Box, 410, Sacramento. - nl6 4ptf ■
~ JILIIS STBKTZ.
SUCCESSOR TO FOX & STRUTZ, IMPORTER
ond Wholesale Dealer in Wine* ond Liquors,
No. 41 J street, Sacramento. ' Sole ogent for A.
Hupfel's Sons' New York Beer. nl4-4plro
11. H. . McWILLIAMS.
HOPE IRON WORKS, FRONT STREET, BE-
tween I and J. Machinery of all kinds made
to order and repaired. Sole manufacturer of Car-
lisle's Patent Derricks. Lawn Mowers Rep—red.
For sale, a 26-horse stationary engine and boiler,
complete. n!4-4ptf
D. A D. FALCONER,
SUCCESSORS TO HOOK A FALCONER, CON-
tractors and builders, furnish estimates for all
work in their line. Address all communications to
workshop, southeast corner Seventh and 1 streets. I
nK-4plm* ----.-*- r.
GROVE 1.. JOHNSON,
ATTORNEY AT OFFICE, FIFTH ST.,
between I ond J. Residence, No. 207 1
street, between Seventh aud Eighth. nlo-4olm
WM. . GOTTEN BERGER,
IRON AND BRASS FOUNDER AND MA-
' chlnist, Front and N streetn. Manufacturer of
Gattenbergei"s Horse Powers, Patent Ground Roller
and Clog Crusher and Barley Mills. All kinds of
nydroulic Pipes. For Bale, Three Miller Patent Hay
Presses. "v. -"■""' 029-4plm
7 CALL ON SCOTT _ MIIK
N0.'303 J STREET, FOR THE LATEST STYLES
J_M ' in GAS FIXTURES. Plumbing in all its
branches done — short - notice. Being practical
workmen, we are - able to do work at the lowest
rotes..' -■-.:. <"■.-■... ■ 028-4plm
is:, J. 7 7 F. FOSTER, 1879,
BOOK BINDER, PAPER RULER AND ELANK
Book Manufacturer, No. 319 J street, between
Third ond Fourth, Soci amento. 020-4ptf
W. B. KNIGHTS,
CORNER OF FRONT AND T. . STREETS
Highest price for Hides, Sheep Pelts and
Tallow. Supplies Butchers with Salt, Paper, latest
mproved Sausage Machines, Stutters, Lard Presses
Etc Prompt cash returns mode for all consign-
ment— ' *^ ■--. ". '<:'. Q i a-aml
G. M. DIXON, M. D., .:
SURGEON AND HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN
Office ond residence, on Eighth street, between
II and I. Office hours— B to 9A. it., ond 12 to 2, and
0 to 8 P. M. Diseases of the Eye and Ear a specialty.
„ — , 09-4p2m i_
T. B. MCFABLAND,
A TTORNEY AT LAW— OFFICE, SOUTHWEST
__\ corner of J and Fourth street*. Residence,
H street, between Fifteenth ond Sixteenth. 09-4p*
' DB. HATCH.
OFFICE 84 J STREET.— OFFICE HOURS: 9
A. M. and 12:30 to 2p. M. - 529-t^
DB. WALLACE A. BBIGGS
HAS REMOVED HIS OFFICE AND RESl-
dence to Dr. G. _ Simmons' Building, J
street, between Second ond Third. Office hours : 8
to 9A._,llA._to 2 P. _. and 6toB P. — 812-1 f
CREED HAYMOND,
A TTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW,
>T_ Office in' Quinn'* new building, corner of
Fourth and J streets (up stairs), Sacramento. — -4p
REMOVAL.
DR. NIXON HAS REMOVED HIS OFFICE TO
" M street, between Ninth and Tenth streets,
No. 918. Will visit Railroad Hospital at 9:30 A. H.
doily. ' " ■■■■■■■■■■ - ■■■--■ ■:-"■ «9 -tf
JAMES HcGHTRE,
MANUFACTURER OF IRON DOORB, SHUT-
- ters, Rollings, Gratings, House-work and
Block smithing in general, No. 148 X street, between
Fifth and Sixth Second- Hoars .or sale
' . ' ' ' ou— -4ptf :--a ■:■■
CAPITAL ALE YAVLTS,
NO. 302 J, AND 1006 THIRD STREETS
Hot Lunch daily from 11 A. _ to 1 o'clock
p. _ The Best ol Wines, Liquors and Cigars,
JylS -4plm BOWERS A LONGABAUGH. |
DR. G. L. SIMMONS, "7_v
"Jkj*o. 212 J STREET, BETWEEN SECOND AND
_% Third, Sacramento.
(> to 10 a.m.)
ttT Office Hours: . Ito lr.».J ap23-*ptt
l 7 to 8 p. X. J
HOTELS AND BESTAUBANTS.
HOTEL LANGHAM,
CORNER FOURTH AND L STREETS, SACRA-
. : mento— Strictly first-class, on the European
plan. Free coach from Railroad Depot. Fine sam-
ple room* * . TERRY & CO., Manager*.
■y . . ..'.,.' dl-4plm .... . . .:— :7-
NEW ATLANTIC HOTEL.
CORNER OF: I AND TWELFTH STREETS,
Sacramento, FRITZ RINK, Proprietor. Board
and lodging per week, 85 to 86; board and lodging
pore.ay, 81 to tl 25; eingle meals, 25 cent*. This
house has been thoroughly renovated ond the rooms
newly furnished in the best style. The table will
always contain the best the market affords. Com.
modioli* stables and yard connected with the hotel.
. - i- cj n!2-4plm ■ - :■' <■ ■■■".'.
ARCADE HOTEL
SECOND STREET, BETWEEN J AND X, SAO
ramento. -■=.-"."'.■"':-■" "■--- -*--•'--.--
-n24-tf . THOS OUINBAK.' Proprietor.
STATE Ti HOUSE.
Corner Tenth and X Streets, Saeramenta.
ELDRED, PROPRIETOR— Board and lodg
• ing at the most noble rote*. Bar and
rd rooms attached. " Street cars pass the door
ever}- five minntes. "... : " . '7 . '
_ Free omnibus to and from the Housenlg
YOUNG AMERICA
OYSTER AND . CHOP "" HOUSE, ' aV* aT_
No. 46 Second street, bet. J and K.M^i ImJ I
Eastern and California Oysters in every
style. Meals at all hours. Imported .'Jmmw,,.._
Wines. Cigars. Etc. ""l, BOBAN, Prop. -14-4 p-
l 7 HOUSE,
WORKINGMf-N'S . HOME.— BOARD AND
:.- Lodging, at low rates. - Club Room, Pool
and Amusement Game*. -No 81 Front street, bet.
