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The national Republican. (Washington, D.C.) 1860-1862, December 11, 1860, Image 3

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LOCAL NEWS.
CITY COUNCILS.
A Spicy Time The $260 Military Appropria
tion Hill A Muss.
Board of Aldermen. Vico President Captain
William W. Moore In the chair.
Several hills were received from the Mayor,
! L L.J I -.1 !.-J t 1.1 I '
wuicu nau own Buoraiueu lur uis
Cant. C. W. C. Dunnlncton Introduced a bill
which he thought required Immediate action,
and therefore moved that there be four-way fire
plug! near Second street east and Pennsylvania
nvenae. The bill, on its third reading, passed
unanimously.
Mr. Thomas J. Fisher introduced a bill au
thorizing curb stones to be set in front of squares
number one hundred and twenty-six and one
hundred and sixty-three, which passed without
discussion.
Mr. Joseph F. Drown reported back a bill In
reference to the collection of taxes in arrearage,
which bill had been presented to the corpora
tion attorney for his opinion ; and, after some
amendments in accordance with such opinion,
he, in behalf of the committee, respectfully-returned
the same.
Messrs. Brown and Ward entered into some
discussion as to how the property holders should
.be notified of the sale ol. their property for
taxes in what way published.
Mr. Fisher-said that many persons have prop
erty sold for taxes, knowing the fact at the time,
not being able to raise the money at the time,
yet they redeem it, within the two years pre
scribed by law.
Mr. Ward said there are parties In this city
who desire their property sold for taxes, in order
thereby to secure a better title, and sometimes
permit it to be sold several times for that pur
pose. The bill was then read as amended, and
passed.
Mr. George A. Bohrer moved that the board
meet in future at five o'clock, instead of half
past seven. Laid over.
- Several bills fro 21 the lower board were re
ported, and referred to their appropriate com
mittees. On motion of Mr. Fisher, the special order of
the evening was taken up, namely, a bill in re
lation to the uniting of the cities of Washington
and Georgetown, lhe proposition from George
town contained a provision for two wards.
Mr. William II. Ward moved that it be so
amended as to read " one ward."
This elicited considerable discussion as to the
propriety of an amendment, as it was merely a
proposition from Georgetown, and must be sub
mitted to our people before any validity can be
given to it.
It was thought it should be simply courteously
received, and let the people decide what they
desire.
Mr. Clark moved that the proposition be laid
on the table for the present, which motion was
carried.
On motion, the board adjourned.
Common Council. Board met at the usual
hour, and was called to order by the President.
Several members were absent.
A communication was received from the
Mayor in relation to approving an act for the
relief of the Western Hoso Company) also, in
relation to a nuisance in the Sixth Ward.
Mr. Rnssell introduced an act to repair a
gravel foot-walk in the Sixth Ward ; passed.
Mr. Jones moved that the Mayor be request
ed to return to this Board the bill in relation
to the improvement of Market space, as several
material errors occur in it ; agreed to.
Mr. Mulloy asked leave to offer a petition of
Itezin Elliott; referred to the Committee on
Claims.
Bills from the Board of Aldermen :
Bill for gravelling Tenth street west, from L
to N north j referred to Committee on improve
ments. Bill authorizing a curb to bo set on the west
front of square 352 ; referred to Committee on
Improvements.
Bill for eravelline Second street west, from
G street south to Virginia avenue ; referred to
Committee on Improvements.
Bill for the repair of the Council Chamber;
referred to the Committee of Conference on
the disagreeing votes of the two Boards.
The 1250 Military Appropriation. The bill
returned to this Board for the benefit of the
volunteer militia was then taken up.
Mr. Jones moved to postpone the bill till
next Monday ; not agreed to.
Mr. Mead moved to reconsider the vote taken
by this Board ; he wanted to put the bill fairly
before the Board upon its own merits. He
was opposed to the bill, however.
Mr. Borrows hoped they would wait for a
full Board before a vote should be taken. If
any encouragement could be given to our Dis
trict military, it ought to be done. He had un
derstood that the whole volunteer system of
this city was supported principally by a few
men probably not more than thirty. A good
deal of alarm is felt at this time in this imme
diate vicinity. If any real difficulty occurred,
we would then see how much we needed the
services of this volunteer militia. For his part,
be thought every man ought to be compelled
to bear arms. There was hardly a city in the
United States which did not give support to
their volunteer militia. At the time of the
Harper's Ferry afTair, the military had to pay
even the gas bill at the Armory. There was
no set of men who performed more real service
f;ratia. Though they all have their private pol
itical opinions, yet no party influence is ever
brought to bear with them ; they were reliable.
