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The record-union. (Sacramento, Calif.) 1891-1903, April 13, 1891, Image 2

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DAILY RECORD! NION
MONDAY- APRIL 13, 1891
ISSUED BY THE
SACRAMENTO PUBLISHING COIFAIT
Ofliee, Third Street, 1 Jet ween J and K.
THE DAILY RECORD-UNION.
(Six Pages),
Published six days in each week, and
THE SUNDAY UNION,
(Eljrht Pages),
Published cverv Sunday morning, making a
splendid seven-day paper.
For one year —§8 00
For six months 3 00
For three months 1 50
subscribers served by Carrier at Fifteen
O.nts iH>r week. In all interior cities and
towns the punt r ran be had of the principal
Periodical Dealers. Newsmen and Agents.
The SUNDAY UNION is served by Carriers
at Twenty-ki ye Cents per month.
THE WEEKLY UNION,
(Twelve Pages),
Is the cheapest and most desirable Home,
Hews and Literary Journal published on the
Paciflc Coast.
The "Weekly Union per year $1 50
The Sunday Union alone per year 1 00
All these publications are sent either by
Mall or Express to agents or single subscrib
ers with charges prepaid. All Postmasters
are agents.
The best advertising mediums on the Paciflc
Coast. ■
Entered at the Postoffice at Sacramento as
■eeond-cla. s matter. ' ___
The Record-Union, Sunday Union
ond Weekly Union are the only papers
on the Coast, outside of San Francisco,
that receive the full Associated Press dis
patches from all parts Of the world. Out
side of San Francisco, they have no com
petitors, either in influence or home and
general circulation throughout the State.
Weather Forecast.
Forecast till 8 r. m. Monday—For North
ern Calilornia: l_ight rain In northern por
tion; fair weather ia southern portion; winds
generally south to west; warmer, except
nearly stationary temperature in the north
west portion.
THE SUGAR TARIFF.
Our very intelligent contemporary, the
Marysville Democrat, after referring to
the free listing of sugar, says that on
April Ist when the markets opened, the
price of sugar at Chicago "was two cents
lower, and about the same iv New York
and Philadelphia; iv San Francisco it
had only affected the market half a ceut a
pound. Since then the price at each of
these places has advanced, and to-day
thero is no more thau oue cent a pound
difference in the East, and not any differ
ence iv the markets of the Pacific Coast.
It proceeds to charge the combinations
and trusts for this state of affairs. The
revised tariff, known as the McKinley
bill, provides that sugar below No. IG
Dutch standard should be free of duty on
and after April 1, 1891. Thus when the
raw material comes in free of duty and the
tariff is left to stand as to the refined
article, the consumer gets nothing what
ever. And then comes the hopeful view
taken by the Democrat that after July 1,
1801, the provision of the tarifl" which pro
vides for a Government bounty of one
and three-quarter cents a pound on all
sugar grown in the United States, above
the standard of ninety, goes into effect,
and that should be of benefit in inducing
more people to engage in the growing of
the sugar beet, sorghum and cane. The
McKinley bill, while professing to place
a bounty on sugar, produced a situation,
entirely unfavorable to the production of
sugar at home. The growing of beets and
sorghum for sugar is simply a production
of the raw material or unrefined sugar,
and that has been placed ou the free list.
From the standpoint of tho cultivator of
the soil, there are two ptil.Mil of the sugar
product. The prod .-el ion of raw material
and the refiued article. The consumer
consumes only the latter.
The producer of the raw material iv
this instanco will find the competing raw
material admitted duty free. The grower
of beets is thus placed in competition
with the cheap labor of the world. The
refiner will purchase the cheapest artie.e.
There is nothing compelling him to buy
sugar beets, or sorghum or cane. We
would havo a parallel case as between the
grape cultivator and the wine cellar. If
there was a possibility of a large importa
tion of grapes, and (.'ongress had placed
grapes on tho free list and placed a tariff
on wine, the vineyardists would have un
derstood tho situation at once. They
would have seen that the vineyard
business h;\d been sacrificed to the wine
maker and wine merchant. From tho
very outset the friends of the McKinley
bill declared that the revision of the tariff
relating to sugar would induce the people
of America te make their own sugar.
When we reach tlie practical working of
the bill, we find first, that the removal of
the duty from the raw material did not
reduce the cost to the consumers in tho
i ottod Statea. The first realised fact con
demns the Mil. The eaeond fact is that
it furnishes to the refiners, sugar combi
nations nnd trusts a cheaper material out
of which to make a more costly article,
the price of refined sugar remaining the
same after a duty of from two to two and
a half cents per pound has been taken off
tho raw material.
