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The record-union. (Sacramento, Calif.) 1891-1903, January 10, 1891, Image 8

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INDIAN TROUBLES.
Fears that an Attack Will be Made
on the Pine Ridge Agency.
EVERY MOVE OP THE HOSTILES
CLOSELY WATCHED.
Settlers ln Oklahoma Agitated—All
Border Towns Under Picket Guard
Kevadn Indians Assuming a Bellig
erent Attitude—No Danger of an
Outbreak In Idaho.
Special to the Record-Union.
Pine Ridge (S. D.), Jan. 9.—Yesterday
afternoon all the commands in the field
were ordered to march from three to .six
miles nearer the hostiles. Late last night
this waa pul into effect
At interval* of two or three days the
cordon will be drawn more tightly around
the hostiles, until they agree to either
come in peaceably or be whipped into
submission. The disposition they display
to accept the overtures of Geneva! Miles
Is susceptible of but one interpretation,
and thai is that they propose to surrender
and retain their arms or die in their de
fense. This is backed up by the fact that
a majority of those; who have come in
from the hostiles are squawaand children,
whom it is desired to get ont of the way.
The coming in of Red Cloud ia variously
interpreted. His good i'ailh is doubted.
No one can tell what the cover of dark-
Bess may impel the Indians to undertake.
That they have contemplated, and do still
contemplate an attack opon the agency, is
believed by all well-informed people.
That they are now awaiting the oppor
tunity is almost an established fact. Red
f: un! is living iii his house tn the midst
of the alleged friendliea. At a signal from
the hostiles it is believed that ho will com
tnunicate the same to tht Wendlies. The
agency could then bo attacked from all
sides.
There are now less than 1,000 soldiers
witiiin a mile of the headquarters, lie
fore those station, d in the field could
reach here great damage could be done.
Genera] Miles to-day, as if impressed by
this fact, is extending breastworks around
the school, which will commands larger
extent of the friendlies* camp.
lie also received word from Brooke
that a number of hostiles last night tried
to break through his lines and escape to
Kosebtui. They ion ial the line too strong,
however, and retin d.
Colonel Kent and Captairi Baldwin.
who an collecting facts in the Wounded
Knee fight, have already examined a
number of eye-witnesses. The informa
tion is being gathered in an informal
manner.
Troop A, Seventh Cavalry, Captain
Mayhan, left as an escort to-day with
Pavm::■!■ rs Baker and Comegys, who
wiu visit till the troops in the field.
Bed < loud says there are one hundred
wounded Indians among the hostiles,
whom Little Wound wauls to send to the
agency.
■ tal Miles !ins placed Colonel
Shatter, First Infantry, m command of
the troops ■■■'■ Ui" agency.
Sitting Bear and Long Bull h-ivo writ
tea General Miies that they propose to
come in with their followers and be good
Indians.
< I'.UIC'AL BITI-ATION IN OKLAHOMA.
St. Louis (Mo.), Jan. p.—A special from
Guthrie, Oklahoma, tiys that much ex
citement prevails there regarding the
Jireaent Indian outlook. Grave appro
tensions are tell, and trouble is expected
as soon as the disarming of the Indians
has begun.
Reports regarding the seriousness of
ra ■ situation has been withheld by corre
spondents, bnt it is no longer a secret
thai trouble is imminent and the facts
must be promulgated. Settlers along the ,
reservation borders are of course, more
alarmed. Their position is most critical.
George 11. Laing, of that place, came to
this city and sought the office of United
Slabs Marshal Grimes. Laing suites
that a militia company has been hur
riedly organized there. A company of
minute-men has also been formed.
The Indian scare in this Territory is no
longer a fake, and within a week's time
X the longest. Kingfisher and other bor
der towns will be under constant picket
guard.
Laing stated that the Cheyenne mid
Arapahoe Indians had come into King
fisher and purchased cverv cartridge that
could be had. The aspect is serious.
Ju Ige Sea, of the Supreme Bench, said
to-day that the inland towns should at
once organize in companies to aid. If
necessary, the settlers along the borders.
It is learned that General Miles' reason
for ordering un extension of the breast
works about the school grounds was due
to the discovery of the fact that one of tiie
plans of the hostiles. with the assistance
ol the alleged friendlies, -was to attack the
school. Tbe attack would not be mado
until after the children had left the build
ing. This evacuation was to be accom
plished at a given signal, and immedi
ately preceding it the scholars were to set
upon and overpower tlio teacher. Then
the work of destruction was to begin
The story is well authenticated and was
brought to I leneral Miles' attention. He
ba- taken due precautions.
"Colonel Shatter issued an order to tho
wooers in command of the several de
techm< nts to take every precaution to re
pel a night attack, in the event of such a
surprise. Several troops and companies
ere to repair immediately to designated
positions, which the will hold to the last.
\\hileihe post could bo satisforily de
fended during the day by breastworks,
iloK-hkiss and Gatling guns and four
places of artillery, it could not be so well
prelected in the event of a surprise at
night. 11ms order has doubtless been
suggested ior tho purpose of aliaving tho
leai oj a night attack, whiehexistsamong
the \, bit< . 6
Lcle lbs afternoon ihe Seventh Cavalry
was moved from tiie bottom in which it
bni been stationed tothehlU immedi
ately east, which commands a view of the
agency. From this position they can
mere easily respond to a call from any
pr.i, ..t the agency at any time, day or
Shortly after the change throe fires
were noticed from the school-house. It
is thought the houses of "Tho Mexican,"
his-Horses and
Standing Soldier were fired by the set-
He Dog and Jack Cloud and about one
hundred others have returned to camp.
Mil: more have promised, but Lave failed
to keep their word.
•'eneral Miles says: "At last accounts
tl m'l-idi-Mis were lighting among them
ti, ( * i lu "' ,*' a:n l> was pandemonium.
There was no head to the hostiles. Des
peradoes were destroying their own pco-
If those Indians who belong to this
agency com in, other, the General thinks,
will endeavor to get b : .ck to their own
reservation. The hostile element, bo
says, is composed of Ogalialas from the
Banding Rock, Cheyesne River and
Kosebod Reservations. The troops on
Highest of all in Leavening Power.—U. S. Gov't Report, Aug. 17, 18S9,
1 \®\sa_2_s_j« lewder
SACRAMENTO DAILY RECORD-UlS^Oy, SATURDAY, JANTTABY *<>, 1891.—EIGHT PAGES.
the other side are frequently skirmishing
with them, and will lollow if they come.