X and L. [ol^pln ] J. R. JOHNSTON, Proprietor.
"7=TONEY-S77'7^: '; 7"
(*?*»* if-e. OYSTER & CHOP HOUSE, Cm*
NKWy' Nob. 74 and 76 J Str*_, &_?_)_
: -~Sl_|r Between Third and Fourth. : Bfcr
. ; Newly refitted. Private Room* for Fomil— a.
Eastern and California OYSTERS ln every style
-■■-■■■■- ■"..- "•■'■".■"■'•■ ____m ■■,--'■■■.■ „-..-..-„..
7 MECHANICS', EXCHANGE. 7
DECTSCHES OASTHAUS, NOS. 18, » AND tr .
ii I street, between Front and Second, Sacra .
mento. Heal*, SI cents; Beds, S3 cent— :'v-'V-
i' Jy-r-tf ?f-\',<-y JACOB SCHMID, Prop— star.
The Best 6-Hole Banco , -J--I_s^>i_i *
-",'. ra re* won- — 7 ~^"*ei»r^s2___HSsf
THE GARLAND I jgpgflffi
PO* SAL* FT' ____f^^^_g*6
(_ L. LEWIS _ C*m f^3_\*m____\
Ui _ 134 J ia***- **^iS'--*«_J_»»
; - . V,7: _-.ptf --.'. " - -i^j»!» .._;
SACRAMENTO, TUESDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 7, 1880.
TBOPIO FBOIT LAXATIVE.
" We need tlie Medical action of
tlie pure fruit acids in our system,
and .cooling corrective influ-
ence. Medical Journal. ' : -
LAa^pVE
SUPPLIES THE DESIDERATUM.
Constipation
md all disorders for
fl_. r m
which pills, aperients,
and- cathartics '- are
Used, it is unexception-
all) the: best remedy
extant.
: One Lozenge is the usual dose, to
be taken at bed-time; dissolve slowly
in the mouth, or eat like fruit or a
confection.
TROPIC-FRUIT LAXATIVE is put
tip in bronzed tin boxes only. Avoid imi-
tations. • Ask . your druggist for Descrip-
tive Pamphlet, or address the proprietor,
J. E. HETHERINGTON,
" Now York or San Francisco.
, - -- -.-. . __^.^^_^ ... •-- , ....-,.
H. C. kiltk A CO.,
WHOLESALE AGENTS........... SACRAMENTO.
tiOSTETTEIft
fa*** CELEBRATED **3*B
' jma£L
fefe STOMACH -^gga.
There Is no civilized notion in the Western Hemis-
phere in which the utility of Hostetter's Stomach
Bitters as a tonic, corrective and anti -hi ions medi-
cine, is not known and appreciated. While it is a
medicine for all seasona and all climates, it Is es-
pecially suited to the complaints generated by the
weather, being the purest and best vegetable
stimulant in the world. _'- - "•>
- For sale by oil druggist* and deobrs, to whom
opply for Hostetter's Almanac for 1881. . . ; ' .
TnThf"d2-lm .
-ENERAL OTIOES. ~~
Cakes, I'll- nnd nil kind* of Fancy I 'mull
at W. F. PETERSON'S. . d2-lm
.
All Who nave Tried W. F. Peterson"*
Ornamental Cokes, Tarts and Mince Pies, soy they
ore the best ever bought. Try them. d2-lm
Go to the Inrn.v ri c for not Drlnks.-
Specialties : Tom and Jerry, Peach and Honey, etc
X St., Third and Fourth. J. O. HECTOR. dl-3plm
';-■;:-'.-:- -v ■ . ;
Fonnlnln Mlnlna Company.— Notice, Ihe
Annual Meeting of the Stockholders of the Foun-
tain Mining Company, for the —ec'.ion of Seven
Directors for the emuing year, and for the trans-
action of such and other business as may be brought
before the meeting, will be held at the office of . the
company. No. 900 L street, In the city of Sacra-
mento, on MONDAY, DLCESIBEIt 20. 1880, at 7
o'clock p. 11. D. DIERSSEN, Secretory.
9-4plm
A Foal-mouthed Woman (
Is even worse than a foul-mouthed man. But no
one need be foul-mouthed if they will only use
SOZODONT and rub it in well. Don't spare the
brush and spoil tbe mouth, sr some parents do with
their children when they withhold the rod.
7" ' 1~- d2-3tThSTu •
.' A rd.— To all who are suffering from
the errors and indiscretions of youth, nervous weak-
ness, early decay, loss of manhood, etc, I will send a
recipe that will cure I you, FREE OF CHARGE.
This great remedy was discovered by a missionary in
South America. Send a self-addressed enveloiie to
the REV. JOSEPH T. INMAN, Station D, New
York City. . 014-'lhSTu6m
STAR MILLS AND MALT HOUSE.
NEEBO—BG — LAGES,
KTOS. 60, 62 AND 64 FIFTH ST.. SACRAMENTO
-J3J • dealer* in Produce and Brewer*' Supplies
Manufacturers of Molt and all kinds of Meals, etc.
Oatmeal, Corcmeal, Cracked Wheat, Graham Flow
Buckwheat Flour, etc New Grain Bags lor sole.
____________________ l£!l______— ___— -
A.J. VERMILYA
COUNTY CORONER AND UNDERTAKE!.
No 108 J Btreet, between Fourth and Fifth.
Always on hand a large assortment of Metallic on
Wooden Caskets, Burial Cases and Coffin*. Shroud i
furnished and Funeral Wreath* Preserv a. v-omilr
orders will receive prompt attention on anort noti
and ot low —tea. . 014-4p* '
MANHOOD; RESTORED.
A VICTIM OF EARLY V IMPRUDENCE,
' causing nervous dt-bllitv, premature decay,
etc, having tried in vain every known remedy,
bas discovered a simple means of self-cure, which lie
will send free lo his fellow-sufferers. Address J. U.
REEVES, No. 43 Chatham street, New York. ■"-»
: r n2-lyTuThS : '*v .
The Pioneer Box Factory
Still Ahead of all Competitor
COOK!- BOS '
_"•".■ ooam or . -
Front and M 5treet*.. ....... stcrunno
»-. ■ ••- -,-r ■:. :.:-*.-. d«-4ntf ..-_■■ ■ '--->».-.■*■■ ..'>■
— —^ _______————■ — — — — — .
