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Honolulu star-bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii) 1912-current, October 15, 1912, 2:30 Edition, Image 1

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- Frta & P.t ' t
: r Korea,' Oct. 18. . ;
tn & r.i ' i'
China, Oct 15.
From YaieoiTtrt
Marama, Nov. C.
For Yaaeonveri
Makura, Nov. 5.
Evening Bulletin. Est 1882. No.' 5367.
Hawaiian Star. Vol. XX. No. 6408.
12 PAGES. nONOLULU, TERRITORY OF HAWAII, TUESDAY, OCT. 15, 1912. 12 PAGES.
PRICE FIVE CENTO
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MmmttMS MAKE OFFICIAL
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So Says Attorney-genera! in: a
Formal Opinion v to
vl Mott-Smith " 1
8 v "it is not fatal to his homlna
H tion If the candidate, falls at the tt
U time' of filitg' his nomination pa- 8
tt pers to tl&U his party affiliation tt
tt and he may do. so subsequently
tt and' by separate. letter, of later tt
It date than the pate of .placing bis
tt nominaticn papers ' In your of- tt
tt flce.M. -r Attorney-general ..LInd. tt
tt car's ODlnicn on ilaui Republic- tt
tt an nominations, t ; .
Jv.Aserting . that the Xalluro, of ,-the
republican nominees from Maul .' to
write their party affiliation on the
nomination - ropers seLt to ' the Ter
ritorial Lea tlary for-c;:ing,rdoetf '-oot
Invalidate . the nominations : of those
nita, Attdrncy General Lindsay' this
morning cave his' written opinion on
the protest of the democratic party's
representatives, which .was submitted
to him .yesterday by Secretary IE. A,
Mott-Smlta. .-. ;.r r- f.- ...
In each Instance ; in which a candi
date failed to i peclf y his party af
filiation, the nomination paper was
held tip by Secretary Mott-Smith," and
not, filed until later, word,; supplying
the necessary information was receiv
edV In -substance the Attorney Gen
eral's opinion holds that the law does
not specify tae manner in which this
statement of party affiliation shall
be made; therefore, inasmuch as the
statement is made, in some manner
before , the nomination papers are
placed formally on; file; the nomina
tions are va!li .V. V'.y' f-v;,::-::. . v'.,
The Repu; Means arei not. alone 5 in
this failure to express party affilia
tion on their nomination papers.The
Secretary explained . this - morning
that five democrats .were guilty of
the same omission.' In four instances,
after they had been notified by him,
the candidates sent in their, notifica
tion of party f affiliation -by separate
letter, and :n one instance by an en
tirely hew s e t - of nomination papers.
Two home rule candidates also omit
ted the important statement and sup
plied the omission later. ; -.The
one difference ; between the
Republicans and democrats - in this
respect is that the former, in six in
stances, sent -in the additional ; in
formation . by wireless. ' - -
The Democratic Central Committee
will hold a meeting tonight to dis
cuss the carrying of the matter into
the courts, y
(Continued on Page Twol )
DCPtlCATE TTPIYRITEU
! SAVES 50 PER CENT OF PRINT
, , ER'S BILL.
II. E. HEXDBICK, LTD
Merchant and Alakea Sts. Phone 2C1S.
MM
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Observers and Umpires As
signed to Opposing Armies
: and;Stations
FIELD HEADQUARTERS
AT SCHOFIELDiBARRACKS
General Macomb and Staff Will
Jake Move' to Leilehua
- , Saturday ;
' To get ; the mobile army of Oahu,
approximating 3,000 men, into the
field for the coming inspection ma
neuvers : requires, just as much detail
and preparation as to put an army
three times that site into action. There
is the same amount of paper work at
headquarters, the same perplexing de
tails to be worked out, and the same
number of last-minute oversights to be
rectified. A whole division could be
turned out with ho more trouble than
is being taken with one brigade;
'While the maneuvers proper do not
commence until next Monday, General
Macomb, his. adjutant general, ;and. the
have a considerable staff attached to
what, is "to be known .as vthe central
station, which is to be located at the
sJte olheftwJOstAShofieliBarr
racks, will take up their field quarters
there on Saturday.- There wHl be any
amount of work which is to come up
at the last minuter, which can be better
handled on the ground than from de
partment Headquarters in Honolulu .