The thin! Raped Of tha Q_MM relates to
the bounty on home production, and
that is to go into effect July Ist of tho
present year. As wo approach the time,
we Bnd that the free listing of unrefined
sugar simply offers a foreign competition
to the production of tho domestic article.
Our contemporaries will say that it is too
early to predict results. Let it now bo
noted that beet* planted ill the spring of
'Id would have enjoyed the benefit of tho
bounty. There has boon no con
siderable additional plantiug. A very
few, perhaps. who knew no bet
tor than to believe that some great
good was to DOOM out of the Mc-
Kinley bill, may have planted a few
acres, but we venture the prediction now
that the homo production of raw material
to be worked into refined sugar by the
refiners will not be encouraged by the
bounty. We have but a short time to
wait.
CHILEAN COMPLICATIONS.
Chile, to secure permanent peace, will
have to amend her constitution. It now
provides that the immediate re-election
of a President shall not bo had, but after
fclie oxnirin'ir.n of nnn term he nan contest
anew for the office. An ambitious Presi
dent, therefore, conspires to be succeeded
by one who will give over much of official
control to his predecessor, that he may
lay wires for his second term.
Balmaceda has been doing this, and
hence the present brutal war. Brutal,
because from all accounts the usual rules
of warfare are ignored, and tbe rebellion
proceeds with the most atrocious cruelty
recorded against any modern nation.
The rights of non-combatants are ig
nored; towns and cities are burned or
bombarded without giving women and
children and non-combatants opportu
nity to escape; prisoners are butchered
without time to breathe a prayer, and the
wounded bayoneted on the ground as
taken. Even the dead are refused decent
burial, aud all pri%-ate rights are set at
naught.
The latest dispatches are to the effect
that the rebels, who have entire control
ofthe navy, are winning all the battles,
and steadily gaining ground. They have
the sympathy of the great mass of the
people, and embrace nearly all the better
classes. Tho President, on his part, has
the treasury; feeds his army royally,
pays it promptly, has force sufficient to
imprison, and has control ofthe forts and
arsenals. He has crowded the jails with
political prisoners., and punishes his
enemies with the most cruel severity. In
fact, it is a civil war characterized by
many of the horrors of barbarism.
While Balmaceda is a shrewd man, a
capable official, a capital manager, and
an astute politician, he is cruel as a com
mander, and heartless and unscrupulous
as Presidont. He has so controlled the
recent elections that he has practically
named the Congress, and thus has sur
rounded himself with creatures of his
will. If he dared, and he may do so, he
would declare himself Dictator; possibly
he may make the bitterness of the civil
w rar the pretext for such a declaration
very soon, holding that tho need of the
country at this time is for a stronger than
a constitutional arm.
By law he goes out of office in Septem
ber next; he came in as the creature of
Santa Maria, agreeing to so cast his inllu
ence as President that the latter might
succeed him. Once in power, however,
he threw Santa Maria over and figured to
put in office as his successor a member
of his own Cabinet, one who will insure
his own re-election. Out of this action
has grown the present rebellion, for
though Santa Maria is now dead, liis
party lives, and the rebels are doing bat
tle for it.
_*,
The idea ofthe Minnesota Senate must
be that long skirts insure modest de
meanor upon the stage. Nothing could
be more erroneous. Behavior in long
skirts may be more immodest than any
dressing in short raiment. The legisla
tion that attempts to make people modest
is a failure. Where the moral sentiment
is sound and good taste dominant there
is no need for statutes to protect the sensi
bilities of theater-goers. The only possi
ble defense for such a law as is proposed
in Minnesota, is that susceptible youth
may not be influenced improperly. But
it is doubtful if even this can be main
tained in this case, since the statute is so
sweeping as to prohibit the most chaste
and proper dramas, where the costumery
ofthe era ofthe play would require peas
ant girls to appear with short skirts;
or where, as in several of Shakespeare's
plays, a woman assumes male attire of
the period. It ought to be sufficient for
Minnesota to do as have all the other
States, inhibit immoral and lewd exibi
tions of any kind, leaving to enlightened
sentiment to say, in each case, what is in
decent and vicious within the meaning
ofthe law. If the Minnesota idea is car
ried out to its legitimate conclusion, the
j people of that Sfcite may presently be
known by the cut of their hair or the
I fashion of their beards.
The Women Managers of the Chicago
Fair have fallen ont. It is not surpris
ing. They undertook a business task
that is beyond their capacity probably.
Non-essentials have usurped the func-
tions of the commission, and tho whole
board is by the ears as to whether Pho'be
Couzens, the St. Louis lawyer, is or is
not Secretary of the Executive Com
mittee. What difference does it make?
If the Executive Committee has any
business to do, let it go about it and
ignore Miss Couzens or recognize her, as
it pleases. If the idea of these women is
that their duty hinges on questions such
as those, the sooner they disband the bet
ter. It is not exactly clear why the
Woman's Board should have been
created at all.
