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The record-union. (Sacramento, Calif.) 1891-1903, February 10, 1891, Image 3

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GUISEPPE SCATINI'S SLAYER.
Frediani, the Aged Lime Peddler Will
Plead Self-Defense.
■©Ten Jnrors Secured From tho Regu
lar Panel—Forty Special Jury
men Called For.
Judge Catlin occupied Judge Van
Fleet's place in Department Two of the !
Superior Court yesterday, and will con
tinue there until the trial of Eduardo
Frediani for murder is concluded. Judge
Van Fleet being tired and in need of
a rest.
Frediani's trial was commenced in the
forenoon, and the entire day was con
ttimed in the work of impanelling a jury.
Last evening when an adjournment was
taken only seven jurors had been secured,
and the regular term venire had been ex
hausted.
Frediani—who it will be remembered, is |
the aged Italian lime peddler who fatally j
stabbed Giuseppe Scatini, an L-street
saloon-keeper, last November —is repre- j
sen ted by Grove L. Johnson, while Dis- j
trict Attorney Ryan and his assistant,
ex-Judge Buckley, are looking after the
interests of the people. Mr. Johnson in
examining the talesmen is pursuing his
usual exhaustive and thorough method
of questioning, and the caso in conse
quence is proceeding slowly.
FKEDIANI'S DEFENSE..
Frediani's defense will Ije that ho
stabbed Scatini in defense of his own life.
This was made evident in the course of
Mr. Johr.son's examination of the jurors,
an idea of the extent of which may be ob
tained from the following, which com
prised a portion of the set of questions
propounded to J. C. Baumgartel, one of
the talesmen:
"Where do you reside?"
"Freeport."
"Your business?"
"Farmer."
"Do you read, •write or speak the
Italian languago?"
"No."
"Did you ever live near, or mingle with,
Italians or Portuguese?"
"No, not particularly. There are a
number of Italians down near my place."
, "Is your hearing affected?"
"No."
"Have you any prejudice against a
man because he is simply accused of
crinfj?"
"No."
"Or because ho is accused of murder?"
"No."
"Were you living in Sacramento in
November last?"
"Yen, a portion of the time."
"Did you take any of the Sacramento
newspapers at that time?"
"Yes."
"Read about this case?"
"No."
"Will you give this defendant a fair
and impartial trial?"
"I will."
NOT AFRAID OF NEWSPAPERS.
"Are you afraid of newspaper criti
cism?"
"No, sir."
"Would the fact that the newspapers
have censured and abused juries for ac
quitting persons charged with murder be
liable to affect your judgment in this
case?"
"No."
"Would the fact that there are other
persons at the present time awaiting trial
lor murder, and should the newspapers
pay that the people needed protection and
that these murderers should be disposed
of summarily—would that affect you,
eithor?"
"No."
"Have you any prejudice against a man
because, in a ease of tliis kind, he enters a
plea of self-defense?"
"No."
"Do you believe in self-defense when
necessary?"
"I do."
"Have yon any prejudice against a man
who would use a knife in defending him
self?"
"None."
Etc., etc., etc
A SPECIAL VENIRE.
It might not be amiss to add {hat Mr.
■Raumgartel was not accepted as a juror.
The seven who were secured out of the
regular term venire were Fred. Kolliker,
William Cmmsman, Herbert Melvin, A.
Logan, C. Kellogg, David Poorman and
C. M. Ackenuan.
Attorney Johnson asked that instead of
calling upon the Sheriff" for a special
Venire of jurors from the body of the
county, the court order that they be
drawn from the names just selected by
the Supervisors for the new panel. Mr.
Johnson said he had every confidence in
the Sheriff, but he considered the Fredi
ani case a most important one, and he
thought the bettor way would bo as he
suggested—there would bo no trouble,
then. It was not a good plan to put so
much responsibility upon the Sheriff.
District Attorney Ryan said he had only
one objection to oner to Mr. Johnson's re
quest, and that was that it would cause too
much delay. Many of the persons whose
names were on the now list, lived at Gait,
Elk Grove, Lsleton and other places, and
it would take three or four days to get
them in town.
Mr. Johnson insisted that the ends ot
justice would be better reached in the
manner suggested by him.
