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Honolulu star-bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii) 1912-current, December 04, 1912, 2:30 Edition, Image 9

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HONOLULU STAR-BU LLETI N, WEDNESDAY, DEC. 4r1012.
STAR
i?(QSTS
News and Comment
Written by Experts
Edited By
L. REDINGTOH
J D)IUJ:J UJ uJ U(l y Ul-X
i
ALL-CHINESE ANXIOUS FOR
SERIES WITH
111
-V
The All-Chinese ball players are
inmotrn
taKing a lay-off, and waiting to playt is certainly sticking some. En Sr.e
against the Oahu League champions,1 is next on the list with .318, while
as soon as the series is decided. The, Kan Yen, the speedy backstop, come3
oriental cracks are willing to take
the league 'champions on. a winner
take Halt basis, and are hoping that
the flag will go to the Portuguese, as
they hare already trimmed the J. A.
us, A. same, or series of games be -
,iwe?n the Chinese and, the P, A. C.s
would prove a good 5 drawing card,
with the fans, although the -Chinese
would probably rule strong favorites.!
Whatever the opinions baseball pat-j
ions may hold as to the business po!-
icy of the Oriental aggregation. It
must be admitted that the team can
deliver the goods, and that. It has
more baseball y on tap than all tho,
rest of the local teams put together.
Tbd All-Chinese have played
61X. I
Kamt since returning from the main
land, and batting and fielding aver-
jiges, both team and individual, are
-now available v The figures show
great fielding brilliancy,' four; players
on the team having a clean error col-
umn, while two more are charged
with but a slnglo mistake, two with
a braced and t two with three. The)
team is .batting 231. but this average
Is held up by the first few men on'
the list, there being.only two hittlnr,
- over .300. ; . :. , "
V Patting honors go to "Chief ; Aka -
K na, who-has poled ah even .500, get-
BASEBALL MAGNATES NOT MUCH WORRIED 1 .
V "OVER FORMATION OF PLAYERS' FRATERNITY
" NEW TORK National and Amerl- Fuitz appears and states his case, ; if
; can League magnates do not appear be is allowed to do so, be will con
to be- In the least disturbed by.de front some very wily gentlemen, who
foimal organizations of the Baseball
Players' Fraternity, which has' recent- law of the land, and are fully able to
!y teen accomplished. Those who protect themselves and their Interests.
: have expressed themselves on the sub- If the magnates should balk at what
' Jwt ure , apparently entirely rndlffer- the fraternity wlr, ask of them and
?nt as to what the fraternity will ask f the" players get stubborn, followers p
' of the club owners. ' , " :. j the game may have an opportunity to
One official of the Pittsburg club r j see how strong the new protective as
cently passed Cue subject "up with the eoclation really is.
' remark; SI suppose Dave Fiiltz, needs Scried Money a Problem. " r . v k
some money to help out his taw Prao- Here' is'adposltioit Hhat wiil se'
ticeVDaye Full, retired ball player, ome of the diplomats of the B. P, F
. being the preUdeiit of ihe.organtza- to da ?ome .heavy, thinking.. vli is : in
. -: ;, tion. - . ,..tJ-.J., .. (regard to the division of the money la
, j - .Another magnate recalled the hlst-jtho world's series games. The bail
' . ory-Rhd finish of the Players' Protect players. who, under the rules, share
five Association, organized In the sum-; only In the proceeds of the first four
mer of 1900. when, three delegates games,vwhich this year included th
from each National League team met j eleven-Inning tie score game," think
, tne.bturtevant nouse, in tniBcity
and formed an organuatun jand pass-
ec various,resolutiona;c , r
Soc'en "Forgets' Petition.
i At -the National League meetiug in
iJecember, ioo,?ciark Grimths, Char-
ley! Ziranier, rJImmy Callahan, Joe
Kelly and others handed a petition to'
Preiidett A. JL Sodci, of the Boston
c ub, o b pTesCiHt'd to the league.
