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Honolulu star-bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii) 1912-current, February 27, 1913, 2:30 Edition, Image 1

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X
P
Si.
7v;-
From S. r.i
Nippon Mam, Feb. 27
For S. F.i
Shinyo Maru. Mar. 4
From YaacoiTrrt
Makura. Feb. 26. '
For VaarovTert
Marama, Mar. 25
liJJ JJJl UL " jl ' J '$1! V:;l I . ) :.
Kvcning Bulletin, Kst. US2. No. . t"owi "-- .- ' - ' - v- ' , .... .... . -
Hawaiian star. Vol. xx. No ;zz. i 1 PAGE8noyOLULU, TEHKITOKY OF HAWAII. Tiiri:si)A WAV 27, lMI.S. -12 PAGES. PIUCK FIVE CEKT3.
:.7 v 7 Tnxmr
BMJNT
: . ' .- . '
TEff DOESN'T
m WY SUEM
Engineers Announce Ingenious
Scheme to Conquer Treach-
erous Coral Bottom
WILL CLEAR WRECK AND
BUILD ANEW OF CONCRETE
Huge Longitucfnal Blocks to
Be Constructed Ashore and
Put in Place by Gigantic
Crane, Holding by Sheer
Weight and Strength De
tails Go to Washington by the
F;rst Mail
The great naval drydock at Pearl
Harbor wll- be built on the present
'.site: It will be built by a method en
tirely new and untried In'drydock con
struction; tt will be finished on time.
The next mail co&stward will . carry
to Washington a full report. of the re
cent disaster, and the details of a new
plan to conquer the treacherous sands
and mud pockets on which the great
ship basin rests, worked out by Civil
. Engineer E. R. Gayler, the naval en
gineer in charge of the Pearl Harbor
project There Is every reason to be-
. lieve that ' Admiral Stanford, chief of
the bureau of yards and docks, will
approve the new scheme, for during
his visit, here last summer he thor
oughly familiarized himself with con
ditions at Pearl JHarbor, and there-
- fore fully realizes what the engineers
an,d, the contractors have; been, up
- against In trying to -anchor the dry
dock to the unstaple bottom.
Briefly stated,, the latest solution to
the drydock purzle . is to build . the
bottom" of the .pasin of huge longi
tudinal blocks of concrete set on end,
and' the sides of blocks of the proper
shape and dimensions, to be moulded
on chore, ' and . , laid entirely under
j water. Tne drydock will ,be built as a
whole, and not in sections,' which
means that the million ,feet of false
cribbing 'and sheath piling, some of
which is now a .hopeless .wreck above
and below the' surface, will be taken
s out'. atttpgtrtheTVvlesuring the - basin
' clear ;Of . all . tinkering. ; The blocks
.wl.v be - set closely together t)n top
of the anchor piles and concrete will
1 then be poured between the blocks
by the tremle ', method, , welding the
w hole into a solid concrete bottom 20
feet In thickness.
. The concrete blocks which will be
set on end to form the bottom cf Uk
tock will be 9 feet square and ?0 feet
In height. They will be cast on dry
land In forms, and when properly set
will be swung Into' the depths by the
great floating crane, which is now be
ing assembled at the Honolulu naval
dock. These blocks will weigh 120
tons each. They will be stood rp like
rows of ten pins on the bottom of the
basin, about one foot apart, and when
in place the tremle pipes will . be in
serted between them, and will pour
concrete until the bottom of the "dock
Is a solid block 20 feet thick. The
engineers know that they have a concrete-mixture
that will set properly
under water, and that the tremles will
do their work properl7; this was dem
onstrated by the recent upheaval. It
Is now a question of getting enough
-weight on tne drydock to keep the
bottom of the harbor from rising, and
20 feet of solid concrete will un-
doubtedly do this, say the engineers.
