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The Maui news. (Wailuku, Maui, H.I.) 1900-current, January 04, 1913, Image 2

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THE MAUI NEWS. SATURDAY, JANUARY 4, 1913.
THE mUI NEWS
Xocals
Ivntercd at the Post OiTioo .it Wailuku. Maui, Hawaii, ns second-class matter
Republican Paper Published in the Interest ot the People
Issued Every Saturday.
Via ui Pufcli55hing: Compnny, Limited. i
Proprietors nnri I'libllahera
PUHst'iPTioN Uatks, in Advance f J.OO per Your, $1.25 ix Months
$2.50 per your when not in advance
V. I-, Steuenson
SATURDAY.
Bdltor ntiri AlnnnKer
JANUARY 4, 19115.
Sugfir jhuI Coffee Tiriif.
THV. Los Angeles Times hits Hie nail on the head in the following
editorial :
.When the duty cm coffee of 3 cents per pound was taken off and
coffee placed on the Tree List, Brazil immediately levied an export
duty on coffee, and the only effect of this Tariff reduction was to re
duce Uncle Sam's yearly revenue about 512,000,000, while the people
paid the same price for coffee and still pay it.
We imported from Brazil in 1911, 651,1 18,172 pounds of coffee for
which, owing to government manipulation a'. Rio Janeiro, we paid
15n cents per pound as against 11 cents in 1910 and 6-s in 190S. The
activities of the Brazilian government in adjusting exportation of
coffee to the demand and to production are such that it is not probable
that placing a duty on coffee would affect prices here or would be of
much service in stimulating production in Hawaii and Porto Rico,
where coffee can be grown to advantage. A bounty on coffee for a
period of a few years might induce such additional planting in our in
sular possessions as would in time render us independent of foreign
production of coffee. It is the opinion of expert coffee growers that
the climate of the Imperial Valley is such that coffee might be grown
there.
The removal of the duties on sugar here would probably result in
Germany and Russia withdrawing the bounties they now pay on beet
sugar exported from those countries. Our farmers would then discon
tinue growing sugar beets. The United States would lose its present
revenues from duties on sugar. The people would not get sugar any
cheaper. The Louisiana sugar planters would lose, and the only bene
ficiaries of free sugar would be Germany, Russia and the American
Sugar Refineries Company. 9
The more the intricacies of a readjustment of the Tariff are studied
the more apparent it becomes that such adjustment ought to be made
on a scientific and not a haphazard basis.
"The Revolving Wedge" party visiteil
Ilale.ikaln crater on New Year's Day.
George Cooper, of liana, reports that
all the citizens of that part of the world
had n glorious holiday.
The prison gang got busy on Thurs
day morning, and soon cleaned up the
streets. In places the remains of lire
crackers were an inch deep.
A fine fish pond is being constructed
in the garden of Dr. Oyatna on Main
street. The basin is of concrete and
there will be a minature waterfall in it.
The Woman's Guild of the Church of
the Good Shepherd will hold a social
meeting with Mrs. G. A. Hansen, Wat
luku, on Wednesday, January 8th, at
2:30 p. m.
C. D. Lufkin, of the First National
Hank of aiinkn, is returning from an
extended trip to the mainland. He is
expected to arrive 011 the S. S. Willie
111 in.i on January 22.
0n ZDit
Horse Racing.
IT seems as if a revival of horse racing in Hawaii is in full swing.
That is good, as long as all crooked work is kept out. It was
cronk racing that killed the "sport of Kings" in Honolulu years
ago. Horse racing, when conducted properly is the best sport in the
world. What red-blooded man can resist the call of the fluttering silk and
the thundering hoofs,- as the "field" straightens out for the home stretch?
Then the rush for the wire, and a whirlwind finish. That is the
sport that sets the bloud coursing through the veins oi the spectators.
. But the sport must be controlled with an iron hand. Stewards and
other officials who fear nothing, should be in charge. The Jockey
Club should give these officials unlimited power, and once a 'crook" is
caught, he and his horses should be "warned off" for life.
1 There is no reason in the world why horse racing should not flourish
here. We have the moneyed men who can, if they wish, race for the
sport of the game. We have smaller men who can keep a few good
horses, and race for what there is in the game. The totalisator should
be introduced and, in that way, the bookmaker can never get in and
spoil everything 1y his crooked dealings.