General Macomb, who will be direct
or of maneuvers and chief umpire, will
have a considerable staff attached to
his' headquarters, the assignment of
officers being announced this morning
as follows: : :. '
Central Station Brigadier Gener
al Macomb ."Major George H. McMan-
us, division inspector; Lieut CoL Ar
chibald . Campbell, adjutant general;
Major B, Frank Cheatham, chief quar-
(Continued on Page 8)
BUSY IN JM
The Republican nominees . are all
busy with campaign meetings now.
Last night, they stood bareneaded in
the rain and while, the voters, likewise
stood in the rain and listened -atten
tively. This morning, - some of the
Democrats and , Home Rulers who
were present at the meetings of the
Republican patfy at Atkinson Park
and Kamehameha 1 v road, called at
the Republican Headquarters and an
nounced .their readines to help boost
the regular Republican nominees.
This evening, at 7:30 o'clock, one
meeting will be held at the residence
cf W. C. Achi, rifin District, and an
other at Moillili, Fourth District. Achi
wil preside at the fifth district meet-
ng, while Mr. Freitas will omciate at
the Moillili meeting.
Almost all of the candidates of the
Republican party, will be present to
address the electorate of tne rourtn
and fifth districts tonight.
George F. Renton will speak at both
of these meetings.
With the return this morning of E.
K. Fernandez, the moving picture ex
pert from Hilo, it is hoped that the
portraits of the candidates will be ex
hibited this evening by means of stere
optlc slides.
Music will be furnished at bow of
these meetings. The speakers tomor
row evening will be :
On Fort near School A. S. Kalelo-
pu, Geo. F. Renton, Sam Parker, Geo.
K Smithies, D. Kalauoalani, Jr., Chas.
Costa, C. G. Bartlett, C. A. Long, John
Enos, C. N. Arnold.
Fifth District meeting will be held at
Aiea. Wm. A. Kane presiding. The fol
lowing candidates' will address the
voters there:
J. M. Dowsett, J. W. Cathcart, Capt.
R. Parker Waipa. Jas. Bicknell, E. K.
Fernandez, David Notley, E. H. Paris,
Andrews Cox.
C. L. Crabbe will preside at the
meeting on Fourth District,
REPUBLICANS ARE
mm
Giants Slash Out
I omorrow
Tells
.'7'.'. '-i . 1
"7
, i
1
r y JEFF, TESREAU
Mcflraw's great, youngster, who stood
... y the test today. iA ,
Joe Wood Is Hammered Out bt
.Sr-Hrtters'
BOSTOrf, Mass Oct 15w Under
the terrific strain of five games clos
er, than any previous. world's baseball
series; both the NewYorks and the
Boston Red Sox slumped today in the
field, but the fierce hitting . of the
Giants made the resulting sixth game
of the big series one of the most sen
sational on. record. t '-y
It was this fierce hitting, a contin
uation ' of the bombardment of yes
terday, that drove "Smoky Joe" Wood
from the box, beaten in his attempt
to wlrt three times over the metro
politans. .Wood plainly showed the
effects lot r the great efforts he put
forth in the first two games, when hej
held New York at his mercy. Today
he was Ineffective, his curve, ball
havlhfiv no "stuff on it, and his old-
timt speed had been lost He was
evidently. tired. ;
On th Other hand, "Jeff .Tesreau,
MuggkY; McGraw's .husky youngster,
had a world of speed. Even at that
he ; could not entirely check Boston's
sluggers, y y
'The game early developed intoa
duel of basehlts, in which the Giants
led, getting . a start ' that made them
safe", eo that the frequent bingles se
cured off, Tesreau were not alarming.