"The method of building the dry
dock which I have worked out Is hew,"
said Civil Engineer Gayler this morn
ing, explaining the proposed plan,
"but we are going on the theory that
Jhe United States must have a dry
.dock at Pearl Harbor, and this seems
to be the best way of arriving at re
sults The scheme of making the
blocks ashore and lowering them Into
place was talked of some time ago,
but at that time, we had not proved
the success of laying under water con
crete by the tremle method. Now we
know that w e, can -get as good a con
crete under water as we can on land,'
no there is no difficulty in filMng'in
between the blocks to make a solid
bottom. The blocks will be recessed.
a a v if . s x a
;": ' ' : ! : . a
After fen days of Invetiga'
tion, fipurlnc, and study, an all- a
Important deelhlon has been
reached In regard to the Pearl
Harlxar drydock, wWeli h!ew a
yp" February 17, whea Section 2
was being pumped. After the ac-
eidrnt there, .wa some doobt h a
to whether a hhlo basin could be a
built on the site, or whether a M
floating drydock would have to
be ibititated. The muy engU '
neer the day after the Mnash de- a
dared that a drydock conld be J
bnllt, and today com ex the an-
Donnccment that an entirely new
method, reiolutlonary in dry. a
dock construction, is ' to be
adopted, and thrt the work will
be rushed to completion. The l
a dock is to e made of huge con- P
crete biocas, laid under water, K
und it in believed that by this a
method enough weight can be a
secured to hold down tbe bettom,
which, owing to the pressure of a
both, earth and water, has a ten.
oency to rise when the water
pressure Is-rrmoTcd from -with-i
iu the basin.
; x
a. a . j j. a, jt k . M
mm
HIS BLOCK
ATTACK ON
F!
EAR
Kuhio Faction in the Lower
House Reported to Have
Asked Democratic Support to
Resolution Asserting Lack of
Confidence in the Adnrnis
tration of the Governor but
the Latter Take thrGroiihd
They Will Not Climb to Pow
er in That, Manner
SENATE:
Seventh Day
a a
k, '; .
'
a
H.
8.
'
a
ft. a X X X X X X X X X X X X
TERRITORIAL SENATE
SEVENTH DAY.
Rills Passed Second Reading
5" -' .
i
. S. B. No. 18 An act to author
ize the appointment of a bank ex
aminer, to define bis tenure of
office. and the duties to.be' per-.
X formed by him and to provide for
a "his compensation. Brown. .Re
X ferred , to the ways and means
a committee, underM a ; resolution
a contained in a report of the judi
X clary committee.
W S. B. No. 23 An act making
a additional appropriations for cur-
rent erpenees. Introduced by '9
a the ways and means committee a
for the governor. A Referred to a
a the ways and means committee, a
S. B. No. 24 An act making X
a additional appropriations for per- a
a manent Improvements and pur- a
a poses incidental thereto. Intro- a
duced by the ways and means
a committee for the governor. Re- a
a f erred to the ways and means X
a committee.
X S. B. No. 23 An act making
a appropriations by way of ad
a'vanctment out of general reve
a; nues for the construction of
a streets in. the Auwaiolimu dis
a trict, Honolulu, to be reimbursed
a out of the sa'.e of lots in said
a tract. Introduced by the ways
a and means committee for the
a governor. Referred to the ways
a and means committee.
' S. B. No. 26 An act to pro
a vide for the settlement ': of" the
a rhineppt claims. Introduced by
to that the poured concrete will form
a keyto bind, them; solidly together. a the ways and means committee
ThereJs no difficulty In making the' for' the covernor. Referred to
vertical Joints on the bottom, and on a the ways and means committee.
the sides of the dock, where ; hori- a
zontal joints must be made, the blocks :
will be -so-laid that the stresses at
the joints will be low. '
' "From the, times that we have
pumped sections of the dock and met
with set backs, we know the sum total
of the upward pressure, and can figure
the weight necessary to offset this.
These concrete blocks will give the
necesssary weight.'
The blocks will rest on the piles
that were driven to pin the bottom.