Reappoint Thurston.
IF there is one man in office at tlie present moment, who should be
retained, irrespective of his political faith, it is Fire Chief Thurston.
The chief has been a success from the minute he joined the service
up till the present time. That he will, if given the opportunity, con
tinue tn his clean hardworking way, is certain.
Chief Thurston knows his work and he has always had the confi
dence of the public. That much cannot be said for some of the men
who seek the job.
Thurston has helped his men in every way. He erected cottages
when nobody else would in the vicinity of the fire station. He con
tented himself with less rent than any other owner would. The men
are glad to be near their station and yet men of the "Soap Box"
variety have the gall to twist tilings around and tty and make people
think that the fire chief forces his men to rent the cottages. Leave
Thurston where he is and be safe from fire.
Honolulu and all Hawaii will soon be further linked up with the
outside world. The plans of the United Wireless Company to con
struct a new wireless station, have advanced so far that bids are being
culled for the erection of the plant. With the cable and federal wire
less service already in the field, the new wireless concern will still fur
ther link up Hawaii with the United States and the Orient.
The day of romance has not yet passed and hunts for hid&i treasure
are still carried on. At least one treasure trove has been unearthed on
Maui, and the story of the discovery at Makawao will be read with in
terest. The Makawao correspondent of the Maui Nkws had a story
sometime ago on the subject. The seijttel is deeply interesting.
C1IAS WILCOX That new fire
bell is surely sonic bell. It can ' lie
heard fir miles around.
"JACK" l!KR(iSTi:()M-M,.,ui
is a fine place and I always enjoy
my visit.
J. N. S. WILLIAMS-Tl.c death
of R. R. Elgin was a shock to every
body. 1 was speaking to him just
before Christmas and be seemed to
be in excellent health.
JOHN SMITH A motorcycle
officer sliotilcl be appointed at once.
There are so many automobiles now-a-days
that proper tab should be
kept on thein.
J. B. STEWART (pur letter)
It is cold back home, and Philadel
phia seems a trifle large after Wni
Iuku. Still, Maui is a good old
place. Aloha to everyone.
EXOS VINCENT I have always
favored the appointment of a motor
cycle officer.
W. STEWARD-Ye, I'm back
on Maui once more and I hope to
remain permanently this time.
I Rnto Botes. I
. . . '
A Cadillac cur, 1913 model, was
completely victorious recently in -a
unique contest at Riverside, Cul,
a coasting event in which 32 cars,
representing 21 different makes,
were entered and which was watch
ed by 7,00!) people. The ears were
sent down a grade with power shut
off, gravity supplying the energy.
Besides piovidng Riveiside and at
tractive holiday and considerable
excitement, the contest had its value
from the standpoint of motor car
demonstration and comparison be
cause, all other things being equal,
lack of friction is the factor that en
ables a ear to win "itch a emit' st, or,
in other words, to "roll" the farth
est.
The victorious Cadillac captured
two prizes, winning the Grand Prize,
or A. X. Sweet cup, for coasting the
greatest distance, irrespective of
class, and also the "Buil Moose"
cup, or first prize in its class. Thus
it was victorious over all ears regard
less of weight, some cars being
heavierand sonic lighter, the weights
ranging from 17U0 to J KM) pounds
"The third annual convention of
the Cadillac motor car dealers,
which closed Friday, December
13th, was the most successful we
have ever held," said Sales Mana
ger E. V. Howard at the close of
the session. "A large; proportion
of our dealers were here and ex
pressed themselves as more than
satisfied with the benefits derived
Many interesting and instructive
addresses were delivered bearing
upon various phases of the retail
motor car business. The value of
service to the motor car user was
the subj"ct of emphasis all along
the line because with the approach
of perfection in manufacture the
motorist is more and more appre
ciative; of close personal attention
M WHEN IT IS TIME TO
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Re-Tire
DO NOT FORGET THAT WE CARRY
THE FAMOUS
COME IN AND LOOK AT OUR STOCK
OF
AUTOMOBILE SUPPLIES
Recently Received.
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Maui Dry Goods & Grocery Company, Ltd. 1
W
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Sftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftig
tenderedViim after he has purchased
his car. When he buvs an auto
mobile that dominates its class he
takes for granted a high standard
of quality and efficiency. The
Cadillac dealers in their gathering
laid stress on the point that in ad
dition to what lie expects lie must
be given just as high a grade of
active, co-operative seivice while
the car is in use.
