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Sacramento daily record-union. (Sacramento [Calif.]) 1875-1891, January 09, 1891, Image 2

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DAILY RECORD-UNION
FBIDAY JANUARY 9. 1891
Weather Forecast.
Forecast till 8 p. a. Friday; For Northern
California—Fair weather.
THE INAUGURATION-THE ADDRESS.
Governor H. H. Markham was yester
day, with due ceremonial, inducted into
the high office of Chief Magistrate of the
.State of California.
There is a general and most gratifying
feeling of confidence in Governor MarkT
ham. The people freely express them
selves as expecting at his hands a clean,
economic and firm administration of State
affairs. He is looked upon as one who
comes to the discharge of the great trust
committed to him, untrammeled by politi
cal entanglement! and not bound up by
pledges and obligations to influences with
only selfish ends to accomplish.
We have every reason lor entertaining
high hope that all that is expected of
Governor Markham will be realized. He
certainly himself invites the entertain
ment cf such expectation by the most sol
emn and emphatic expressions of purity of
purpose and intention to conserve the true
interests of the State and its people, be
fore any and all things.
Governor Markham's inaugural address
is a modest, hopeful and pleasant paper.
He urges upon the Legislature rigid econ
omy, advises the ascertainment of a reason
able sum beyond which there shall be no
expenditure, and that all appropriations
be rigidly confined within such limit.
He favors aid to the California exhibit to
the World's Fair, and suggests that the
sum to be appropriated for that purpose
may be properly treated as extraordinary,
and not within the aggregate of expendi
ture for support of the State Government.
He insists that the Legislature shall
make the new apportionment upon a
basis of fairness and justice, so as to
give the people as nearly as is possible
true representation. The bills for the
exclusion of the Chinese should be fos
tered in Congress, useless Commissions
should be abandoned, and the Federal
Government urged to expend means for
the discovery of some method by which
hydraulic mining can be prosecuted with
out infringment of the laws and the edicts
of the Courts.
He does not commit himself to any
form of reform ballot system, but advises
that whatever of good there is in our
system be retained, and all the best feat
ures of the best reform system be added.
He advises renewed attention to the for
estry question, that irrigation supply
sources may be preserved.
Governor Markham indicates his in
tention to address the Legislature on
several topics in special communications.
It is to be hoped that in one of these, at a
very early day, he will call the attention
of the Legislature to the deplorable condi
tion of our navigable rivers, and notably
of the Feather and Sacramento rivers, and
advise the Legislature to do all that can
be done to promote the awakening inter
est by the Federal Government in the
matter of river restoration. The Federal
Engineers will be in this city in a few
days more, to sit as a Government Com
mission ujion this very subject, and it is of
high importance that the Legislature
should promote their labors, and that the
good work of examination done by the
State River Commission should be fully
availed of, as was intended when the State
ordered the examination made.
This is the sum of the address, which
is brief, in plain and understandable lan
guage, and expressed with becoming dig
nity and vigor. It is marked by sincer
ity and warmth of feeling, indicative ot
purity of purpose and an earnest desire
to promote the highest and best inter
ests of the people.
THE ASSAULT UPON THE SCHOOL
BOOKS.
The assault of the book rings upon the
State school books has been opened. We
were well aware that it wai to l>e made,
and knew precisely the form it was to
take. We had not anticipated, however,
that there would be quite such wholesale
dealing in falsehood and misrepresenta
tion. We do not propose now to take up
the charges in detail. It would be profit,
less to do so. In the main they are, that
the books cost too much; that they are
of inferior quality ; that the State never
has, and therefore never can, produce as
good a book as the private individual.
We might, for argument's sake, admit
every one of these propositions, though
they are not true, and still maintain for
the State infinite gain in the elimination
of the book ring, wjjjLaiA-itß~e<»fr«ptiq%
--irifluenees and demoralization, from the
politics, the schools and the school boards
of the State. That is to say, if the text
books we vow have are, in the opinion of
the County Superintendents, but half as
good as the books of the ring, and if they
cost twice the price of the books of the
ring, we have made a happyand beneficent
change in trading ofl the ring and putting
it oul of the halls of legislation and the
schoils and Boards of Education.