In cases where these piles have come
up, in the. last upheaval cf the bottom,
they will have- to be re-drlven. As
the bottom of the dock will be thicker
(Continued on Psge 8)
Regal Motor Cars
, UNOERSLUNQ
t " -
H. E. HENDRICK, LTD.
Merchant & Alakea, Phone 2648
S. B. No. 33 An act pertaining
to the sale In bulk or in large
part of merchandise or fixtures.
Coke. Referred to the judiciary
committee. !
Reports
Accounts committee reported
on salaries of the attaches of the
senate. - . -.'-
Judiciary committee reported
on bill No. 13. Finds that res
olution No. 3 dealing-with suf
frage would, if granted by Con
gress, perform all. that Act 13
plans to do. Approved.
Judiciary reports on Bill No.
19. Refers it and all Similar fi-
? duclary measures to ways and a
a means committee. fa
a ' . ' '
a' a- a a a .a a a a; a a a a a a a a
That the Kuhio-Frear embroglio has
not reared its ugly head in the lower
house, of the territoriol legislature is
not the fault of the Kuhio faction, if
reports from authentic sources can be
BADE UNHURT;
FATHER HILLS
WIFE AMD SELF
Infant Found Close to Bodies of
Parents Who Die in
Double Killing
' Emptying four shots from a brau-J
new 38-caliber revolver into the body
cf Oyena, a young Japanese woman.
Lis wife, the flame from the powder
scorching the face of a sleeping 11-montbs-old
Infant nestled at ' its
lather's breast, II. Shimaza then
turned the gun upon hims?If and sent
two bullets into his own person, re
sulting In the death of loth the
woman and the man. in a small cot
tage some distance off the Walalao
road, at Moiliili, shortly after 10
t "clock this morning.
Revenge prompted the wanton mur-
cer of the rather comely woman,
whosa .body was found weltering In
a pool of blood not- three feet away
fiom"tb3 prostrate form of her hus
bands. . '.:':,.
That the, little Haruko. a female
child, not ;yet a year .oli, who, hFln
lf j?e, was "found., lying ''between:-the
deh- parents.-escaped th train of
leaden missiles sent broadcast In ta
room is considered by ?pect9torq wan
vli!ted the scene in th? light of a
nfracle. - .v;.-' ; . ' :'-
Divorce Led to Double Killing.
Ac ion for divorce. Instituted ''.upon
ihc part of the woman. Is now be
lieved to hve Ud to the akercatlor.
v.Uch; finally hront?ht death to thr
wire and then to the rann. . 1
On February 2, of this ye-r. thr
weman called upon Lfghtfoot & lAzhi
fcot, and began legal action toward
.1 separation rrom -her. nusuand..', ex
treme, cruelty was . the charge mad
in the complaint! - The I action Vrs
still pending, In the courts when te
tiagedy enacted in the little iloi'Tli
heme this morning transferred the
j!'ter o a'highrr tribunal. " C
. The shooting took place In rn o?
the concefied .."districts, of Moiliili.
pLAf e 'principally populitcff bv Japan
cifi.iJThc -. sound of altercation fol-
lOwTI! tiimoet immediately ry six dJs
tluc shots from .thr revolver. 'brought
hundreds of. people to the place.
Murder Was Premeditated.
The murder of Oyeno and tlie su'-
ride cf Shimazi were premeditated, as
v as borne out by the discovery of
several vlmrnrtant papers, found o-i
the person of the dead man -bv-chief
. ... .ii ir.lv. rr .
O' Ueiectives Annur Jici'auij uu .
AFsistunt Chief KelletU
In the possession of Chief MeDnf
On is n registration certificate for on
3S-callbre revolvar. Issued the first o:
the week; in the name of Shimazt.
Uj)on " examination the revolver
(Continued on Page 8)
illflN lOiFEDERAL DLDG.