There were over 200 dealers at
the Cadillac convention. It has
beVn figured out that the average
distance traveled by these dealers
was 500 miles apiece, or a total of
100,000 miles. This is equal to
four times around the gljbe-
"With regard to our liusiness in
motor cars, that is the carriages
in distinction from trucks, our
sales for this time of year are today
the greatest in our history, at this
season. We have upwards of 500
unfilled orders to customers on the
books of the company. That does
not mean to dealers, but sold direct
ly to users."
"The general business of the
t
country, according to all informa
tion that comes to me, was never
better: never apparently in a more
sound condition, nor ever before of
a greater volume."
"This condition prevailing today,
with a certainty of coming democra
tic administration, is, I state, pecu
liar and absolutely not in accord
with similar records in the past."
"We are writing new history."
Hawaiian Island Oahu Island -South
side Honolulu Harbor... Channel Light
No. 5- a fixed white len9-lnntern light
supported on a pile, has been carried
away. Until such time as it is replaced
a 2d. class can buoy will be substituted
in its stead from which a white hand
lantern will be exhibited nightly. C.
& G. S. Chart 4116, 4109 4100. List of
Iiuoys, etc., 19th District, I911, p. 12.
Light List, Pacific Coast, p. 95, No. 575.
liy Order of the Commissioner of Light
house: A. K. ARLEDGR,
Inspector, 19th Lighthouse District.
New Officers
Installed
On December 27 the Masonic
Lodge Maui, No. 984, installed its
officers for the year 1913. The
full lodge attended and the follow
ing officers were installed: Senior
Warden, E. It. Bevins; Junior War
den, Ben Williams; Treasurer, D.
C. Lindsay; Seoetary, C. E. Cope-
land; Senior Deacon, C. C. Camp
bell; Junior Deacon, II, K. Dun
can; Tyler, W. F. J. Dale.
Pine Rains
Have Fallen
Good rains have fallen right
alone" the coast of Maui. liana re
ports a fire fall, and the other sta
tions froin that place into Wailuku.
also report rain.
Wailuku had a good soaking
during the week, and the rain has
been pretty general.
The roads genendly are in good
shape that is where they are
macadamized. Some of the "dirt"
roads up country have not been
improved by the rains.
Hawaiian Island Maui Island North
east shore -1'auwela Point Light, re
ported extinguished, will be relighted as
soon as practicable. C. & G. S. Charts
41 16. 4100. Light List, Pacific Coast
1912, p. 9d, No. 561 a. Iiuoy List, etc.,
t9th District, 191 1, p. 9.
ALOHA LODGE NO. 3 KMGHT8
OF PYTHIAS.
Regular mediums will be held at the
Knights of Pythias Hail, Wailuku, on the
second and fourth Saturdays of each
month.
All visiting members are cordially in
vited to attend
C. HANSHN, C. C.
ARTHl'U MOTS. K. R. & S.
LODGE MAL I, No. 984. A. F. & A. M
HARNESSING THE MISSISSIPPI.
To make land for a great union
station, St. Paul is to change the
course of the Mississippi. As") if
that were not enough,' the people
are going to make the Father of
Waters get down to hard work. A
great dam is to be built, and the
power generated is to be employed
to light Minneapolis and a- thou
sand and one industries in and
alxwt the twin cities, even to
maintaining an even temperature
in the mushroom cavers in the cliffs
of St. Paul.
Slated niefung will be held at
Masonic Hail, Kahului, on Uie first
Saturday nigi.t of ,.at.h month at 7.30
P. M.
Visiting bi e.iii en are cordially in
vited to attend
w. w. wkscoAtt, r. v. m.
C. K. (HI ELAND,
t f Secretary
Maui Hotel, Wai'uku,
Jan. 1st, 1913.
I will be nt
PAIA -:- Jan. 61H -:- Jan. 18th'
H'AILUKU -:- Jan. j ,Ui .:. Jan. 25th
I VQ'i."R :- Jan.::th : Feb. 1st
Those suffering frm their teeth
woi Id do well to make an early
appointment.
DR RUSSELL,
DENTIST.,
REASON BLC TE v,s-R I tl Bi t '
WOHK-PERI ICT AM TARV MITHOill

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