If for a moment we admit that some of
" the text-books are not up to the ideal
standard, let us seek for the cause, not
abandon the system. It has come to a
pretty pass, indeed, if all knowledge and
skill is crystallized in the editors and
compilers whom private publishers em
ploy. It is strange, indeed, that State
coin cannot command ability of as high an
order as is at the beck and call of private
capital. But while some of the books are
not, perhaps, up to the highest all-around
standard, and while carping critics may
take them to pieces, they are capable of
being made precisely what we wish them
to be. It does not follow that we must
abandon the system that puts up the bars
against the book agent and his sack, nor
once more turn the parents of the State
over to the tender mercies of the publish
ers who have amassed tens of millions out
•f the profits of school text-books. As a
matter of fact, the State school books
cost the people fifty per cent, less than
school books under the old system, and all
tbe figuring of the ring literary bureau.
cannot defeat the fact.
We say tha*. this assault was foreseen
So it was; the book ring never intended
to give over California. It has been too
fat a noose to be yielded without a struggle.
The syndicates have planned their attack
well; they have laid their trenches with j
cunning and run their parallels with con-!
summatc skill. They have waited until
just before the Legislature meets, and then
poured upon it such a mass of involved
figures that with a wholly new set of offi
cials coming in, the hope is entertained
that the legislators will not be able to go
to the bottom of the matter, and in sheer
desperation will submit an amendment to I
the Constitution for the abandonment of
the school book system.
The viciousness of the assault, the long
preparation it indicates, its sweeping char-
I acter, its falsehood and misrepresentation,
clearly disclose its source and the motive
that underlies it. There is money behind
the whole thing, not public interest. The
sack is clearly seen and the bid for legisla
tive assistance to undo the school book
system is undisguised. There are none,
unfortunately, to stand for the people in
this matter except the fearless and inde
pendent press. They have no advocate
against the syndicate lawyers and agents,
except the voice of such of the press as is
not subservient to the rings. So far as the
Eeccrd-Ukion is concerned, it did battle
for the new system; it believes in it; it
believes it has had fully as trreat success
as was to have been expected, when the
fact is taken into account that it was com
mitted to its enemies, for the most part,
for carrying out. That is to say, that the
State Board of Education has not, as a
body, shown that warm friendship for the
system that it should. Some of the mem
bers were open opponents of the system
prior to adoption, and some labored for it
thereafter in a meek sort of manner not
at all encouraging to its real friends. It
should have been put into the hands of an
independent and wholly friendly board.
Had that been done, the utter folly, for
instance, of accepting from a second-rate
teacher one of the text-books complete,
because he gave the MSS. to the State,
would not have been committed.
Let legislators not take for granted all
that is charged against the system; Ist
them investigate the matter if they
choose; but whatever they do, let them
not brave the people by daring to loose
upon them once more the infamous po
litical school book system; the private
ring of book men: the agents with their
sacks, and the secret representatives of
book syndicates, to corrupt the district and
county boards, and bribe even the children
at their desks.
ELECTION OF SENATORS.
Congressman Langston, the colored Rep
resentative from Virginia, has proposed in
the House an amendment, to the Constitu
tion of the United .States providing for
the election of United States Senators by
the people, under such regulations as Con
gress may by law establish, provided, how
ever, that no elector shall be allowed to
vote for Senator, in any State, who can
not read and write the English language.
We cannot resist the temptation to call
the attention of the Wisconsin Democrats
to this outrageous trespass upon the rights
of free men by making the scholarly <puali
fication relate only to the English tongue.
Is not Mr. Langston aware'that a great
party which claims capacity and patriot
ism sufficient to administer the affairs of
the American nation, has decided by its
Wisconsin council that to insist upon citi
zens having the ability to read the laws in
the language in which printed is an
invasion of constitutional liberty, and of
the guarantees of the American system, as
well as an assault upon the sacred right of
Wisconsin Democrats to grow up with
knowledge of the German and Polish
tongues only ?
However, passing this pleasantry, let
the people think seriously upon this prop
osition to abandon the present method of
choosing Senators. The Farmers' Alli
ance, the Republican Convention of Indi
ana and; the Labor Party have made the
demand Mr. Langston's bill reflects. It
has, therefore, considerable organized
backing, and it is well known that there
is, besides, a growing " popular " demand
for the election of Senators by the direct
vote.
If the change is made it will be retro
gressive. The present system was wisely
devised and the prescience of the fathers
who laid its foundations was something
divine. The Senators represent the States,
not the people as units, but in their ag
gregate cap icity as communities. Depart
ure from that idea will seriously impair
the American system. But it is needless to
go over the familiar reasons that led to
the adoption of the Senatorial plan—it is
sufficient to warn the people that election
by direct vote will place it within the
power of congested populations in each
State to name the United States Senators.
Rural populations will have only the poor
privilege of voting for whoever the cities
choose to name.