Should such be the case, the General
think, the military problem will bo
solved. The control of the Indians in
peace, he holds, will still bo a matter of
serious consideration, because he will
have to be so cared for as to not to be a
terror to the people of these States and go
to war in tho spring, even if he should
desire to.
General Miles to-day received a note in
Indian, couched in terms of sweetness
innocence. It camo from Sitting Bear
and Short Bull.
NO FEARS OF AN OUTBREAK IN IDAHO.
CmrAoo, Jan. 9.—A dispatch received
by the Associated Press from Po_-atel!o,
Idaho, says: The reports of serious trou
ble or fears of an outbreak among the
Indions on the Fort Hall reservation,
surrounding this place, are utierlv with
out foundation. A visit to Blackfoot, on
tho edge of the reservation and at the
agency itself fails to reveal any cause of
apprehension.
Attempted Train Robbery.
St. Louis, Jan. 9.—An abortive attempt
was made on Wednesday night to rob tho
Southern Pacific Express between Fla
tor.ia and Wclldorr, Texas. The United
States Marshal received information of
tho proposed robbery and with a posse
boarded the train. When the robbers
signalled the train to stop the posse fired.
Only ono man could be seen, but it is
thought several were hidden in the
brush.
Earthquake Shock In Ohio.
Toledo, Jan. 9. —-\t noon a shock of
earthquake was felt here that shook
houses and rattled windows and fright
ened horses. A slight rumble accom
panied the shock. At first it was sup
posed that it was a dynamite explosion at
some point in the oil-fields, bnt messages
from sil points within a radius of fifty
miles showed that ibis was incorrect. The
shock was felt at other points.
THE RAILWAYS.
MEETING OF TIIE SUB-COMMITTEE I
OF THE ADVISORY BOARD.
Tlio Southern Pacific Protests Against
the Eastern Roads Controlling
Freight Rates.
New York, Jan. 9.—The Sub-Commit
tee of tho Advisory Board of Western
Railroads, met this morning to complete
tho by-laws begun yesterday. The full
Board will not meet until to-morrow.
This morning's discussion was upon tho
tlie Pacific roads, and tho manner in
which business across country was to be
divided. The sub-committee wanted to
have the distribution of freight left to
them, and to this there was decided ob
jection. Tho Southern Pacific protested
against any such arrangement, declaring
tho road had contracts with connecting
lines which they must carry out, and
would be unable to do so if they left the
distribution of freight with tho commit
tee. This state of all'airs brought about a
prolonged discussion in which the South
ern Pacific was tirm in adhering to its
position. It was said that all tho other
members of the committee were firm iv
demanding this concession.
KO AGBEB3CENT IN' SIGHT.
New Yobk, Jan. o.—The J'ost says
regarding the railway meeting: A
well-known railroad man who has been
in tho meeting, said it looks as if an
agreement was lar oil', and that a great
den! of pressure would have to be brought
to bear upon tho Southern Pacific in or- i
der to bring that road into line wiih the]
others. lie thought that it could be
brought to see, however, that it was im
possible for an Exception to be made in
I the case of the Southern Pacific, especially
when the other Pacific roads ware willing
to submit to the action of tlio Presidents' I
Committee when a division of through
business was made. Ho believed when
tho final draft of the agreement was
made and accepted by the Advisory
Board it would be found to control tho
trafic of Western roads. It would be
placed entirely in the hands of the Com
mittee of Presidents of Roads, such as is
now acting as a snb-committee to the
General Advisory Board.
That, the informant of the Post declared,
was the principal point of the agreement,
and the one upon which along discussion
was taking pla-c. O her points of agree
ment, such as iho limine aft. c association
of railroads, places of meeting, officers,
committees and other details wotdd, he
averred, be the subject of little trouble.
Iv any event, the decision readied by the
sub-committee would be made after hear
ing from other members of the General
Advisory Board, and when it came beforo
the full board it would bo ratified im
mediately.
THE ATCHISON' ROAD.
New Yokk, Jan. 9.—Tho authorized
statement is given out this afternoon that
Jay Gould has not obtained control of tho
Atchison Railroad by purchase, as re
ported, but that he and Russell Sage and
their friends hold more Atchison securi
ties now than ever before.
Another story was current to-day, to
the effect that Gould had obtained a large
block of Rock Island stock. This seems
improbable.
Ono railroad official said: "The fact is
that Gould is practically in control of the
great part of the combined railroad sys
tem, but lie has obtained that control
simply by engineering iU)( - nr> t - )V p Ur .
chases of stock. He holds a large block
of Northern Pacific, 00,000 shares of l'nion
Pacific, 70.000 shares oi' Atchison, 10,000
shares of tho Richmond Terminal. and is
in absolute control of tiie Udion Pacific,
Missouri Pacific, Wabash, St. Louis,
Arkansas and Texas and Texas Pacific.
He is also in dose relations with the
Denver and Rio Grande, Rio Grande
Western, Southern Pacific, Central lowa
and Great Northern.
TICKET COMMISSION'S.
New Yoiik, Jan. 9.—The Executive
Committee of the Trunk Line and Cen
tral Traffic Associations to-day consid
ered the <jucsti<>n 0 f commissions on pas
senger tickets from Chicago to tho sea
board, and an ironclad agreement ar
ranged for to not recognize the payment
of commissions. This law will go into
force the first of February, and will be
absolutely enforced.

New Snioltlup "Works.
"Washington-, Jan. 9.—The Bureau of
American Republics is informed that
sineo the passage of the McKinley bill.
which places a heavy duty on silver
bearing ores, formerly brought from
Mexico into thf United' states for reduc
tion, a company has bean established for
the erection of a large smelting works at
San Luis Potosi. with a capital offt,ooo -
000, furnished by a New York syndicate.
■«.
For coughs, asthma and throat dis
orders, use Brown's Bronchial Troches
25 cents a box.

Bradtcrotin-e cured headache for Miss
F. g. Bang, Franklin. Term.
NATIONAL AFFAIRS.
Another Strife Expected on the
Passage of the Silver Bill.