Mr. Jones was in favor of a postponement ;
he wanted to see a full meeting.
Mr. Mead was perfectly willing. He had
been charged with opposing the bill because
of a partiality for a company which did not
Eropose to make use of the Armory. With
im, it was a matter of principle. The cor
poration ought not to pay the expenses of a
military. For purposes of protection, the po
lice force was enough.
Mr. Wilson observed that this was a Govern
ment building, and they had merely failed to
appropriate money for this purpose. The cor
poration had appropriated $2,500 for a fence
around Judiciary square, why not do the same
thing now ? Some of the companies had been
compelled to sponge on othere to pay for the
gas.
The question was then taken on the recon
sideration of the bill, and it was agreed to
yeas 12, nays 5.
Mr. Borrows then remarked that if this bill
wero put to a vote of the citizens, it would be
carried two to one particularly if the ladies
were allowed to vote.
Mr. Easby gave the reasons why he should
vote against the hill. He was unwilling to
give away money in the manner propositi. He
acknowledged that the military had done much,
and ought to he paid. Let them bring in a
bill. He would then be in favor of instructing
the Committee on Polico to report a bill to re
munerate them for the services they bad ren
dered. Let it come in as a claim.
He then moved to refer the whole matter to
the Committee on Police, and that they be in
structed to report a bill for $50, or as much as
necessary, for the services of the military at
the time of the Harper's Ferry raid.
Mr. Jones thought they bad better wait till
the claim was made.
Mr. Chapin suggested that Mr. Easbv's idea
might be obtained by voting for the bill.
Mr. Easby was aware that the object could be
accomplished by the enemies of the bill voting
with the friends of the bill. But he was op
posed to the principle Involved. He was per
fectly willing to pay any reasonable amount for
the services they had rendered. The principle
of our Government was based upon the strength
and virtue of the people. Twenty five years ago, a
lady could walk from the Navy Yard to George
town at midnight, without fear of molestation.
It was'not so now. If the police was not suf
ficient for purposes of protection the Booner
they knew it the better. If we contribute money,
we should know why we contribute. If we take
$250 now, who can say we may not at some time
he called upon to contribute $5,000 7 He hoped
the occasion would never arrive when the mili
tary would have to be called out ; we had better
go back to despotism. If they have rendered
services, they should not be too proud to send
in their bill.
Mr. Jones moved to postpone till next Mon
day. Mr. Easby wanted his bill to be referred.
Mr. Given would vole against any postpone-"
ment whatever, and would warn his friends
against the parliamentary tactics of tho oppo
nents of the bill. He thought tho bill possessed
real merit It was as little as they could do to
givethis small amount, and let all who desirdd
receive the benefit of it. We give this appro
priation as an auxiliary police power. The
military were just as meritorious aa the police,
and should receive encouragement.
Mr. Borrows observed that the military were
not properly organized, and could not be
speedily called out. He cited a number of
cases in which it might become necessary to
call out the military. If there had been a
proper District military here, there would never
have been any necessity for calling out Gov
ernment troops for shooting down our own citi
zens. He would have seen the city deluged
before he would have called out United States
marines to shoot down American citizens. He
honed it would never be done again.
The question was then taken on the motion
to postpone, and lost yeas 7, nays 10.
Mr. Jones observed, that reference had been
made to the stand of colors which had been
presented to the New York seventh regiment.
That vote was caused by the circumstances of
the case, which all then admitted to be just
and proper. He cared nothing for precedents.
It was under the pressure of patticular cir
cumstances that men act ; and so in the case
referred to. We had a good police force ; that
was enough. This hill was opposed to the in
terests of the people. It would lead to conse
quences which would drain the treasury of tho
city. There was no authority in the city char
ter to justify any such expenditure. There
was no law which authorized the Mayor to call
oat the military. There was neither precedent
nor authority lor it; nor was it expedient at
this time. We were in the midst of a storm ;
the clouds were gathering ; let us take in sail.
We ought not to embark in any new expendi
tures at this time. If the Armory was shut up
entirely, our interests would not be damaged.
He hoped the Board would not reverse its ac
tion. He then moved to adjourn; lost yeas 8,
nays 9.
Mr. Powell remarked that the military paid
a large part of the tax themselves. They de
serve encouragement. He was in favor of the
bill.
