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The Maui news. (Wailuku, Maui, H.I.) 1900-current, January 11, 1913, Image 6

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82014689/1913-01-11/ed-1/seq-6/

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G
MAUI NEWS, STURDAY, JANUARY 11, 1913.
XL U. p. ITn H4cv
Korh press.
MARKET TRAVELING.
She walked in and out of tin
apartment at all hours with a suit
case. Slip must do a lot of travel
in:, the neighbors thought, hut her
trips were only from the Ilariem
flat to a market where the prices
make the high cost of living look
just a hit ashamed. Nobody in the
house except her family knew what
she was carrying in that mysterious
grip, until one day it came open and
out rolled a steak, some vegetables
and other good things to eat.
PENALTY OF REFORM.
The old sexton of a Scotch village
took the pledge. At a temperance
meeting he told his "experience."
"I never thought to tell ye that for
a whole month I have not touched
a drap of anything, but I've saved
up enough to buy me a braw oak
collin wi' braw handles and brass
nails and if I am a teetotaler for
another month I shall be wantiu'
it!"
WOMAN'S WORK FOR HORSES.
Feminine sympathy and feminine
faith 1 lave done much to better the
living and working conditions of
horses in New York. One of the
most notable instances of indivi
dual effort in this direction is Mrs.
Jacob M. Ehrlieh. She is the
founder and principal supporter of
the Horse Aid Society and of the
Paving Improvement League, with
headquarters at No. 3l West Forti
eth street. Mrs. Elirlich is wealthy,
but she spends the greater part of
every day hard at work at her
Fortielh street ollices and in going
to the relief of sufTsring dumb ani
mals in various parts of the city.
Her ofliee is in an old brownstone
house. The vacant space in the
fireplace of the drawing room is
piled full of chain shoes in winter
to keep horses from slipping on the
icy pavements. Any driver who
will may get enough for his team if
he will ask. In cases about the
room are all sorts of medical and
surgical remedies and appliances.
FIRST AID BY MOTOR.
Mrs. Ehrlieh has a big, hand
some motor car, and carries in this
a full set of first aid appliances.
She also maintains a big horse am
bulance. She follows the ambul
ance in her car on every trip and
gives personal aid to the veterinary
in charge. Her efforts extend even
further than getting the horse on
its feet. She has established cheap
model stables in several parts of the
city "Mills Hotels for Horses,"
she calls them. There horses that
are weak or ill are brought back to
health and strength. When the
owner is poor Mrs. Ehrlieh lends
him one of her own horses until his
animal is able to go to work once
more.
STRAY CATS PICKED UP.
Mrs. Ehrlieh is no less mindful
of cats and dogs than of horses.
No matter if she is on her way to
the opeia or the theatre in the
evening, if she sees a hungry or
suffering cat or dog she has her car
stopped at once and takes it in.
There are a number of places be
tween her home up town and the
distiict where her olliee is where
she has arranged with the janitors
to take care of any animals she may
leave with them. She sends for
them the next morning ami has
them eared for.
FAVORS FROM THE PUBLIC.
The ownt-r of this traveling musi
cal organization is a white-haired
Italian with opera manners.
Wherever he goes he gets a shower
of coin, and with nearly every
piece of money is a lump of sugar
or a carrot or some other delicacy
for the mule. Even the mule's
supply of ribbons is furnished by
admirers along the route.
CABARET SHOW MEALS.
"These here cabaret shows are all
right for a person on a diet,'' says
Uncle Hiram, in from the country,
but when I m out for a reg'lar
meal I d ruther have all the money
they're sopping up from me put in
the food than for the most of it to
be paid out to entertain me into
nut noticing how little real nourish
ment I'm getting for my money in
the way of something I kin eat."
BANDITS STILL ON TIIF. JOB.
"W here are the old-time bandits
'Your money or your life!' "n
correspondent from the West writes
Tip. Uight here in New York.
Go to any Nmas bazaar and see for
yourself. And they're just as pic
turesquely bloodthirsty and determ
ined as ever for you to have what
they want you to have, whether you
want it or not. It's your money
or your life, hut you can deed your
purchase back to the bazaar if you
don't want it. This is a free coun
try. Nobody compels you to take
it home.
CAT'S CARIi OF A DEAF MUTE.