BE OBSERVED DILLS MA.lfJG
HOUSE iPROGEJESS CJOU
Dr. Archer Irwin; Democrat of
Hawaii, Will Make Speech
on Inductonof Wilson-
V
, . . -':; T:.-
::' r J. :. " ... i
.;...
.y" '' o . - ;.:?.
K.'
Rr. Archer Irwin
Representative from Hawaii .
Speaker Holsteln of the house of
representatives 13 arranging a. simple
lut Impressive little program by
which one hranch at least of the fer
ritorial legk latnre will ecogniz'e: the
inauguration ol a new prsidsnt of the
Cnited States. " v
Next Tuesday 'afternoon.- March .
jt:st before the house adjourns for t
r'as , Seaker Holftein will call upon
Dr. Archer Irwla of Hawaii to niak?
h brl?f sd'lre s filtinfl; to the occasjon,
Pr .Irwin: is the'. Hawaii nemo-ira i'
the house and' already proving him
self to ie an active worker and la
fuentlal member. - : ,
A largo jwrtrait of Prcsi Ten' W"
son, surrounded with wr?a.TB of flow-'
t-rs. .will be" bnngin a conspicuous
position in the house chamber. ;
President Kmidsen of ' the ssnate
sbs asked today if the upper honsi
will havr-any special program on in
aaguration dav. but said be new. of
no plans idn foot "far.- anything. He
suggested, with r smile, that rosslblv
the Democratic senator; plight wish
to hall the lnductfor. of their illus
trious chief with ceremony ot som2
kind. " '.:; ,;; ':-' ..'' ; :V-
Delegate Kalanianaole Cables
News of Both House and
Senate Action
The Waterhouse Trust Company re
ceived a cablegram from - Delegate
Kalanianaole late yesterday afternoon
bringing " news of the Manuka federal
building bid, reading as follows;
"Present bill carries, $120,000. "With
former $350,000 makes eight thousand
more than needed for all sites. Build
ing appropriation have to wait, until
next Congress." ' ; ;'-.''
This is the House bill. ;
This morning, a second cablegram
came from the delegate to the Water
house Trust. Company reading as fol
lows: v :V"i '-''. ;.
"Senate . passed public buildings!
bill with $150,000 for Honolulu."
PAELE'S PUBGlY
mmiER,
mm
r i n ?7 n n
EVOLUTIONS
DYING. LAST
DEPORT
OLE
GETS THE
HOOK
, A cruel, h?artless Republican ma
jority In the house this morning calm
ly crushed the life out of Representa
tive Paele's pet measure; thereby il'l
ihg for the present at least the chance
of fathers . having five or more chil
dren1 to escape : from ' personal taxation.;-''
::';?:"'' "' -:- -W"" :; , w
Paele pleaded tearfully; Kawewehi,
the lone Home Ruler, touched by his
appeal, bestirred himself .and by, n
diplomatic resort to parliamentary
tsctlcs, sought to defer the progrcsi
of the malorltyr8 "steam roller:" VA s-
.'; ;.' (AssocUtrd-rrpra Cbll
MEXICO CITY, Feb. 27-Thit the
incipient revolutions that threatenea
trouble to the : rule of General Huerta
and his followers are fast dying out,
and that the country is assuming a
peace and. quiet that it has not had
since . President Madero opened h:
warfare upon Dlar is the statement
made in many official quarters today.
Gomez is said to have been, brought
under the Huerta flaflt Diar and Hu
erta are working hand in glove, anci
the only cloud that obscures the hori
zon is the threat of the bandit Zapaia,
to continue fighting. Seventeen of tne
ragged followers of this leader nave
been captured and were summarily ex
ecuted this morning. These will, De
clared General Huerta, be the only p
litical executions. Huerta this morn
ing drafted a proclamation granting
amnesty to all political offenders who
surrender within fifteen days.