CENSUS BUREAU EULLETIN ON THE
INDIAN POPULATION.
Bill Introduced for tho Remodeling of
tho Executive Mansion—The Treas
ury Surplus Fast Accumulating—
Proposition to Reorganize tho Demo
cratic Congressional Campaign Com
mittee.
Special to the Record-Union.
Washington, Jan. 9.—lt is the general
expectation that tho latter part of next
week the Senate financial bill will come
over to the House, and the members are
awakening to the possibility of another
strife over the measure somewhat similar
to that preceding the enactment of the
present silver law.
There is considerable speculation as to
the shape the bill will take in the Senate,
as its features, outside of tho free coinage
.proposition, which is looked upon as in
evitable, will to some extent Influence
the members in their view 3. On this
point the silver men themselves do not
appear united. Some think a bill should
be passed providing for nothing whatever
save free coinage, as they fear considera
tion would bo retarded if tho bill were
lumbered up with general banking legis
lation. Others are of the opinion that freo
coinage would bo strengthened by associ
ation vflih thoso sections popular in tho
East.
When the bill comes over to the Houso
the general impression is that it will be at
once referred to the House Committee on
(.'oinage. However, the attitude which
the Speaker will assume towards tho bill
hero incomes of importance, and there is
good reason to behove that Reed lias not
himself determined upon his course.
A prominent Western Republican sil
ver man, a member of the Coinage Com
mittee and a friend of the Speaker, said
tho hill would go to the Coinage Commit
tee, and would bo reported to the House.
If the bill is not reported within a reason
able time, a motion will be made to dis
charge the committee and take the bill up
for action in the House.
The Speaker has it in his power to bo a
great stumbling-block in tho -way of
adion, and for this reason his attitude is
the subject of intense interest.
INDIAN POPULATION.
Tbo Census Bulletin Shows Tholr Kaiu
ber to bo V_4,7o_.
Washington, Oct 9.—The Census Bu
reau has Waned a bulletin giving the pop
ulation and other information on the va
rious Indian tribes, exclusive of Alaska.
Tho bulletin shows tlie total Indian pop
ulation of the United States to be 214,704.
This also makes tho total population of
the country, including Alaska, estimated
at 87,000, almost 63,000,000.
Tho Indian population is made up as
follows: On reservations or at schools
under the control of Indian police—not
taxed—l3o,264 Tiie Indians incidentally
under the Indian Office, and self-sup
porting, are as follows: India Territory—
25,637; Chcrokees, 3,404; Chickasaws,
9,990; Choctaws. 9,291; Creeks and Semi
noles, 2.535. There are also about 11.247
colored people (mixed Indian blood) liv
ing'with the members of the above tribes.
The total population of the live civilized
tribes is, therefore. 64,871. The Pueblos
of Xew Mexico, 8,270; Six Nations and
Stregis of New York, 5,804; Eastern
Cherokee, of North Carolina, 2,805; Indi
ans (98 per cent, of whom are not on the
reservations) taxed and self-sustaining
citizens, counted in general population,
32,.=»07; Apaches at Mt. Vernon Barracks,
384; Indians instate or Territorial pris
ons. 184. Total, 114,473.
The bulletin further shows: Total
males, taxed and untaxed, S0,7lo; total
males, untaxed and on reservations, 68,
--770; total females untaxed and on reser
vations, 00,4v54; ration Indians ou reser
vations, lo whom rations are issued by
the United States, 32,210; self-sustaining
Indians on the reservation by farming,
herding, root-digging, horse-raising,
fishing and hunting, 90.044; total self-sup
porting lu.*ia«is, 32,6C7; taked, and not
including the five civilized tribes, 128,611.
The number of whites on the several
reservations in Indian Territory aggre
gates 107,987, as follows: Cherokee Na
tion, 27,170; Chichasaw Nation, 49,444;
Choctaw Nation, 27,991; Seminole Nation.
90; Creek Nation, 3,250.
DEMOCRATS IN CONGRESS.
Proposition to Reorganize tho Congres
sional Campali<n Committee.
Washington, Jan. 9.—At a meeting of
the Democratic Congressional Campaign
Committee, Congressman Kerr, Chair
man of the Democratic Committee of
Pennsylvania, proposed a plau for the
reorganization of the Campaign Commit
tee, which met with general favor.
It is contemplated for the selection by
the Democratic State Central Committees
of every State of one person well known
for his Democracy, capability, energy and
general knowledge ot the details of prac
tical organization in his own State. The
man selected need not necessarily bo a
member of Congress.
The idea is to secure a Congressional
Committee that will be in every sense a
representative organization, and yet not
individually interested in their own re
election.
In addition to the full Campaign Com
mittee. Kerr suggested that an Executive
Committee of live be appointed for the
purpose of establishing a bureau which
will be a permanent feature of the com
mittee.
MISS EMMA AJiBOTT.
Her Remains Placed ln n Vault at
Grc.eelanil Cemetery.
Chicago, Jan. 9.—The body of Emma
Abbott arrived from Kansas City this
morning, accompanied by members of
the opera .company. The casket was
transferred to the hotel where Miss Ab
bott's mother and sister are stopping.
The burial services were held at (he
Central Music Hall this afternoon. Tho
hall was thronged. Miss Abbott's rela
tives and hundreds of friends were pres
ent, while the casket was literally buried
in fioral tributes from all over the coun
try.
Professor David Swing and Rev. Dr.
Thomas paid tribute to the dead iv brief
discourses, and a quartet sang appropriate
hymns.
The remains were placed in a vault at
Graceland Cemetery.
EASTERN WKATTTER.
Street-Car Traffic at St. Louis Inter
rupted by Snow.
Washington-, Jan. 9.—General fair
ness prevails in the gulf States. Snow is
falling in the lower Ohio, central Missis
sippi and lower Missouri Valleys and
from Dakota southward to Texas. Fair
weather continues on the Atlantic Coast
and in the lake regions, with indications
tbat the rain area wili extend over thoso
sections during Saturday. The tempera
tureis lower iv New England aud west
of the Mississippi, except in the north
ern portion of Dakota and Missouri,
where it is warmer. It is also wanner in
the lake regions and southward to the
gull.
TRAIN'S DELAYED.
St. Louis, Jan. 9.—Snow is still falling.
street-car traffic is interrupted and all
the railroad trains are late.