We are free to admit that it is most de
sirable that the selection of State legisla
tors should be wholly disconnected from
the election of United States Senators.
The evils of uniting the two are so obvi
ous that it would insult intelligence to re
count them. But there is a plan by which
the desired separation can be effected, the
eleetioftof Senators directly by the people
secured and still the character ol the
office o Senator retain its original pur
pose, t was the fortune of the Record-
I'.Nioy o propose the plan about one year
ago. ; ' 'he more it is considered the
strongci hold it takes upon good judgment.
This flan, which secures to all the peo
ple dn«l voice in the selection, and com
pletely Iprevents centers of population
from C<|minating, calls for the establish
ment o*| a Senatorial Electoral College in
each StSe. Once in three years the elect
ors of fie several district?, counties or
other (Bvisions, as may be agreed upon,
will se»l up representatives to a college
based -fpon ratios of population. This
college 'will choose the Senator. The
canvass by candidates would be conducted
precisely as if they were to be voted for
directly |by the people, but the virtue of
the plait would be, that every given group
of the p«ople would have a potential voice
in the dfcosing, and mere numbers in one
locality jbould not exercise an influence
greater tlan an equal force widely distrib
uted. Ll short, we would choose Senators
as we dO now, practically, with the in-
Tolvemeifl of selecting State legislators,
and determining local issues, eliminated.
SoLicrroß-GE>-ERAL Clarke of Great
Britain is reported byjwire as saying that
Ijord Salisbury only asserts the doctrine
laid down by the United States, that no
nation can claim sovereignty over an open
sea. Wrong again, Mr. Clarke, though you
be Solicitor-General. The United States
does not base its claim to protect the seals
upon the assumption that Behring Sea is a
closed sea. It does claim, not sovereignty
over the sea, but over the taking of seals '
anywhere in the sea, for the very excellent '
i reason that they breed upon one of our
shores, migrate to another and there as
semble. Now to take these seals en route
we claim is unlawful interference with onr
property and a right in it which we pur
chased from a nation whose title was never
disputed. That is the long and the short
of the matter. British poachers desire to
be let alone in their lying in wait to take
our seals as they pass by, and that is a
policy we can never agree to.
SACBAHJ&NTO DAILY RECORD- UK ION. FRIDAY, JASUABY 9, 1893.
IRRIGATION DISTRICTS.
Representatives Therefrom Hold a Ses
sion in this City.
On the I2:h and 13.h of September last a
Convention of irrigation district officers
was held at Tulare City, and a part of its
mission was to form a permanent Associa
tion of Irrigation Districts, embracing all
of the districts in the State. This organ
ization hes not been entirely completed,
and a session is now being held at Room 14
in the Clunie building in this city, for the
purpose of perfecting the organization, and
preparing such legislation as is deemed
needfnl.
There are now twenty-eight districts or
ganized nnder the district law in the State,
and twenty-six of these are actively at
work furthering the objects for which tbey
were formed.
There are embraced within these dis
tricts 1,703,152 acres of land, and they have
voted bonds in the aggregate sum of $9,-
G20,000, of which $1,893,500 have been sold.
A number of districts have not yet voted
bonds, and a number of those wh'ch have
voted bonds have not placed them upon
tne market.
It is understood that, in addition to
minor amendments to the law, tbe Legis
lature will be asked for an Act giving legal
sanction to tbis State Association of dis
tricts, and conferring upon it certain super
vising powers which seem needful to guard
against injudicious action upon the part of
districts, but it is not tbe intention to ask
for any great amount of pecuniary assist
ance.
This Association held two sessions yes
terday, and will reconvene today at 10
o'clock, for the consideration of proposed
amendments to the law.
AMUSEMENTS.
A better houve witntssed tbe second ap
pearance of Miss Adelaide Moore last
night. She played the leading part in
LeClercq's "Fatal Marriage." It is a dis
mal melodrama. There is not a touch of
light in it. Miss Moore failed to invest
with any spirit or vigor tbe part she
assumed. She lacks sadly in emotional
roles the vitality and fire necessary. She
has intellectuality enough, but will never
please American audiences with such
pulseless efforts as that of last night. Her
Juliet was of some merit, her Madaline of
the very least. The American stage is
accustomed to something more of womanly
vigor and depth of feeling in such roles.
The "U and I" Company, with Gus
\Villiam3and John T. Kelly, is announced
fjr a return engagement at t"« Metropoli
tan Theater of one night, Monday next-
The company has played three weeks in
San Francisco to crowded houses. The
piece has been much changed since it was
presented here, we are told, and new spe
cialties, songs and witticisms introduced.