NOTE AND COMMENT.
Napa has a now daily paper, called the
Bee, tho publication of which was com
menced on the Mil inst., by 1). 1,. Hack
ett. The Bee is small, but the first num
ber indfbates that it is alive and liable to
make things warm in its neighborhood.
*». , 1
PEOPLE WHO A.RE TALKED ABOUT.
< -eiieral Booth, tlie head of the Salva
tion Army, is seriously ill.
Tennyson's last poem, "A Song," was
paid for at two guineas a word.
Ex-Mayor Hewitt has succeeded to a
great extent in conquering his old ene
my. Insomnia.
General Manuel Gonzalez, formerly
Preaident <>t Mexico, is dangerously ill
at homo in Mexico City.
Yon Ilulow, the musician, is an excel
lent and accurate Greek scholar. Ho is.
moreover, an unusually well-informed
man and an entertaining talker.
D. .M. li..r'., one of W. M. Evarts' pri
vate secretaries, is a negro. He is a grad
uate of Harvard College, and a young
lawyer of mon; than average ability.
Tho Czar of Russia is said to have a
fondness for rising early in the morning
KBd going about the market places of St.
Petersburg Not infrequently on theso
trips he makes purchases for the royal
larder.
\V. K. Yandorbilt experienced the un
usual in having a 70-pound turtle depos
ited on the deck of his yacht by an enor
mous wave while on the journey to
Villefranoho. The turtle was served in
the cabin later on.
According to the Kuomanian journal
Lupta, Emperor William and Emperor
Franz Josef have consented to Ik; pr- s. t.t
[n Bucharest al the celebration in honor of
the -Mix anniversary of King Charles 1
procl -inati >v as ruler of Boumania.
The movement for tho erection of a
monument to Admiral Semmos, of the
Confederate Navy, started in Dultimoro
time ago, ti being helped on i y a
SACRAMENTO PATI7T RECOKP-UOTOy, MO_NT»AY, APRIL 13, 1891.—SIX PAGES.
Mobile organization of veterans. It is
intended to raise ?10,000 or $12,000 for this
purpose.
"Senator" W. H. Crane will spend the
summer at his new home in Cohasset. He
will begin his next season in September;
will present three new plays during the
season, the work of Clinton Stewart, Au
gustus Thomas, Clay M. Green and Hen
ry Guy Carlton. •
Mr. Blame's gout is an occasional vis
itor. It is not something he has acquired.
It is an inheritance. He uever earned it,
and therefore does not enjoy it with the
zeal that a self-made man applies himself
to the assimilation of the possessions that
have given him the joy of accumulation.
The King of Greece has recently pur
chased a handsome castle and park in
the neighborhood of Copenhagen, which
is thought by many people to indicate his
intention of retiring from Greece at an
early day. He has accumulated a quiet
little fortune of about §(3,000,000 during his
reign.
Senator Walthall and ex-Gov. Low ry,
of Mississippi, will be the orators at tho
unvailing of tbe great Confederate monu
ment in Jackson, June 2d. The former
gentleman will pay a tribute to Jefferson
Davis, and the all'air is expected to prove
the most important Confederate demon
stration in that State since the war.
Putting tho Duke of Edinburgh in
charge of the admiralty establishment in
Devonport is costing the British taxpayer
rather a pretty sum. For five months
workmen havo been busy repairing, al
tering and enlarging the oliioiai resi
dence, and now the Duke has found out
that there is not enough privacy for him
there, and a high wall" has to be built all
around the house.
Queen Victoria's month's sojourn at
Grasse, in the Maritime Alps, will cost
somewhere between §50,000 and $100,000.
Probably only two persons will know
the exact figures, namely, the Queen's
Director of Continental Journeys, who
makes all the arrangements and pays the
bills, and Sir Henry Ponsonby, the
Queen's man of business, who checks olf
the accounts and preserves them.
Everyone has a liking for so: ue partic
ular gem, although, indeed, most women
prefer diamonds, which are the most try
ing jewels worn. Mrs. (.rover Cleveland,
Mrs. James G. Blame, Mrs. Frederick
Vanderbilt, Mrs. Wm. Astor and Mrs.
Cameron, Wife of the Senator, are among
the well-known women who wear and
love the brilliant. Mrs. Willie K. Van
derbilt chooses pearls, Mrs. Matt Quay,
sapphires; Mrs. Noble, moonstones, arid
Mrs. Roswell P. Flower, opals. .
A regular contributor to the Boston
Post, alter expressing an earnest hope
that Mr. Booth's threatened retirement
bom the stage will be only temporary,
adds: "His position as the foremost
American actor is one which we cannot
permit him to vacate without a protest. I
say this not alone becauso I admire his
art immensely, but because I think that
his cultivated, dignitiod. self-respecting
career has an incalculable inlluence for
good upon his profession."
