OCR Interpretation


Honolulu star-bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii) 1912-current, February 04, 1913, 3:30 Edition, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014682/1913-02-04/ed-2/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

V if.
Frees 8. F.i
Chlyo Maru, Ftb. 7.
rer8.Ki
Hoaololan. Feb. 4.
Frvta VaaresTer t
Makura, Feb. 26.
For Yaseoevfrt
Zealandia, Feb. 25.
Evening Bulletin, Est. 18S2. No. 5461.
Hawaiian' Star. Vol. XX. No. 6502.
14 PAGES.-BOXOLULU, TERRITORY OP HAWAII, TI KSDAV, FEB. 4, 1913. 14 PAGES.
PRICE FIVE
nnr?
(5
rnn
ni-
7j
nn
nn
i
X
i
IIBIBIJ
The l.-l. Officials Say Shipping
Unaffected by Withdrawal
and Dismissal of Men Cap
tains Assert Corporation. Will
ue enousiyAuecie
Move of the Harbor
Lane feared, the strike of
tains . employed . by the Inter-Ilrad
Steam Navigation Company developed
late yesterday afternoon. This morn
lug the men 'are declaring that they
have the corporation ln a cleft stick,"
while the officials of the company areL.
that the sbfpe of the company
will 1
' leave promptly on time and with foil
land competent crews in .forecastle and
1 cabin. ; : ; : ; -r- . J : ,. . :.;
The; attorneys ' for "the Harbor; are
responsible for the statement thatVbe-'Uon to 0118 effect to the chairman of
t ween thirty-five and forty men have - the senate committee on public build
tendered their resignatfonsor have tags and grounds.. In his .letter the
been discharged'' from the service of. acting secretary estimates the total
the company, following the action of I cost of the additional land required
we aroor," yeBieroay aiiernoon. utu,
tain Tullett; xhalrmahpf the special
committee of the Harbor is Authority
for the. statement -that with the new
men in charge Df the bridge the com
pany will find itself in difficulties; at
., once' and that the public will suffer.,
He also asserts that but'three of the
old captains , have stuck; with the fcom-
' pany,- -v ; . V . r:V'-:rt
That the Inter-lsland Steam Naviga
tion : Company has not 1 nd will not
discriminate in its selection of officers
and emp?)f s veto nay b- affiliated
with oat or raore ortanlzations,; was-
cmphaticaiiy orccgt to tne tore - tnis
morning in a ti-e.1 statement coming
from. President .zr l CtneraV -Manager ictistfljQusrt'(VioluIu7-4UwaJi:- ' 1'
James .A. Kennedy vol 'tbe.4 stesjnshiTtbsAct.' pi.. Jonei ?80- 6nnUr.(f
company. -Mr Kennedy,:- takes occa
j ticn to deoy ,that the Inter-Island man
agernct Las or Is attempting to dis-
nrpt the 'organltation' of masters and
mates better known as Harbor No. t4.
: On the othyr hand, the attorneys
who represented' the striking element I
' among the local masters and mates, I
insist that the list of "dismissals from,
the service would ? indicate that the
, present policy of the company is to rid
Itself of those employes who are affil
iated with the local Harbor,
t in his statement this morning Mr.
Kennedy plainly states the position of
the company. In, the following man
ner:;;. V-V -'. " y
"Rumors having reached 1 the man
agement of' the. Inter-Island Steam
Navigation Company, 'Ltd., to the ef
fect that certain members of Honolulu
.u v. (Continued. on ags 2) ,
"If you tell, what i you've seen you'll
get ' the sane as this man got"
These words,-alleged to have; been
spoken by; Benito 3almendes. as he
stood, over; Mthe i lifeless body of
Private Bostic on tbe' evening of June
10. last year, and addressed to a Rus
sian girl who .came upon the scene
just as the. tragedy apparently had
reached its conclusion, produced a
startling effect when given by the
girl witness In Circuit Judge Robin
son's courtroom this morning.