Mr. Clark moved that the words, " Columbian
Armory" be stricken out, and the words, "that
it be equally divided between every military
company in. the city," be inserted. He was
not opposed to the bill in toto.
Mr. Lammond thought that military compa
nies were a great evil in a community. Many
a mother had bad cause to weep over a son
who had been led into habits of intemperance
by these military companies. He was opposed
to the bill.
Mr. Mulloy moved tho previous question on
Mr. Clark's amendment.
The question was taken, and the amendment
was lost.
The question then recurred on Mr. Easby's
motion, which was als6 lost yeas 8, nays 9.
Mr. Jones moved to adjourn ; lost-'yeas 8,
nays 9.
Mr. Easby then gave notice of his intention
to call up this bill on Monday night next.
The bill was then ordered to be read a third
time yeas 9, nays 8.
Mr. Jones moved to adjourn ; lost yeas 8,
nays 9.
The question was then taken on the passage
of the bill yeas II, nays 6 and it was passed.
Mr. Clark moved to adjourn ; lost yeas 8,
nays 9.
Mr. Mulloy moved a reconsideration, and Mr.
Robertson moved to lay that motion 011 the
table.
Mr. Easby thought it was not in order, as he
had himself given notice of an intention to call
the bill up again at the next meeting.
The President decided that it was in order.
Mr. Easby appealed from the decision of the
Chair.
The question was taken on the appeal, and
the President was sustained yeas 10, nays G.
Mr. Jones moved to adjourn, lost yeas 7,
nays 9.
Mr. Easby then remarked, that as several
members who were known to be opposed to the
bill had left the Chamber, he did not believe
that the members in favor of this bill had act
ed in an honorable manner in pressing it to a
vote.
Mr. Mulloy wished to know if the gentleman
referred to him.
Mr. Easby replied that he certainly did.
Mr. Mulloy here seized a heavy cane which
was near at hand, and rushed at Mr. Easby,
holding the cane over the head of the latter
gentleman, as if about to strike. Several mem
bers who were near at hand caught hold of Mr.
Mulloy, and pulled him away Mr. Easby
standing all tho time, cool and collected, as if
nothing had happened.
Tho President shouted to members to preserve
order, and for a time there was a scene of much
confusion Mr. Jones calling on .the Board
to adjourn.
Order being restored, Mr. Easby made an
explanation, stating that he had intended no
insult whatever. If gentlemen on the opposite
side would explain their cohduct in relation to
the matter, no one would be willing to take back
any implied reflections quicker than himself.
But if gentlemen could not discuss questions
without having bludgeons thrust at their heads,
or daggers pointed at their hearts, they had
better disband. As for himself, he felt no ill
will whatever to any man. He felt confident,
when his friend had time to reflect, he would
see his own error. He hoped all would retire
from the Hall in good spirits.
Mr. Mulloy desired to say that there was no
member in this Board who more disliked a
harsh feeling than himself. He had under
stood the gentleman to say that those who had
acted in the majority had not acted in good
faith, or as gentlemen should act. He asked
pardon of the Board for his action, which had
been hasty. The fault had been with tho head,
and not with the heart.
Mr. Jones moved to adjourn, lost yeas 8,
nays 8.
The question on the motion to lay on the
table the motion to reconsider was then taken
yeas 8, nays 2. There was no quorum.
The Board then found itself compelled to
adjourn.
NATIOXAt, UKIOH PlUTER MEETIKO CoKVES-
tion. Quite a number of the delegates arrived
last night, and, wo believe, a large number to
day, to attend its sessions, which commence
this evening at the Four-and-a-half street Pres
byterian Church.
SuAMEroL. Yesterday afternoon, Mr. John
Darby, a quiet citizen residing on the corner
of Fifth and Washington streets, in the Fourth
tVnrn. npnrtniy gnmalMnn v!1.a .i.aln.1 1.1a
door, opened it to find out the cause, when he
wus n.rucK on me neaa wild a large stone,
which inflicted a very large and painful wound.
The person who threw the stone made his
escape.
Carter's Wiiinr Schooner Motive, Cap
tain Malar, of Philadelphia, arrived this morn
ing, with seventy-five tons of coal, consigned to
Terence Drury.
Criminal Coort. The court met at tho
usual hour this morning, but, no cases being
ready, the jury were discharged until to-morrow.
Central Guard Hodse. Before Justice
Thompson, John McDonald, alias John Mc
Pherson, was brought in, charged with being
drunk and disorderly. He was sent to Mr.
Queen's palace for ninety days.