(Certainly the money rec-ipts of the com
pany in San Francisco have exceeded any
thing on record to the credit of farce com
edy for a similar period.
Tbe fifth annual ball given by Sacra
mento council, Young Men's Institute, at
Turner Hall last eveniug, was a very
pleasant affair and largely attended.
BRIEF NOTES.
The recent rain has caused the river to
become ijnite a muddy stream.
The pay-car stopped in this city yester
day morning and paid ofl all of the railroad
employes.
The Artillery Regiment ball will take
place February s:h, not January 15'.h, as
published.
A colt belonging to A. Wahl was run
over and killed by a railroad train on R
street on Wednesday night.
Ed Stapleton and wife have re;nrned
from their trip to Southern California.
Reitz is expected back in a day or so.
In an item published yesterday regard
ing the installation of officers of Fair Oaks
Corps, the Senior Vice-President's name
was given as Miss Jennie BonsoD, when it
should have read Mrs. Jenuie Bronson.
SUPERIOR COURT.
Department One—Catiin, Judge.
Thiesdav, January B,ISUI.
In re. Fred Mason, au insolvent debtor—Ar
gument postponed until the 10t!i instant.
Department Two—Van Fleet, Judge.
Thursday. January B,IMU.
H. A. Root vs. Carlatrobel et al.—Argued and
submitted.
Ledyard Frink vs. J. Nahl—Dismissed on mo
tion of appellant.
Weber vs. Weber—Action dismissed, on mo
tion of plaintiff, without prejudice.
Substantial Improvements.
[Placer Daily Argus, January sth.J
The Record Union is just getting ad
justed to its new Goss perfecting press, and
proposes substantial improvements. The
Record-Union, though a little ofl on the
McKinley bill, is under good management,
and we wish it all possible future success.
• m
We are all free American citizens, en
joying our personal liber;y: but most of
us are in physical slavery, buffering from
scrofula, salt rheum or "some other form
of impure blood. Hood's SarsapariUa is
the great blood purifier which gives phys
ical liberty.
I For a Disordered Liver'l
1 Try BEECM'S PILLS.
1 25cts. a Box. \
•T OF .AJJL, DK.TJGGI.-STS. *
ELYS ggP^gJJ
Gream Baim B^ly'stjb
Olea-usca theggJ^^A>cu REi •*!
n*sai r«w*RcaS^^c^Af *HEftjjl
I..fl*mm«tlon.^ ftlf rtVt^J-|- ££
Heals theSores.lSj^ <TV^H
Restores t b ejfljL -t^'l »ii
•"snsos of TactcfjßJ^fc ,r£-^A*v@a
•nd Stnell. g^^l
TRY THE CDRE.HAr-FEVER
A particle is applied into each nostril and if
agreeable. Price, 60 cents at Druggist*; by
mail, registered, 60 cent*. ELY BROTHERS
SB Warren street. New Yorfr MWFAwIv
TO EPICDRES
And Lovers of Good Meats!
YOUR ATTENTION IS INVITED TO OUK
specially Belected rjnality of
3533 3EI JF* !
(Durham Cattle), purchased from the STAN
FORD RANCH, wnich is to be sold at regular
prices. It is the finest lot of BEEF ever brought
to Sacramento. Our supply is large, but tho de
mand is great.
MOHR & YOERK, Sacramento.
d«-tf-2p
A. MEISTER,
arrtaices, Victorias, Phaetons, Baggies
and Pprtng Wagons.
910, 912"914 Xinth Street.
DR. A. BARKAN,
Specialist ior diseases of the
E.TF, EAR, NOSE AND IHKOAT,
Has returned from Europe, acd resumed the
practice of bis profession.
Office, 14 Grant Avenao,
ja7"t San Francisco.
CAUTION AGAINST FRAUD.
IN THE MATTER OE THE ESTATE OF
Thomas Ilarruan, deceased, uow peniirg in '
the I'robate Court, no final account has ever
been made nor no final settlement a> vet. MAK
! GRET HARRIGAN, executrix and ailminis-tra
tnx. jaS-lm
NOTICKTOCREDITORS— ESTATE OF JOHN
R GILLILAND. deceased. Notice is here
by given by the undersigned, EDWIN K. AL^-IP, <
Executor of the last will arid testanent of the
estate of JOHN R. GILLILaND, deceased, to
the creditors of, and all persons having claims
against said deceased, to exhibit them, with the
necessary affidavits or vouchers, within lour
months after the first publication of this notice,
to said Executor, at the law offices of Root. T.