THI" TEMPERATURE.
Cricago. Jan. 9.—The temperature at 8
o'clock this morning wa«s as follows:
Chicago, 2b 3; Cincinnati, 30°; St. Louis,
30°; Winnipeg, 4 3 above.
EXECUTIVE MANSION.
EUI Introduced for an Extension of
tho Building.
Washington, Jan. o.—Senator Stan
ford introduced in the Senate to-day a bill
for the extension of the Executive Man
sion in accordance with a plan proposed
by Mrs. Harrison, to embrace the present
mansion as a private executive, enlarged
by tho addition of an executive office or
official wing on tho west, and a public
wing, or gallery of pictures, historic relics
and art treasures en the east, both coun
terparts of tho original structure In de
sign, and connected there by colonnades
and hallways, and on tho south by a con
necting range of iron and glass strueturcs
of symmetrical design, forming executive
conservatories and winter gardons; the
whole architectural group forming an
inner park or garden, at a cost of uot to
exceed f!)50,000.
Agricultural Reports.
1 Washington, Jan. o.—The reports of
the Department of Agriculture estimating
the acreage product and the value of tho
corn, wheat and oats produced in the
United States will bo given out to-mor
row afternoon. Tho condition of the
growing wheat during December v. ill
also be reported upon.
Tho Surplus Increasing.
Washington-, Jan. 9.—The available
cash surplus in the treasury, which was
reduced to about $5,000,000 (hiring the re
cent financial Hurry, by the heavy pur
chase of bonds, has been steadily increas
ing since the Ist instant, until it has now
nearly reached §18,000,000.
EASTERN LEGISLATURES.
THE GUBERNATORIAL MUDDEE
IN NEBRASKA.
Tho Stato Now lias tho Distinction of
Being Ruled by Two Gov
ernors.
Lincoln (Neb.), Jan 9.—The morning
session of the Legislature was wasted in
wrangling over tho minutes of the joint
convention, which were badly mixed ou
account of the confusion. The work was
unfinished at noon. All of the newly
elected State officers took possession df
tho offices except Governor Boyd, who is,
at 12 m\, kept out by Governor Thayer ou
tho ground that he is ineligible.
Powers, tho Alliance candidate, took
the oath of offico this afternoon, and jit is
smd that the Legislature will recog
nize him as tho Governor. All of
tho new State officers have recog
nized except tho Governor. Tom
Major wns installed as Lieutenant-Gov
erribr and President of the Semite under
protest. Governor Boyd is recognized l.v
the new State officers, and they will re
port to him.
Tho proceedings In the Sonato this after
noon were not of much Importance.
There is a movement toward limiting the
employes to about halt the number who
baa been given places last .session. Sev
eral bills wero introduced, and an unsuc
cessful attempt made to approve the min
utes of the last session. This business
was still pending when an adjournment
was taken uutil to-morrow.
In the House au uproar was created by
a motion to appoint a committee to wait
on tlie Governor and ask for his message 1
Amendments directing the committee ta
trait upon Governor Thayer, Governor
Boyd and Governor Powers wero pro
posed in rapid succession, and this inci
ter had not reached a focus at tho time of
adjournment.
A resolution directing the preparation
of a bill appropriating --100,000 for the re
lict ot the drought sufferers near the
C olorado hue was adopted with enthus
-1:4/1i.
The Gubernatorial mix-up still con
tinue:-. Governor TWer still holds the
tort against Governor I'ovd. As reported
in these dispatches yesterday, his objec
tion is that Boyd was never naturalized
an, is therefpse ineligible. The Board of
Public Lands and Buildings, bowevet
to-day assigned Boyd quarters in another
par. oi the Capitol, aud he begun acting
as (jovernor.
The iirst conflict of authority occurred
this afternoon when a telegram was re
ceived stating that an Indian outbreak
was feared in the northern part of the
State, and asking that the militia now at
tlie front be placed to repel the attack.
I ho Governor ordered Adjutant-General
Cole to make the preparations, but Cole
replied that he would like orders only
irom Governor Thayer. BoyoVthereupon
declared Cole ousted, and appointed Gen
nm or * lf9uin to the position.
The State militia on tho frontier now
has two commanders, and it is impossi
ble to tell which they Avill obey
The janitors of the State itouse have
gonoover to Boyd, and it is said the gas
and steam will bo turned off from Tha-.
er's office. J
Thayer to-day petitioned the Supreme
Court tor a co-warrantee writ to deter
mine Boyd's position. Tho Court will
decide next Tuesday. Meantime Thayer
has issued a public statement savffin- that
he wishes tho Supreme Court to decide
the matter before he vacates tho oflice
Boyd has nothing to say about his case
except that lie tea citizen. His friends
claim that even if he was not legally nat
uralized, ho is a citizen of the United
States, because he was a citizen of tlie
Territory of Nebraska, and when the
State was admitted into the Union all of
its citizens were invested with full citi
zenship. All parties to tho struggle are
keeping cool. SB "
ILLINOIS LEGISLATURE
Springfield, Jan. 9.-In the State Sen
ate, in accordance with the action of the
caucus of Democrats last night, a h__ wis
introduced for the repeal of the Compul
sory Educational law and tho substitu
tion of an enactment which practically
concedes the sectarian opponents of the
present law all they doiViVmdo'i * torh e
the last campaign. It provides for at
tendance for at least sixteen weeks i>cr
annum of every child between the
ages of seven and fourteen years it
"some public or private school'," pro
vided such child has not already been
instructed for such period in connnon
school branches, or Has not already ac
quired such branches, or is not to such
mental or physical condition M to
render such attendance "inex
pedient, impracticable or ™
necessary.'' A penalty for violation s
fixed and truant officers for the enforce
ment of the Act provided for The bill
it is understood, will receive the toll
party support. uu
WORLO'S FAIR APPROPRIATIONS
Ho\ey, in his message to tho Legislature
R_? 7' 0 theSvorld's
fair. {several Legislatures have re
puted from $100,000 to 8300,000 foi this
ES\eVSS' SISh°Uld not bebchind
ttc*i3 to Millioos of Homea—*o Yeara the Standard. •-
COAST CHRONICLES.
Apache Indians Arrested for Pass
ing a Forged Check.