Sarah Brown, for passing her time in the
same manner, and adding the art of swearing
to her accomplishments, was also sent to the
same domicil for sixty days.
Patrick Morrisey came in for lodgings, but
became very disorderly during the night, and,
for the benefit of example, was sent down for
thirty days, after receiving a lecture from the
magistrate.
Police Matters. Before Justice Donn.K
woman, very drunk, was arrested by Officer Car
ter. She refused to give her name, and received
the beautiful cognomen of Mary Drunk, with a
certificate for ninety days board in the countv
jail.
James Urady and David Harry were arrested
by Officers Busher and Barron for stealing a
carpet bag, vest, pair of shoes, and pair of scis
sors. They were committed to jail for court.
Before Justice Barnaclo. David Dixon was
arrested by Officer Ginnity for throwing stones
and beiug noisy and profane, and fined $3.94.
Flunkeyism. Mr. Editor: Why is it that,
on all public occasions, our "authorities" mu
nicipal and otherw'ise, are allowed to jostle
and molest our citizens as- they do 7 Courtesy
seems to be a thing entirely unknown to them.
Is the quiet and respectable citizen to be al
ways thus treated by those who are appointed
as the "guardians of the peace," as your local
editor sarcastically observes? I noticed an
example of this on Friday last, in front of the
President's House, when the Putnam Phalanx
were about to be reviewed by the President.
A very old and infirm gentleman who had
been pushed from the curb by the pressure of
the crowd behind him, aud wns trying to get
back to his place again, was roughly seizedljy
one of these " flunkies," violently pushed back,
and would have fallen to tho ground had it not
been for a gentleman by bis side, who very
kindly caught him in his arms. When will
this "flunkeyism" cease 7 A Citizen.
We might give our correspondent a few
hints on this subject, but at present we prefer
simply to publish his protest.
communicated.
I send you a local item which may be of
somo interest to the people of Washington, as
few, if any, are aware how the statue of Jef
forson was placed where it now stands. I do
this, as I am the only survivor of those who
were present on that occasion1. You must be
aware that this beautiful statue was presented
to Congress by Lieut. Levy, of the United States
navy j they were averse to accept any gifts,
and hence they ordered it to be taken from the
rotundo of the Capitol, where it was exhibited,
and to place it in the pnblio grounds without
making any appropriation for its removal.
Mr. James Maher, the then public gardener,
thought of selecting a site on the grounds of the
President's House. Having received permis
sion from President Tyler, ho bought the stones
for the pedestal, and three or four of his coun
trymen (Irish) engaged to cut the stone and to
build the pedestal. When finished, Captain
Easby offered his services to bring the statue
from the Capitol, and to place it where it now
graces the north front of the White House, in
one day. c.
ALEXANDRIA ITEMS.
Attempt to Pass Counterfeit Monet.
On Saturday evening last, a man named lloby
entered the establishment of S. GenzbirTg, on
Royal street, and attempted to pass two coun
terfeit five dollar notes purporting to be notes
oi me mormwestern uanK of Virginia. Ue
was anested and committed to jail tor court.
The Marshall House. This excellent
hotel was closed yesterday, and will remain so
for a short time, in order that some repairs may
be made. As soon as the repairs are completed,
the houso will again be opened by Mr. W. M.
Miller, the present proprietor.
We are glad to announce that the Rev.
Robert Nixon, whoso afflicted condition has ex-
I cited so much sympathy among our citizens, is
much improved in condition, and is now con
valescent. His children arrived here yesterday
) afternoon.
I Rev. B. Villagar, Provincial of the Society
i of Jesus for the Province of Maryland, preached
i an eloquent sermon at at. Mary s cuurcn Sun
' day, to a Inrgo congregation.
Military Parade. Yesterday afternoon,
the Mount Vernon Guards, Captain S. II. De
VAUgbn, made a dress parade. They turned
out with full numbers, and made a fine appear
ance. At night, they visited the ladies' (air at
tarepta Hall, which is being held for their
benefit.
Professor Anderson, the great Magician, is
performing at Liberty Hall.
The only Clothing Establishment that suits
tho times at the present period is Leopold
Oppenbeimer's, No. 300 Pennsylvania avenue,
between Ninth and Tenth streets. Virginia
money taken for goods. Give him a call.
UMVERSALIST SOCIETY.