A blind girl has matriculated at Mel
bourne University. In algebra, arithme
tic, French, Latin and several other sub
jects of study she has taken a first-class
position. She has been sightless from in
fancy. She has had, however, a passion
for study, and it is her ambition to earn
her own living by educational or literary
pursuits. At the examination she wrote
her papers by the aid of the Brailie sys
tem. A teacher from the blind school
transcribed her work into tho ordinary
characters.
A Valuable Remedy.
BitAXDRETn's Pills purify the blood,
stimulate the liver, strengthen the kid
neys, regulate the bowels. They wore
introduced in the United States in 1835.
Since that time over lifty millions of
boxes of Brandreth's Pills have been
used.
This, together with thousands of con
vincing testimonials from all parts of tho
world, is positive evidence of their value.
Buandretii's Pills are purely vege
table, absolutely harmless, and safe to
take at any time.
Sold in every drug and medicine store
either plain or sugar-coated.
tftpccxal tltfttccsr*
HOITT'S ADDITION TO TE_E TOWN OF
LINCOLN.
Ira G. Hoitt has subdivided forty acres
within the corporate limits of the town of
Lincoln, Placer County, and is soiling lots
50x125 feet at §25 to 855 each, payable $10
to S'.u cash, balance In monthly installments
ot S5 without interest. Lincoln is Ihe liveliest
town on the railroad between Sacramento
and Portland; over seventy new buildings,
among which are two new church* B, have
been erected there during the past year, and
the purchase of these lots, which are only ten
minutes' walk from the depot, must certainly
prove profitable to the buyers. For maps and
full particulars apply to A. ('. FLEMING,
Lincoln, or to STEP 11 ENs* >N A; HAI.TMAN,
1007 Fourth street. Sacramento, mrai-lm
CATARRH IN COLORADO.
I used Ely's Cream Balm for dry catarrh.
It proved a cure.—H. F. .Nf. Weeks, Denver.
Ely's cream Halm is especially adapted as a
remedy for catarrh which is aggravated by
alkaline dust and dry winds.—W. A. Hover,
drugt_i«t, Denver.
1 can recommend Ely's Cream Halm to all
sufferers from dry catarrh, from personal ex
perience.—Michael Herr, pharmacist, Denver.
Elys Cream Halm has cured many cases of
catairh. Itis in constant demand.—Geo. W.
Hoyt, pharmacist, Cheyenne, Wy. MWF
MKS. WINSLOW'S 'Si mi ill I NT; SYRUP"
Has been in use over fifty years by millions of
mothers for their children while teething,
With perfect success. It soothes the ehil3j
soften- the gums, allays pain, cores wind colic,
regulates the bowels, anu Is the b: st remedy
for diarrhoea, whether arising from teething
or other causes. For sale by druggists in every
part of the world. Re sure and ask for Mis.
Winslow's Soothing Syrup. Twenty-live „. Nts
a bottle. MWF
FAST TIME TO THE FAST.-The Atlantic
and Pacific Railroad t.Santa Fe route) is now
twelve hours shorter to Kansas City and St.
Louis,and twenty-four hours shorter to Chi
cngo than formerly. Pullman Tourist Sleep*
Ing Oars to Chicago every day withontchange.
lvrsonally conducted excursions every Thurs
day. GEORGE W. RAILTON, Agent, 1004
Fourth street, Sacromcnto. MWF
HAND-MADE CKKAMS, 35 cents per
pound ; also finest variety of candies. JOHN
AKCEGA, 50h X street. mr__l-tf
SAMPLE ROOMS, 101-1 Sixth street, be
tween J and K. Fine Wines, Liquors and Ci
gars. JACOB KEARTH, Proprietor.
PAINLESS EXTRACTION OP TEETH by
use of local anesthetic. DR. WELDON, Den
tist, Eighth and J streets.
%tent gtfriTcrttoentente,
RECEPTION.
TO THE CITIZEN'S o. BACRAMENTO'
The President and Hoard of Managers of
the Young Women's Christian Association of
Sacramento in\ite the public to visit their
new .manors. 1011 Ninth street, between .1
and X, MONDAY EVENING at 8 o'clock
where a fine musical and literary programme
will be given iree. It
ART EXHIBITION."
OIXTII ANNUAL EXHIBITION <>F SAC-
J5 ramento School ot Design, E. 11. Crocker
_•• Gallery, MONDAY EVENING, April
13th, irom : to 10, and TUESDAY ana WED
NESDAY tday time only). The public is cor
invite.!. Admission free. [B. _v N.c. it
AUCTION SALE
ELEGANT PARLOR FURNITURE, BEDROOM
SETS, EXTENSION TABLES, BOOK
CASES, LOUNGES, RECEPTION
AND LIBRARY CHAIRS, ETC.,
—WILL TAKE FLACE OK—
Tuesday, April 14, at 10:30 A. M.