Nothing, was heard of Jae petition tin
u aiier ne. jeague caa aajourn.3a,
fcooen iouna me aoeument in ms
pocket an claimed he hd. forgotten all
alo.t It. i r v "
W In June T901. the association, re-
elected Charley fZlmmer ; .irn ildenr.
. I J & T- T 1. 1 W . - a f
?j rreeiucm tiau juuubuo ju-.u oruereu
tnc Amencaa league players, who nad
' .ithat yeaf become affiliated with the.'
-1 association, to witnaraw; if zimmer
T's eiectea. ;io pDviate tnat step zim-
mer resigned ,and Tom Daly, . of the
Brooklyn club! was elected president.
:4 The astodatJonrheld, or attempted
1t hold, several meetings during the
pext two years,, at which there was
mv-ch rquabbiing. ; Finally on July 2
19C3, a meeting was called to reorgan
ize the cssoclation. It, was sliraly at
tended, and resulted in a flzzle.7
Tavlor.Flrst Attorney. t
? Circuit Judge Harry Taylor, of Buf-
f alo, who has played on the Louisville
an4 Baltimore teams, and was then
practicing law. was the first attorney
- for the Association. Several players
tr;ed to charge Taylor with the mlxup
that caused their first failure.
Nobody will, deny that the rulinz
powers of baseball are Just as astute
1u there day, if not more so, than
they' were in' 1900. vWhen President
Pills
from the Orient
will stop all drains and losses. They are
worth their weight in- gold to all who
suffer from nervous exhaustion, either
mental or physical. They restore diges
tion, regulate the circulation, clear the
brain, prevent insomnia and impart 4
magnetic vigor. . One box of
d toe Essence
will make 30a feel like a new person;
six boxes are guaranteed to makt a per
. inanent cure or the money will be re
funded- Persian Xcrve Essence contains
.no mercury or other injurious drugs.
The proprietors. The Bown-Export
: Co 95-97 Liberty St., New York, N. Y
U. S. A., earnestly ask , you to give
w Persian Nerve Essence a good fair trial
at their risk, Commence to-day, j-ou can
obtain the preparation from -
,V AJid hj CHAMBERS DRUG CO.
These
Little
Persian
THE PENNANT
F SENIOR LEAGUE
ling 12 hits mil of '24 times; up. This
on almost within the mystic triple cefh-
tury circle with .296.
Following are the averages of the
All-Chinese team:
Team Batting Games, 6: at bat.
; 227; base hits, 47; per cent,, .251
Team Fielding Games, 6; putouts,
162; assists, 9J; errors, 12; per cent,
.vi4
BATTING.
G. AB. R.
L. Akana .
En Sue . .
Kan Yen .
V. Ayau . .
Sing Hung
A. Akana
BH. SC. Pet
...6
...6
...6
...6
...6
...6
21
22
27
31
25
30
24
26
10
7
5
4
4
4
7
2
4
1
12
7
8
8
6
t
5
3
1
0
4
9
5
1
4
0
1
1
0
0
.318
.296
.258
.240
,233
.208
Tin ........6
- A.
Asam
. . .6
.115
.100
A pau Kau
.3VilO
...2 8
Luck ; Yee
i ,
.000
FIELDING.
G. PO.. A.
E.
0
0
0
0
2
3
1
" 3
TC. Pet.
5,1.000
: 14 ; 1.000
7 1.000
L. Akana ..,.6
En Sue.. . 6
Sing Hung ...6
L. Tin .... .'.6
Kan Yen .,.6
A. Akana . ;..6
5
12
5
7
39
65
0
. 2
2
11
13
3
12
27
15
i 8
18 1.000
54 .962
71
16
46
,957
.937
.934
.920
.909
Apau Kau ..34 3
1 V, Ayau .....6 16
'A. Asam '....6 8
Luck Yec ...294 2
2. 25
1 11
understand baseball law as well as the
r.'nce tie score contefts do not count
as a victory or defeat for either team
ithey should not-count as one of the
j fcur games in which the piayers share
tne gate. It Is an added revenue
wi me cwn owners ana national com-
mission and should be, they say, an
added revenue for the ball players.; ,
j : :On the otheir hand Chalrmait August
Herrmann, of the national commission
thinks the bal players are getting en-
tirely too much out of the champion-
snip terles as it Is. and has formulated
a plan to cut down their revenue to a
jfat sum 1750 each for the members
tit the winning team and 500 each for
- the losers, dividing the balance of Tae
... . .
juoney inai . unaer present arrange-
roents goes to the contending players
1 et ween, the eligible oU playeis of
the fourteen teaq?s not taking part in
the world's championship series.