Charlie : Hall was finally-sent into
the. box to succeed Wood, but he
could not stop the . slaughter. .The
Having an estimated surplus of
S16.000 over outstanding appropria-
tions, the supervisors last night held
a caucus of committees to consider
how the money snould be. expended.
No -definite schedule of improvements
however, was adopted. Results were
largely negative, being decisions
wnere not to spend money.
One proposition turned down was
that of macadamizing the Wahiawa
road, which, being estimated would
cost from $10,000 to 112,000, was
determined to be out of the question.
There was discussion over the
right of way for the Pearl Harbor
Traction Co.'s line, at a point where
S. M. Damon's interests are involved
It was promised that Engineer Whjte
house would have the required data
on the matter ready for presentation
today
It was voted to devote $1000 to
finish the Ewa and Waianae road.
The sum of $300 was granted to
Third avenue, Kaimuki, the resi
dents on that thoroughfare contribut
ed S135 additional out of their own
pockets.
Action was deferred on the propo
sal to lay bitulithic pavement on the
strip connecting Queen street with
Hackfeld wharf, which was mention
ed in this paper some days ago.
Burial of the indigent dead was
another problem discussed, it htfving
y v r
I: -
SUPERVISORS CAUCUS ON PLANS
TO SPEND SURPLUS OF $16,000
smwjiim;
Easy Victory;
1
; 4CiaEF2IETERS v
Indian catcher, who floored. In 'the
'I' v SMOKY JOE WOOD
Of Boston, who couldn't win his third
game from the Giants.
Giants hit everything that came near
the plate, getting sixteen safeties, in
cluding several clean-up drives,
v Both teams were off in their field
ing. ' New York had four errors and
Boston five. .
The games now stand 'three for
each team, and according to the turn
of a coin flipped in New York yester
day, by the captains, the 1 deciding
game is to be played in Boston to
morrow. Score: R. . H. E.
New York 11 16 '4
Boston !..,." 4 9 5
Batteries New York, Tesreau and
Meyers .Wilson; Wood, Hall and
Cady.
(come to a somewhat serious pass. H.
H. Williams, contractor for tms ser-
vice, has been burying the Indigent
dead in a cemetery plot owned by
himself, but this is now filled. The
board of health has closed the Pearl
City cemetery, so there is no opening
in that quarter. It was decided to ask
the superintendent of public works
to grant space for a "potter's field"
in the Makiki cemetery.
Lhamp
lonshm
SCHRENCK BELIEVED WAS AVENGING PRES. M'KINLEY
The following Associated Press message was received by the Star
Bulletin yesterday evening, in addition to the news of the shooting of
Col. Roosevelt contained in its second edition and extra editions:
MILWAUKEE. Wisconsin, October 14. Col. Theodore RooseveH. was
shot in the breast and slightly wounded tonight a3 he was leaving tho
Gilpatrick Hotel, where he was stopping, for the Coliseum, where he was
to speak later in the evening, as part of the presidential campaign.
The wound was superficial. The colonel insisted on going to the hall
and begin his speech after seeing that
1 taken to the police station. Henry F.
vard and a prominent Bull Moose leader in the State, seized the assassin
and held him until the police arrived.
A great mob surged around t;he man, who apparently is extremely
radical on the subject of Roosevelt running for a third term. The man
is of small stature. His name has not yet been learned. He admitted the
firing, saying that any man who is looking for a third term ought to be
shot. Notes in his .pockets stated that the man had been visited by
dreams by the spirit of the martyredWilliam McKInley, who said to him,
indicating Roosevelt: "This is my murderer. Avenge my death." Roose
velt refused to permit physicians to examine the wound until he had fin
ished his speech at a temporary platform erected in front of the hotel,
where he was to address an overflow crowd.