At 1009-1011 J Street.
«S-Sale positive.
apl3-_it D. J. si MM* *Ns ft CO., Auctioneers.
bids for gvnaas.
QEAI.EDIUDKFOR TDE PRIVILEGE OF
O keeping the t-ar at tiie pfcante of Sacra.
mento Btamm, No. 124, I . o. n. ■•
Natoma* irove, near Koi--om,on sunrtav ipril
26, i>-.u. will be received until \. i
I».\Y, April 15th, at Sp. x. The committee
- the right to rcjtvt one or all bids.
ess PICNIC OOMMITTI
German Ped Men, P.'». Pox 'j _>, Sucn.
33 aU gvoa. & ©a.
I.—That unprecedented offering in Fine Checks,
which came to us cheap through the
embarrassment of the importer. He in
tended them to retail for $1. The 1,500
yards will go to-day at 50 cents a yard.
DRESS GOODS DEPARTMENT.
II.—A sale of 1,200 yards of Fancy Outing
Flannels, stripes and checks, for 5 cents
the yard.
111.—An attraction in Ladies' Fine Kid Oxford
Lace Ties, opera and common sense
styles, worth $2 25. To be sold for
$1 35 the pair.
See the Show Windows.
The "Stanley" Shirt.
The " Stanley" is the neglige Shirt for 1891, and is a
dressy-looking garment with starched cuffs and graceful
rolling collar. The body of the skirt, however, is soft
finished, being made out of such materials as cheviot,
madras cloth and sateens. They are cool and comfort
able, always tasty, and have a merit which the run of
Flannel Shirts don't possess—that of washing. We think
gentlemen will recognize the special merits of the " Stan
ley" Shirt if they take the pains to examine it. Prices,
$i 50, $2, $2 50.
Men's Four-ply Linen Cuffs, 15 cents a pair.
Men's Four-ply Linen Collars, 10 cents each.
Transparent Glycerine Soap, 5 cents a cake.
Castile Soap, white or mottled, 5 cents a cake.
-
HALE BROS. & CO.,
Nos. 825, 827, 829, 831, 833, B^s X St„ and 1026 Ninth St.,
SACRAMENTO. CAL.
THE "DANDY"
Lawn afiffl!
If you must buy a Sprink
ler, why not buy one that
will not clog up and wear
out in one season? Such a
one is the one we offer for
sale. Made of brass, nickel
plated and sold at the small
price of
SS Cents.
ffl. MANASSE,
610 J STREET.
Roofing, Tinning and General Jobbing
DONE at
REASONABLE RATES.
MWF
Baker & Hamilton,
—IMPORTERS AXD JOBUERS OF—
HARDWARE, IRON, STEEL,
COAL, POWDER,
Agricultural Implements and Machines,
BARBED WIRE, CORDAGE, BELTING,
Sao ramento California
SHERWOOD HALL NURSERIES,
Timothy nopklns,
MEXLO PARK, SAN MATEO COUNTY, CAL
Carnations, Roses, Chrysanthemums
and Cnt Flowers.
«>SWEET PEA SEED A SPECIALTY.-**
FRIEND & TJECRRY
Lumber Company.
MAIN YARD AND OFFICE 1310 PEC
ond street. Branch Yard, corner Twelfth
iind J streets.
BAMMER'S GLYCEROLE OF TAR
For Coughs and Cold«.
A SPEEDY AND KEEIABLJE CURE.
Fourth and X streets and all Sacramento
druggists.
$<=*. BUYS A CORD
! AF OLD LIMBER WOOD, OR S6 A TON
\J of I Oal at the C. O. D. YARD, Fourth and
i street*. _
TTOUSE PAINTING AND PAPER HANG
t~L tag 111 all its branches at reasonable rates.
A. H. A N DKUSON, _»5U9 I street. Orders left
; \m(!i M. Hirsli, at 1013 J Street, Will ]•• e-'ive
| mHE NEWS OF THE WORLD IS CON-
I J. tamed in the WEEKLY UNION.
PEOPLE'S WIM BANIT
Sacramento City California
Guaranteed capital 5410,000
Paid up capital 285,500
Reserve aud surplus 56,000
Term and ordinary deposits received. Divi
dends puid semi-annually. Money loaned on
real estate only.
*_.-To encourage children and people o*
limited means to save, deposits of $1 will be
received and interest paid thereon. For
further information address,
WM. BECKMAN, President.
Geo. W. Louknz, ( ashler.