A Remarkable Accident.— remark-
able I accident occurred recently daring a
theatrical • performance ;at _ Rouen. The !
second ! act | had * begun when -a " shriek 'of
horror I burst j from every one I present, tf A
spectator had fallen from the third gallery
upon a man, M. Poccard, seated in the or-
chestra stalls, and a chandelier, torn away
from its fastening*," had struck him on the .
head. Great confusion ensued -every one
rose as some of the \ audience I hastened to
remove '. the ' wounded ' man. ;' Fortunately
M. Poccard'* \ injuries -were ' not - serious,
and Harel, the cause of them, had also es-
caped with slight contusions from his per-
ilous falL He was, however, sent to the
Hotel . Dieu, as * internal " injuries were ap-
prehended. ".-: Harel, who was in the box on
the third gallery, attempted to sit with his
legs ontside the box, but lost hi* balance
and fell.;: .The first moment of confusion
over, the ' performance : was I resumed, but
one of the actors was ; so much affected by
the event that he : swooned [at the end of
the act.
... - -
liebig Ct.'s Ceiea Beef Tonic. .
- Professor E. — 15 HALE, author Materia
Medica New Remedies ; Professor at Chicago
Medical College, recommend* Coca for bad
taste in the month, furred, coated tongue,
dryness of the mouth or -waking, debility of
the digestive organ?, colic, constipation, in-
effectual i urging 7to V stool and i flatulency.
Beware of cheap, worthless imitation* under
oar and sin— tar names."-: Ask for Cooa Beef
Tonic. --'- -."-vv ' ■-.' A-A
::.-... , • # — — — — — — j
•±'A— tiToo- DscoaxßT for Hammer's Gly-
oerede of T.»r for oough* sod odd*, and take
nn other.
A PARISIAN SCANDAL.
A Husband . Tries . to Starve to Death His
Wife's Lover.
[Paris Correspondence Cincinnati Enquirer.] V.
Last night, at the Comedie Francais, the
box '- at our right : was occupied by a very
distinguished-looking ■ couple, who, from
the nods and ' smiles ': that ' greeted " them
from the different parts of the house, were
evidently well ; known. The lady, not
more than 25 years of age, was tall, supple,
and elegant in , figure, and wore a toilet of
dark ; green velvet, embroidered about the
corsage and sleeves with gold, as is now the
fashion, and which was peculiarly becom
ing to her delicate complexion, just tinged
with pink, and to her, dark-blue eyes and
golden hair, which 'was 1 1 worn low on the
neck, and terminated with a few long care
leas curls. 7 Her vivacity ' and • grace could
be seen in every movement, not j one of
which escaped the jealous eyes of her com
panion. , j He was at least fifteen or twenty
years ' her; senior, short, rather stout, and
with a face that would be called handsome
as far aa features and- color go, but brutal
in its expression. -His iron-gray hair, fell
in short, thick locks over his low forehead,
almost shading his intensely bright black
eyes, and his iron -gray mustache sharply
pointed at - the .' ends rather added to the
effect of v V" -.-.-•■-' "-■"-'.- ■"'""'■" _',''
HIS SARDONIC SMILE. :■_ i."-
Convinced that they were "somebody,"
your correspondent 'inquired'- in regard to
them, and was greeted with expressions of
surprise that in a fortnight the heroine of
a lamentable scandal had not been pointed
out. It seems that the iron-gray gentleman
with the jealous eyes was M. Edmond'B."
I refrain from the full name until .finding
out how much protection the English lan
guage is against a suit • for libel. Mon
sieur B. married five years ago the beauti
ful daughter of an impoverished physician.
Mademiselle being - without a . dot, and
therefore, in France, most unmanageable,
was esteemed fortunate in having capti
vated the affections of a wealthy man, and
received the congratulations of her friends
when established in a handsome hotel in
the Faubourg : St. Honore, with means to
entertain luxuriously and to dress extrava
gantly if she wished.' It lis hardly neces
sary to say that she wished and did do
both, but that being at perfect liberty to,
in time she grew weary and longed for
more diversion than could be found in balls
and elegant gowns. Being adorably pretty,
she . did not lack ' for adorers, and the
wished-— r diversion presented itself in the
shape of a dangerously handsome and
dashing young officer. . The affair was one
of coquetry and gallantry, say the friendv
of Mine. 8., who call her
AN ABUSED ANGEL,
But love to talk of the matter ; while his
enemies well, what they Bay need not be
recounted, but at any rate Monsieur 15.,
jealous, vindictive and determined on re
venge, resolved to bring affairs to a crisis.
French people love to do things dramati
cally, so Monsieur B. j laid a clever little
plot. When it was time to leave for Trou
villc, the favorite, watering-place, and
where they owned a charming residence,
he ordered all his domestics, except his
wife's maid, to go first and get the villa in
readiness for their arrival. When they
were fairly out of the way he suddenly
announced to the golden-haired Madame B.
that a business lii.pat summoned him to
Lyons, where he would probably be de
tained a couple of days, and that mean
while she must await his return and escort
to Trouviile. Madame smiled an angelic
assent, and after the apparent departure of
her iron-gray lord proceeded to enjoy her
self, unsuspecting of the trap laid for her.
Naturally the theater suggested itself.
She went in her carriage, accompanied by
an ancient lady friend, and enjoyed the
first night of "Daniel Rochat," lt'ding
home she left the duenna at her residence
and proceeded alone ; but when she left
her carriage at the door of her establish
ment, she saw pacing up and down in the
moonlight
THE .. D._UI-Q TOT— IO I— mi Ut,
Who awaited her appearance, having aeeu
her at the play that evening. He bogged
for an interview of but live minutes. She
hesitated, and, of course, consented, for
five minutes only. She rang the bell, and
her maid, the only creature in the house,
and half asleep, slowly unlocked the pon
derous doors that make a French house
secure aa a citadel. They entered and
passed up into the richly-furnished draw
ing-r-aoni, where Madame 8., throwing
aside her mantle and hat, bid the young
officer be brief in what he had to say, as
she felt she was committing a frightful
imprudence in allowing his presence at that
hour. What he did say nobody seems to
know, but at any rate it took him almost
an hour, and it is possible that hi* elo
quence was getting exhausted when the
great door below was heard to open and
close with a dull clang, succeeded by foot
steps on the stairs of polished wood. Know,
ing her husband's disposition, and terribly
alarmed as she saw the impossibility of
any explanation being accepted, Madame
B. yielded to her first impulse, and half
dragged the young officer through her
sleeping-room into the dressing-room ad
joining, and, pushing 'him in, shut and
locked the door.* Scarcely had she re-en
tered the drawing-room when her husband
entered," amiable, smiling, and with a brief
explanation that, having found his presence
quite unnecessary in Lyons, he had re
turned on the first train. ■■■ He asked no
questions, and was so unnaturally pleasant
that ..-.'
.HIS WIFE'S HEART SANK.