Her statement was the nearest ap
proach to direct evidence yet pro
duced: by the prosecution in the Gal
mendes murder t t'ai. Despite the pro
test of Attorney Leon M. Straus, coun
sel for the defendant, it was admitted
to the record, and on cross-examina
tion of the girl Attorney Straus im-
mediately began a line of questioning
intended to impeftch her testimony.
He brought out the fact that she had
been arrested on the evening" of the
murder and had been held in tbe
county jail, undergoing rigid question
ing two or three times a day before
she finally told- the authorities her
version of tbe affair.
His queries tended to give the im
plication of "third degree" methods
on the part of the police and the
county attorney's office.
The girl, who gives the name of
Efdakia Gregbrefskaja, testified she
i
(Continued on Page 3)
Regal Motor Cars
UNDERSLUNG
H. E. HENDRICK, LTD.
Merchant Alakea, Phone 2648
GIRL VfTflESS
TELLS SMRTLft
STO nv IN COURT
T FAS RY flFPT
unnnmicv mnu
0 DV InfU rl I I III I V I ll I II I .If
1 IB sr V M
ah maw inn
' initiiiin iiimi
- ; :
f the Increase of $500,000
Dilation bill to acauire
;
Sabuka building site at
Honolulu haveen given, by the treas
ury departme at Washington. Un
der date of January 18 Acting Secre
tary R. O. Bailey sent a communica-
lUB ne w w.wuniww, auu
that the ' total award for the final
parcel,, meaning that on which. E. O.
Hall & .Company is situated, probably
will reach about' $200,000.
The acting secretary's communica
tion; is i civen .below: ;
The Chairman, ToWmittee on Public
Buildings and Grounds, United
States Senate. : "
Sirst-In oombliancejwlth your re
quest, 1 have the honor to 'submit the
following report on Senate Bill 7968.
providing for, an increase of $500.00$
ia ,t!;e Imit)f tcost 'for; the Acqulsi-
tion of a. site , and v the i erection of
new post v of flee, f court house and
ued th0 JLcqmsiuon of site alone an
the limit of ; cost of $150,000, and the
Act of May : SO, 1908, authorized the
construction of t:e huilding at a limit
of cost- of $850,000, making the total
limit of" cost for site atd building
$1,000,000.
The 'Act of June 25, 1910, provides
for the acquisition of additional
land for the site at a limit of cost of
$350,t)00, which is to be payable out
of the $1,000,000 previously author
ised for both the site and Building.
Under the authorization of June 30,
1906, there ha been - expended for
the site, apprahately $105,000.
Condemnation proceedings have
been Instituted for the acquisition of
the. additional land authorized by the
act of June 25, 1910, and awards have
been made as follows:
The CummIns estate A
corner , lot about 6330 . -
squsre feet $138,000.00
Hawaiian Trust Co Inside
lot about 850 square
feet ........ 72,179.82
Office Supply Co. Inside
lot about 3800
square feet 49,872.00
$260,051.82
No award has ieen made in tbe
case of the remaining parcel, which
is a comer lot containing 7000 square
feet, - but from Information received
from the United States Attorney, an
opinion could be ventured that the
award will be approximately $200,000.
making the. total for the acquisition
of all of the additional land required
$460,000,00.
In this connection it may be said
that the properties in question are in
the heart of the business and financial
district of the city, and the value of
same is thereby correspondingly
large.
It Is estimated that an increase of
$300,000 in the present limit for the
site and building will be ample both
for the acquisition of the additional
land required for the site, and for the
construction of a suitable building.
Respectfully,
(Signed) R. O. BAILEY,
Acting Secretary.
PUBLIC LANDS SALES
HEAVY, SAYS TUCKER
In his annual report to the goverr.or,
njadepublic this afternoon. Land Com-
iris-sioner Tucker give some interest
ing figure? on tentorial iand sales
and purchases since the land law of
iroy went into effect Under that act
sales have totalled $24,424, and pur
chases $13,508, with $13,412.70 of this
HJtount being spent in Honolulu. All
ot these sales were on the island of
Hawaii.
Under the act of 1911 total sales
reached $4,447 and purchases $13,777.
all of these purchases being at Hilo.
leaving a balance on hand for further
land purchases bv the territory, of
$1,586. The report shows that under
the first law all the lands sold were
on Hawaii, and that the purchases
with this money were almost entirely
in Honolulu, but that under the sec
ond the receipts for Hawaii land .sales
were spent , on the same island. This
was required by the second act.