Turks mm io
CITY
'. ' -;:- 1 - -, '; .' :
( Associated Press Cable)
SOFIA,' Feb. 7.Accordlng to semi
official dispatches from Constantinople
this morning, the Turkish government
rcrsioRs were'eist MionIthe--ineiitr3 la abouirsady -4-f surrender Aonn
BIG BOON FOR SOLDIERS
WOULD BE THESE TWO BILLS
House Measures Introduced
Todays Protecting Uniform
and Jobs of ex-Army Men
Ki-soldiers: of the United States
arm v. once obtaining a job under the
territorial government cannot be dis-j
charged except on a showing or gross
Incompetence or misconduct, if house
bill Ko. 101 lhtroduced by Representa-"j
live Julius Ascn, Jr., tnis morniug oe-
cpmea a law.
. Ukewlse keepers of theaters, aance
halls, wharves, or other public duiu
)tKs or places of business in which
tb general nubile Is permitted to fore
gathermust permit soldiers in Uncle
Sam's uniform to enter their business
establishments, if house bill No. 100,
introduced PT Representative Ascn,
is placed n;the Matutes.
There' meapures are said to be an
outcome of the recent cnarges Dy
annv men that they were not per
mitted to enter certain public wharves
to' which civilian j w ere granted
entrance. The fecond one mentioned,
H. B. 100, is net uncommon, as sev
eral states already have provisions of
like character. Tho first, however, is
regarded as radical. " '
i.
J
. . . - . v' "' '"
Va,
Representative Julius Asch, Jr., whose
bills concerning soldiers were
introduced today
JUST HAD TO PAY
THE MESSENGER
M 0 R E
(Continued on Page 3)
seconds communfs with Heaven in be
helf of the solons.
The fat started to fry when the
semite took up the consideration of
the report of the accounts committee
relating to tho salaries for the at
taches. The committee report set the
pay of the clerk at $12 per diem, the
assistant c:erk at ?8, the sergeant-at-
hc deemed manifestly 'unfair, and : he
slruRaied to correct the false Imprca
s;on he jald Sheldon had given. v
But the statement of Norman Wat
kins, chairman of the flnanre rom
rnittee. which had reported adversely
on it, decltred that the famous H. R.
4.v could not become law because it
was unconstitutional, unfair as tj
gendering class favoritism, and; more
over, had been denied favor in pre
viiis legislatures therefore it wia not
St to become a part of tha territorial
rtatutes. The vote wis taken, and
the committee recommendation to ta
blo the bill wa adopted by a large
Majority. J'v
Paele wanted to submit-' h!s stnte
loent as minority member of t1'
fnance committee. Kawewehi moved
that action on .he bill be dferrn'
until the minority report was si
nitted. No vote wrs fken on h''
motion, but Paele virtuallv gave hi;
report in a talk of ten minutes' dura
tion. :.' -'vv-- :''''.-';:: n,:
Sheldon d?clared tho mensurwouM
exempt man" of the wealthiest nm'
lies of the islands from taxation, be
cause they happen to have five or
n.ore children. This, h? !s erted.
would deprive the territory of a val
uable source cf revenue. On the
Pother hand, he argued, many poor
families would br disrlmfnaten;
raainst because they do not have'Mj
families. Kaniho corrected this the
ory, however. He said the bill did .rot.
efect property taxes. It touched only
I crson?l taxation. : : : ' "
Eut the bill was buried, and thus
dees Paele lose his first flec'ins
gllropl e of fame.
lies and the refusal cf the great powers
to Intervene In the strife, as well as
her own flnanc'al exhaustion are said
to be the reasons for the Wii;;ngnes;
of the Porte to surrender a city that
for hundreds of years has been sacred
to the Ottoman empire.
FISHER'S REPORT
ON HAVAII W
NEVER SHO
By C. S, ALBERT
Special Siar-Bullctm CorrcsirKlonccJ
WASHINGTON,' D. C, Feb: 14 The
recommendations for the future bene
fit and prosperity cf Hawaii, promiseo
by Secretary Fisher - as a result ol
his visit to the Islands last Septem
ber, seem destined to go over as a
jegacy to tne Wilson au ministration.