In an apartment house in West
1 loth street, near Riverside Drive,
lives a girl who has been deaf and
dumb from birth. She and her
ni( ther and their cat occupy the
apartment. If it were not for the
eat the mother never could leave
her daughter alone in the apart
ment. The cat is a big black fel
low, and has been the girl's con-
taut companion for the last eleven
years. When the cat and the girl
are alone and the doorbell rings or
the dumbwaiter hu.zer sounds the
cat springs to his feet and hounds
over to the side of bis mistress.
He stretches up and pulls at her
skirt. He docs not mew, for he
seems to know that she cannot hear
him. He tugs at her dress until
sue nonces mm, ana wiien no Das
attracted her attention trots over to
the entrance of the apartment or to
the dumbwaiter door. There he
stands on guard, every sense alert
for the girl's aid and protection.
WATCHFUL OF STRANGERS.
The cat who is guardian of the
girl knows all the friends of the
family and if one of them appears
at the door he walks off to his
favorite corner and resumes his nap.
If it is some one that he is not sure
of, however, he arches his back and
spits cat-fashion, making himself
Appear as terrible as possible.
When the mother is at home and
he is oil duty this cat asks to be let
out into the hall and waits at the
levator to be taken down to the
street entrance. The West Indian
elevator and hall boys treat him
with great awe and respect, lie
sits sunning himself in the entrance
for an hour or so. and then goes
over to the elevator and mews his
request to be taken up-stairs.
A COW PI NCHLU'S PRIZE PLAY.
John Frederick JJallard, whose
comedy received the Craig dramatic
prize at Harvard, was two years ago
cow punching on the Western plains.
lie spent two years rounding up cat
tle and was doing other cowboy
stunts when he was told of the Mc
Dowell dramatic fellowship at Har
vard. Herding his cattle by day and
playwriting by night, he just failed
of winning the scholarship. Mr. Mc
Dowell and Professor Baker, how
ever, made arrangements which
landed him in Cambridge. llallard
is a graduate of the University of
Nebraska and has worksd for two
years as a stage hand at the Illinois
Theatre and (irand Opera House,
Chicago. His prize-winning play,
"Believe Me Xantippc," will have
professional production in Boston
during the Christmas holidays.
BALD IIKADS AFTtR CHINA
"Old blue" and historical china
may never have been considered as
rivals to the ballet or the chorus in
the esteem of the tired business
man, but they are. There never
is an auction sale of these two kinds
of china in the evening that the
gallery where the auction is held is
not well filled with bald-headed
men keen on the hunt for the bar
gains. And they carry out the
ancient adjuration "bald head go
up" literally, for they fight to the
last extremity to get some old piece
of china they want to add to their
collections.
WORTH NAMING.
There is a line nautical llavor
about the name of a firm of lawyers
down town that styles itself Wing
it Wing.
CAT LECTURES FOR LONDON.
When Anthony II. Kuwer used to
act as auctioneer at the annual sales
of the American Fakirs in the rooms
of the Art Students' League every
body who heard him and saw him
thought the Weber and Fields com
pany would be his destination after
he left the art school. lie took up,
of all things, the making of book
plates instead. But he couldn't stop
fun producing or drawing pictures
that make every one grin as hard as
his amateur auctioneer's antics, pat
ter and gags did, and now he is
abroad lecturing about eats, making
pictures of them while lie talks and
amuses the simple-minded Lon
doners as much as he used to his
New York audiences when he was a
youthful Boliiniian making "atmos
phere" m West Fifty-seventh street.
BULLET TRAVELS IN MAN.
Bullets sometimes travel in strang
est ways once they get into the hu
man body. Ail unusual case is re
ported by Dr. li. Buliesch. A young
fellow shot himself in the heart with
a cheap pistol of rather small calibre,
but fell more pain in his leg than in
his breast Gangrene of the leg set
in, but cure followed at last after
the leg was cut oil'. Although the
bullet went right into the big blood
chamber of the heart's very centre,
strange to say, the heart itself gave
no trouble. The bullet stopped for
a brief second inside the heart, the
circulating blood stream immediate
ly carrying the bullet out of the
heart into the great blood vessel ol
the trunk and on to the big artery in
the leg. There the bullet stopped,
something like a lish from the re
servoir getting into a small water
pipe and clogging il.
PUTTING 'I HE BOSS OUT.