H
pp Picnipf-,'iftffiniii mi-:ni'-:"PE:";v'i"'"n"nin'1
mtlm, iJllrm. i;feyu.l,
.i iii 1 ' ' 7 i 1 1 frr 1 m . . ..-
. a n a n n n n n nnn nnn n
nGOYEBXOR'S C0M3TE5T OX - ,tt
n y -boosevelt- snoonxo n
U j . U
n ; Governor; Frear,' discussing the' n
n attempted .assassination of Roose-,8
tt velt, this ; mornings commented : n
tt ' "Men in public life and In the tt
tt public eye .' such --as Roosevelt1 tt
tt must -.naturally : expect - that at tt
tt any time they may be made ' the - tt
tt'. victims of assaults from fanatics, tt
tt it is regrettable, but it is and al- tt
tt ways has' been true that the lives tt
tt of prominent men always are in tt
tt more . danger than those of 4 the w
tt ordinary- individuals.' s . . ' tt
tt : suppose that this -unf ortn- tt
tt nate affair will . have a tendency tt
tt to swing some votes .to? Rbose-i tt
tt velt, that; he might noti i other-; tt
tt wise a have - received rJust how tt
tt many, not. even; the.;:election next tt
tt mohth:inarface;;iirur
tt doubtedly av-avtendoey ; to- in- tt
tt fluence t votes jn his ,f ajrort hoWt
tt ever." - - 1 : V-tt
n n tt a n n n n a tt ttttaa n
MOfW.3 IS
HI
IN HARD BATHE
Prince Telegraphs Capture of
10,000 Turks and
Artillery -
l Associated Prew Cable
heidelbero; Germany, Oct. 15.
Prince Peter of. Montenegro hasr tel
egraphed his former tutor in Heidel
berg University that Montenegro has
won a glorious victory, that 10,000
Turks with their artillery have been
captured. ) .
CONSTANTINOPLE, Turkey, Oct.
15. The Porte has recalled its min
isters to Athens, Sofia and Belgradue,
this officially severing relations with
Greece, Bulganla and Servian.
. e ' ' :
JURY COMPLETED TO .
TRY LABOR AGITATORS
f Associated Press Cable
SALEM, Mass, Oct 15. The Juryi
. ... ... w V . ml
l licit win u iuc Birvtuicu iiviuia I
the World cases here, including those
of Ettor and Giovanitti, charged with
killing a woman during the Lafrence
strike, has been completued.'
The wonderful vitality of James J.
Corbett has brought him safely
through am operation which would
have proved fatal to the average man
Helen Gould Is writing a book of
memories. She hasn't given it a title,
but says the book will contain much
food for reflection.
the assassin was arrested and
Cochems, former football star of Har-
h m
LEMB WML MMSE
Mrs. Roosevelt
yy:MahsChildrert$H
egrams
And Condolence Pour In From
All Over The World--Absbl U t e
Vr CHICAGO, IIU Oct 15 Col.. Roosevelt's phys!:lans;thls aftsrn::n !
sued ; bulletin-rtatlnjultratriMr.R r.:. 3
merefle$rCOUndf but. a serious wound; in; the chest. Absoluts q.!:t x
wtr' '. :: -
tne 7eaers or governments and from hundreds of private citizir.;. t . .1
man ilar, kept busy; receiving and .filing these metsasu and ar.v..r!.3 t.' ?
more Important ? ? ': ..'' -. - ,
M'; K?ilx: f Associated Press Cablel "'' ' y '
- ! MILWAUKEE, Wis., Oct 15- John Schrenk, thejeraied launiryrr-n
who shot Roosevelt,' was arraigned here today 'on a charge of attempt;.!
murder. He pleaded guilty. . - t ' ' ' -; '. ' ' ; ' ;y . . ' : '
LA F0LLETTE TELEGRAPHS HIS SYMPATHY TO COLO !iEL
;"y : :i j, ': ' i : '; ,' Associated Press Cable V: l' -'- ' " '
MADISON, Wis. Oct 15- Senator R. M. LaFolIette today telegraph
ed his profound sympathy for Col.
1 - Associated Press Cabtel 1 "v Vv''"V "-"--
NEW YORK, N. Y; Oct ISMrs" Roosevelt, Theodore Ro6iee!t Jr"
and Miss Ethel Roosevelt together with Dr. Alexander Lambert the farv
ily physician, are hastening to the bedside of Col. Roosevelt In Chlca; 3.