An adjourned meeting of the. First Universal
ist Society of the city of Washington will be held
at Temperance Hall, on E street, on Wednesday
evening, December l.lh, at 7 o'clock, to hear
the report of the Committee on Constitution and
By-Laws, and to elect officers for the ensuing
year. The Committee appointed to procure a
place for holding public religious worship will
also be prepared to report. The friends of the
cause are invited to attend. dec 11 2t
JOHN LANGE,
Practical Chronometer, Clock, and
Watch-maker,
437 Seventh street, bet. O and II,
Informs his customers and the pub
lic in general, that he has just re
ceived a finn tnrt- nf rir.A P.i.ni
nilU Wn,UV .....-, ...u, fblgMGA, MIU UfcUCt
Watches; also, fine French Clucks, Jewelry,
4c. Attends promptly to the Repairing of fine
Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry, nor 20 lm
nnA ria.KnliAil 1 .ArR. T.OnlnA Timlnv .. . .1 .!.....
D. JT. BISHOP'S
American and European Newspaper, Magazine, Re
new, Periodical, and
CHEAP PUBLICATION DEPOT,
No. 210 Pennsylvania atenue, between Fourteenth
and Fifteenth streets, and at Newspaper Stand in
the JTaU of Wiltardf Motel
NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA, AND BAL
TIMORE DAILY PAPERS received on
day of publication, and for sale at Store, and it
the Newspaper Stand In Wlllards' Hotel, or will
be promptly delivered Immediately upon their
arrival at the residence of subscribers.
Boston Dally Papers received morning after
the day of pnb'lcatlon.
All the principal Weekly Newspapers, Monthly
Magazines, end Review!, recelred ai toon as
published, and for sale by single copies, or fur
nished to subscribers.
European Newspipcrs, Magazines, and Re
views, received 'mmedlately upon the arrival of
the steamer, and for sale at Store and Hotel, or
will be prBmotly delivered to subsirlbers.
All the new publication! of thj day received
and for sale as soon as published.
A complete assortment of Blank Books, Letter
and No'e Paper, Envelopes, Stationery, Fanjy
Articles, 4e. '
A superior quality of Playing Cards constant
ly on hand at lowest prices. nov 20 2w
E. WHEELER,
AOI.1T rOR THE SALE or AMERICAN AND rOBEIOX
HARDWARE.
Ai. 07 Louisiana av., opposite Bank of Washington.
BAR, Sheet, and Hoop Iron; Horse-shoe Iron,
Norway Nail Rods, Burden's Patent Horse
flhneR. TTnran.BhnM Valla . ? QV... .-.I ..It-
1 ---.. .uuv ..(...a , imt, uueu, auu OU-
ter Steel j Anvils, Bellows, and Vices ; Sheet
Ing Tin; Dright Tin of all kinds; Block Tin,
Carriage Bows and Curtain Canvas, Hubs,
,.w.v.,i.llu,, auu nAico, uuun.Bf ninge j, ocrews.
NaHh. rtrnAm Hah WUia ., n.J n..li
Planes, Saws, Chisels, Files, Boring and Mortice
M.uwico, auu unuuBiuneB, Axes, onoveii.opaaes.
Bakes, Forks, Ac. '
DEPOT FOR PLANT'S NKW PATENT
BLIND HINGE.
All at the lowest prices for Cash, or to punc
tual customers on short credit. nor 26
Wines, Brandies. &c.
ChftlRn Old Marlftlr TinfF fln-J Ql...
Old LD Port, Fine Table Madeira,
Uld Oarasquedo Sherry, Superior Brandies,
Fine Old India Madeira, (a very Buperfor article,
not usually found In this market.)
Curaco, Maraschlo,
Anuesette, Absynthe,
Congress Water. For sale low by
BROWNING & KEATING,
353 Penn. avenue, near Sixth street.
FRESH TEAS.
I AM receiving a lot of Green and Black TEAS,
amonir which are soma of nit find irrnrtm
can be bad, to which I invite the attention of all
lovers of choice Oreen and Black Teas.
JESSE B. WILSON,
327 Pa. av., between Sixth and Seventh
nov 20 streets, south side.
BOOKBINDING.
"1EORGE P. GOFF,
Vj
Bookbinder,
Corner Indiana avenue and Second street,
nov 20 Washington, D. O.
THE UNION WILL STAND, NO MATTER
WHO'S PRESIDENT 1
CONSEQUENTLY, I shall remain In Wash
ington, and continue to pursue my occu
pation of HOUSE, SIGN, and ORNAMENTAL
PAINTING. Gilding In all its branches. Old
Glazing promptly attended to. Fainting and
Ornamenting Cottage Furniture in the best
style. I also call attention to the Painting of
Roofs and Brick Walls.