Judge Catlin, however, said that in
view ui'the fact that most of the witnesses
in the case were foreigners, and their tes
timony would have to bo taken through
interpreters—causing the trial to drag
along slowly —he did not feel disposed to
add to the delay by going into the new
jury panel.
lie then ordered that the Sheriff sum
mon forty s]H»cial jurymen from the body
of the county, and have them in court
to-day, when the trial will be resumed.
REGULATIONS FOR LENT.
Bishop Mnnogruo Instructs the Catholic
Diocese in Their Duties.
The pastoral letter, written by Bishop
Manogue, of this city, was road last Sun
day in all of the Catholic churches iv the
Sacramento diocese, lie announces that
the live diocesan collections will be as
follows: Feast of the Kpiphany, for the
Missions of Africa, ordered by the Holy
Father. For the orphans of tho diocese,
the first Sunday of Advent; Indians, ne
groes and propagation of the faith, the
first Sunday ot Lent: this collection has
been ordered by the late Plenary Council.
Seminarians studying for the diocese,
Pentecost Sunday; for the Holy Father,
first Sunday of October, or Rosary Sun
day.
The pastors of tho several churches are
orden.nl to announced a week before
band, the lact that certain collections are
to be taken up, and encourage the congre
gation to contribute liberally.
The regulations lor Lent are as follows:
1. All the week days of Lent, from
Ash Wednesday to Easter Sunday, are
fast days of precept, on ouo meal, with
permission for a moderate collation.
This collation, according to circuni
rttpces and greater convenience, may bo
taken in the morning or evening, and
is regulated by the time of the principal
meal.
2. Flesh meat is allowed lon Sundays
without limitation, and by dispensation j
granted August 3, IS&7, fbr ton years, !
once a day on Mondays, Tuesdays, j
Thursdays and Saturdays, except Satur
day of Ember and Saturday of Holy !
Week. I
3. The promiscuous use of flesh and '
fish, even on Sundays, is prohibited at
the same meal.
4. By dispensation Igranted February
9,15K7, for ten years, milk, butter, cheese,
fruits, vegetables, eggs and fish are al
lowed at collation.
5. All under .twenty-one, or over sixty
years, are exempt from the obligation of
lasting; also the delicate, the sick, the
feeble, and those engaged at hard labor;
and are not restricted to meat once a day
on duvK when its use is permitted.
6. The |use of lard in preparing food la
allowed every day throughout the year.
7. The tim© for complying with the
Paschal precept in the Diocese of Sacra
mento extends from Quadragesima Sun
day, or first Sunday in Lent, to Trinity
Sunday.
The respoctive pastors are hereby em
powered to dispense in cases of fasting
and abstinence where prudence and suf
ficient reason authorize. They are also
requested to be diligent during the holy
season of Lent, in laying before their peo
ple the great truths of religion, and the
necessity of availing themselves of this
acceptable time to regain the friendship
of God, by salutary penance for their sins;
by alms-deeds ana works of mercy to the
poor.
Where circumstances permit, let dovo
tional exercises be hold as often as possi
ble during the week, but especially on
Wednesday, Friday and Sunday even
ings.
The collection ordered by the late Plen
ary Council is to be announced next Sun
day and taken up on the following, or
first Sunday of Lent. Your attention is
particularly called to this collection.
Olives and Olive Oil.
Mr. Isaac Lea, who has a splendid ranch
! near Florin, in this county, has left at
| this office samples of olive oil and
| pickled olives that demonstate beyond
question that this fruit can l>e produced
in Sacramento County to advantage and
of as fine quality as in any portion of the
State. The oil compares favorably with
the best foreign product.
Sacramento Coxinty's Population.
A subscriber requests the Record-
Union to state the population of Sacra
mento City and County separately. Ac
cording to tho last census the population
of the city is 26,380, and the remainder of
the county 13,958.
State Printing Office Expenses.
The pay roll of the State Printing Offico
for the past two weeks amounted to
?9,805 65. Of this amount $7,402 25 was
drawn from the printing fund, $322 05
from the school text-book fund, and
§l,y'JO 75 from the school book fund.
THEY ARE NOT MIXED.
County Superintendent Howard on
the School District Boundaries.
Forgetful ness on the Part of the Super
visors—Lack of Interest In
tlie Country.
"The Board of Supervisors, through
their lorgetfulness, have kicked up a
groat row out in the country," said
County School Superintendent Howard
yesterday.