Devlin, 328 J street, Sacramento. California, the
same being his place for the transaction of the
business of sa'd estate.
Dated, December 18,159D.
EDWIN K. ALSIP,
Executor of the last will and testament of
JOHN R. GILLILAND, deceased.
Eobt. T. Divlis, Attorney for Executor.
APYKKTISEMtaT Of MALE JtHUS. « CO.
For This Evening.
Wen's pull Dress Suits, Shirts, fleekcuear an( j
Dancing Shoes.
Ladies' Itaee Handkerchiefs, Fine Fans, Party
Gloves in opera shades, Silk Hose, Sandals
and Slippers.
Reduced Dress Goods.
54-inch All-wool Checks, in navy brown, black and \ (t" A
gray, reduced from $i to 50 cents. ) * A
\ TO
54-inch All-wool Plaids, reduced from $1 to 50 \ rr\
cents. / OUC.
38-inch All-wool Striped Cloth, reduced from 50 and \
65 cents to - - - • j
38-inch All-wool Self-striped Serges, 10 shades, re- 25c
duced from 50 to 2^ cents. \
38-inch All-wool Serges, in green, tan and blue, for'
Cloak Bargains.
Whatever you want in Cloaks,
for all ages, it will pay you to first
see the BARGAINS created by our
end-of-the-season reductions.
—11 —
Shoes Less Than Cost.
Broken lines of Ladies' Shoes and Slippers and Men's
Shoes have been put into the Clearance Sale at less than in
voice cost. To those who wear narrow widths we can give
high class goods at prices like these:
Ladies' Shoes that originally sold from $4 to
$7 50, for $2 95.
Ladies' Oxfords and Slippers that were once
from $2 50 to $6, are now $1 25.
Men's Shoes, finest makes, are $3 65, that
were $5 to $8.
The above lines are closed out at these exceptional prices
simply because we have not a full round of sizes. There are
various styles in the assortment.
HALE BROS & CO.,
Nos. 82^, 827, 82Q, B^l, 833, 83s K St., and 1026 Ninth St.,
SACRAMENTO. CAL.
THE NONPAREIL.
GHEtEJLT
Annual Clearance Sale!
SIXTH TZArY.
—n —
Still Progressing Immensely.
We will place on our counters:
LOT I—Children's Cloaks and Dresses,
former prices $10, $8, $6, $4, all
reduced to $2 33.
LOT 2-Children's Cloaks and Dresses,
very stylish and fell assorted, all
reduced to $4 21.
LOT 3—Children's Cloaks and Dresses,
the choicest in stock, all reduced to
$6 10.
We place on sale TO-DAY one case of

Plaid Woolen Dress Goods, 38 inches wide,
J&.T 25 Cents ct Yara.
•#"This is special and should not escape your attention.~©t
THE NONPAREIL,
Corner Flftlx and J*. Saoramento.
. APCTIOBS.
BELL & CO..
Auctioneers and Commission Merchants,
1009-1011 J street.
Regular Salesdays: Wednesdays and Saturdays.
WILL SELL ON SATURDAY, JANUARY
lu, l?9l, at 10 A. M., at Salesrooms: Horses,
Buggies, etc. Also the furniture ot two houses,
consisting of two elegant Parlor Suites: two An
tique Sideboaids, with Extension Tables to
match; one elegant Black Walnut bedroom
suite: plate-glass mirror, costing 5225; one fine
Bedroom Suite, Tennessee marble; Spiing. Top
and Hair mattresses; one very flne Marole-top
Hat-tree; one flue sofa Bed lounge: Patent
Kitchen Table: Gasoline Stove; Oak Center
Tables and Chairs: high-back Dining Chairs;
large Wicker and Plush Kockers: Ranges, and
a choice lot of other Household Goods, all latest
style g00d.., and must be sold as parties are go
ing East. Also, job lot of goods, including
jewelry suitable for a peddler's outfit, ao re
serve; terms taah; sale positive. js'J-2t
W. H. SHERBURN,
AUOTIONEEH,
323 is: street.
FOR SALE,
Or to Lease for a Term of
Years,
80 Acres of Land Two and Ouc-half
miles from Rocklin, Mag North half
of East Quarter of Section 33, Town
ship 11 North, Range 7 East.
Apply soon for terms to
W. H. SHERBURN,
323 K Street, Sacramento.
STATE
Citrus Fair
FOK
NORTHERN
CALIFORNIA,
WILL BE HELD AT
MARYSYILLE,
January ita to fffc, 1891.