. Appk
nn
ORDERS
HEARINGS ON
lilRATION
President Breaks Precedent to
Weigh Measure Friends
of Hawaii Take Hope
By C. S. ALBERT
Special SUr-Bulletin Corixepondenee
" WASHINGTON, D. C, Jan. .24.
The announcement by President Taft
that he would give public bearings on
the immigration bill before approving
it came as a surprise and senration
here. Although widespread interest
attaches to tbe measure it was not
known the president intended to so
carefully , weigh all its provisions. A
public hearing in tne White House:
is entirely without precedent I
COUniefl With tha nneMit'. n.l
nouncement Was A strnne nnH an
khentic intimation that he would veto!
the mjeasure when presented if It did !
not -meet his views in all resDwt. !
This gave friends of Hawaii renewed
nope, it being considered probable 1
Mr. Taft might take into consldera-'
tion the failure to except the islands
1
(Continued on .Page 4) ' (. .'
t
I, , CHARLES BON ILL
Charles Bon, president of the
Merchant's association, was t
S taken, seriously ill this . morning &
$ at his home and will be rushed
$ to the Queen's Hospital this af- 3
$ ternoon, if he can be moved. His $
$ physician will not talk regarding v
$ the case, but it is understood $
$ that Mr. Hon is suffering with
s stomach trouble of long stand-
ing. S
SEEKS AID
Deserted by her husband and turned
out of the homo of ier brother-in-law
because he was'unable to earn enough
to support his own family a young
Spanish woman wii.h four small chil
dren has been thrown upon the mercy
of the community and is now seeking
aid at the Palania Settlement.
The woman, whose name is with
held by the request of those who are
investigating the case, came to the
Islands from Spain three years ago
with her husband and children. The
husband secure;! work and a year
later deserted his wife, and, as she
was in ill health and suffering with
tuberculosis, placed two of her chil
dren in the Salvation Army home and
went to live with her sister and
brother-in-law. One of the children,
a boy of eight years, was placed in
the oublic school, and after living
TAET
i; I m l ; AOY RESERVE IS
. Wk j POPULAR PLIN
1 I 4 LOCALLY
-JsKl I Mahomed Beshei Effendl, Saltan
AiH VWJ of Tirkey
Mahmosd Shefket Pasha, war minister U jUTj 'SlCllER
FOR
BABES
the mother went to the Leahi home..nt to Honda for cultivate. Using
where she was taken in and medical 'the names -Hawaiian bitter yam
attention given her. air Potato." Harley Harris Bart
A few weeks ago she became much"", n expert in the department of
improved in health and left the -home, J Agriculture prepared an eighteen
thinking that her children needed her PaSe pamphlet on the topic above in-
(Continued on Page 3)
ULiuLJia
Threatened By
Major Barer Bay
AT VOLTER'S
Rightly or wrongly because Wol-
ter won't talk there is a gentle
snicker going the rounds at the ex
pense of the new supervisor.
jThe snicker hangs upon the following
j story also going the round?. Efforts
to find Mr. Wolter this morning prov
ed vain. He was said to have gone
cut inspector inspecting.
I According to the perambulating
yarn Mr. Wolter plana a pleasant
(Continued on Page 3)
w, MM '
I-
EXPENSE
SHORT, SIMPLE STORY OF
THE PURPLING CHR0M0GEN
Jared G. Smith Responsible for
Troop of Perfornfng
Appellations
BY C. S. ALBERT.
Special Star-Bulletin OorrcspnnlMR-
WASHINGTON. D. C. Jan. 24.
Pleasure inexpressible and joy beyond
description has been outpoured upon
the national capital. "Thci purpling
chromogen of a Hawaiian dioscorea",
has been presented to a long-suffering
and anxious public. A suspense,
worse than death, has been relaxed. ! tion it is especially interesting that
Everybody with a pencil and tab of during the process of purification rho
paper may now, sit down at home and j-dochlorogen was separated from tan
make hi? own figures on this subject i nm hy the use of lead acetate and ffir-
i en jears agu -ui. jareu j. amitu,
in charge of the Hawaiian Agricultur
al Experiment Station, sent in some
specimens of a Dioscorea under the
Hoi.
uicuiru.