NATIONAL BANK OF D.TmIsIIo,
Sacramento, Cal.—Founded 1850.
Saturday Hours 10 A. jr. toIP.M.
Directors and Shareholders:
D. 0. MILLS 1,538 Shares
EDGAR MILLS, President 1,538 Shares
8. I'RENTIss SMITH,Vice-Pres. 250 Shares
FRANK MILLER, Cashier 351 Shares
C. F. DILLMAN, Asst. Cashier... 125 Shares
Other persons own I,I<JS Shares
Capital and Surplus, $600,000.
*3-Chrome Steel Safe Deposit Vault and
Time Lock. "~~
FAKMER.S 1 AND MECHANICS 7 SAVMsTaNK
Southwest corner Fourth and J streets,
Sacrameiito, Cal.
Guaranteed Capital.. $500,000
LOANS MADE ON REAL ESTATE. IN
terest paid . emi-annually on Term and
Ordinary Deposits.
B. U. STEINMAN President
EDWIN K. ALSIP Vice-President
D. D. WHITBECK Cashier
tt H. CUMMINGS Secretary
JAMES M. STEVENSON Surveyor
DIRECTORS:
B. it. Stkinman, Edwin R. Alsip,
C. H. Cummings, W. E. trrry,
Sol. Runyon, Jamks McNassar,
. Jas. M. Stevenson.
CALIFORNIA STATE BANK
And Safe Deposit Vaults,
SACRAMENTO, CAL.
Draws Drafts on Principal Cities ofthe World.
Saturday Hours, 10 A. M. to 1 P. M.
OW XI CE R5. *
President ...N. D. RIDEOUT
Vice-President FRED'K COX
Cashier A. ABBOTT
Assistant Cashier W. E. GERBER
DIRECTORS:
C. W. Clarke, Jos. Steffens,
Geo. C. Perkins, Frkt/k Cox,
N. D. Rideoct, Justus Greely,
W. E. Gerber.
SACRAMENTO BANK.
mHE OLDEST SAVINGS BANK IN THB
X city, corner Fifth and J streets, Sacra
mento. Guaranteed capital, $500,000; paid
up capital, gold coin, $300,000; Loans on real
estate In California, July 1,1890,82,898,442;
term and ordinary deposits, July 1, 1890,
$2,709,394. Term and ordinary deposits re
ceived. Dividends paid in January and July.
Money loaned upon real estate only. Tlie
frank does exclusively a savings bank busi
ness. Information iurnlshed upon applica
tion to W. P. COLEMAN, President.
_Ed^R. Hamilton, Cashier.
cssimfmwwffl uwm ins,
1U22 Pine Street, San Francisco.
D UP CAPITAL, $1,000,000. SURPLUS, $250,00(1
[ARLES CROCKER E. H. MILLER. Jr.
C. WOOLWORTH President
E. BROWN Vice-President
W. H. CROCKER Cashier
A CARD.
THE UNDERSIGNED BEGS LEAVE TO
inform the insuring public that he has
been appointed manager of the Sacramento
branch office for the following well-known In
surance Companies, and as successor to J. M.
Mllllken, deceased, viz.: Sun Insurance Com
pany of California. Franklin Fire Insurance
Company of Philadelphia, and American In
surance "Company of Boston. I respectfully
solicit a continuance of the kind patronage in
the future as in the past, and promise to use
my efforts to merit the favors that may be ex
tended to us. All i-ayments tor unpaid pre
miums of the above-named companies shall
be made at the office, 1010 Fourth street, be
tween J and K.
mrlS-lm THEO. J. MH..LIKEN, Manager.
3#lt&cellancouß.
■' ■ ■ — . ■ „ „ ..
PLACED
On sale to-day, and until closed out#
200 DOZEN
.Ladies' Fast Black
HOSE
Full finished, French toe, and very elastic
334 c PER PAIR.
You have often paid 50 cents a pair for
just such a Hose, and three pair is a sav
ing of 50 cents.
W. I. ORTH, 630 J St.
(*Mc.
METROPOLITAN THEATER.
CHAS. P. HALL Proprietor and Manager
To- 1 Tuesday Evening, f For Ono
Morrow,/ April 14th. \NightOnly
THE KAMOXTS
BOSTONIANS!
All the Great Company
In the Great English and American success by
DeKoven and Smith, a Comic
Opera in three acts,
ROBIN * HOOD 1
Lovely Music! Good Comedy! Press and
public unanimous over tlie success ol three
countries—England, Germany and America.
PRICES—Sue, SI and SI 50. No higher.
Seats on sale TO-DAY' at 9 o'clock. apll-_t
SPRING MEETING
OF THE
.MTMTll.lU'll
OF SACRAMENTO,
TO OPEN
Tuesday, May 6, 1891.