WOMAN KILLED BY AN UNKNOWN
PERSON AT NEWMAN.
A Committee of Citizens Appointed to
Urgo tho Passage of a BUI Organiz
ing a New County to bo Known ns
Riverside—The Palmer Trial Post
poned.
Special to the Record-Union.
San Francisco, Jan. 9.—A Chronicle
special from Newman, Col., says a mur
der occurred last night near the Cotton
woods, nine miles south of this place, tho
victim being Mrs. Perry McDowell, wife
of the foreman of the San Mateo ranch, in
the coast range of mountains.
Mrs. McDowell- was visiting her
mother, Mrs. Robert Pendleton. The
family wdre sitting in the parlor, when
the assassin approached the house and
fired a 4i-caliber rifle bullet through the
window. Tho bullet struck Mrs. Mc
j Dowel I in the side, and sho died in a few
minutes.
Footprints ifere afterwards found lead
ing from the window in the direction of
E. F. Hale, at the Cottonwoods, two
miles away, and Halo was arrested and
taken to Los llanos.
Halo borrowed a gun the day before
the murder, and though he denied hav
ing done so, the weapon was foued in his
house.
Mrs. McDowell formerly worked for
Hale's wife, and the women became ene
mies on account of » dispute over wages.
As fur su known this Is tlie ouly oause
Hale could have hud for shooting Mrs.
McDowell.
The Coroner's Jury has been impan
nolod. Excitement over tho mureler is
ntense, and there is strong talk oflynch
ug.
SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY.
A Committee Appointed to Advocate
Its Division fey the Legislature.
Riverside, Jau. 8. — The Riverside
County Executive Committee met at the
city court-room this afternoon. Repre
sentatives from Perris, Elsinore, Ban
ning aud San Bernardino were present.
Each one reported unanimously in favor
of the new county.
J. S. Noyes, Chairman of the San Ber
nardino Republican County Central
Committee, spoko earnestly lu,javor of
the plan.
Tlie committee seat to San Bernardino
to interview the citizens of that city upon
the question, reported that Byron Waters,
M, Katz, Judge C. C. Howell and many
other influential men fi.vor tho new.
county.
O. 1\ Dyer, F. A. Miller, E.W. Holmes.
A. S. White. J. W. Vance and W. S.Wise J
were appointed a committee to go to Sac
ramemo to work for the passage of tho
bill. Tac committee leaves for Sacra
meuto on Monday next.
OPPOSITION TO DIVISION.
San Bernardino, Jan. 9.—A meeting
of citizens at Rodlanels last night unani
mously protested against county division.
The protest was signed by all present,
and is being circulated for more signa
tures, and will bo presented to tho Degis
latnre.
Beaumont citizens mot last night and
unanimously agreed to light county di
vision. Riverside stands nearly alone in
the light for the new county.
PALMER'S TRIAL.
Tlio Court Adjourns Over Until Mon
day Morning.
San Francisco, Jan. 9.—The trial of
11. J. Palmer on one of the eighteen in
dictments for forging receipts erf work
men employed by James G. Fair on his
ranch in Yolo county, Palmer being fore
man, was resumed to-day before Judge
Murphy aud a jury. George S. Boice,
who was employed on the same ranch as
time-keeper, occupied the witness-stand
all the morning session. His testimony
was to the effect that receipts were signed
by himself and others in disguised hanils,
using fictitious names, at the instigation
of Palmer. On one occasion witness held
$150 which belonged to Fair, and Palmer
told him to keep the money ond get even
with the old for employing
Chinamen. The witness was subjected
to a long and most rigid cross-oxamina
tion. and he became considerably confused
in his statements. At 1 o'clock the court
adjourned over until Monday morning
next.
CLEVER FORGERY.
Apncho Indians Arrested for Being Too
Handy AVith a Pen.
Tucson (A. T.), Jan. 9.—Advices from
Solomonville say that Modoc Wind, Sen
ard, Mott and Mohen, Apache Indians,
were held to answer by United States
Commissioner Blake on a charge of forg
ing Captain Ilullis' name to a Govern
ment check for $125. The forgery was so
wjll executed that it was not detected
until presented to the Assistant United
States Treasurer at San Francisco, when
it was discovered that the check was.
dated September "list, and was sent ba«k
to Captain Bullis for correction. He
could not find the stub in tlie check-book,
which led to the discovery of tho forgery.
Modoc Wind was confidential clerk to
Bullis. Ho was educated at the Indian
school at Carlisle, Pa. The other Indians
were educated at the Sau Carlos school.
All were addicted to poker-playing.
Election Contest Settled.
Marysville, Jan. 9. —Tho election con
test over tho oflice of Sheriff of Sutter
e-ounty came up in the Superior Court to
day. W. P. Harkev had been declared
elected over W. H. Phillips by nine votes.
In the recount thero was a change of but
one votef so ITarkoy was declared elected.
It is the eighth timo ho has been elected
to that oflice.
Carelessness Caused His Death.
Merced, Jan. 9.—Albert Whistler, a
duch hunter on tho San Joaquin River,
accidently killed, himself yesterday uear
Miller's Santa Rita ranch. He started to
pull his gun ont of tho wagon muzzle
first. Tho gun went ofl', the discharge
entering his breast and going clear
through him.
Sudden Dentil.
Vallejo, Jan. 9.—John McKenzie,
while going down the wharf this morn
ing to go to tho yard to receive his
monthly pay, was taken violently ill, and
i;i less than "half an hour was dead. The
cause was heart disease.
A Japanese Fatally Injured.
Vallejo, Jan. 9. —A Japanese caterer
on board the San Francisco fell through
the open forward hatchway of the ship
from the upper dock to the double bottom,
a distance of 25 feet, to-day, and wasac*
br.dly injured that it is feared be cannot
li ye.
Death of an Editor.
Reno, Jan. 9.—Alfred 0. Porter, a part
owner m the Evening (Jazclte,, died at 1
o'clock to-day of typhoid fever.
.» ,
CONGRESSIONAL.
Yesterday's Proceedings in the Senate
aud House.
Washington, Jan. 9.—ln the Senate sever
al petitions for anil against Conner's lard bill,
and resolutions deprecating uny further legis
lation in regard to stiver were presented.
l'iatt gave notlco that he would oak tho Sen
ate on Monday, after the routine morning
huHlness, to consider the House copyright bill.