The conclusions reached by Mr.
i
uuuu
Mutiny In
Ranks Of Turkish Forces
i -
:f
Former soldiers on Oahu take kind
ly to the plan of organizing, a force
of United States reserves here, and
the circulars recently sent oat as a
feeler by the adjutant general have
met with ready responses itt most
casts. Of some sixty men who have
answered to date, only two have come
out with flat-footed statement! that
they would never join any military or
ganization again. ' Nearly all the med
heard from are willing to Join,- a;U.
S. reserve, and about half of tiiem ex
press a willingness to enlist in any
white companies of the national guard
that may be organized. ,. -
The Department of Hawafl has
taken the lead in this matter of or
ganizing a reserve, and credit for the
original impetus should be given to
Major Fred V. S. Chamberlain. Philip
pine Scouts, who, when . attached to
department headquarters pending his
departure for the islands got in touch
with a number of Spanish War Vet
erans, and others who had seen regu
lar service, and after talking with
them became convinced that a crack
(Continued on Page 4)
Dartlett are of the most Interesting
nature and are thus simply stated:
"A chromogen isolated from the
aerial tubers of the Hawaiian bitter
yam has been named 'rhodochlorogen.'
It has possible chemical and physiolo
gical relationships with the am-
; moma-greening anthocyanin of that
plant in that it forms green salts and
oxidizes to a red compound which
would itself pass from an anthocyanin
if it were not Insoluble in water.
Many investigators have supposed
that the anthocyanins were closely al
lied to the tannins. In this connec-
rous suiDnate. Lad acetate did not
precipitate
precipitate
rhodochlorogen, but did
its red oxidation deriva-
tive.
"There is reason to believe that rho
dochlorogen of Dioscorea contains the
same chromophoric nucleus as the an
thocyanin of the same plant; conse
quently, the reactions of rhodochloro
gen afford evidence against Miss
Wheldale's hypothesis that the so-
(Continued on Page 3)
Ui UUUJ'.u
h My MM ; lia p, j
Havoc Already Done by the Eo.t.It.ic1.
rhent!bf the Bulgarian Guns Snid to I;
Frigfitful-Bulgars Expsct to i: .'
Within a Fortnight-Quiet ic. : ..
Fighting in the Tchatalja, Wlnre Al!!
Ate Preparing Final plow at Cor.:;r.
1
r. SOFIA, Bulgaria, Feb, 4. dispatches from the front anneu
sumption of war along the entire line. The Bulgarians last n':
furious bombardment of the sacred city of Adrianople, aiming t
at the constcratd mosques of the Turks especially.. The hav;.
dons by the cannonade is said to have been terrific and the IttV.r
that the city cannot hold out for more than another fortn!;ht. Tr.s
son of the city is said to be less than forty thousand, while the at'.s:'
number nearly 106,000 and have reinforcements already on the way ta t.v :
assistance, ..' y't ;.' 4 . -.-t.' . - , i , . '
c Fighting took plaes In th lines before Tchatalja last nT;ht hut at tM
time of sending this dispatch, reports had reached here of the diss:-.:- -,
anes of the bombardment and the coming extemporary quiet. The t:::i z':
reported to have learned that the Turkish army there I in nj p:: '. ;i t)
meet a final heavy blow and are said to be preparing to strike at c::, !i
the hope of piercing the lines and surging through to Constantlnc;! tlo
Stroke. . ,. ,. , . v '.';V."- -. " v.-' V' ;-' '' ..