FIVE DAYS OF FINE RACING.
PROGRAM IS/IE:
Tuesday, May ..th.
Xo. 1 — RUNNING — Weinstock, Lubin &
CO. Stake, for two-year-olds; $25 for starlets;
$15 forfeit; S'-'OO added: winners of 1891 to
carry 5 pounds extra; second horse, fSOj live
(tuiongs. _ , _, •_
No ■> — RUNNING —Golden Eagle Hotel
stake: hantUeap for all aces; $50 for starters;
$25 forfeit; S2oO added; second horse flOO;
one mile and a quaiter. Weights to be an
nounced Monday, May Ith, at noon. Declara
tions due at 8 i l. M. May sth.
No 3—RUNNING — Woodburn Stake, tor
all ages; $25 for starters; Sl5 forfeit; $200
added; second horse $50; three-quarters of a
mile and repeat.
Wednesday, May «ith.
No. 4—TRoTTlNC—2:26class; purse,s4oo. j
No. S—RACING—Five for all: §100.
Thursday. May Tth.
No 6—RUNNING— Matadero Stake; sell
ing race lor all aires: S2". tor starters; $15 for
loit- SISU added; second horse $50; horses
entered to be sold for 51,500 to carry rule
weicht Two pounds off for each $100 in < al
uii'jon down to $1,000, and one pound lor
each $100 down to $500; seven furlong*.
V,, 7—RUNNING-Western Hotel Stake,
tor ail a<*es; $25 for starters; $16forfeit; $150
added: second horse $60; five forlong heat--.
No s—RUNNING—Hale Bros. A Co. Stake,
for ail ages; $50 for starters; S2."> forfeit; $250
added; second horse $ IOO; one mile.
Friday, May Sth.
No 9—TROTTING—2:36 class: $400.
No. 10-PACTNO-2:32 class S3OO.
Xo ii—TROTTING— Lessee's Purse; gentle
men's roadsters; v ile heats, 2 in 3, to cart;
$100.
Saturday, May Oth.
NO 12 —RUNNING—HaII, Luhrs A <"...
Stake; consolation handicap lor two-year
olds, non-winners of 1891; $25 for starters;
$15 forfeit; $150 added; second horse $80;
five lurloii'-rs. . , .
No. 13—TROTTING— Special race for named
horses: purse. $200.
No. 14—TROTTING—For two-year-olds, 2
in 3, heats; purse, $200.
conl^lTons.
The conditions are as follows: Five to enter
and three to start in all races.
Trotting and pacing races, mile heats, three
in live, unless otherwise provided _
Trotting and pacing purses divided Into 60,
30. and 10 per cent.
Trotting and pacinz purses require 10 per
cent, entrance. No added money for any W__U_
over
The rules of the State Agricultural Society
to govern running races.
Entries to close April 15, 1801, except for
the Consolation Handicap, which will close at
9 p. m., May 6th.
J. W. WILSON, President.
C. H. TODD, Secretary.
api2-3t F. A. JONES, Treasurer.
DANCIK& CLASSES AT TURNEB HALL. G_
GF.NTLEMEN'S CLASS. MON- ggA
day at 7:30 p. M. Ladies' and TSgJL
Gentlemen's Class, Tuesdays, 7::!0 Sff\¥k
p.m. Ladies'and Gentlemen's Class %rf .JB
for new beginners. Friday, at 7:30 //' * yfftll
p. M. Private Lessons at all hours. sTTTCnfIB
JON ES, FISCH .- WATSON. <£_a_3_sgF
|£eal (£*tatc, (&U.
the; lots
—IN IMPROVED PORTION OF—
OAK PARK
—ABE GOING FAST
DO NOT DELAY.
80x100, with improvements, corner Twenty
eighth and X streets.
40x60, with improvements, corner Sixteenth
and G streets.
40x160, with improvements, 1425 E street.
40x160, corner Fifteenth and E streets.
145 acres, with improvements, only 5 miles
from city. One of the linest farms In Sac
ramento* County. Very cheap.
stephensonTbartman,
Real Estate and Insurance Agents.
IOOT FOFTITH STREET. fe-l-Iy
FOR S-A-LEI.
n Af\ ACRES OF SPLENDID LAND, ONI3
q4:U half patented and the other half to pre
empt and homestead.
;t2O acres, fenced in two fields, 35 acres in
grain; well wat red by living springs; near
railroad: dwelling, two barns and all neces
sary outbuildings; wagon, mower and other
implements; furniture and carpets, livestock
and chickens; all go with place; also, several
tons hay. Price, $3,500. Location healthy.
MILLS & HAWK,
REAL. ESTATE AGENTS,
301 J Street.
AGENCY UNION INSURANCE COMPANY
LAWTON, BARNETT & CO.