The Punahou seconds and Honolulu
School for. Boys are playing football
this afternoon on Alexander Field, the
game being scheduled for 3 o'clock.
Should the latter team win, it -will
give the second team championship to
McKInley High.' but it seems hardly
likely that the H. S. F. B. aggregation
which has been losing consistently all
season, should come from behind and
beat the fast Punahou seconds to the
wire. :'; .... -
If Punahou wins, the team will play
the McKinley seconds next Saturday
for the championship.
So far there has been no date set
for the football game between the
Schofield Barracks team and the Orig
inal Town Team. Capt. Chillingworth
of the latter ieleven expects to hear
from the soldiers within a day or so.
Instead of going to heaven, most
men will be lucky if they land in a
fool's paradise.
5 ON
T3 Sulphur
For Soap
Clears the complexion,
Skin whitens the hands and
E is a time-tested remedy
' for skin diseases.
Sold by HT. Hmtti WUkr Drt,
BUCK GROUSE OF PITTSBURGH
CLAIMS MIDDLEWEIGHT TITLE
mm-'
v . .-t, -J .Jrf- vl-,"1 '.V
::t.Vv..i
iiT
PITTSBURG. Buck Crouse is
ctc
glove artist claims the star middleweights are side stepping hfm.
says he has tried hard to Induce Mike Gibbons, , Eddie McGoorty and Billy .
Papke to meet him, but all efforts have failed. Now he claims thi title, and
any one of the above mentioned who
commodated; s Crouse: has been fighting about three years and has never -
been, defeated, : Many experts declare
is the hardesLWUlng man of his weight Ih the gam . today ; Hugh Mcln-
tosh of Australia' recently offered tho local rlad a chance to g6 .the vAn
tipodetf'to meef several:mlddleweightsv but th 4uraed'th6brfe)rh.?:vni3-'
most retelt flgEtwat with Leo 1 Honck, whom he knocked auH'.'
OF GOLF
, Many' a man who is most ccrupulous
in regard to observing the : rules of
I-Iay sometimes by reason of Inatten
tion errs inpoints of golfing etiquette:
Gerald Batchelor says some very pertl
rent things about this in' Golf IIlus
truted. c , " : .v '' ::' 'C y
'Each competitor holds a position of
tr:stln respecMo the whole field of
players; ;apd It is his duty, to play, and
to see that his . partner plays,, the
game strictly inccordance With the
ctrb mlesand .that the'scores of both
are correctly marked." ; ? w
So runs an admirable "N. B." on a
card issued by a ' welHcnowa dub in
Wales.'-'Thla notice evidently refers to
competitions involving a "field of play?
era and the partnen." means the ex
ponent with whom- the competitor is
paired; but It would apply lequally to a
friendly match where on!yjtw6 players
art? affected, for in this rake the play
er owes a duty, not only to himself,
but to all other golfers, by insisting
that the game be played in accordance
with the club rules, Iwhich are pre
sumably identical with the universal
Isws Issued .by-the. Royal and Ancient.
It lg.verv unp'easant to be forced to
disqualify, a companion, but to ailow
the offend erv to eo unenlightened and
unpunished would be to wrong a
whole world of golfers in order to
spare the feelings; of. oneSuch 'duties
must not be shirked. The law break
er deserves pitv. for his actions
nre inexcusfh'" The golfer s mis
takes, occur f ""jr through ignorance
of from fo' ':lne:s. A Jaw one
well learned. T-ov ever, is not readily
forgotten. It is ignorance, then, which
causes most of the trouble, we an
1-now that the ."de is terribly difficult
to remember. 1 rppy can always
he carried for the sake of reference.