Suddenly „ he exclaimed : •" A delightful
idea occurred to me coming . from the sta
tion, so I kept the voiture waiting at the
door. ,' Ring for . your . maid, put on your
hat and mantle, and we will go right onto
Trouviile to-night. While yon are doing
that I will lock up the house." It was in
vain Madame B. declined and excused her.
self. % Her husband insisted, and began the
lock— process by - trying - the door of
her dressing-room. *' Ah !it■ is * locked.
That <is well, but give me the key,'.' and
Monsieur B. , quickly ' drew 'it , from : the
pocket of his wife's dress and put it in his
own. Then he locked the door of the bed
room beyond, and so on through the house,
hia wife accompanying him in I dumb - fear,
but : her horror can be ; imagined when
finally, attended by her i maid, he hurried
her half-fainting down stairs . through the '
marble hall and heavy oaken door*, which
he fiercely fastened behind :. him. 7 They
went on the train to Trouviile. The gal- •
lant young officer was caught like a rat in
a trap. Such : a situation, either morally
or architecturally, would be difficult j in an
American house ; but the3e | in France are
built like vaults, with such walls and case
ments that to burn one even is an impossi
bility. - Mme. B. 's dressing-room faced on
the deserted court, and was of I such hight
from the ground a* to render descent I im
possible, and to effect an exit through the
heavy doors without implement* seemed
beyond hope. The dead and long-continued
silence led , the I truth - to ' dawn upon the
young man. s He had been left there .
7-"' TO STARVE TO DEATH. V ... ;':'
Rage and ": horror :' of the * discovery gave
him ' strength j and \ ingenuity ; j he worked
like a tiger for two days and two nights at
the fastenings of the doors, until he reached
the _ lower," story, and | almost /: famishing
forced his way into the court below. His
attempts crowned with success, he had the
strength, born of hope, to climb the high
Btonejwall, to do which he had waited until
nightfall ; but, sad to j relate, in jumping
down on the other side, he | landed j almost
on the shoulders of a Sergeant de Ville,
who promptly arretted and trotted him off
to i prison. '"-' According ■to the code of
chivalry and • romance ' the ■ dashing young
officer should, with | the majesty of a lion
and the mildness of a dove, have pre
ferred the ? galleys to tarnishing the name
of a fair lady, but alas 1 his temper .'' and
his stomach had been too sorely tried, and,
alike enraged at the cowardly and brut
revenge of | the husband, and at I the seem
ing indifference | of the blonde beauty who
bad made no attempt to rescue him for fear
of her own fame, be told the truth.
Imagine", the sensation :it produced. Yet '
this season Mono, and Mme. B. are again
at the theater, and the young officer looks
at them through the opera- glaa*. PSJ
INTERIOR DEPARTMENT.
Synopsis of the Annual Report of Secre
tary Schurz.
[By Telegra p'a.J
7 Washington,' December. 2d.— Secretary
Schurz, in j his report "on • Indian Affairs,'
says experience has j strengthened his [ con
viction that the '* management; of : Indian
affairs should continue .to Ibe intrusted to
the civic and not the military authorities.
His : arguments ; on - this ' topic have been
fully foreshadowed jin j former annual re
ports. He again quotes with emphasis the
conclusion of the report of the Peace Com
mission of 1878, signed by Generals Sher
man, Harney, Kerry and Auguer, in which
these | distinguished " officers |of the | army
said, among other things : to the same pur
port : "If we intend to have war with the
Indians, the Indian Bureau should go to
the ; Secretary of ■ War. : If we intend to
have peace it should be in the civil depart
ment." I desire to say that it has not
been the purpose of this department under
. my administration, while ordering all un
necessary outlays of money, to cut | down
expenses merely for the purpose of making
a striking exhibition of economy. -. The
history of Indian affairs shows that ill
judged parsimony not unfrequently led to
serious trouble and very costly - complica
tions.' I am noV convinced that a gener
ous appropriation for agricultural imple
ments, for stock and cattle, to be distrib
uted among the Indians, and for educa
tional facilities made at the time when the
temper of our whole Indian population is
such as .to receive such aid in the right
spirit, would be judicious. The case of
the Ponca« receives minute attention.
Looking at the present condition of things,
it may be said without exaggeration . that
on the : whole the Indian situation is now
more hopeful than ' ever before. The de
sire of the Indians to maintain friendly re
lations with their white neighbors, to go to
work for their own support, to cultivate
the soil, to acquire ; permanent homes, to
have their children educated, and to assim
ilate themselves to the civilization of the
country, is growing stronger and . more
general every day.
:7,'.V V • . THE BIG TREES. "' . : .
He again calls attention to the fact that
the waste and destruction of the redwood
and big trees of California have been and
continue to be bo great aa to cause the ap
prehension that in " the course of a -few
years these magnificent species may entirely
disappear unless some measures are taken
to preserve at least a portion of them, and
he renews his recommendation of last year
that the President be authorized to with
draw from sale or other disposition an area
at least equal to a township in the coast
range in the northern, and an equal erea in
the southern part of California, upon which
these interesting trees grow. He remarks
thßt the bill introduced in Congress to ac
complish this object has not yet been acted
on, and adds : " It seems important that if
any measure for the preservation of these
species of trees is to be taken at all, it
should be done as soon aa possible. _ I
therefore once more commend thia subject
to the attention of Congress. The Secre
tary also renews his last year's recommen
dation for the enactment of Senator Ed
munds' bill to provide for the settlement of
-I VAT 1 LAND CLAIMS
In all tho territory derived from Mexico,
except California. He says, with reference
to the Public Lands Commission, the bill
now pending in Congress "The import
ance of the pa— age of this or some similar
bill by Congress cannot bo overestimated.
Existing laws for the autvey and disposal
of the public domain were enacted mainly
while the Government was disposing of the
public lauds cast of the Missouri river.
The climate, soil and products ol the laud
west of the one hundredth meridian are so
entirely different from those east of it as to
require legislation specially applying there
to. Kaily action upon this lull is urgently
demanded by the public iu'-reats. As the
settlement of our Western Tetritories pro
gresses, I leg that the attention of Con
tress be invited to this important subject.
The main features of legislation urged by
Secretary Schurz for the lection of Gov
ernment timber and the
PRES ERVATIOS 01* THK man—
Oi the country are the following : First,
that the Government should be authorized
to sell timber from the lands principally
valuable for the timber (.rowing on them,
that is to say, not suite I to agricultural or
mineral purposes, ata reasonable price above
the nominal rates to supply all domestic
needs and all wants of local business en
terprises, as well as of commerce ; the lat
ter so far as compatible with the public
interests. Secondly, that these sales of
public timber be so regulated as to preserve
the necessary proportion of the forests (on
public lands from waste and indiscriminate
destruction. Such a policy can, in his
opinion,, be carried out without great cost,
and in perfect justice to tbeaettlersnndbusi
ness enterprises of the country. It is
virtually the policy proposed by the
Public Land* Commission in their, re*
port, and the bill submitted to Congress at
its latt session. He again urges the enact
ment of a law prescribing severe penalties
for willful negligence or carelessness in
setting of tires upon public lands and pro
viding for the recovery of damages sas
tained. He also recommends a liberal ap
propriation for the extension of a geo
graphical survey all over the United States.