"How so?" asked the RECORD-tJNiox
man.
"Well, a few days ago, while the Board
was in session, Chairman Ureor called at
tention to a complaint that had come in
from Alder Creek District that one of the
Trustees of that district had been gerry
mandered out of the district. The Chair
man then vacated the chair and made a
speech on what ho was pleased to term
the 'mixed-tip condition of the school
district boundaries,' and he suggested
that it wast high time to have matters
straightened out. The other Supervisors
fell right in. and tin expert was employed
to attend to tho readjustment—paying
particular attention to the school assess
ments.
THKY FOROOT.
"Now," continued Mr. Howard, "just
see how forgetful the Supervisors were.
In December last this same subject was
brought up by them, and I had the de
scriptions of tho boundaries prepared by
Mr. Bhftpard on an iHcale. The
board approved these descriptions, and I
remember that they were congratulating
themselves on the fact that these bounda
ries had at lust been straightened out.
Those descriptions were prepared on the
basis of the original organization of
school districts, subject to legal changes
by the Board of Supervisors. Tho board
has no right or power, however, to change
the boundaries of any of these districts
except upon tho receipt of a petition ask
ing for a change, and that is what has
caused all the trouble this time.
"As soon as it became known in the
country, through the Record-Union,
that the board was making changes, my
office was flooded with letters asking that
other changes be made. What will the
result be? Why, the boundaries never
will be settled.
ON THE WnOXO TACK.
"I don't think," resumed Mr. Howard,
"that the board really meant this time to
change the boundaries. Instead I think
they only intended to have a proper seg
regation of the property in the districts—
that, I think, is what they will have the ex
pert they have employed do—and I would
consider that very proper, as in the case
of tho special tax levied last year there
were a great many complications. Tho
trouble is that the residents of tho various
school districts do not keep themselves
posted as to the boundaries. Many of
them actually do not know what district
they live in. Take the Alder Creek Dis
trict case, which tho Supervisors consid
ered last week, for instance. In that mat
ter one of the Trustees of that District hap
pened to pick up ono of our pamphlets
containing the boundary descriptions,
and to his astonishment found that ho
was not a resident of that district at all.
Now, in conclusion, I would like to
make a suggestion to the Supervisors and
the country people. If the board willJ
simply let tho boundaries stand as they
are now and make no rn'ore changes, a
great many complications can be avoided.
Also, if the residents of these school dis
tricts will just read the pamphlets that
have been sent out to them, and find out
where they belong, the samo end will be
reached; and, finally, Iwth should see
that the assessments are properly made
this year."
Clougrh's Whereabouts.
E. H. Clough, of, Oakland, who has been
missing* from home for the past few days,
has not yet been heard from. A friend of
his, however, who holds an office in the
Capitol building, says that beyond doubt
Clough has gone to Seattle, Wash. He
received $48 TR>out two weeks ago for
services as Assistant Journal Clerk in the
Legislature two years ago, and told par
ties he intended leaving for Seattle.

Hebrew Social.
An enjoyable entertainment was given
by the Sacramento Hebrew Association
Sunday evening at (Hid Fellows' Hall.
There was a large assemblage present and
the following programme "was rendered:
Address, "Impressions on Europe," by
H. Weiustock; recitation, "Song of Is
rael," by Albert Hart; song. If. Liobling;
piano solo, Mrs. Gus Ellcus; song, Mrs.
A. Bonnheim; whistling solo, Miss B.
Levy.
Gait Workmen Installed.
The following officers of Gait Lodge,
No. 113, Ancient Order United Workmen,
of Gait, were installed on last Thursday
evening by D. D. G. M. W.,J. E. Harlow,
assisted by G. J. W., C. W.JJaken M. W.,
S. E. Wristen; Foreman, J. H. Sawyer;
Overseer, L. J. Young; Recorder, A. A.
Clough; Financier, J. X, McKinstry; Re
ceiver, J. W. Beckwith; Guide, G. Max
field; Watchman, S. W. Palm.
«.
It "Was a (ianard.;
It was currently rumored on the streets
last evening that Judge Cravens had met
with a serious accident in attempting to
board a street car while in motion. A
visit to his residence, however, elicited
the fact that such was not the case, as he
bad uot even thought of taking a ride.