Gash Premiums, $2,500
SPECIAL EXCURSION

Leares Southern Pacific Depot, Sacra
meuto, Saturday, Jannary 17th, at
10:35 A. M., by way cf PaYlsville,
Woodiand and Knights Landing, over
new road through Sutter Counly.
Returning Saturday evening, leaves
Marysville at 9 P. M.
FARE, ROOND TRIP, $2 50.
Tickets for sale at Railroad Ticket
Office.
ja6-10t
FOR SALE
Edwin K. Alsip & Co.,
The Oldest and Leading Real Estate
aud insurance Agents,
No. 1015 Fourth Street, Sacramento.
A FRUIT FARM
In Newcastle Fruit Belt, in the
Light Tract Colony, four miles
from Newcastle, Penryn and
Loomis.
THE TRACT ORIGINALLY CONTAINED
476 acres, which hss been subdivided into
20 acre lots. .Some have been sold and im
proved. It is all cleared of underbrush; corn
grows without irrigation. If required, water In
abundance can be secured, as water ditch runs
through the place. The soil is deep, rich and
easily cultivated.
We claim this to be one of the most desirable
places in Central C'aiilornia.
TEKMS—One-third cash, balanee in five
annual installments, with interest at 7 per cent,
purchaser paying taxes.
A'e will accompany anyone wishing to view
the land.
No. 471—34 03-100 acres very finely im
proved land, on M street road, al", ait two miles
from city limits: 17 aer js fine baaring orchard;
2 acres foreign vines: this land will mostly all
produce fine vegetables or alfalfa: good house 6
room*. 2 good bams: ail fenced and cress
fenced; 5 wells and 2 windmills; this place has
been held at f 1.">,0C0, but has now been reduced
to JU.BOO, or wtll sell In sub-divisions of 17 acres
each.
No. 518—110 acres about 4 miles from New
castle; this woald make a flne Pear or Peach
orchard and is very cheap; $20 per acre.
No. 577—280 acres near Newcastle; 20 acres
in fruit: small house; $50 per acre; small pay
ment down.
No. 519—160 acres fine fruit land near Rose-
Tille; 15 acres vineyard: small orchard; house,
barn; several springs: J4O per acre.
No. 520—80 acres near Loomis; 52.500; % aere
•TChard, % acre vineyard.
No. 521—14 1-8 acres very fine vegetable
land near city cheap; inquire at onee.
No. 522—A very nicely improved riv«r farm,
cheap and a bargain.
No. 524—840 acres Ko. 1 fruit and gTain land,
6 miles from Auburn: well improved and under
irrigation ditch. Price, J6.300.
160 acres three miles from Loomis; 5 acres
orchard. 4 acres vineyard, 6 acres alfalfa: good
house, barn, and all fenced: lies on main ro&d;
will exchange for good located improved or un
improved property; $7,000.
80 acres 2>j miles south from Rocklin: 22
acres orchard and vineyard; well located, and
under main Bear river ditch; will also ex
change.
80 acres near Hickev Tract, Placer connty;
improved: some fine land; will exchange for
city property or sell for cash at 155 per acre.
Sourt for Catalogue,
Houses Rented, Rents Collected,
Property Insured, Money L'oaned.
EDWIN K. ALSIP & CO.,
"arramptito. Oat. ol4tflp
Grossman's Specific Mixture
WITH THIB REMEDY PERSONS CAN CURH
themselves without the least exposure,
change of diet, or change in application to busi
ness. The medicine contains nothing that is of
)he least injury to the constitution. Ask your
drnsMst f«v it Price fl * bottle. 'v9-lvTujr
WEAKFREE "ttV^
. M*-wftOE SealedTreaUae, rxi.lainiiut also
M^ JSm ifV 1"' an'1 l'f''i» I'IKK without
XTDiINIa "loiimrli ririiuclne. < r L»»t Jl.in
WltfUllW li'.-i Nervous Debility, Uk ol
Vigor ana Development. Premature Decline, Funo
tloiuil Dl^rters, Kkluev snd TAuidiT I>A ii.*a. etc.
liina TBI lit-T.l CO., 19 Put flut, Kew fork, L I
H. K. WALLACE—RASWfcS. STOYES. TINWARE, Klf.
t SACRAMENTO
STOVE HOUSE.