He recommends that four new Government
buildings, of adequate size, bo erected on
the three blocks surrounding Lafayette
Square, opposite the Executive Mansion,
for the Interior Department. . The report
also contains a* synopsis of reports fur
nished , under special instructions of the
Department by the Government of ' the
various Territories, setting forth their ma
terial resources and their respective attrac
tions for immigrants. ' ■.■..-"-.
„..,.. . . , ♦-♦ ■ ■ •
MARRIAGE IN ALBANIA.
1 Albanian marriage '- arrangements , are
very pechliar. : .-■ When a damsel ; arrives at
marriageble age her parent* publish the
fact among I their j friends ' and ' acquaint
ances. - Should no suitor come forward, it
rests with her brothers to find one. '7 A
brother thus circumstanced will sometimes
come up to a male, friend in the street and
make the complimentary proposal then and
there. "Yon are just the man I wanted
to see"— thus | goes tha abrupt formula on
these occasions—"*' my sister is now four
teen years old ; you must marry her." '■■ As
etiquette forbids a plump refusal, the gen
tleman thus honored gives a sort, of half
acquiescence, and then hurries ; off to in
struct some old lady to act as go-between.
Should ha be : satisfied , with ! the ' report
made, after, duo inquiry, by this adviser,
the wedding is arranged ; but not until the
very last moment is the expectant bride
groom . allowed to see his future spouse,
and then it would be contrary to the pre
scriptions of society for him to draw back,
however unprepossessing she might prove
to be.' .'.'After the performance of the cere
mony 7a : very; curious J piece :of etiquette
comes into play.' '"'Among Asiatic and un
civilized people generally, it is the rule for
the bride-elect to feign coyness, but among
the ants ; the bridegroom hap to make
this pretense. 7 After the marriage feast is
over, and the '■ newly-made .wife has with
drawn, her ! husband i lingers behind,', and
not until he has been enbjected to a variety
of rough usage by her relative, arc the pre
scriptions of etiquette considered to betuf
fioirntly complied with to" admit of his fol
lowing the lady.^ft— B^|[||ysy)_ttWWMMßS—
; 7 Capon . RANAQC—V-Slit the" capon down
the back with a sharp knife, then with the
knife close to • the J bones scrape' down the
sides, and . the bones will oome out, all ex
cept the leg \ and wing : bones. Then stuff
the capon with a forcemeat ef cold grouse
or duck or lamb, chopped or pounded into
a smooth i mass, -, richly seasoned with salt,
pepper, two \ tablespoonfnls of - chopped
pork, the juice of a lemon, and some sage
and f summer savory. Sew np the capon,
tie it into a good shape, and lard the top
or breast ; thickly with • bits of fat pork.
Roast "- in - the oven, basting ' often with - a
little fresh batter. It must be thoroughly
done,' and the surface delicionsly browned.
Serve with ma ocaroni dressed with tomato
BMC*'"'7:.-777 v;v:-V-=.:.V.:-"-a --i-r ,--
COINAGE MATTER.
Operations of the San Francisco and Car
; . son Mints.
[By Telegraph ]
},\ Washington, December sth. — The re
port of the Director of tho Mint shows that
the amount of gold and silver bullion dis
tribute among the Mints during the last
fiscal year 1 was j as | follows : 7 Tbe Mint at
San Francisco received : $28,545,544 46 in
gold, and $10,842,390 58 in silver. Carson
received §368, 17451 in gold, and $022,
--291 88 in silver. 7 The | Director j says that
the superior facilities | at San Francisco for
filling with dispatch orders ! for the speedy
delivery of j silver in China, and the dimin
ished production of silver in the States and
Territories contiguous to the Pacific Coast,'
have operated to carry the price of bullion
at San Francisco above the New York and
London prices, rendering it difficult at
times to purchase at - market rates silver
bullion j for I delivery at the Pacific Coast
Mints. This compelled a suspension .of
coinage at Carson from November, 1879, to
May, 1880, the stock of silver bullion at the
iormer 7 date I having become „ reduced to
1,234,241 ■ standard ; ounces. :- - The . pur
chase , ; and . reception ; of j I silver £ j bull
ion ', was, | however, ■■-. in the : meantime
continued, ; : and ' the : stock ! . accumulated
by April, 1680, to * 22, 705, 754 standard
ounces, which " justified ; a resumption of
coinage, but the whole amount of silver
bullion obtained for the Carsou Mint dur
ing the : year | amounted, : at its coinage
value, to $59,762,428. | The total purchase
of silver during the year for San Francisco
was 7.331 standard ounces, at a cost of
$7,568,331 06. The total for Carson of
51. 358,338 standard ounces cost $52,723,
--378. The statement of the distribution of
appropriations and expenditures 7 shows :
Sail Francisco, $387,400 of appropriations
arid $32,366 150 of i !'ii'"Rures; Carson,
§1 -166.1 SO ■ot appropriations and - 1 9,715,.
73-3 nt expenditures. Oi-r.fi'it-rv earnings
anl sili'nres San Fracci— wis credited
with $15,848,734 '• charge* collected and
$15101,448 expenses; Carson, $"J56,442
charges colli cted and $553 759 expenses.