This is equivalent to saying that no
recommendations will . be made.
Neither will a detailed report be tlie
concerning the Investigation of Gov
ernor Frears regime made by Secre
tary Fisher. -"I
have not had a minute's time io
Eo through the great mass or ies;:
mony- taken during the hear:ng3 :n
Hawaii." said Mr. Fisher to the Siar
Bulletin correspondent.-',Mlt. is a ditii
cult task and requires time ant: care.
It is impossible to say when I will
find ; time , to begin this important
work.' '. ,' v
, With routine matters pressing more
closely upon Mr. Usher, every ciay,
Passengers ; on the Oceanic
Liner Recced of ;
: -V;-;A $5000
SAN FRANCISCO POLICE
ARREST TWO ON CHARGE
Card Sharps Joined Vessel
When; She Stopped at
Honolulu
f Associated rrrs CM!l
SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 27. Two al
leged gamblers and card sharps, who
gave their names as L. Master and J.
McQulen, and who are said to have
joined ths Oceanic liner Ventura wh:n
shs stopped at Honolulu on ncr last
passage here from Australia, wtre ar
rested by the San Francisco psllc: t
day, charged with defrauding the pas
sengers' out of more than in a!!.
The game is said to have started al
most as soon as Diamond Head was
dropped, astern, and continued with
slight Intermissions -until one of th
gamblers looking througrt a port, an
nounced that the Farallone Islan 1
wers in sight. .The police havs ttt-s
mute regarding' the names of XY . . ,
who lost money to th card e?tr.j
during the trip, and the ship's efficsr?
and sawardj maintain the sane ti
Isnce. The passengers are net fcou.-J
by the same considerations si ths
names of the unluck. cnes, v.'.h ths
amounts they are said to navs
are fast becoming, public prcpirty.
The names of several women p;::n
gers have been mentioned as we.'t.
'- " o - .
PARIS
UiiL
- u
to c;e : : . ;
;lid
...I in. i ii ii m iwm. a- . i . . - 1
,.' - TASaocUtrd I'fxt Cabll
PARIS, France, Feb. 27. Fc-r eft:
so-called automobile L--iiti, c.nvi;t: J
of a score of crimes, -must pa ;
penalty upon the QuiWsVnt. Such w. i
the decision of ths court this T:r-
ing. Fourteen of th i other are f;: j
long terms in the stats prisons, to
effort will be maie to appeal tn:;r
cases. Thus ends the most sensational
criminal trial Pxr has seen for yeai .
ilSHLIFET
CP'
victim, as clerk of the senate: Make
kau's resolution would have paid him
S15 per diem, the commiUee's but $12.
A snow of hands cut his pay to $12, nd , e8s than a month of his service
with which he will have . to gruo ;remaninirt it seems certain Ihat no
along as best he may, helping out his report and no recommendations wu.
meager stipend with what little he be made
can profit oy handling the journal off. it ; would be impossible for 5ecre
the senate at the rate of seventy-five ary Fisher's successor in the Inter
cents a typewritten page. ' ,ior department to review the findings
The assistant clerk came In lor a ,nrt fr.rmita nthor ronort nr sutr-
good word from oenator Coke, who
declared that his duties and responsi
bilities are but little less than those
of the clerk and therefore should oe
rewarded with a salary hardly infer
ior to that paid his superior. He failed
to persuade the rest of the senate, and
t he assistant ' will receive $8 per. day,
with a slight rake-off on the Journa;.
There was little difference of opinion
as to the sergeant-at-arms. pay. He
will receive five dollars per day, but
Always pbilanthropical Senator Ma
kekau, the bright and shining legal
light of Hawaii's finest district, sprang
to the rescue of the attaches cf the
senate this morning, only to find his
benevolent Intentions blocked by the
parsimony of other members of the
upper house. He managed, however,
to secure a salary of five dollars a day
for the senate messenger and an in
crease in the pay of the chaplain, who
ever' morning for the space of thirty the line.
pestions for the future benefit of Ha
waii. He would know nothing of the
situation beyond what appeared on
the printed pages.