There is no npJ 'o relv on memory
when a real difficulty arises. It is In
Oiiite simple csf that erolfers-are
fnott snt to tr-rseiess. How manv.
crmpetitors. for 5"5tance. have been;
penalized for hrr'ih:? pside Jpaves.
twigs, worms, tr.. on the green? An
how many medals are unlawfully pos
s rsed by players who have done such
things and escaped punishment?
Another conimri error Is that of '
touching the Imp nT 9 nutt during m
ciication. A strict polfer lately claim
ed a hole because one of his foursome
opponents had placed his club shaft
In the hole, while the flag was out, as
a, guide for is partner. He was ruled
to have incurred the penalty for
torching the line of the putt
Many of the latest rules appear to
he unnecef sarily precise in their ob
scivance of petty details and cause
irritation to golfers who have not the
slightest intention of cheating. It is
too late actively to oppose a law after
It has.beein passed, however. It may
b privately condemned, but it must
be publicly, observed until rescinded.
M-ny of the most Important rules of
Eolf have never been teen In. print.
-' - J A I -
'4
1 ATX.'
BUCK 'CROUSf '.f A
on the warpath. . The . crack
. local -Buck
Is anxious to : dlspntc . lt will "he Ac
he is th best man in this divisioQ..Ic
A few are formulted in the "Etiquette
of Golf," but it is impossible to publish
a complete code of good conduct for
the course. ' ' ".r- ?Z: :
A player 'recently lost a close .com
petitive, match through his'' attention
being jilstracted from . a-aiort ap
proach by the clatter made hy his op
ponent in picking up his clu&s. It had
not been dorie with that purpose, of
course, and. the loser '.coalj, make no
clalmi but his unimaginatLvei. compan
ion would have; been": surprised : to
learn ; that, be owed his victory main
ly to hi6 on .carelessness. . 1
Some such remindersras tie follow
ing might be added to;thi etiquette of
the game for the education of thick
skinned, self-centered" players3' who arg
occasionally encountered on the linki :
Don't advertise a good drive by
striking attitudes on the tee. Your
match play opponent is not the least
hit Interested to hear (hat ; you are
"two above- fours' at the turn, oc
round in "ah approximate 76. r v
If you are given a putt don't attempt
tc hole it. . If you concede one don't
ninke a favor of it.
-When caught and in a tight corner.
for, which no local' rule provides, don't i
appeal to the generosity of your op
ponent by -plaintively enquiring:
"What can I do here?"
If your man is "Off his game, don't
ask'" What did you say is your handi
cap?:;; .
Many tuca maxims a ill occur to
thoughtful and cone iderate golfers.
Each man plays for himself, it H
ti ue, but he must constantly; care fori
the Interests of others or he wllrtie
left to, play , bf himself. The golf
courso Ms an . admirable finishing
school.
DICTIONARY OF SPORT
PROPOSED FOR FRANCE
-France- is to have a dictionary of
sport, an official dictionary, that is, 1
compiled by the-Academy of Spprts.
The terms of sports have as many
cases been borrowed fr$ni the Eng
lish, and, so far. In addition to tak
ing over the word, people have more
or less ventured upon what they'con
ceived to.be the pronunciation. ?
But now that standardization seems
imminent, the question is being ask
ed "Why not 'standardize a French
form of the word?".
Why not do as Madame de Sevigne
did when she was confronted in her
day with bowling green, white "boul
ingrin," and pronounce It as such?
Why waste precious hours in the lost
cause of spelling and pronuncing
"dead heat." "upper cut" and "drive
in the way the English are able to
do, -but the French never at least,
hardly ever? '
. Why, . indeed J The English and
Americans who have appropriated the
French nomenclature of motoring and
aviation without any thought of seem
ing to give either vowel or consonant
its Continental value, unless where
that coincided with the English,
should he the last to complain.