Ihe igbingand assaying were in all cases
satisfactory. Under the heading of tho
." Condition of the Mints and Assay Of
fices," the Director says that the coinage
at the San Francisco Mint in 18S0 was
$13,000,000 leas of gold and $6,000,000
of silver than in 1878, owing to the
diminished production of gold and silver
on the Pacific coast. The total coinage of
gold pieces was 2,284,500 ; of ailver pieces,
7,910,000 ; total value, $36,053,000. Car
son coined 38,567 gold pieces and 408. 000
silver pieces, valued at $654,790. Refer
ence is made to the Reynolds patent suit,
pending 'in the California Circuit Court,
against the Superintendent and Melter and
Refiner of the San Francisco Mint. The
Director says the process of parting at the
Mint has been in use since it was organ
ized, and was continued by the present
Superintendent solely for the benefit of the
United States, and if advantage has ac
crued it has been to the United States, and
not to these officers. They ought not to
be required to pay or defend themselves at
their own expense in this suit. The plain
tiff justifies his suit for the alleged team
that DO Court I as jurisdiction of any suit
i which he could . bring against the
United States.. The Director, . there
fore, rtegmmends that the ' jurisdic
tion of the Court of Claims be « xtended
to hear thia case, or legislation be extend eel
to enable the patentee to test the validity
of his claim, i and make the Government
ami not the officers responsible, With
reference to the indebtedness of the San
Francisco Mint to the Treasury, arising out
of the deficit! of officers prior to the or
ganization of the Mint Banal and the ap
pointment of the ■' present officers, whose
accounts are satisfactorily adjusted, and
the loss on the sale of sweeps aud wastage
prior to the same year, of which there is no
hope of collecting, . the Director re-om
mends their cancellation by an appropria
tion of the necessary amount from the
profit on coinage or from moneys in the
United States Treasury. There were
1,046,500 standard, silver dollars distribu
ted from the New Orleans Mint and 932,
--500 from the Philadelphia Mint. The total
shipments from the New Orleans Mint
since June 15, ISBO, have been - 4,943,498.
During the week there were 462, 92S stand
ard silver dollars distributed. During the
same period last year but 272,497 were dis
tri tinted.
CURIOSITIES OF THE VOICE.
Dr. Delaunay, in a paper read recently
before the French Academy of Medicine,
gives some details on the history snd
limits of the human voice, which be ob
tained after much patient research. Ac
cording to tho doctor, the primitive in
habitants of Europe were all tenors ; their
descendants of the present day are bari
tones, and their grand sons will have semi
baas voices. Looking at different races,
he calls attention to the fact that inferior
races, such as the negroes, etc., have
higaer voices than white men. The voice
has also a tendency to deepen with a^e—
1 the tenor of sixteen becoming the bari
tone at twenty-live, »nd bass at t'uirtv-live
Fair-comple.xioned ' people have higher
voices than the dark-skinned, the former
being usually sopranos or tenors, the latter
I contraltos or basses. "Tenors," says the
' doctor, "are slenderly built ard thin;
basses are stoutly made and corpulent."
This may be the rule, but one is inclined
to think there are more exceptions to it
: than are necessary to prove the rule. The
game remark applies to the assertion that
thoughtful, intelligent men have always a
■'ctrp- toned voice, whereas triflers and friv
olous persons have soft, weak voices. I Tho
tones of the voice are perceptibly higher,
he .points '■ out, before than alter a meal,
which is the reason why tenors dine early
in order that their voices may not suffer.
Prudent singers eschew strong drinks and
spirituous j liquors, . especially a tenors, bnt
basses can eat and drink • generally with
impunity. ?■ ■':'.' The south," Bays the doctor,
"furnishes the tenors and the north the
basses ;"7 in ' proof of -which he adds that
the majority of French ; tenors come from
the South of France, whilst the basse* be
long to the northern department , '.■ „;'"-jt?J
Solomon Jones of Bloon— burg, Md., was
70 when," after many years of poverty, he
received $'2,000 in pension money." . He had
no relatives to leave it to when he died,
and therefore made up his mind to spend it
all himself. In view of the probably short
time remaining to him in this world, he felt
that he must be fast and furious in bis
pleasures if -he would , spend the whole
$2, 000.* i He married - a - young ' wife, and
gratified her love of dress ; ha got in a large
stock of beverages, and drank ,m reck
lessly ; he bought a fast horse and | bet on
him. At the end of three months the last
dollar was gone, his wife deserted him, his
horse died, and he is still without any im
mediate prospect of dying. 7 v
. ■ A very touching incident, and : one that
illustrates the enduring love of woman, oc
curred in - St. Louis the other day. VJ'A
broker who was: rendered penniless by an
unexpected decline in stocks broke the news
to his young wife ;as 5 gently as , possible.
She did not faint or give way to tears, but,
with a look of ineffable sweetness, brought
from her writing-desk < the money she had
been saving up to buy a pair of shoes with,
putting it into his I hand without a | word.
Fortunately, the | firm to which she bad let
the contract I for the shoes j was \ a wealthy
Chicago one, and, although the unexpected
withdrawal of so much trade will make a
decided difference in the annual commercial
showing of that city, the consciousness of
a' good deed performed will more than com*
pensate for the loss. 7?V7'7;777' 7 7 7
7 Hamkeb's ; Gltczbole or ■ Tab ha* been
before the public for the past six years,' and
its constantly increasing demand is the best
testimonial of it* snooes*., . V i ";_- A-.
% Fob tb_ Coughs and Colds note prevail
ing, Hammer* Glyoerole of Tar is a specific.
7 Hama*'* : Cabcajla Sao sad a. Birrs** cure* tl
eomp— arising from an obstructed state of tte
system. :A^-^... -. :.--..- A-^J:. .. :
'; ___ sal i <_■__ I l_M-*i Brrrva tot hahttoo
«n ■_ta—fc* n. <- -•-.-..-■".-:•■■ -r.-.A^mm
PACIFIC COAST ITEMS.
■" Gridley is to have a new passenger de
pot.. . . - : 7 :■-•"- 7-.- 77"
Provisions are scarce at Wood River,
Idaho. ;
7, Pneumonia ' abounds in the Truckee
regions. 7 ; " : 7' , v l v ' ;
7 Thirty-two deaths occurred in Oakland
last month.'; .
Several cases of scarlet fever are reported
in Stockton.
"' Numbers of freight teams are blockaded
at Downieville. ;-.. '."i'-.-'-i. 7^7 -"■-"• 7 ••
Hay sells tor $50 per ton at Gunnison,
wholesale price. 7
A new Catholic church is about to be
erected at Napa. 7 7 , .7777';
I , Numerous thefts of cattle are reported
in Alameda county. ■ „■-'.
■ Tygh : - valley, "» Oregon, 'is increasing ;in
population and wealth.
' The oldest person in Montana is an In
dian woman, aged 115.
Red Bluff is to have a new paper, an
evening Republican daily. ,7;. .. ,
The 7 People's Cause of Red Bluff lias
changed hands once more. . '7. .»7
Forest fires have destroyed much timber
in southern Plumas county.
Silverton ' (Or. ) hunters : lately got in
Bight of a baud of forty elk. :,;7V .-■•',
. There are no less than 3,000 Indians in
the eastci n portion of Montana.
. Woodland wants some kind of a literary
society organized for the winter. . 777
Portions of Briggs' orchard at Marys
viile are being cut down for firewood.
There is to be a military post established
near the head of Big Chino valley, Arizona.
Ninety-one per cent, of the SCO school
children at Oakland are regular attend
ants. ..- 7
It is rumored that the Carson (Nev. )
Times is to be removed to Reno in the near
future.