Tho finance bill was then laid before the
Senate.
The House bill to provide for an additional
Assuclnte Justice of the Supreme Court of Ari
zona was passed.
The financial bill was taken up, and Plumb
gave notice of an amendment limiting to
$1,000 the compulsory requirement of * de
posit of United Suites bonds forevei y national
bank. This ls not to apply to the deposit of
bonds to secure public moneys lv national
banks.
liluckbum addressed tho Senate in advocacy
of Stewart's amendment* for free coinage. He
was not willing to have it goto the country
and the world that the amendment was sim
ply an effort by representatives of the silver
States, and that the rest of the country was
Indifferent to tlie result. There was not a sil
ver mine within the limits of tho great com
monwealth of Kentucky, and yet he ventured
to assert thai her people were as nnltedas earn
est, as honest] and as clamorous in their
demand for the free coinage or silver us were
the people of Colorado, Calilornia, Idaho or
Nevada. The opponents of free coinage might
rely on the veto power of the President, But
that would prove a vain reliance. He de
nounced tho nnti-sllver policy of every ad
ministration for the past t went y years, ft did
not matter to him that Ids own party was, for
four years, responsible for enduring wrong-
Cleveland's administration was just a., ana 8.
able to criticism and censure as Its predeces*
!s>rs, or its successor. The Farmers' Alliance
was centralized In a National organisation,
and protesting against class legislation. Every
Intelligent man, and every honest man,
acknowledged that they had just cause Ofcom
l plaint. They ask a redress of grievances, not
Imaginary, but real. The mighty West and
rcjuvitiated South had endured the Jlceclng
process until pntlence w;i« exhausted: and
now they meant that Just laws shoul-i be on
acted and unjust laws repealed.
Morgan followed Blackburn in advocacy of
the amendments. He yielded the floor with
out concluding his speech, aad the bill was
laid aside.
The Senate Mil appropriating §100,000 for
a public building ut Jollet. 111., and the Honse
bill appropriating f 100.000 ior one at Rock
ford, in., were reported and placed on the
calendar. Also tin- bill creating the office of
Fourth Assistant Postmaster-General,
Adjourned.
I3t THE HOUSE.
Washington, Jan. O.—A bill authorizing
Oklahoma City to issue bonds, and to provide
for tbe right-of-way to the Choctaw Coal Mid
Railroad Company through the city, ha*
passed.
The Honse then went Into Committee of the
Wholo on the private calendar.
The first bill on the calendar was to refer to
the Court of Claims the claim ot Citizens'
Bank Of Louisiana, growing out of the seizure
und covering into tiie United States Treasury
of certain moneys of the bauk by General Rat
ter. Aft<r a long debate Uk- bill went over.
Tho committee rose and tho House took a
recess until SJ o'clock, the evening session to
be for consideration of private pension bills.
"Tnaow physic to the dogs," and uso
Angostura Bitters if you desire good in
gestion and a healthy appetite. Solo
manufacturers, Dr. J. t>. B. Siegert A
So is.
a .
ABE YflU TROLfSLEO
With an, old sore, ulcer, or
gun shot wound that refuses
1 I lp——— 0m tmmtm >--__-M-_MWM-W--_M-P
to heal r- «•-• i
" For rive years J
up. II
, I had n sore leg, which 9
so take would yieUl to n ,j treat .
S.S.S., ment—until I took tivo
and be- bottles oi &• s- s '» wllic1-*
prompt y cured it, and
COme there has been no tign of
VOUr lelurn; this was in 1886.
r E. It. BocT.Ncwton, N. C.
former .
..i. ■ ■ ii___«-»-B----""***************iM'*«a»**»'»^'*"»
self. Sf S. S., has curec
many such cases after every
other remedy had failed.
BOOKS OH BLOOU 4/1/0 SKIH DISEASES /*s££.
The Swift Specific Co.. Atlanta, Ga.
©hutch "Sjjoiiccs.
/11-'NTKAL M. I', I HI'IM H, FI.KVMXTH
Vj Btreet between il and [—Rev. C. H. !'•<■•
pood, pastor. Services at 10:15 a. ai.'aud
7:;;o P. M. Sabbath-Cbool at 12:10. Young
people'.? meeting nt i':'s r. at. All are cor-
I'.i.-iiiy ii:\ ited to theao services. *
CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH, I STREET,
between Twelfth and Thirteenth—Rev. A.
C. Herriek, pustor, will preach at 11 a. m.
Subject: "The View Point lor 1801—the
Things for Others." Sabbath-school, 12:15.
Washington school, 3:30. Preaching at 7:30.
Question: "If a Man Shall Die, Shall He Live
Again?" Members of the Legislature and all
strangers invited. *
CONUREGAtIoNAL CHURCII, SIXTH
street, between I and J—Tbo pastor. Rov.
J. C. Sllcox, will preach at 11 a. at. and 7:30
v. M. In the evening the pastor will continue
and conclude last Sunday evening's theme,
viz: "The Gravel of ihoo." strangers hi the
city are cordially invited to the services.
EMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH~fWEN
ty-fifth and N streets—Rev. 11. I*. Hutch
ins, pastor. Preaching at 11 a. m. and 7:30
r. m. Sunday-school at 12:30. *
TTINGLISH LUTHERAN," FIREMEN'S
VJ Hall, Eighth street, between J and K—Rev.
W.S. Hosklnson, pastor, Services at 11 A.
m.: "Tho Chureh and the Home." Admission
of members. At 7:30 r. m.: "Our Mind and
Spirit." Sacrament ct the Lord's Supper. All
will be very welcome. *
1' TOBST UNITARIAN "SOCIETY, CASTLE
1 Hall, northwest corner of Ninth ui!.; 1
slrceLs—Preaching at 11 a.m. by Rev. C. P.
MaaMy. Subject: "The True Liberal"—an an
niversary sermon. Sunday-school at 12:15.
A cordial welcome to all. *
EOURTEENTH-STREET PRESBYTERIAN
Church, between O and P—Rov. (.;. P. Tin
-11, pastor. Services at 11 a. m. and 7:30
p.m. subject for the morning: "Character-
Building." For the evening: "Is It Well
WIU. Thee?" Sunday-school at 12:15 l\ tt.