A recent addition to the editorial
stall' of the Salt Lake IIorald-Kepuij-lican
went into his olliee one after
noon to go to work. Two men who
in appearance resembled a couple of
prosperous farmers were comforta
bly seated there and deeply interest
ed in a discussion. "Sorry to dis
turb you, but I have to go to work,''
u marked the energetic editor. "Ail
light," answered the men as they
stepped across the ball and into the
private olliee of tlie general manager.
"Those fellows have a lot of nerve,"
remarked the editor Ij one of the
reporters. les, was the reply;
"the taller of the two Is Senator
Sniool and the other is Ivl Callistcr.
'J lay only own this newspapir.''
HIGH ART SURGERY.
One battle yell is not In. in Tur
key, but comes of a New Orleans
surgeon charging ?l),UUU lor slash
ing the appendix out of a million-,
i i re. High art comes high. Do on
know there are fewer hib c. ass sur
geons than high-class pianists, fid
dlers, sculptors, paintei'K? Surgery
is high art if there is such thing as
high art. While the surgeon's fin
ger play with life and death is ac
companied not with the solemn
rumbles of the war drum nor the
inspiriting trips and trills of the
Greek pi;,e, yet it is brain and hand
art just as much so as Joachim or
Ole Bull on the fiddle.
LUXURY FOR THE RICH.
When a rich man disports in
ni'isic, paintings and marbles he
pays for the luxury. When the big
rich gets cut for bis life he pays
big. Surgery is not exactly luxury,
but, like luxury and art, it is nour
ished liy wealth. There are not
moii' than 100 first-class appendix
surgeons in the world, ami they
could not attend to one one-hundredth
of the cases if they operated
night and day steadily without ever
stopping to eat, drink or smoke.
But why are there not more first
class surgeons? Because few are
qualified to learn. Why an- there
not more first-class tiddlers?
4
Huto 1Motcs.
.
Quail hunting by motor car is the
latest novelty for sportsmen, and,
judging from the enthusiastic reports
from Texas, this methods of getting
a full bag not only adds much to
the comfort and pleasure of the
sport, but also has its practical
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Maui Dry Goods & Grocery Company,Ltd.
St
The Choicest Butter
That Gomes to This IViarket
AT YOUR GROCERS
FRESH SHIPMENT BY EVERY STEAMER
values.
ljceently I Joy M linger, of ha'las,
Texas, aceonipanisd by friends,
made a hunting trip to West Texas
using his Cadillac touring car not
oniy to get to the hunting grounds,
but actually employing the car in
the field. Mr. Muuger and his
party made the trip in his car
overland to liig Springs and drove
thence about (iO miles north.
"Automobile hunting is the great
est sport in the world," Mr- Muu
ger said on his return to Dallas.
"We shot fioni the car nearly all
time and the Cadillac took nie near
ly any place I wanted to go. In
fact some of the places we pulled
through would have been impassable
for a horse and "buggy."
The M linger party bagged nearly
IS TIME TO
e-Tire
FORGET ITHAT 'WE
IN AND LOOK AT OUR
OK
AUTOMOBILE SUPPLIES
Recently Received.
as much game as the law allows.
Bluecpiail were killed in large num
bers and the duck hunting near
tlail, Texas, where the nights were
spent, was declared all a hunter
could wish for.
LODGE MAUI, No. 084. A. H. & V. M
Slated ineeiiiifs will be held al
Masonic Hall, Katiului, on Urn first
Saturday night of each inonlh ut 7 .31)
1. M.
Visiting brethren are cordially in
viied to attend.
W. W. WKSCOATT, R. W M.
C. E. COPKLAND,
t.f Secretary
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ALOHA LODGE NO. 3 KNIGHTS
OH PYTHIA8.
Regular meetings will be held at the
Kuights of Pythias Hail, Wailuku, ou the
second and fourth Saturdays of each
uiouth.
All visiting members are cordially in
vited to attend
C. HA NSEN, C. C.
ARTHUR BUTTS. K. R. & S.
Notice of Annual Meeting.
The Regular Annual Meeting of the
Stockholders of the Baldwin National
Hank, will be held at its Bunking House
in Kahului, Maui, T. II. on Tuesday,
Jauuury 14th, 1913, at 10 A. M.
D. C. LINDSAY,
Cashier.
Dec. 21, 28, Jan. 4, 11.

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