X-RAY . EXAMINATION SHOWS DOCTORS WOUND SERIOUS
: ' ' ; ' (Associated 'iress. CableJ r v. yyy;:- ." . ..
V f: CHICAGO; lll Oct" 15-CoI. Roosevelt arrived In this , city ' lats' last
night from Milwaukee, and was attended by a corps of physicians. This
morning a thorough examination by X-ray; was made of ths wound, after -which
the physicians gave out an official statement. In this ' statement
fo the first time the seriousness of the wound Is revealed The physi
cians say that, the hurt Is deep. The bullet cut the chest wall without
striking any vital organ,' entering an inch below the right nipple, and
ranged ' upward four Inches, imbedding Itself deeply. . No evidence is
found, that it penetrated the lung. The wound has not been probed and ,
the necessity for an operation Is not Indicated. Col., Roosevelt's condt
tion is hopeful, but absolute rest is demanded. His pulse Is 90, tempera
ture 99.2 and respiration 20. ' :' ' v ' y ' , .;
As the colonel descended from his automobile - lats last night and
walked toward the hospital where he was to be cared. for and the exam-
(nation made, a photographer exploded a flashlight just Inyfront'of him, .
endeavoring to get a picture. MGoshl 8hot agalnl" exclaimed the colonel.
Mr. Roosevelt's' secretaries this morning announced that he wiltaban.
don his scheduled campaign . speeches and the probabilities art that he will
rtipri Ovtftr Riv fni a' rf aa iaaii ai I fa rlflnltl knAwn' h ma .'
-ft-,f.n, tH! huii.t wnunrf
VWI . W. V. W . aw . w w - w - -
CHAS. BROWN, CLEVELAND,
ritftfhMfttnl
CLEVELAND, O., Oct 15. Charles Brown, a leading Roosevelt sup
porter of this city and prominent In the Ohio Bull Moose movement waa
shot here this morning by a lunatic, who . made his escape . In the crowd.
Brown will recover. : ;
TAFT ISSUES STATEMENT EXPRESSING HORROR AT ACT
(AMoctated.lTa CaoieJ - .'. ." ' . "y 'y
NEW YORK, N. Y., Oct 15. President Taft t6day Issued a. statement '
expressing the deepest regret at the attempted assassination 'y of y Col.
Roosevelt "I cannot withhold an expression of horror at the act of a
maniac who attempted to assassinate Mr. Roosevelt he said. v' ;
FALLS THROUGH GRATING;
NECK BADLY GASHED
Wong Duck, a bartender in the
Young hotel buffet, while walking
along Hotel street yesterday afternoon
fell through an open grating In the
sidewalk leading to the basement of a
building near the corner of Smith
street, with the result that he was
taken to his home with a large gash
in the back of his neck.
The accident occurred between
Nuuanu and Smith streets. - Duck was
walking along Hotel street and' as he
neared Smith he looked across the
street and at the same time walked
Into the opening in the sidewalk. In
falling he struck against the edge of
the hole,) cutting a deep gash In the
back of bis neck. A crowd .quickly
3 .-3
And Wounded
Rcosevelt ; r y
witi in
..... wv w w mm
SHOT BY MANIAC AMUCK
Prnt Cahl.l
gathered around and assisted inv get.
ting him out and he was taken to the
office of Dr. Walters; where - th
wound was attended . to. Later v he
was removed to his home and is pro
nounced out of danger. y
DR. G. V. RAYMOND ' '
DIES IN SAN FRANCISCO
-'V.yy'. . f y- "v
Word has been recelved here 6f the
death on October j 2. ot Dr..Creorge W.
Raymond, of San 4 Francisco, due to
pleura pneumonia. " Dr. Raymond . is
well known in Honolulu, having prac
ticed here for seven years previous
to his removal to San Francisco.
Sympathy
The meaner a, woman" grows tha .
harder it Is for her to get a becom-
ins . :.-l,.:,-:.:.izJ.
1

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