REAL ESTATE,
Insurance, Loans negotiated, Houses to Rent, collections,
402 J Street, Sacramento, Cal.
-L'lotcl* atxlf f&e«taitrant«.
GOLDEN EAGLE HOTKL,
Corner Seventh and X Streets.
STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS. FRF.K'BUS TO
and from the cars.
W. <>. BOWERS, Proprietor.
WESTERN HOTEL.
THE LEADING HOUS! ok BACRA
mcnto.C.tl. Weak,2scents. WM.LAND,
Proprietor. Five 'Bus to and from lioiel.
THE SADDLE ROCK
Restaurant and Oyster House.
FIRST-CLASS HOUSE IN EVERY RE
spect. L_adles'dining-room separate. Open
day and night BUCKMANN a CARRA
GHER, Proprietor--. No. 1019 Second street,
between .! and K. Sacramento.
PACIFIC HOT I 1..
Corner X and Fifth Streets. Sac ramento,
CENTRALLY LOCATED AND oONVE
nient to all places ot amusement. The i>est
famiiy Hotel in the city. The table always
supplied with i!ie i>est the market affbrds.
Street Carsfttrai the depot pass the door every
live minutes. Meals, 2o cents.
c. F. SINt-LETON, Proprietor.
NEW HIBERNIA HOTEL,
Across from the Depot and Boat Lauding,
WELL OPEN APRIL Ist AT 1025 FRONT
street, ftxmu and board. Sl* per
mouth. Rooms by the week, from $1 up.
MRS. CHRisM A AN, Proprietor,
inrl.-lm*
TREMONT HOTEL,
MRS. P. BRYDIM-, - Sole Proprietor.
A WELL-KEPT, CLEANLY. oON
venienlly located Family Hotel. A.well
gupplied table; airy rooms. Terms moderate.
Accommodations first-class. 112 and 111.1
street. apl- m
INTERNATIONAL HOTEL.
CHEAP FURNISHKD ROOMS BY THE
day, week or month.
W. A. CASWELL, Proprietor.
W~ P. COLEMAN, ~~
Real Estate Salesroom, 325 J st.
We have eight lots in
block 53, the Town of Fol
som, for sale at $250 each.
Only one block from the
mill site of the dam. A bar
gain.
These lots will be very
valuable shortly.
MONEY TO LOAN.
_P- BOHL. E^ A . CROUCH.
OFFICE OF THE
Central Pacific Railroad Company,
San FnAKCTsro. March 20. 18. H.
mHE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE
I stockholders of tlio Central Pacific Rati
road Company, for the election ot" Directors
for the ensuin* year, and for the transaction
of such other business as may be brought bo
fore the meeting, will be held at the office of
the company. in the City of San Francisco, on
TUESDAY,"the 1 Ith day of April, 1891.
mr3o-td E. 11. MILLER, JR., Secretary.
Northern Railway Company.
•VTOTICE.—THE ANNUAL MEETING OF
W the stockholders of the Northern Railway
Company, for the election of Id rectors for the
ensuing year, and for the transaction of such
other basinets aa maybe brought before tho
meeting, will be held at the office of the com
pany, in the City of Ban Francisco, on WED
NESDAY. April 1 5.1891, between tho houra
of 10 A. M. and 2 v. xr.
W. V. HUNTINGTON, Secretary.
San Francisco, March 31. ISOI. apl-td
California Pacific Railroad Company.
NOTICE.-THE ANNUAL MEETING OP
the stockholders of the California Pnoitid
Railroad Company, for the election of Direct*
orsforthe ensuing year, and for the transac
tion of such other business as may bo brought
belore the meeting, will be held at the office ol
the company, in the City of Son Francisco, on
WEDNESDAY, April 15, 1891, between tha
1' mrs of 10 A. X. and 2 P. EC
W. V. HUNTINGTON, Secretary.
Ban Francisco. March 31, 1891. JM'Ltd^
dia ERRORS OF YOUTH SRSS
SuSRI by NERVOUS DEBILITY PILLS. Al
MMIHB those suffering 1 from Nervous Debilltl
■JfigßKß and Weakness, and having Ix-eu unsuo
%*sasY cessfully treated, will find this f__n_ou_
lost manhood, promarure decay, inabiiity, lack ol
confidence, mental depression, palpitation of th(
heart. weafc memory, exhausted vitality, bad dreamn,
&c. Price Jl per box, or 6 boxes, which willcuremoa.
cases, for §5. postpaid. A.tdress or call en
N. fe. MBDiCAIi INNTITITE,
•2i Trmnont Kow, Boston. Macs,
THK NEWS OF l'llE WORLD" WOW
talncd in the WEEKLY LNION.

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