$5 BTTYS
PARLOR * COAL * STOYE,
L. ■£ Just received, one carload of
i^(ffg aiw*i>s^ the FINEST AND CHEAPEST
■ .intfl^irVi^jfii'^gHF'' PAELOB STOVES ever sent to
'J ! 'i^ a:S-r,lf one when you can buy a Coal
■: HlCliii* Etove for $5- CALL EABLY
>.-^-;_^:! j-pf^^al and pr.rchase a Parlor Stove, as
> 'M','; ;i i I|a''i li j tiley are selling fast.
: H. K. WALLACE.
•~i "y^^Smm\^mm^^'. Nos. 813 and 815 J street,
A JOB LOT OF CLOAKS AND OLSTERS
From $2 SO to $S.
Also a Full Line of Medicated Underwear
ie. i_fX"o:£T &c go.,
625 O" Street.
BRAND, LAWTON. BARNETT & CO..
BEAL ESTATE, INBCRANCE. LOANS NEGOTIATED, Houses to Kent, Collections.
■40Q iW gi-»-»-«j>«^-» ..V&r. r-.-wjm to f»?CT •*•<?>- «~Vn "I. tag
cs^ X3[- WA.CHIIORST, at
ffijBLEADING JEWELER OF SACRAMENTO, Sm
Agent for PATEK, PHILIPPE & CO.'S WATCHES. Best ln the world.
SIGN OP THB TOWN CLOCK, NO. 315 J ST., SACRAMENTO.
sm 3S.IjTJ]!VJJ3 <*j H^XiQJQJEIiO.Or, JL
gv/*k WATCHMAKKIW and JKWKLKKS, 428 J St., Det. Fonrth and Fifth. jSS:
Utesjjt DEALERS IS WATCHES JEWELRY and DIAMONDS. REPAIRING In all Ita •*■►
Branches a specialty. linger MR. FLOBERG. Agents for ROCKFORD WATCH COMPANY.
Sacramento Lnmber Coffipanyj^^SsS?*-
Main Office Sww»d ntrwt. T* *od TO. Tard: Front and R fttreela. Bftnr«mffnM.
fiBO. WISSEMANN, TDM IVQ ST. LOUIS BEER.
AGENT FOB I J Pi 111 K 11 o ALWAYBONTA?ATWI^-.«ANN?
1 I I i 111 5 kj SALOOH. BALOOX3 4.1D
1029 Fourth *t., Sacramento. "^^ ** nr g CPI . UED BY THE z r ;3 31TTLE.
AMUSEMENTS, ETC.
METROPOLITAH THEATER,
CHAS. P. HaLL Proprietor and Manager
REIUKN OF THE FAVORITES!
Monday, Jan. 12—For One Night Only!
The management respectfully announces
the return of the Popular Comedians,
GDS WILLIAMS AND JOHR T. KELLY,
Assisted by their Great Company of
Comedians, in
-£XT 1^
NorK—The success of the ' U and I" Com
pany in San Francisco was the greatest; ever
known in the annals of the Bush-ftreet The
ater, and their return to Sacramento will no
doub! meet with the entire approval ol our
theater-goers.
PRICES, 50 cents ani Sl—No higher. Seats on
sale Saturday. ja9 3t
THE TENTH ANNUAL BALL
—OF TUB
FIRST ARTILLiSRY REGIMENT.
Fourth Brigade, N. G. C.
WILI. BE GIVEN THURSDAY EVENING,
January 15. ISPI. at ARMORY HALL.
There will be an Exhibition Drill by COMPANY
A, at 8 o'clock Sharp.
Tickets, admitting gentleman and ladies, tl.
The proceeds to be devoted to the construction
of a target range. Tickets already sold will be
good for the above date. jaS-St
611KB FEBB FOR ALL
Billiard Tournament
—AT THE—
Cafe Royal Billiard Rooms,
—TO COMMENCE—
Monday Evening;, December Iff, 1890.
Entrance Si">, Mr. Gamble to add $100. Games
to be 250 points up. straight three-ball game.
Names entered to date are: H. D. Gamble, Chas.
T. O'Neill, Ralph Lockhart, 8. S. Beede and
Edward C. Roeder. Beede and Roeder are con
ceded the odds ol 100 points. Wm. Eberhardt
has presented a beautifully polished cane made
from wood taken lrom Sutter's Fort.
H. D. GAMBLK, Proprietor.
SKATING
EVERY AFTERNOON AND EVENING.
Music every Wednesday and Saturday Evenin
n!2-lm G. H. STAUFF, Prop I
DANCiNG CLASSES ft.