Stewardess Held
' SAN FRANCISCO Feb, 4v-Mrs.
the PacliSo liall liner Mon-ilia.as
from Marshal Hendry of Honolulu, carcd tth having t '-1
ity of 'opium Into1 the Hawaiian city
froute'Saa:-
the discovery of Mr. and Mrs. 15!ho that tns t-i tn: . . . . , v. -
reported to hive been paeserigers orr the liner, c: j . -
back to NoholiW for trial. Rumors hers assert thit iiveril pi.;: .
npr in ths opium ring believed to have been operating fir :r.s t:..-.:, i ;
now In a fair way to be tripped throu-gh a full confession IJ::i to havs
been made by Mrs. Taylor to the officials of the United Cut: j CJvernr.sr:
! who examined her after her arrest. . . ,t ' - ' . j ' h V .T. :
. Gives Warning To Mexico :
i-,-, "; - ... . MMsMeMaeaa ,
i . - ;" f ' c , . - ' ' t -' - el
MEXICO CITY, Feb. 4 Speaking before; the national serste here t
day Manuel Calero, former embassador to the Urtited .CtatJi from t-i
country warned the senators that the state of the nation is despsrxt.
"Ws ahould tell the truth though It kills usV he '.said; "and tie-truth Ji
that the present political conditions of our country are detperats." Ho ur-.i
that factional disputes be forgotten In the chamber and that all tend their
energy to settling the chaos now existing throughout the republic.
Hearst Blocks Bond Sale
NEW YORK, Feb. 4. In his efforts to secure a municipal subwiyvfar
which he has been fighting for several years, William Randolph Hearst to
day; through hie attorneys; obtained an Injunction, blocking completely C
sale of three hundred million dollar's worth'-. of, dty bonds to Plerment
Morgan and Company. The Injunctl oft' was', granted Hearst just raif art
hour before the contract would have beensigned.by the ban Iters and repre.
Governor's Friend5 JailsdP:;
'A- --ii ill l .
. v . . , . ' : J
8AN . FRANCISCO, Feb. 4. Marshall 8Uck, sUte senator. and; one of
the closest friends of Governor Johnson,' was sentenced to serve Urm
of ten years in the state prison for embezzlement. Black was convicted of
robbing the Palo Alto Loan Assoc fat
official. , .
Bourbons
Bock
WASHINGTON, Feb. 4. Democratic senators today blocked mors than
1800 civil appointmenta made, by President Taft, and declare ..that they
will vote down every appointment Mr. Taft may make between now and the
end of hia term. .' ' f Yr u '
WRESTLES WITH
MEASURE
A. L. Castle has been having legis
lation troubles lately, though unhappi
ly he was one of the many Republi
cans who were defeated In the deluge
of Democratic votes last fall that
overwhelmed candidates for the house
of representatives. Mr. Castle's
troubles have arisen over the "suf
fragette bill" as the cynical have
dubbed it.
The republican party having form
ally indorsed woman's suffrage, it be
came the duty of Republican states
men to draw up some kind of a meas
ure getting the sentfmenrof the party
in action. Mr. Castle was picked a
a statesman highly qualified to handle
tfcbj difficult and dangerous subject
and to do it justice. Consequently lie
has been laboring earnestly to put th
measure into shape. .
Mr. Castle's researches hive
brought him to the conclusion that the
proper form of measure i a con
current resolution to be acted upon by
each house of the ' territorial legisla
ture and then entrusted to Delegate i
J J y J .. .
Vr;
. ..- .
i r':'
j tv3 r;-
r i
For 'Cir.
riael Tyr, cMef : -
r?rest:4 hera tni morning cn a v.::. ;
while ttia stssmer ; : -5
Ion of which no was
' '" '''-'-
prominent
f '
mtrilenw
SUFFRAGE
FOR LEGISLATURE
Knhio and, the United 'States con
gress, the resolution asking that con-,-gress
amend the organic act to pro-i
vide either the legislature may give,
woman's suffrage here, or that it be -.
submitted to voV of the people in a
sort of suffrage plebiscite- j -
The management of the itoana Hotel
announces a dance c'forv tomorrow
(Wednesday) evening to which t cur
isu. local army and nsry and soc!:ty
folk are cordially : Invited advert: 3
ment' ..;.:' 't??kl?v''! .?
Dissension : among" ' the "slz-power
group may prevent ChinaTi 4 rett:-T
her 1125,000,000 loan. ?- - 4
Appb
WADS
lUlilb

xml | txt