■Young people's meeting at C:45 F. M. The
public cordially invited.
FIRST CHRISTIAN' CHURCH. EIGHTH
street, between N and O—Preaching by the
pastor, J. C. Aganier, at 11 A. M. and 7:30 l-A
ai. The last meeting of the union services of
the week of-prayer will be In this church this
(Saturday) evening at 7:30. A cordial wel
come to afl. Seats free. *
THIRST ~ BAPTIST CHU RCH^ N Inth
J; street, between L and M—Rev. W. Ward
Willis, pastor: Service at 11: "Jehovah
Jlreh." At 7:30: "Demon Dispossessing."
Sunday-school, 12:10. Song service, 7. Cor
dlai invitation extended. •
ME. CHURCH SOUTH, SEVENTH
. street, between J and K—Preaching bv
tho pastor, Rev. A. C. Bana, at 11 A. M.: "Th'e
Church Member." Every member of the
chureh earnestly requested to bu present. At
7:30 P. Jl. Itev. H C. Christian wilt preach
and administer tho Sacramcnt of the Lord's
Supper ! *
OIXTIi-STREET M. E. CHURCH~BH>
j^) tween K and L streets—Rev. Arnold T.
Needham, pastor. Services ut 10:15 a. m. and
7:30 P. M. Evening subject: "The March"—u.
sermou to military meu. Epworth League,
6-30^ P. M. *
ST. PAUL'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH,
Btghtfa street, between I and J—ltev. John
r. von Herrlich,rector. Services at 11 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Sunday-school at 12:45. Mis
sion school at 3 p. M.
Q PIRITUALIST-" MEETINGS, PIONEER
O Hall, Sunday. At 2:30 Addle Ballon:
i•■ tVomau at Home and in Public." At 7:jo
Dr. Taylor. Mrs. Abbott, "Tlie Georgia Won
der," explained. Mrs. Baiubrldge, musical
dh-LCto:-. Public test;. __ »
OPIRITCALISM-THERE WILL BE A
O meeting at Pythian Hall, Ninth and I
»tr•■>is. Sunday evening at /:30 o'clock, by
the WJII-kuown cbiirvoyant and Ust medium,
airs. Cowries,"Oa Oakland. *
UNITED 'BRETHREN CHURCH, POUS
tenth and K— To-morrow's services are to
btahi a series of revival services. Morning
subjoct: "ChrSl's Truth Revealed in His Pe(A
pie." Welcome M. I). Bovey, pastor, 1329
K street. «
WESTMINSTER PRE S B YTERI VN
Church—The pastor, Rev. R. __ Steven
son, will preaeh at 10:45 A. M. and 7:30 P M
special pains are taken to make it pleutmnt'for
ail who come. Siuiday-school at 12:15 p m
Yf>mi2 ceoale'i ro«a>*.itar at fiino. • '
WENONAH COUNCIL NO. 2~^«£>~
Degmi of Pocahontas, meets —•__£_.
TO-XIOHT af Red Mens Hall, at r^Sgr 3*
7:30 o'clock. Installation and ban- -r&VidH
Viet. Friends invited. POCAHONTAS
Mas. E. .1. IU; a/.ij.k, K. oIK. If
OS*. I',--? i; y^i;i-;Ks of "sacramento
. oouncii >„. y oj uro requested to meet at
I irentan 8 Hall on SUNDAY, at l:'-0 o'clock
**'' ;"*"'; t(> attend the runernl of our friend Mr<.
A. lyler, formerly Mrs. Mark l-'oster. Vlslt
ttlg members cordially invited.
r. Tr t> o MPS. 1. MARSH, C.
C. JL Dexto>-, SccreUry. i;»
-VTrANTED-PY A YOUNG LADY, A P0-
VV sltlon an bookkeeper, stenographer or
olhce work of any kind. Address, Miss F S
088 M strceL jalo-2t*
WANTED— FURNISHED ROOMS FOIi
housekeeping; Address, with full oar
ticulars, F. A., thta office. ' n
WANXED IMMEDIATELY—TWO LADY
agents to sell our new book of art
music and literature. Outsells all others of iu
kind lif'ty to one. For exclusive right of terri
tory address j. Mclaughlin, iioom iot,
Flood Building. San Fr-mcisco. jafi-7t*
WANTED— IN A PRIVATE FAMILY^
One or two boarders. Cail at ltst)2 G
street. ja6-7t»
WAXTED, AGENTSI-GOOD ACTIVE
gentlemen or ladies for something en
tirely new; light and profitable: takes with
every one. Apply IOoS Eighth street, from 1
«_ '•» I\M- j u 1-tf
WANTED— PARTIES TO TAICE AN IN
tercst In the Sectional Giant (Quarts
Mill, of meritorious qualities; patented. .lAS.
A. SCOTT, Golden Eaelc Hotel, Sncra-
J: icul o. d2.*.-l t
WAXTED— MEN FOR FARMS, VlXE
yurds dairies and all kinds of labor,
women and girls for cooking and general
bousowork. Plenty of work for desirable help.
Apply at EMPLOYMENT OFFICE, Fourth
street, K and L.
WA NT E D "—BY A THOItOUGH nVSl
ness man getting low in cirenmstoneea
through pun; misfortune, epiployment in aKjT
capacity. Thirty ye.ir.- e-. (I .'rii i.c'e in thegrain
and produce line. Steady and wel^deserving
assistance. Address Business, tlrts otllce.
ja9-2t* /
WANTED— A SITUATION HY A TAl'AN
ese to cook. Understands his business
thoroughly. Address .lap,, this office. ja9-3t«
WANTED— A BITUATION BY EXPJ i
enced horseman, as coachman or trainer
ot horses. Address "33," this oflice. j ; !i-:>; ■
\\~.\\"i ED—a Nl'ii \tive t:tAi-i.t . ■:i;-;;f.
Vi Address Xo. "Zf," this office, stating
where last employed. ja9-21
MESSENGER I.• >VS WANTED-IN<,> ( BE
Snnset Telephone Co., SOg*^ J st. I " a
TO 8260 A MONTH CAN Uli MADE
PI r) working for us. Persons pretcrre I who
Can furnish a horse and kive their who!- t:mo
to the business. Spare moments mav be prodt
ably employed also. A few vacancies :u
tovyns and cities. H. P. .H.iHXbON it CO.,
1009 Main street, Richmond, Va. s
gdfit—4;CtVtit^.