SACKAMJSJyiO DAILY RECOKI>-Tl3rroy, TUESDAY, FEBBTJAKT 10, 1891.-»SIX PAGES.
Levy Made by the Board of Trustees
for the Next Fiscal Year.
The Bate for City Advertising Adopted
—Two Petitions for Saloon
Licenses.
The first subject takon up by the Board
of City Trustees yesterday at the regular
weekly session -was the report of the com
mittee appointed to fix a schedule of
prices to be charged by the local newspa
pers for city advertising. The commit
tee, composed of Mayor Comstock. City
Auditor McKee and O. B. Turrell, set the
following rates: One square (156 ems
nonpareil), tirst time, §1; second time, 75
cents; each subsequent time, 50 cents.
The report was adopted by the unani
mous vote of the Board.
THE PROPOSED GAMING ORDINANCE.
The ordinance introduced at t£o last
regular meeting in regard to gambling
was read for the second time by the
Mayor.
Trustee Wolf said he understood that a
bill had been introduced in the Legisla
ture covering most all of the points made
in the proposed ordinance. He consid
ered that a State law would be stronger
than a city ordinance, and thought the
board had beter wait until they ascer
tained what action the Legislature would
I take.
Trustee McLaughlin said he did not
oare whether or not the ordinance was
brought up again. There was no use
passing ordinances when they could not
be enforced.
The Mayor made no objection to post
poning action on the same, and it was
laid over till some future date.
SALOON LICENSES ASKED FOR.
A petition was received asking that
Louis Catlaro be grunted a license to
open and conduct a saloon on the north
west corner of Second and J streets. The
petition was signed by H. F. Dillman, L.
Klkus, W. Haborkorn, Seth Gainsley,
James A. Barwick, Jacob Schinid, Frank
Baccillia, W. R. Waters, Guthrie Bros.,
A. Simoni, P. B. Fountain, C. Baize, J.
T. Shuls, Carl Strobel, Manuel J. Santos,
J. A. Cunningham, J. C. Treichler,
Charles McLaughlin, P. Vanzetti, W. W.
Wilson, D. C. Berg, Lawrence Lagomar
sino, 11. W. Harkness, George Schroth,
Daniel Murphy, J. G. Hcaney, John C.
Mannix, Charles J. Quinn and Eugene
Sullivan.
Action on the matter was deferred one
week.
F. E. Graessler and M. J. Gastman also
presented a petition to establish a bar and
billiard hall at 315 X street. It was
signed by Samuel Nathan, C. Nelson, M.
Dawes, Frank Wickwire, Isidore Jebad,
Louis Phillips, W. J. Hall, J. 11. Stocker,
F. 11. Johnston, W. F. Mahler, Samuel
Zeimer, B. F. Pendery and S. S. Nathan.
There was no remonstrance against the
granting of the request, and the petition
ers were authorized to procure a license.
DOES NOT WANT A SEWEIt.
George L. Bronner made a protest
against the construction of a sewer in
the alleys between X and L, Fourteenth
and Sixteenth streets. He claimed the
property-owners were burdened too
much by taxation for street work, and
thought the sewer made tor the use of
the brewery at Sixteenth and X streets
could be utilized to carry off the sower
age of two additional blocks.
Trustee McLaughlin informed Mr.
Bronner that ho would build a sewer in
the alleys unless the proporty-owners
presented a remonstrance.
FESTIVITIES IN CHINATOWN.
Trustee McLaughiin wanted to know
what right the Mayor or Police Commis
sioners had to grant the Chinese permis
sion to celebrate their New Year by dis
charging fireworks. He considered that
the Mayor was exceeding his authority
when he gave the Chinamen such per
mission, and should have instructed them
to make their request to the Board of
Trustees.
The Mayor said George Rider came to
him and asked that permission be granted
the Chinamen to discharge fireworks oa
the first two nights of their New Year,
and also on February 14th.
Trustee Wolff said he believed it was
the custom for the Mayor to grant such
permission. He did not remember of the
Board ever having been consulted on
such a subject.
THIS YEAR'S TAX LEVY.