All of the above I will do as cheap as the
cheapest. I therefore solicit the patronage of
my friends and fellow citizens of the Distilct.
Punctuality strictly observed, and work done in
the best manner.
You will please mind your stops, and stop at
M. T. PARKER'S Painting Establishment, No. 53 1
5311 53 II I Louisiana avenue, north side, be
tween Sixth and Seventh streets.
P. S. Signs put up free of charge, as usual.
nov 26
THE DEBATES OF CONGRESS.
THE Daily Globe, containing the proceedings
of the next session of Congress In newspa
per form, and the Congressional Globe and Ap
pendix, containing them In book form, revised
by the speakers, will be printed by me during
the session to commence on the third of next
December.
For one copy of the Daily Globe until the first
day of next April, $3 ; for one copy of the Con
gressional Globe and Appendix during the ses
sion, $3.
The Congnssional Globe and Appendix go free
through the malls.
No attention will be paid to any order, unless
the money accompany it.
JOHN C. RIVES.
Washington City, Oct. 18, 1860.
BOARDING,
By the Day, Week, or Month, uith or without
Rooms.
MRS. M. A. MILLS, having taken and fitted
up, in handsome style, that large and
pleasant house, No. 504 Pennsylvania avenue,
third door east of Third street, between the St.
Charles Hotel and Adams's Express Office, near
the Capitol and railroad depot, is now prepared
to accommodate Transient or Permanent Guests
with pleasant rooms, with or without Board,
nov 20
FOR RENT.
FURNISHED PARLOR .AND CHAMBERS,
(with gas,) with or without Board, at No.
388 North Capitol street, between B and O
streets. Board, one dollar per day.
nov 30 2w MRS. M. H. CARPENTER.
FURNISHED ROOMS.
MEMBERS OF CONGRESS and others In
want of nicely-furnished rooms, In suites or
single, can find them by appl) log at No. 30 Four-and-a-half
street, east side, between Pennsyl
vaniaavenue and Sixth streets, dec 10 lw
J. J. COOMBS,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law,
WILL practice in the local Courts of this
District, and in the Supreme Court and
Court of Claims. Office at the corner of Indi
ana avenue and Second street.
AMERICAN AND ENGLISH PICKLES,
SAUCES, &c.
CHOW CHOW, 1 .,,.
CHOW, 1
PIOCOLILLY, English.
White and Brown ONIONS, J
Sauces.
Worcestershire Sauce, Soyer's Sultana, Read
ing, Harvey, and Anchovy BAUCJ5S.
For sale by JE3SE B. WILSON,
327 Pa. av., between Sixth and Seventh
nor 26 streets, south side.
WOOD AND COAL
A COMPLETE assortment of the above now
on hand, of all kinds and sizes. Also a
splendid free-burning coal for cooking purposes,
a choice article.
Sawed and split wood also on band.
All those against secession and those In favor
of It will do well to give me a call. .
GEORGE BOGUS,
East side Ninth, bet D and K its.
dec 10 2w
LADD, WEBSTER, tc Co.'t
SEWING MACHINES
Are preferred above all others.
LADD, WEBSTER, k Co.'s
SEWING MACHINES
Are preferred above all others.
LADD, WEBSTER, Oo.'s
SEWING MACHINES
Are preferred above all others.
K5T For reasons why, see advertisement la
another column.TSa
AT JANNEY'S, 348 Pennsylvania avenue.
Young Ladles In attendance.
OERMAN1A HOTEL.
JOSEPH GERHARD'S, Germanla notel and
Restaurant, No. 346 O street, between Four-and-a-half
and Sixth streets.
Refreshments of all kinds. Also, the finest
Oysters, in every style; French, Hungarian,
Rhein, and Moselle Wines, Champagne, Bol
linger, Mumm, and Heldslck; with the best of
other Liquors. nor 30
BOARDING.
A CONGRESSIONAL MESS of four or five
can be accommodated at Mrs. GILBERT'S,
No. 548 Pennsylvania avenue, between First and
Second streets, Washington, D. O.
nov 28 tf
G. L. SHERIFF. J. B. DAWSON.
SHERIFF & DAW80N,
Dealers in Coal, Wood, lime, and Sand.
OFFICE south side of Pennsylvania avenue,
between Third and Four-and-a-half streets.
Wharf and Mill, Four-and-a half street and
Canal.