- Hence, it becomes : an apparently
safe " bet that no advantage win ac
crue from Secretary Fishers visit to
Hawaii as a special commissioner, re
presenting President Taft: It seem
destined to go down in history as om
of the flashes that failed.
Placards have been posted all over
tia rtt-n rf Cairn II! .-arniTi!T all no-
corauuuee .uuu c '"V lu"";; tgroes to leave the vicinity within thir-
l Licit: , naa a opiii. i tic iuic olwus
arms at the messenger and janitor wnen"the senate came to vote on the
at pay of the messenger, down on the
Hardly had tlie report been read by
the clerk, when Makekau jumped to
his feet and proposed to "amend the
report and resolution by submitting a
new resolution.", Some question of
parliamentary law, a thing abhorred
by the Hawaii solons arose, and: a
sharp little conflict ensued. When
the smoke of battle cleared away
President Knudsen announced that
the senate wo".ld take up the question
of salaries one at a time, beginning
with tlie highest amount suggested
for each place, and going on down
John Wise was the first
UliiiiiuLiU
( Associated Press Cable),
LONDON, Feb. 27. The public pros
ecutor this morning announced thn
when the cases of the militant -'
fragette leaders comes to trial he ia
going to work for a sentence for lire,
if the prisoners are found guilty. He
asserts that in no other way can simi
lar outrages be prevented In the fu
ture and that men tike Lloyd Ceorgs
and other government officials must
and shall be protected.
SAfllP
NOTCOuffl
seven to seven, and President Knud
sen, after-a moment's hesitation and
with a slight smile, voted for the
larger sum as set forth in the; Maie
kau amendment. The janitor will ge:
three dollars.
The violet producers in New York
state admit that their industry has
been practically ruined by the advent
of the new "near-dances. : The deli
cate little violet is "all In" after one
round of the turkey-trut
ty days.
A! general strike of Belgian work
ingmen has been called by the national
council of their organizations " for
April " 14. ' ":: . y-
The suffragette "army" marching to
Washington made its first "bivouac-."
at Metuchten, N. X The weather was
a bit "snappy" and only sixteen re
mained at night of the 200 who march
ed gaily forth from Newark, N. J., that
morning! '
The steamship Yucatan' rcrp'rfd
lader charter with the Alaska PafT;.
ers Association to make-a round trip
from the .coast to the Hawaii'.i
islands, for the purposq of transport
iiig a number of laborers, may not be
cm ing here after ail.
Coast correspondents for lli Ha
waiian Sugar Planters' Asocl'lon
have aisurei officials In this rily that
the rumored project for senJlng the
y ucatan or any other vessel to- th?
islands to carry recruited labor to
the Alaska fishing canneries fa not
Materializing. . '-.'" '";"
The Yucatan was reported all aing
tbe coast .as having been fixed to take
an, early departure for Honolulu. For
some weeks pist.one or more. agents
representing the northwest ,fl:h ean
ners are said to have been at work In
the islands,. with a view of enlistin";
njipinos. Portuguese and Spaniards
to take up work in Alasa waters.
. The prediction was miidewith a -gree
of positiveness that the Yucatan
vould sail frm San Francisco for tM
klands within the month. ,..
" SUGAR :
SAN FRANCISCO. ,Ca!., Feb. 2S.
Sugar: 96 degrees test, S.5I cents.
Previous quotation. 3.4 8 cents. Beets:
88 analysis, 9s. 8 3-4dA Parity, 4.04 r
cents. Previous quotation, 9s. 9 l-2cL
.'; iwoDDs oKiunum is iryi : u to-
mote a new mining eocpaay D:l.
you fall for it?
tumbled. Exchange.

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