The following tax levy was proposed
on each one hundred dollar's worth of
taxable property in this city, for the cur
rent expenses for the fiscal year com
mencing on the first Monday in April,
ÜBH: For the general tax, one hundred
cents; for tho fire department tax, twen
ty-two cents; for the street sprinkling
tax, ten cents; for the street repair tax,
fourteen cents; for the police tax, eight
een cents; for the library tax, lour cents;
for the sewer tax, fivo cents, for the lovoc
and drainage tax, ten cents; for the street
improvement bond redemption tax, fivo
cents; total, $2 20 on each 8100.
Trustee McLaughlin thought the street
repair and levee funds would fall short,
but he could see no way of remedying
the matter. Extra sprinkling would
have to bo done this year, on account of
the large number of streets which had
been graded and graveled last fall. The
board ought to require the sprinklers
this year to wet down the graveled streets
at least twice a day.
The Mayor thought the levee tax
should be made 12 cents and the street re
pair tax 12 cents, and he made a motion
to that effect.
Trustee McLaughlin moved to amend
by adopting the rates as fixed by the
board last Friday.
Tho amendment was adopted, and tho
levy as first proposed was agreed upon.
It was ordered published in one or tho
local newspapers for ten days.
SUPPLEMENTAL REGISTER.
The Auditor was authorized to have
printed a supplement to the great regis
ter, in time lor use at the March election.
After allowing the usual batch of bills,
the board adjourned.
DEATH RELIEVED HER
Unfortunate Mrs. Foster Succumbs to
Her Injuries.
Mrs. Mary H. Foster, the elderly lady
who was run over by a street car at Tenth
and N streets last Thursday night, died
yesterday morning at 9 o'oclock. When
her leg was amputated on Satnrday the
doctors did not believe she could live, but
there was no alternative other than to
permit the mangled limb to remain on the
body, and this could not but cause death
from torture. Before she died Mrs. Fos
ter asked to sco Mr. Winston, the driver
of the car which ran over her, and told
him that he was not to blame in the least.'
The deceased was the stepmother ol Mrs.
William White, of Briehtou, Mrs. Crewe,
of Walnut Grove, and Mrs. William K.
Foster, of Courtland. She had many
friends in Sacramento, aud was a well
educated woman. Her funeral will take
place this morning from St. Paul's Church
at 9:30 o'clock.
The War Will Open Before the Legis
lative Committees Wednesday.
The following are the main features of
the new Sunday law bill, which will be
considered by the joint committee on
next Wednesday evening, February 11,
1891:
Section 299. Every person who, on Sun
day, gets up, exhibits, opens, or main
tains, or aids- in getting up, exhibiting,
opening, or maintaining any bull, bear,
I cock, or prize fight, horse race, circus,
gambling house, saloon, or any bar
[ barous or noisy amusement; or who
keeps, conducts, or exhibits any
theater, melodeon, dance-house, cel
lar, or other place of musical, theatrical,
or operatic performance, spectacle, or rep
resentation, where any wines, liquors, or
CITY TAXES.
SUNDAY LAW BILL.
any intoxicating drinks or drinks are
bought, sold, uaeu, drank, or given away,
or who purchases any ticket of admis
sion, or directly or indirectly, pays any
admission fee to or for tho purpose of wit
nessing or attending any such place,
amusement, spectacle, performance, or
representation, is guilty of misdemeanor.
Section 800. Every person who keeps
open, on Sunday, any store, workshop,
bar, saloon, banking-house, or other place
of business, for the purpose of transact
ing business therein, is punishable by
fine not less than five nor more than fifty
dollars.
Section 301. The provisions of the last
preceding section do not apply to persons
who, on Sunday, keep open hotel, board
ing-house, baker shop, baths, markets,
restaurants, livery stables, or retail drug
stores, for the legitimate business of each;
or such manufacturing establishments as
are necessarily and usually kept in con
tinued operation; or except as to keeping
open a bar or saloon, to persons who on
account of conscientious scruples observe
and conform to the provisions of said last
preceding section on a day of the week
other than Sunday.
SNOWDEN GETS THE MONEY.
He Defeats Crozier, the Local Cham
pion, Again.
The last of the series of races between
Snowden, tho world's champion mile
skater, and Arthur Crozier, the Sacra
mento champion, was skated at the rink
last night before a large audience.
Snowden won it "hands down."