Every variety of Coal, Wood, Lime, and Sand,
of the best qualities, Including Store and Kin
dling Wood, constantly on hand. nov 26
HALL & WHITE,
MACHINISTS,
STEAM ENGINE BUILDERS,
AND
IRON RAILING MANUFACTURERS,
No. 23 Maine avenue, between Four-and-a-half
and Sixth streets, Washington, D. O. nor 26
MACKEREL.
InAVE In store large and fat No. 1 MACK
EREL. JESSE B. WILSON,
nov 26
FURS! FURS! I FURS!!!
I HAVE now ready for exhibition and sale my
stock of FURS, to which I Invite the atten
tion of the ladies. I have taken great care in
the selection, and feel assured they are unsur
passed in quality, style, and workmanship. The
assortment consists of all the most fashionable
kluds.
Hudson's Bay Sable,
Canada Sable,
Stone Marten,
Royal Ermine,
Russian Fitch,
Siberian Squirrel,,
and many other varieties.
FUR of all kinds for trimming,
A large assortment of CHILDREN'S FURS,
Also,
A fine variety of CARRIAGE ROBES.",
I solicit a call from the ladies, and every effort
will be made to please.
All Furs sold by their real names, and war-
r&Ufceu vo ue aa representee
JAMES Y. DAVIS,
nov 26
late Todd St Co.
A. HUBNER'S
DRESS-MAKING ESTABLISHMENT,
No. 500 Eleventh street, between Pennsylvania ave
nue and E street.
ALL kinds of Ladies' Garments, Dresses,
Cloaks, Mantelets, Sack Zouave Jackets,
ic, &c, cut and made to order, by every fash
ion plate, In the latest Paris and London styles,
at the shortest notice. dec 3 3m
BOOT AND 8U0E STORE,
No. 108 Bridge street, Georgetown, D. C.
THE subscriber has constantly on hand a
a large supply of BOOTS and SHOES, which
will be sold cheap. Persons would do well to
give him a call before purchasing elsewhere,
nov 20 GEORGE GRAY.
DR. DANIEL BREED,
Late Examiner in, the Patent Office,
SOLICITOR OF PATENTS AND CONSULT
ING CHEMIST,
Seventh street, corner of F, opposite Patent
Office, Washington, D. C.
DR. BREED prepares Papers and Drawings,
and attends to all business relative to pro
curing Patents In America and in Europe. He
will give especial attention to rejected applications
and other difficult cases. nov 26
LADIES' MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S
BOOTS, SHOES, AND GAITERS,
OF the best.quallty, and cheaper than can be
found elsewhere In the city.
An assortment of Ladles' Morocco Boots, from
75 cents to $1.50.
Gaiters, from 50 cents to $1.75.
Slippers, from 25 cents to $1.
No. 522 Pennsylvania avenue, between SecorJ
nov. 26 and Third streets.
Chartered by Congress.
THE MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE COM
PANY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
offers to the Property Owners of the District the
cheapest and as safe means of Insurance against
Loss by Fire, as any other Company, as will ap
dear by an examination of its principles.
The fact that all of the Insurance Companies
of the District are declaring large dividends to
their stockholders, at once shows the great
profit on their premiums, and the consequent
saving to persons insuring with this Company.
ULYSSES WARD, President.
CHARLES WILSON, Secretary.
MATHEW G. EMERY, Treasurer.
MABAQERS.
ULYSSES WARD, JOHN VAN RISWIOK,
JOHN DICKSON, MATHEW G. EMERY,
T. J. MAGRUDER, J. O. McKELDEN,
CHARLES WILSON.
Office adjoining (north) the Bank of Wash
ington, nov 26
LATEST, NEWS BY TELEGRAPH.
LOUISIANA AFFAIRS.
Baton Rouge. Dec. 10 The Legislature of
Louisiana met hero to-day, .
A resolution for organizing a militarr system
for the State was adopted.
A resolution for calling a State Conventloni
stating that circuni ances require determined
action on the part-of Louisiana, In consequence
of the election of Lincoln and the hostility of
the North towards the South, was Introduced
In the Senate, and referred to a joint committee.
In the same body, a bill organizing the milita
ry was also referred to a ioint committee.
A preamble and resolutions were offered,
taking the ground, that those States which
havo nullified the fugitive slave law have no
right to Tote for a President of the Union.
LATER FROMMEXICO..
New Orleans, Dec. 10. The steamship Ten
nessee, from Vera Cruz, on the 7th, brings ad
vices from the citv of Mexico to the 28th.