WAGNER SETS NEW
BAT ' :
Tyrus Cobb, who this year leads
the American League batsmen for the
(ixth year In succession, has an ex
cellent chance of equalling the great
record made "by liana Wagner, .who
has led the National League batters
eight times since he Joined the
LouisviIJe,CJub, in 1897. In 1911 Wag
ner finished behind Kirke and Jack
son, who - took part In 20 ; and 39
games respectively, but was ' given
the credit of: being the real batting
leader.
But Wagner ; has established an
other record that many baseball men
think will stand forever. He has just
finished his sixteenth consecutive
season as a .300 per cent batter in the
major f leagues. - Unofficial averages
tor 1912 give Wagner .326 per cent.
The official figures will not vary
many points. Pop Anson of the old
Chicago White Sox batted .300 per
cent for fifteen consecutive years and
held t he record Wagner has Just
smashed. '''':-''';'''":-;'.:' V.
Only seven players besides Wagner
have batted .300 or better for ten or
more years In succession in the last
thirty years. Hundreds have played
the game in that time " Anson , bat
ted' COO fifteen consecutive; years;
Pan Brouthere, fourteen; Willie Keel
er, thirteen; Ed. Delahanty and Joe
Kelly, eleven each; Hugh Duffy, Jesse
Btrrkett; and' Napoleon Lajoie -. ten
years each.
7 Before Wagner ' entered the .Na
tional League he - led the Atlantic
League, batting .379 with the Pater
son ( N. J.) club in v1896. Counting
his v first ; season, played outside the
majors, be has batted over .300 sev
enteen: consecutive years. v 'i-'fy.
: '.Wagner'sf 'smallest average I was
.305; in 1898, with - Louisville. His
best i average . was ; - 80 in :1900, t)te
Ilrst year'he1 played at Pittsburgh.
" : Wagner has played in 2,169 major
league ; games. He has been at bat
838 times, made . 2,849 hits, scored
102 runs and stolen 638 bases. ;:
The Flying Dutchman, has averaged
.312 for each of his sixteen years in
the majors. ;.;':.... :pZ
i Ty .Cobb- has batted .oyer .300 each
of seven years he has bee!i In the. big
leagues.' He - is-.; slightly built arid
ttervous,- and -does notexpectto;he
able ; to play long, enough to equal
Wagner's record ; Wagner's' . record
for sixteerf years:
Vear. . G." AB,
1897.. ,. '61 241
R.
38.
80
102
107
IOO'
105
97
97
114
103
' 98
100
92 .
90
87
92
H. SB. av:
83 22 .344
1898.....
1899.....
1900
1901.,...
1902.....
1903.....
1904
1905.;
14
591
549
528
$56
53
512
490
' 548
516
.515
568
493
,566
473
C62
180
197
201
196
177
182
171
199
175
180
25 .303
36 .385
36 .380
48 .352
43 ;329
46 .355
55 .849
57 .363
S3 .339
61 .350
144
134
141
137
129
132
147
1906...... 140
1907....'.
1908 .
1909.'....
1910
1911.....
1912....
142
151
137
150
130
146
201 ,53 .334
168 36 .339
178
158
183
24 .320
20 .334
26 .326
Totals... 2169 8238 1502 2849 638 .342
; Wagner ; played three years at
Louisville and thirteen at Pittsburg.
Special rates for Island people at
"Pleasanton : Hotel" . for all year
round.- advertisement .
A woman always looks
bright side of a mirror.
on the
nn
u u
Our line of tHRISTMAS
valuable suggestions for that
Shall t get for Christmas?"
Our line of ORIENTAL
predated.
A '. purchase made now will
day
A few suggestions for Ladies:
SHIRT VtfAl ST PATTERNS,- SILK
BAGS, SHAWLS and KIMONOS,' all
GRASS LINE4 and PONGEES.
For the Gentlemen: SILK EMBROIDERED SHIRTS, SILK
CREPE PAJAMAS, NECKTIES, SUSPENDERS and SOCKS
SET. :
Our goods are now on display.
Canton
Dry
Hotel St., Opposite
THROWS CORK LEG
OVER HOME PLATE
FOR WINNING RUN
When tAlbert Billings kicked his
cork leg across the hoaie plate in the
ninth Inning of a game atXanfield,
Colo., the score being a 5 to , S tie.
the umpire called the nmner' safe.