Crozier took tho lead at the start and
managed to keep in the lead for seven or
eight laps. Snowdon seemed to be in
better shape than in any of the previous
contests, and was skating easily. Belbro
they turned into the ninth lap Snowden
made a spurt, mid passed the local, man.
Aftbr that he had everything his own way,
and finished the mile in 3 minutes and 4a
seconds, which is faster than the same
distance has been covered before on the
local rink.
The next attraction at the rink will
take place next Saturday evening and
will be" a race Ijetweon Crozier, on skates,
agninst Knapp, the American champion
short-distance, bicycle rider. Knnpp has
been seen in this city before, and his
speed on the big wheel is well known.
Tho race should be an oxciting one.
AFTER MANY WEEKS.
The Executive Improvement Commit
tee Corrals a Quorum.

Some Important Suggestions Made to
the Trastees Regarding Awn-
Ings and Street Work.
The Executive Committee of the
Sacramento Improvement Association
held one of its old-time meet
ings last evening. For the past few
months there have been no meet
ings for lack of a quorum, but a number
of the members happened to respond last
night, and Chairman Luhrs heaved a sigh
of relief as the thirteenth member walked
into Justice Henry's office, which was
ehoaen as the place of meeting.
There are twenty-five members of
tho committee, and no business
can bo transacted under the by-laws
unless a majority of the entire com
mittee aro present. By 8 o'clock last
evening nearly twenty members wore
present. Chairman Luhrs called the
meeting to order, and Secretary J. L.
Hughes read the minutes of the previous
meeting—so long ago that no attempt was
made to dispute the Secretary's record.
DOWN WITH THE WOODEN AWNINGS.
A resolution was unanimously adopted,
requesting that the Beard of Trustees of
Sacramento pass an ordinance, ordering
that all wooden awnings supported by
po3ts bo removed within the next twelve
months, and that when new awnings are
constructed, they be an adjustable awn
ing of uniform night and style, and not
suspended.
It was also resolved that the Board of
City Trustees bo requested to ordain that
all property owners on the business
streets of the city do away with wooden
sidewalks and lay cement or stono walks
within twelve months from and after the
passage of tho ordinance.
A ROLLER FOR THE STREETS.
There was a lengthy discussion
among the members present, in reference
to the proper manner of leveling and roll
ing the graveled streets, and tho debate
culminated in the adoption of a resolution
requesting the trustees to purchase a
steam roller of at least twenty tons
weight, and require all contractors of
street work to roll the street before and
after the gravel is laid.
A committee consisting of Messrs.
Luhrs, Irvine, Weinstock and Hughes
was appointed to present the resolutions
to the Board of Trustees, and urgo them
to pass the ordinance petitioned for.
NKW MEMBERS ELECTED.
Dr. rfuntington, of the committee ap
pointed to examine the shade trees in the
school yards, with a view to ascertaining
whether or not they were planted too
close together and afforded more shade
than was desirable, stated that he had
made several suggestions to the Board of
Education, and had received the promise
that they would act on the matter.
The following gentlemen were elected
to fill the positions of memliers of the
committee who have not attended but
one or two meetings since the association
was in existence: J. M. Morrison, D. A.
Lindley, J. B. Gilbert, M. Miller, George
H. Stephenson, W. D. Knights and H.
Weinatock. *
Carrazal Mine—lmportant.
Parties who own shares in this mine are re
quested to send 2U cents per share at once to
L. W% Noah, San Luis Obispo.orthe stuck will
have to take the regular course and be sold.
For particulars, inquire at U3l J street. This
is the first and probably only assessment. *
BOHS.
FUCTIB—In this city, January 17, to the wife of
U. J. Fuchß, a daughter. •
'makrteik
HOLLENBECK-(iLi£EX— In this city, Feb
ruary 7, at tho residence of the bride's
mother. Eighth street, between L and M by
Rev. \\ . Ward Willis J. T. Hollenbeclc, of
Ked Blufi; to Alice M. Gleen, of this city.
The brother Willie, aged 12. and the sister
Edith, a^-ed 11, acted as best man and
bridesmaid. [Chico papers please copy.] *
DIED.
FOSTEK—In this eitv, February 9, Mrs. Mary
H. Foster, wife of the lute Wm. B Foster
mother of Mrs. Wm. White, of Brighton'
Wm. M. Foster, of Courtlaud, and Mrs. H.