The Liberals had completely Invested the
city. There was, however, much distress among
them from a scarcity of supplies. The main
body of the Liberal army bad not coma np.
lhe Extraordinary from the capital on the
3d had not arrived at Vera Cruz when the
steamer left, by which news of a repulse or cap
ture of the city was expected.
Mr. McLane and the embassy were to return
home by the next steamer.
The French Minister advises -Miramon to
capitulate.
THE PHILADELPHIA UNION MEETING.
i-nuaacipnm, uec. 1 1. Mayor Henry issued
his proclamation this morning for a Union
meeting, to be held to-morrow noon. Bishop
Potter, of the Episcopal church, will open the
proceedings with prayer.
TnE BURGH DIVORCE CASE SETTLED.
Chicago, Dec. 11. The iury In the Burch
divorce case have rendered a verdict In favor
or Mrs. llurch. '
BOSTON MAYORALTY ELECTION.
Boston, Dec. 11 The official count of the
election jesterday gives Weightman, (Union,)
3,100 majority over Kimball, (Rep.)
CORRECTION.
New York, Dec 11. In the bank statement,
last night, the increase of deposits should have
been $1,361,448.
NEW YORK MARKETS.
New York, Dec. 11. Flour more active in
tho local trade; nothing exported. Wheat
dull j corn steady; provisions dull. Whisky
nominal, 17).
W. KRZYZANOWSKI,
Seventh Street Crockery Depot,
383 Seventh street, (under Dorsty's Motel,) " Sign
of the Plates," Washington, D. C.
CROCKERY, Glass, Cutlery, Coal-Oll Lamps,
Kerosene and Coal Oil, at lowest prices,
nov 20
FOR RENT.
A FINE PARLOR, on the first floor, and three
Chambers on the floor above, at No. 276
Pennsylvania avenue, two doors eatt of " Kirk
wood House." dec 1 tf
HAMS I HAMS 1 1
I" HAVE in store Maryland New HAMS, sugar
L cured, prepared for family use.
JESSE B. WILSON,
327 Pa. av., between Sixth and Seventh
nov 20. streets, south side.
DR. W. P. McCONNELL,
SURGEON DENTIST, continues his operations
at his old stand on Pennsylvania avenue,
one door east of the St. Charles Hotel, where he
will be pleased to have a call from all persons
desiring anything done In bis line of business,
nor 30
THOMAS K. GRAY,
FASHIONABLE TAILOR,
D street, between Seventh and Eighth streets,
nov 26 Washington, D. O.
G. W. GOODALL,
Plumber and Gas and Steam Fitter,
564 Seventh street, near Canal Bridge, Washington.
ALL orders executed at the shortest uotice, in
the most substantial manner, and on rea
sonable terms.
Personal attention given to every department
of the business. nor 26
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables. '
Green Corn, Green Beans,
Green Tomatoes, Fresh Peaches,
Brandy Peaches, Lima Beans,
French Peas, Asparagus,
Mushrooms, Capers and Olives,
Olives Stuffed in Oil. Spanish do.
New Raisins, Almonds,
Dates, Prunes, Figs, ic.
For sale low by
BROWNING & KEATING,
353 Penn. avenue, near Sixth street.
MERCHANT TAILORING.
THE advertiser respectfully invites the atten
tion of his friends and the public in general
to his new stock of
Cloths, Cassimeres, and Testings.
He has always on hand goods suitable for the
season, which be would be pleased to make up
to order on as liberal terms as any other estab
lishment in this city.
E. M. DREW, Agent,
C street, next to Bank or Washington,
nor 26
SHARP'S BREECH-LOADING REPEATER I
WE have sold many dozens of the above
arm, and find they give satisfaction.
Tbey weigh only eight and a half ounces, and
are warranted, at
STEVENS'S
nor 26 Sales Room, Brown's Hotel.
Carriage Sponge and Shamois Skins,
i:OR sale by
CHARLES STOTT,
nov 26 tawlm No. 375 Penn. avenue.
J. W. MORSELL,
(Successor to Howell & Morsell,)
Dealer in Paints, Oils, Lamps, Lamp-
m-. v TT !- -n v.. ' j r
uiasaos, vtirmsu, jirusues, ana
Window Glass,
323 O street, between Sixth and Seventh.
ARTIST'S materials of every variety. Wicks
of every description. dec 8 tf
JONN T. GIVEN & CO.,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
Dianas u
COAL AND WOOD,
Southwest corner of O an,d Fourteenth streets,
Nijlu Civil Bkidqi.
FAIR PRICES AND FAIR DEALING I
nor 26 2w
V
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