Then the last baseball game of the
season broke up in a row. However.
Umpire Jerry Carter consulted the
rule book, declared that there was no
precedent, and held to his decision.
': When the tmm lined up for play
it was found that one team was shy
a man! Billings, of the cork leg. vol
unteered and the first thing he did
was to knock a two-bagger, lie stole
third and started home when one ot
his teammates hit to shortstop. The
shortstop tossed the ball to the catch
er, ten feet ahead of the runner, tht
cork leg flew off and crossed the
plate, -while the owner of the leg
dropped ta the ground.
The catcher stepped out and tagged
the prone figure, but the umpire was
watching closely and ruled that the
foot at the end of the cork leg touched
the base. The opposition team claim
ed that Billings was out because the
catcher tagged him before he crossed
the plate.
"Y" Bowling League
. P. W.
L.
5
9
14
13
16
IS
Pet
Cherries, . ...'...,.. 24
Expanders , ; . . ... . 24
Breakers,; . ........ .27
Dark Horses ; . . .... .24
Splitters ...23
Rollers . '..22
19
15
13
11
9
6
.792
.625
.481
.458
.360
.272
With the whole darn Dummy family
on the joh, the Breakers took two out
of three from the Splitters yesterday
afternoon on the 'Y" alleys. This
puts the Breakers in third place, but
the team has no show of winning the
aeries, and interest is flagging. How,
ever, the fact that the match wac
rolled .at 5 o'clock accounts for 'tht
scarcity of players.. "'.iCr'.-..::
v C. A." White has high score and
average for the winners, with 187 and
167 -respectively,
t The scores:; T '
Breaker .-V-f'
CA: White . . . .144
18? 60i
132 39f
H;-White
Long ley J
Dummy
Dummy.,-
........131
t ' 1 4 0
: 731
C....154
.....167
8ptitters
WInne y
Rletow
Dummy
..156
.145
.143
1651 7TT5-15-2d
The ,46th Annual Conclave of the
National Grange began a two weeks'
session at Spokane. Wash., with rep
resentatives from 36 states In at
tendance. .;:.';: ': '' " "y
It's hard for a woman to convince
herself that her children could ;be
smarter than they are. j ;
Phone 3883. ? Phone 3883
T TRY THE MODEL A'ITABT
i BARBER SHOP.
The name speaks for Itself. Tore
flrst'Class artists at your service.
Prompt attention Is onr motto.
;E. G. SILYESTER E. SCIIBOLL
r.,::'.!' Proprletom. v,;. ." :-..
2
GOODS this year contains many
much-vexed prqblem: "What
v
GOODS
must be seen to be ap-
save worry on Christmas eve.
SILK EMBROIDERED
EMBROIDERED HAND
In rich Oriental finish.
Co.,
Empire Theatre."
ODES ARE
f EVIDENCE
170 t
136
125 151 276
: ; . . '140
156 156 468
741
130 1T7 ,461
131 137 435 nr
156 158, 46? i
145 145 . 435 Aj
1J ' 4J joi
mm
Goods
TITLE IN BASKET
BALL TO BE DE:
nnrn !
iiiunr i
Punahou and Priory Will Battle
for the Championship on the
v Prxry Grounds Some 0 th
; cr Matches
- The deciding basketbatl game of the
season la to be played on Friday, Do
cember 6th between the Priory and
Punahou, on the' Priory gronndg at 4
o'cloclc If the game h won .by the
Priory team, the championship will go
a It, but if Punahou wins, another
?ame between Punahou "and the Priory
II be necessary. Both are consent
nnd.are making great preparations for
the meeting. The Priory girja are out
cracticing every afternoon. I' Mbj
Evelyn Cunningham is coaehln ih.
team and the ruccers of her work ii
evident from the results obtainsi at
fir this season.; The team has played
three games and won two out of th?
three. The Priory's main standbya are
Agnet Frendo and Elisabeth Kaeo. the
two speedy forwards wLa' have dona
ch excellent ; basket throwtn? thl?