Crew, of Walnut Grove, a native of New
York, aged 62 years, 9 months and 20 days.
«S* Friends and acquaintances are respect
fully invited to attend the funeral from St.
Paul's Church, Eighth, I and J streets this
morning at 0:30 o'clock. Omit flowers In
terment Franklin Cemetery.
KELLY—In this city, February 7, Christo
pher Kelly, a native of Ireland, aeed 01
years,
4ST"Friends and acquaintances are respect
fully invited to attend the funeral. ft»m the
residence of hU wile, Sluter's Addition, this
afternoon, at 2 o'clock; thence to the Cathe
dral, where services will be held.
MUXROE—In Ophir, February 8, William
Munroe, a native of Scotland, aged 49 years
and 9 months.
C/ are cured btj
\J $J according to "JI
0 jrictiqns witf\ t*G\ Bonu^
WoU NDS, CUTS. SWELLI NGS
THE CHAILEB JL VOBELER CO.. Batttaora. Mi.
(Shangefr gaii» for DKteirt stock, Jit bin & Co.
TO-DAY, AT 9:30 A. M.,
Ladies' Aprons.
LADIES' WHITE SWISS APRONS, with scalloped
edges and deep change stitch braiding. Price, 11 cents.
LADIES' FULL-SIZE WHITE LAWN APRONS, deep
• hem and two tucks. Price, 13 cents.
FANCY GOODS DEPARTMENT.
t
WEDNESDAY, AT 9:30 A. M.,
TABLE LINEN,
Huck Towels, Skirtings, Etc.
Good size Linen Huck Towels, 13 cents.
tVeam Damask Table Linen, 50 inches wide, good cloth and
soft finish, 30 cents a yard.
White Fringed Wash Cloths, 14 cents per dozen.
Plaid Domet Skirtings, 36 inches wide, with sideband bor
der in brown, terra cotta, green and navy, at 9 cents
a yard.
DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT.
. LACE VALENTINES at 1 cent each. Valentines at 2, 4, 5,
6, 8, id, 12,15, 20, 25, 35, 45, 50 cents, etc., up to $1 50. *
The new "Winnipeg" Collar for men. It is a turn-down
collar but is quite as high as most standing shapes.
Price, 25 cents.
Fast Black Hosiery for men in fine Lisle Thread, 50 cents a
pair.
Gray Goatskin Floor Rugs, 3x6 feet; price, $2 25. Real
Angora Skin Rugs, in fancy shades, $2 and £4 each,
according to size.
Printed Scrim Draperies, tinted grounds, with pretty floral
designs, 40 inches wide, 10 cents a yard.
Something New —Needles threaded with heavy black linen
thread, already for sewing on clothing buttons, shoe
buttons, etc. Price, 10 cents per package.
Weinstock, Lubin & Co.
400 to 412 X street, Sacramento.
'<g& Children's Carriages.-™^
Ono carload just received direct from %%J n'&&**&
/7y^<^*< New York, : wardi 0 p£
'^^ FROM $7 50 TO $35 EACH.;mct^- *„
' T->J riages, Mirrors,
CHeap for Cash or Installments. ißugs^c'locksf ali
lon instul 1 ments.
A. J. POMMER, Nos. 829 and 831J street, corner of Ninth.
_^__»^_ jEhtxK 80^*- A. TSITSIT TAT
Jr^-^^- 631-633 J Street, Sacramento.
EVERYBODY SATISFIES
Not once does a customer leave our store
without saying: "My, but you are the cheap
est Shoe store in America." And well do we
deserve the name. We undersell everybody in
the Boot and Shoe line, for we are continually
buying large bankrupt stocks of
BOOTS, * SHOES % AND % SLIPPERS,
At 40 or 50 cents on the dollar, thereby en
abling us to sell you goods for less than other
stores pay for them. All we ask is give us a
trial and convince yourself. We carry full and
complete lines of Ladies', Misses', Childrens',
Men's and Boys' fine and medium-grade goods.
Our motto is, " Small profits and quick sales."
COUNTRY ORDERS RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION.
Boston Shoe Bazaar, 424 X St.