* During the past eleven months Santa
Cruz county haa sent ten persons to the In
sane Asylum. >''.''
The new railroad town of Dillon, Mon
tana, is growing rapidly. It is in the heart
of Beaverhead valley, j
It cost the turn of $3,999 93 to lay in
winter fuel, do repairs and run the schools
of Virginia City during November.'
There is a flour mill at Bedford, Mon
tana, run by water from a hot spring, and
so able to operate all the year round.
The Yellowstone Journal, Montana, says
that over 100,000 buffalo hides, worth $2
apiece, will be cured in that region this
winter, '
There have been four cases of small-pox
at Tehachipa. One has completely recov
ered and the remaining threo are conva
lescent. ",". -v.,7-77 7 -nL-
Tiie town of Susauville, with less than
400 inhabitants, burns each year over 3,000
cords of wood, at the average price of
1 1 75 per cord.
Mass meetings are being held in many
British Columbia towns in relation to the
delay in the construction of theEtquimalt-
Nanaitr.o Railway. 7" *7777-'
Settlers are fast occupying the creek
bottoms and valleys of eastern Oregon, de
creasing the stock ranges and founding
future cities and villages.
The sea-wall is rising gradually at Oak
land. The contractors have discarded
schooners, and use barges to transport the
rock from Point San Pedro.
It is estimated that the average crop of
grapes in Napa valley is eight tons per
acre. Id Sonoma valley and on the moun
tains the crop is about live tons to the aero.
The first acre of sugar beets jutt har
vested in Puyallup, W. T., yielded eighteen
tons. The dry season cut the crop short.
Samples will be sent to Alvarado, in this
State, to be tested.
The Virginia (Nev.) -ting Club finds
it difficult to make their pond hold water.
An old miner says there i* a tunnel under
the pond, ami proposes to make the pond
hold water by bulkhead ing this.
Russel Heath, of Carpecteria, has SCO
bushels of Grenoble walnuts, shelled and
thoroughly dried. He has abot4ofiO acres
in walnuts, although not all bearing, and
will put out about .'-0 new trees this year.
It is announced, says the Vallejo Chron
icle, that the wages of shipwrights at the
Navy Yard during the next quarter will
be increased from St to .*.*> per day, that
being the ruling rate of wages paid in San
Francisco.
Mi a-jl.er county, Montana, stockmen are
opposed to further importa'.iors of stock
into their neighborhood, and' there-fore are
in favor tf raising th.; taxes a few mills on
the dollar in the hope that such a step will
tend to prevent the driving in of other
herds.
A correspondent of the Eureka (Nev. )
Sentinel, advocating artesian wells, says :
It has been proven that the interior deserts
are as productive as any lands, hardly ex
cept ng the Mississippi bottoms, provided
water lor irrigation can be obtained. It is
my opinion that an abttndanoe can be had
at less than 500 feet in depth. •
The Ortfville Mercury says t Joshua
Heady, of I in Francisco, has purchased
the Butte Mining Company's boat, and it is
now being dismantled. He intends stor
ing the two boilers rear tho railroad sta
tion, and will ship the small machinery to
San Francisco. This ..winter, when the
water in the river i* high enough, be will
float the scow down to Sacramento.
. The editor of the' Silver 7 State says i
Some fourteen ycart ago, the -writer, ac
companied by A. P. Safford anil others,
saw, the . hot springs, near 1 what is now
called the Hot Springs Station, on the
Central Pacific : Railroad, throw a volume
of water sufficient to run a sawmill, at hast
ten ; feet . high, v Tho . water continued to
flow, for two and one-half minutes and
then subsided for a like period. This oc
curred at regular intervals. -
i Judge Hastings, at the last meeting of
the St. Helena Viaicultural Club, broached
tho idea of improving the lands adjacent
to Napa river, by a general system of
straightening and cleaning throughout its
entire '- length, v which should -. enable the
waters to be more rapidly and thoroughly
drawn off and free the adjacent land* of
any standing water. This, it is thought,
might materially affect the liability to frost
of these - lands, and thus enhance . their
value for grape-growing. v :;t" r7i7"r
"' Columbia county's quota of ' arms, ' 100
stand, are at Walla Walla, W. T. , The
County Commissioners some time ago left
the distribution of , these arms to ' General
Smith, and he suggests that a company,
consisting of forty or fifty men, be formed
at Dayton," and that a similar one be organ
ized in the Pataha section. Upon the or
ganization of a company it will be supplied
with these arms, which are the needle gone
of the latest pattern, such as are furnished
to the regular army. 7
:•: Victoria - (B. C.) Chronicle rejoices
over the completion of \ the steamer Peer
less, built for. the Thompson-river trade,
and says that, with a few improvements in
the Black canyon, this piece of water a will
be rendered navigable, and fifty miles will
be added to the present beautiful stretch
from Sivona \ Ferry \to 7 Bpel_ m acheen,
through the best agricultural - and . grazing
land* |of the : province, betides 'giving a
water stretch of 125 miles ' np ' the North
Thompson ' river. 7 It will also be demon
strated that a canal should be ent from the
head 'of navigation "to Okanagan lake, a
distance of twelve miles, making in all a
navigable '_ stretch f of X nearly _ 300 \ mil
through the garden of British Columbia.
■ . : There is one character :of funerals often
seen in Tucson, says the Arizona Star, that
in many respect* lis I peculiarly j tonehing.
1 We ) refer to the . burial ;of little children
belonging to the poorer class of Mexicans.
It is I nothing | unusual jto i see ' the | father
walking through the streets with the dead
bod of his child in an ordinary raisin-box,
while the grief-stricken .mother walks be
hind, often leading one ' or two other chil
M SJBM9-fiM| ■"res?
10-EHR XII-NDttBEB B_.
dren. But even here the tender love of
their parental hearts shows itself in tha
cheap and often gaudy decorations of the
improvised coffin, for it will be covered
with . some " bright .. colored paper, more
often red than otherwise,' and around the
edges ■ neatly-cut scollops of white paper.
From i the residence of - the priest they
slowly wend I their way through : the deep
dust and hot sun '. to ■ the cemetery, and
there, within the precincts of consecrated
ground, lay away, forever the child whose
prattle will ■ never again gladden their
hearts.
NOTES OF THE DAY.
The other day the Paris police arrested
a man who was running about on the
banks of * the Seine in a state of absolute
nudity.: On being taken to the station*
house and supplied with clothing, he told
the following tale : - He had made up his
mind to drown himself,' so, proceeding to
the bank of the river, he undressed himself,
rolled his clothes up into a bundle, threw
them into the river, and then waded ' in
himself. But the water was cold, and, as
he lamcntingly said, "It gave him i m
traction of the stomach," so he waded out
again.:- But his clothes were at the bottom
of the Seine, if he was not, ami so lie waa
obliged to wait,' half frozen and very much
undressed, until he fell into the stern
clutches of the guardians of "the [je ace.