TUB-NJ-K HALL. P«F\
CHILDREN'S CLASS SATURDAY '
AFTERNOON, at 2 o'clock. Gen- MfT&m
tlemen's Clan. MONDAY, at 7:£.' tju.''j^»
P. M. Lessons, 50 cents. Ladies' and "YJ
Gentlemen's CUssA) t'Ks;.,\Y. - }-*♦'?'•
PRIVATE LEMONS at all hours. -- — IUPt
ol«-U IONKS. FIBOH A WATSON
■ lIMMIIIM I I.IIM Wl I ..lIIMIIII W
PflTTVTfllff w- I" Donclan Shoes ml
VaUllvll warranted. :..ni every pai
bas hi** name nud price stamped on button
W. L. DOUGLAS
$3 SHOE CENTLEMEN
Fine Calf and I.p.ced Waterproof Crali
The excellence and wearing oualltlctrvf this six
:annot be better shown than by the strong eudors.
ments of Ita thousands of constant wearers.
5|".00 f^enninc llnml—owed, an elegant ma
mJ stvlish .Sri-ss y.i'.., 'bleh commemls itsel
EA|.Ot Hand-«rwcd Well. A fin" calf «hc
■» unequalled for style and durah'.tv.
t0.50 (iondrear Welt Is the standard drei
v Shoe, at a popular price.
SO.SO Poiiceman « Shoe Is especially adapte
•* for railroad men, farmers, etc.
All made In Congress, Button and Lace.
$3&s2SHOESufn°,l s
ar.ve beer, wsmt favorably received sluc-e Introduce
»nd the recent improvements make them suterfc
U> any shoes sold at these prices.
Ask y<.ur Dealer, and If hj cannot supply you sen
llrect to factory enclosing advertbeJ price, or
postal for order blanks.
W. I. BOUGI.AS. nrcrJuon. Mar
WEINSTOCK, LUBIN & CO., Agents
Nos. «no to 418 K St., ;• acramento.
T. A. LAUDERT
Importer and Dealer In
Boggies, Carriages,Carts
WHIPS
AND KOBES,
927 K STBBET. BACEAMENTO.
» n2i-tf
//
MISCELLANEOUS.
W. P. COLEMAH/
Beal Estate Salesroom, 325 J street,
O l A/» A Will l>ay 160 acrev 3 miles from
3>-ii/DU Elk Grove; good fruit and grain
land. 668
SQ'TAA— 160 acres In El Borado county,
O I \)'f 2 miles from rai'road station; small
vineyard and orchard; good house and ham;
100 acres fenced. 653
80 acres near Lincoln, Placer connty,
825 per acre; good land. 6^7
$/?AAA— Hotel of 24 rooms In thrivlne
J5OlH'" town of Dunsmu-r. Rents for $60
per month. Will ezehanee for unimproved
lands Inquire at this office ior more par
ticulars. 678
MONEY lo LOAN.
P. BQHL. R. A. rtRQUCH.
Mills & Hawk,
REAL ESTATE DEALERS.
180-acro Ranch for sale, only five miles
from Sacramento; all fenced; oranges grow
ing on the place; all the land tillable; eigh*.
room dwelling, barns, etc.; windmillß, tanks,
etc.; a splendid place, and so near the city
that it is quite desirable; it is for immediate
sale; one-hali can remain ou mortgage.
COME AND SEE OT.
301 J Street, Cor, Third, Sacramento,
AGENCY UNION INSURANCE COMPANY
BAKER & HAMILTON,
IMPORTERS ASD JOBBERS OF
Hardware, Iron, Steel,
COAL, POWDER,
Sgrlcoltaral Imp'ements fnd Machines
BARBED WIRE, CORDAGE, BELTING.
SAORAMENTO |dl-tf[ CALIFORNIA.
THE PERFECT
WASH BOILER
-WILL BE
ON EXHIBITION
After <Tcaxa. 4, 1891,
I -AT-
I. MANASSE'S
SIO J" Stroet.
SOLE AGENT
FOK THE CELEBRATED
Acorn * Stoves
AND RANGES.
Aa- COKE AND SEE OUR -%»
SjLO STOVES !
ALSO, A COMPLETE STOCK
-or-
SHELF HARDWARE!
1 «W Tinning, Roofing and General
Jobbißg done in a first-class manner.
. MWF
A-. OVI. SMITH.
Plumber and Gas Fitter,
412 J Street.
A FULL LINK OF GAS FIXTURES, FINK
Globes and Plumbers' Supplies. Agent for
tbe celebrated Clevel and Eyd ra ulic Beer Pump.
All orders promptly attended tj}. Telephone.
No. 143. d2o-lin4p

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