CHA3. TX7OLFF 1, Proprietor,
4ii-4ir, X St., Sacramento. /^~"Y —^ -^ __ A
Waia. Paper of aix Kinds. Skkd \^S rt_ J7 TD T £5.
foe Price List. *~**~ "*" X" 7 x"-' -*—' •
SACRAMENTO LUMBER COMPANY {^^--r^^r'
Main Offloo Becond atnwi. L and M. Yard-Front and R street*. Sacramento.
jy&i*cellancoU9.
—IN—
Dress Goods!
—A LINE OF—
CAMELS -HAIR PLAIDS ANDSTRIPES
REDUCED To_4sc_l'Eß YARD.
All of our Pattern and Combina
tion Suits have been reduced to
one-half their former prices.
MdSolta for « 18 5O
gSOSttlta for l 5 tyn
SIS .Suits lbr 7 ic O
* IO Suits for .'. 5 O (J
dS^SgyE*"aro now *»p**y«y io
Gattmann d Wilson,
601 J STREET,
Sole Agents JoaviQ Kid Glove.
the sacramento~
Boot and Shoe Factory,
Sl-T X STREET.
ALL KINDS OF BOOTS A\D SHOK9
MADE TO OItDEU.
walloper"
OUR NEW STOCK IS NOW AT HAND MD
OPEN FOR INSPECTION.
WE OFFER A SPECIAL LINE OF
AoTelties in Kew Designs and Colorings
Not to be Found Elsewhere.
eoTo&e ra?f?^a^r tlng by SkUl-
Whittier, Fuller & Co.,
1O1» and jLOlj^cconil street. 817-U
H.S.CROCKER&ca
aoB AND 210 J STREET,
The Leading Stationers,
PRINTERS AND LITHOGRAPHED
AGENTS FOR CALIGRAPH TYPB
WRITER AND SUPPLIES.
MANUFACTURERS OF BUNK BOOKS
nl7-tf
ANNOUNCEMENT.
McCarthy"* cooper,
—DEALERS IN—
HllectricalS-u.pplie:s
—WILL OPEK AT—
Sll J STR EET
ON OR ABOUT FEBRUARY Ist, AND
will be prepared to furnish a long-felt
Jise- Particulars in the ftiture. Ja2l-3ptl
IF" YOU NA/AIMT
The Finest and Freshest Box of Candy
In the city, you can be accommodated at
NO. 810 J STREET.
Celebrated Ifew York Ice Cream and
Soda.
The Sweetest and Best
THE CAPITAL HAM
U>rsi<BV_&_COI,_Sacraiiieato.1,_Sacraiiieat0.
FULL STOCK
—OF—
FURNITURE
AND THE LOWEST PRICES ALWAYS
—AT—
W. D. COMSTOCK'S,
FIFTH AND X STREETS.
m mi royal
BILLIARD AND POOL PARLORS,
The Most Pleasant Resort In North
ern California.
OYSTERS AND REFRESHMLMS OF ALL KINDS
*i~An excellent Commercial Lunch served
daily. 11. D. GAMBLE, Proprietor.
_ JalB-tf
L. jOl. IXEcLEjPLISr,
Veterinary Surgeon.
\LL DISEASES OF DOMES- n j9\
J\ ti<: anltnul.H treated ut liis AJKIkV
infirmary. 711 isiKliili *.trnl J^oLr\
Office hours: From H to 10 a. sc.'Sl/M^Vfc
3tocp. m. ja23-tf ya^^y T
HAMMER'S GLYCEROLE OF TAR
For Coughs and Colds.
A SPEEDY AND RELIABLE CUBE.
Fourth and X streets and all Sacramento
druggist*; Jal3-«m
"NO HUMBUG," 6 CENTS
"Spanish Blossom," IO Cents.
THE BE«T 5 AND 10-CEXT CIGAR EVEB
PLACED ON THE MARKET.
A. HERTZEL,
Dealer In Cigars and Tobacco, No. 826 X street
CHARLES FLOHR, PRACTICAL GUNSMITH,
IAO/I SIXTH STREET, BETWEEN J AND
i.yt'C'i: X.importer and Dealer In Shotguns,
KiUes and Pistols. Ammunition of all kinds
constantly on hand. Safes and Scales re
paired, and Trusses made to order.
S. CARLE, -
SUCCESSOR TO CARLE <fe CROLY, CON
tractor and Builder. Orders solicited and
promptness guaranteed. Ullice and thogt
1134 Second St., between l£aadl» :
3

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