Greatly to his surprise he found that ho
had' made himself amenable to the law by
his abortive attempt &tfelo de ac, or rather
by hi 3 preparations '"or the event, and thai
a fine anil a term of imprisonment would
be the penalty for drowning his clothes be
fore he drowned himself. Moral— Never
begin any important piece of business at
the wrong end.
The husband of Lucretia Mott is said to
have abandoned his excellent cotton busi
ness because of its connection with- slave
labor. ' His comfortable income, of course,
went with the business, and Mrs. Mott
opened a school and maintained their fam
ily of four young children until Mr. Mott
established himself in other employment,
in which he finally acquired a competence.
Of their children only one Mrs. tidward
Hopper— bas : died ; their son, Thomas
Mott, spends his life between Newport and
Europe, one daughter is Mrs. F. M. Davis,
of Philadelphia, and the other is Mis. G.
W. Lord.
The luck of the Beresfordsis proviriliial.
It is not so long ago that . Lord William,
"Ulundi Beresford," as he is called,
bought the Bend Or ticket in the celebra
ted Dmballah sweep, realizing thereby
some £10,000 or £12,000. More recently
he purchased half the share of Robert the
Devil for the St. Leger in this same Um
ballah speculation, and as the sweep was
worth between £6,000 and £7,000, the ro
suit was another remarkable success. V ; #
Last spring J. N. Marden of Baltimore,
Mil., tried the experiment of keeping the
frost away from 2,500 of his pear trees by
building fires around them ion never*"
nights. His orchard contains 15,000 trees,
and those treated as above described yield
ed fruit that sole! for more than $'<,*W,
while the remainder of the orchard pro
duced comparatively nothing.
D. C. Iveson of Counellaville, Fa., went
to Scotland to look alter an estate which
he thought he might have inherited ; ar
rived there just in time to listen to positive
testimony that he was dead ; got 8100,000
in cash as his inheritance ; saw the per
jure— sentenced to prison for twelve years,
and returned home with the money.
A short lime ago tho postal authorities
at Vienna were startled by the receipt of a.
letter addressed to Her ova! and Imperial
Highness Maria Theresa^ who died in 1780,
The letter might have been written by Hip
Van Winkle, ».nd was one hundred yeirs
too late. It was returned to the sender
marked " dead."
The amount of money investsd in rci.iu.
factoring enterprises in New Jersey is
about 000,000, a capital which employ*
75,000 persons, 13,000 being engaged in the
manufacture of silk in Patera on. .'..The
horse-power which runs tho- machinery ie
estimated at 50,000.
The amount of tolls collected by the
New York canals during the present year,
up to October 31st, was Sfl93,(i!H) 08— an
increase of 652,148 16 ; total number of
tons carried, 5,083,432— an increase of 321,
--002 tons; total miles of boats cleared,
9,093,463— an increase of 566.516 miles.
King Oscar of Sweden gave 120,000
--crowns toward the expenses of Nordensk
jold's expedition. Tho total cost of the
expedition is said to have been 419,177
crowns. NordenskjoM's account of hie
voyage is shortly to be published in Gor
man, at Leipsic.
Thomas Brassey has bought from Mir
John Macdonald 64,000 acres of lan in
Canada, at the foot of the Rocky Moun
tains. 7 He may now have from 1,200 to
1,1.00 working tenants, with from "forty
to fifty acres each."
Rttv. L. W." Bacon, of Norwich, Conn.,
has started a new temperance movement,
in which he recognizes the need of a certain
limited sale of spirituous* liquors, and also
of places of entertainment for young men.
The "viu de Champagne" color is a
handsome gilded shade combined with pale
rose. Some marvelous toilets are making
of satin and brocard in this color, which
c vmbines well with all other hues.
A girl only 3 years old was arrested for
drunkenness at Lowell, Mass. To com
plete the disgraceful picture; the police let
her lie ten hours insensible in a cell without
attention. ."..-,
Costly shoes for wear with fine street
costumes are made with tops that roll over
and arc lined with silk and embroidered
to match the costume . with which they
are worn. -
Mr. Thomas Hughes is authority for
saying ' that '* Tho - L : fe and • Letters of
Frederick Dcnison Maurice," at least the
first volume, maybe expected late in the
fall.;'" }■■". :':':'■. '■";' *i'
A corsage cluster of flowers is now fur
nished by Parisian dressmakers, with all
dresses except the plainest. Sometimes at
small bird is perched in these clusters. -V
: i For the first time -in more than twenty
years we have a President, an ex -President
and a President-elect, all living. a ,
Ton P— two-ess Louise. — The Princes*.
Louise, it is again declared,' will not return
to Canada, and •' it .: ia added ; that the
Princess, who is frankness itself, make* no
secret of the disappointment | to which she
has been subjected '■■ in '■ her - endeavor te
throw a little refinement into tl. - tone and
manners of the Canadian Viceregal Court.
The I Princess, who | has J always been I re
garded |as | the artist ! of the ' royal family,
finds I herself completely isolated j from all
artistic life at . Ottawa. On her I return te
England from' Germany the Princess did
not go to Balmoral, but to her father-in
law's at Inverary, and while she was there
saw no one bnt her brother, Prince Leop
old, who ia devoted to her.:: He is said te
have been much troubled by the difference ]
in the family brought on I by the Princess's
resolution not to return to the I Continent,
and is supposed to have visited her to in.
duce her to go to her mother at Balmoral.
7 Raised i His ; Own Coffin.— lf ? a imi
wishes to be thoroughly comfortable in his
own coffin he must plant the tree from
which that article is made. At ' least that
was the conviction of Captain I Stone, who
arrived at . Mound ville," West Virginia, 35
years ago, to make his home, and planted
two seeds, remarking to his family that he
wonld like to raise his own coffin. One of
the seeds J died, but the ' other -our-uet.
and grew. Front a shoot it became a sap.
ling, and I finally, in the . course .of thirty
years, a fine tree. About eighteen "' °•
ago a severe windstorm ! prostrated the
tree. He had it' cut into lumber and sent
to a Pittsburg firm. In a short time it wae •
returned to him in the shape of a beautiful
coffin. About four weeks ago he was laid
away in the ooffin which he planted a*
years ago. 7a: 7 •'■;-'■'■ .':'•-. ' -••*'• '
> ______ C-fcsaoui or Tab, fair ooog- and ***>
' Try It '^§3^____^MWSOSgm : '' " '

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