T OST —TWO OOWS PROM MPS. TEL-
I_ ler'* ranch, one mile east of city, a
brown and red cow. Anv person i;i\iiiK in
toimalion of them at 2^:ll 0 Street, or i.
turns them to ranch, will l*e rewarded. ja9-3t*
J OST—NEAR CAPITOL UIKiI'NHS. A L \-
LJ dies' watch-fob with beart-cbann at
tached, >ict wiih turquoise setting. Reward
by returning to 15 io Eleventh St. Ja9-2t_ed*
©^ Set ov xjlctxt.
mORENT THREE FURNISHED ROOMS
A for light housekeeping, 1588, cor. S
aud P stieets. I •-; i
rixo LET—FOR LEGISLATORS THISEE
J handsomely tarnished rooms at : '-I ic
street, npsh jalo-3t»
mOLET—A ROUSE OP MX ROOMS AND
X closets, neatly finished, at No. 3112 J
st._ Inquire of A.'OOOLOT, 812 J st. JaB-tT
|i«1 OOH. LAN:. FOURTH ROOMS BY
•±UI the day, v.eek or month. LANGHAM.
dl9-lm
TO LET—SMALL TENEMENTS AND
J_ also unfurnished rooms, cheap; suitable
for housekeeping. Apply to J'. GARDNER,
lit wood-yard, Fourth and I streets. myiT-u'
r**URNISH2b ROOMS AT CENTRAL
Jj House, from S5 per month upwards; also,
timily rooms at low prices. HuHNLEIN
BROS., Proprietors. mr!9-ly
■nUBNISHED ROOMS AT THE Kiss
f" House; also front parlor suites: pleasant
location; only two blocks from Capitol. 1009
and 1011J street d3O-14t*
T-> LET—A FURNISHED FLAT OF FIVE
rooms. Inquire at 112-s Ninth st. Ja7-14t«
TViO KENT-A I'ARUIR SUITE, :: BLOCKS
J. from suite-Capitol. Apply 1017L Ja7-4f
mO LET DURING LEGISLATURE, A
J_ large furnished suite of rooms at 73 0 J.
j'l'yri.* -
FOR RENT—A NICE DWELLING-HOUSE
of s rooms; Eighteenth and F stn ete: ce
ment sidewalks and iron fence; rent $18.
MILES ,t HAWK, 303_J. j:.i;-0t
n*KJ LET—HOUSE ON THIRD STREET,"
J_ between Qand R, Con taming 6 nice rooms;
has large yard, with fruit trees and stable. In
qulK at :-o-i .1 street,S. ROSENFBLD. Ja6-7t
NICELY-FURNISHED ROOMS AT 1019*^
Fourth stre« t, between .1 ::n>i K. jao-7t*
FOR BKNT^-FURNISHED ROOM IX PBl
vate limiily. suitable for one or two gentle
men; two blocks from Capitol, 810 O stieet.
Ju^"''__ *_
riTO LET — FURNISHED ROOMS FOR
X Housekeeping. Apply at 720 N street.
i.ui)- 3i!
TO LET —A HOUSE OF SIX BOOMS,
newly painted and papered throughout,
corner Thirteenth and F streets. Apply at
Brown House, Fourth and K stieets. MRS.
A. GLEEMAN. ja9-U
TO LET-IN A PRIVATE FAMILY,"TWO
furnished rooms, 710 Xinth st. Jao-3t*
$OY girtU.
FOR SALE—ONE BEDROOM SET NEAR-
Iy new, besides more furniture and other
household articles. Will be sold cheap on ac
count of leaving the city. At 710 D street.
Jiaiq-7t*
T**OR SALE CHEAP-LOT 40x150.~1Nl
Jf 1 quire to r Pstreet. J»10-2t*»
FiU SALE-A HANDSOME BUGGY
hoi-se. perfectly gentle; cspecinlly salted
Tor lady to drive; rapid.traveler, and one of
the best saddle-horses in the city. A. O.
GREGORY. Fiith and J, Saerunu nto. JaO-tf
17-OU SALE-ONE OF THE FINEST AND
largest saloons In the city; extra laniiir
eiitranee; best location; stock and lease. In
quire at this office; 05-tf
CIHOICE LOT OF CANARY BIRDS FOB
_.' side, 1112 Fstreet. d2l-lm*
Fi)U BALE—CHOICE AXD RELIABLE
fruit trees. Call on O. O. GOODRICH,
Riverside Nursery, three miles south of city.
P. O. address, Sacramento. d3l-tf
FOB SALE OAS LAUNCH "NTTA," ONE
man can handle her; need, neither pilot
nor engineer license: simplest and «afe»t en
gine made. Inquire OFFICER MAY, Wash
ington, Yolo. JaS-llt*
(General Jtottcc©.
-fIfONEY TO LOAN-ON CITY AND
ill. conntry property. MUDDOX & FEE,
6001 *treet._ jas-tf
QACRA MENTO OOUKTY POULTRY
p Yards; leading varieties Tor sale: efen for
batching- for (hrtnerpartlcuian send for cata
logue. GEO. E. DUDEN, proprietor. iJox
376, Sacmmento. jaS-tf
VT OTI CE-JIA VEYOUAN Y i N TEN TI ON
il of inventing Iu 2, 4, Cor 3 0 acres: of rich
land Jast outside the city and only short dit
tauct from terminus of New Electric Railway?
If so, 11 will pay jou big to see me and lind
what I have-to otler. M..J. DILLMAN. 3 120
0 street; at aoO J ttreet between 12 aud l.
, JaS-U
DK EBSMAKING-MRS. MAY BTEVENS,
formerly with Mrs. Scblnncr, has opened
fli-it-class dressmaking parlors at 01b Seventh
street, back or Cooper's music stores. Ladles'
children's and Intents' white underwear a spe
cialty: plain sewing solicited. o2"-tf
fuli, stock:
—OI —
FURNITURE '
AXD THE LOWEST PRICES ALWAYS
—AT—
W. D. COMSTOCK'S.
jjyi]H_AyD_K: STREETS. •
QEND THE WEEKLY UNION TO YOUR.

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