vear. f Rose CummingsV ciptain anl
lumping center on the team, is an
other splendid player and has h CT19
record behind her. 'The rest of tb
girls are equally good players and tak
fn altogether ithe team is nearly per
fecL , : - -
The Punahou team, though It hasn't
as good a record as the Priory, playa
a strong, hard, game, and the only
reason It haa not come. out victorious
cere often is because of its lac; of
team work. The girls play individual
ly too much, and when they come up
against a team thatHhis ood tram
wtrt they don't have a sw. Thte
reek, however, the players 'have Wen
I practicing on team work and they ex-
"ect 10 oe a matcn ror .tr o Prtrry i;i
he- game on Friday. ' The Pumhou
forwards,. Mele Williams ajnd Kuth
Soper, aro excellent players . anl If
they had more support from the tran
there is no doubt buC that tho results
would be different from s whnt they
vave been. EHzaboth Low. cai ln
hnd Jumping center for rur."voi, :1
Mario -JJcVelgh-are' a'.5s r'"' I rUycrj
n& are, strong points on tha.t;..o
Plivlnn Arilntt Rnv. ...
"The' Punahou "kirU h'5 Un pT"
tklng with a' team plckr 5 from amo it
the boys, lately, and thU work will 1
f great assistance to ; them- for It
gves them the best of practice. J.lr.
dicker Is coaching tie tm ml - l(t
- asslsfed by Mr. Burdlck hercifter.
he Punabon girlie ar readv to ri id
good fight and there is not
ghtest 'doubt but Lvt tho gatrp w!l
e. a fine cne The Priory gjrla wlU h
i,uuui; lur tue cuanipionsoip an i
Punahou girls for a chance at the
c&mplonsblp. ; ;;.
If the Priory wins the gam. the
championship whl go thcr but rm.
h'ou and McKInley will piny for th
title between those two schools. ThU
tame is to T)e played whether Puni
hou wins or loses Friday, anii to
ecide the i championship hot?.?ea
Punahou and McKInley. The date h3s
rot hren dAfinttMv pt hvt tt la nrnhihla
that It will be Wednefday rf neit
week. It is to -'. be played on t
Priory grounds as they are neutral.
This game - will also he a very good
one, -as both teams. have a good d8il
10 win, . k t : .i--.?
r The line-up' of the teams' as fbey
vrill probably be for the game on Fri
day is as follows: v L
Priory: Forwards. Agnes FTndo,
Elizabeth ; Kaeo: centers. Rose Cum-
mlngs (captain) .Charlotte Kopp;
guards, Mary Hart, Irene Davlaoo. .
Punahou: Forwards, Mele WITliaraa.
i captain;, wane aicveign; guaras,
TuIIa Campbell, Violet Austin. :i
A second team time between Puna
hou and McKInley Is to be played on
Monday. The second teams have been,
doing very good work this year, and
there Is no doubt but that the game
on Monday will be no exception. An
other second team game is to be play
ed this week, probably on Friday; be
tween Punahou and the Priory., Tblv
game will also be a good one. Both
games will be played at four o'clock
ou the Priory grounds. ; ; f
; The basketball game between i ta
5iias ana , me uiues. tne iTinanoT
PreD. teams! was nlaved resterdar
ifternoon, and resulted in a victory for .
the Blues with a score of 126. The
tittle Prep, girls are not the le-st be
hjnd In the game and they plaved fast.
nn strongly, in tne nrtt can - -in
two teams held together .; very wel1.
but in the second half the Blues ran
a way. from their ooDonents. The g?m
-as refereed by Misi Martin, one of
the teachers at the Prep.
Artesian Plunge, Tennis Court and
flame' fiPA fnr ciiocto nf "PlftAjtintriri
Many a man who tries to make his
money go a long .way never thlDka of
contributing to foreign missions.
an immedialo re
lief for cough,,
hoarsenesfl
1 1 h r o a f f rOMhlas
:Afordirig great
relief in bronchi
lis and asthma.
Brown's
Bronchial
Troches,
U1ULLI1

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