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The record-union. (Sacramento, Calif.) 1891-1903, June 13, 1891, Image 5

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THIRTY YEARS AGO.
Ellsworth's Assassination at Alexan
dria, Virginia.
Henry Eil__orton*s Fiery and Eloquent
Denunciation of the Act —Tho
Monson-McConnell Fight.
Tlie most exciting news of that week
brought by pony express was tho an
nouncement of the sensational death of
the gallant Colonel Ellsworth, of tho
New York Firo Zouaves, who was as
sassinated in Alexandria, Virginia, while
engaged in tearing down a secession ilag
from a house. Colonel Ellsworth's mur
der was the subject ot many an orator's
ilightof eloquence during the war and
for years afterward, but there never was
a finer eulogy pronounced upon the
youthful martyr than that uttered by the
lamented Henry Edgerton during a spir
ited address in the Stato campaign of
186 L That address, which deserves to
rank with the best productions of Ameri
can orators, is probably not in print. A
portion of it, recalled by the writer, from
memory, in which reference is made to
Ellsworth's untimely death, is as fol
lows:
"Fellow-citizens, what a spectacle Amer
ica to-day presents! But yesterday we
were a happy and united people, power-
Ail and renowned throughout the earth,
and advancing with rapid strides to • the
realisation of a destiuy great, hopeful
and grand. But to-day how changed the
picture! A wicked and abominable re
bellion has reared its impious crest in
our midst, threatening to overturn our
liberties, and scattering death, devasta
tion and havoc throughout the land!
The trainbands of secession, of nullifica
tion, disunion and revolution are gather
ing thick and fast under rebel chiefs—
under now and treasonable banners, un
der new and unwelcome airs—to wrest
from us the heritage of our fathers ! On
the other side twenty millions of freemen
arise iv their war-clad majesty and might,
and are gathering with thronging liehnß
and serried shields around tho Constitu
tion, to save that heritage and hurl back
the infidel foe!
"In this crisis, sir, there was but one
path Of duty before the great [Douglas]
democratic party. It has merged and
whelmed all past issues in a great, noble,
and transcendent patriotism ! Sir, thou
sands of Democrats gather with us to
night in tiiis State around tho altar of our
common country. Some in the cities by
the sea, others in tho valleys, and others
again upon the mountain-tops, and, with
]muds uplifted to Heaven, they swear by
1 lim who liveth forever and forever that
Constitution which Washington
founded, which Madison signed, for
which Clay lived, and which the immor
tal Webster defended, must and shall bo
preserved! Through measures of peace,
<>f honorable compromise and adjustment
il" possible, but through battle and tears
and carnage and blood, if neci ssary ! By
\ns of peace, I mean when rebellion
sues for peace! By means of compro-*
miseand adjustment, when a great and
formidable conspiracy shall ground its
arms, and sue to a just, magnanimous
and beneficent Government in a spirit of
loyalty and obedience! * • • •
"It was for this, sir, that Neodham, and
Lane, and stone died in the streets of
Baltimore, each a martyr's death! It was
for this, sir, that the brave, noble, vet
unfortunate Ellsworth yielded up his
life, a splendid sacrifice! Celestial Spirit!
Thou shah descend to immortality in
. pany with the sainted heroes of the
republic! Thy day of vengeance shall
surely come; slowly, but brightly will it
ak! A brave, intrepid race of patriots
to-day issues from the mountain fast
nesses of the loyal North: thy spirit has
descended upon them, and they go forth
to shame, by immortal deeds, thy cow
ardly assassination, and to avenge thy
offended shade with heaps of bloody sac
rifice! Tho gory hand of treason could
di prive thee of life, bul not thy followers
ot that spirit of patriotism which inspires
them—that chivalrous courage and that
determined purpose which ere long shall
hurl treason from its throne!"
Every old-timer remembers Na
poleon "Nap) Broughton, the politician
and lobbyist, who died a fey.- years ago.
Thirty yean ago Nap was in politics,
and was something of a bos-*. One day
he! and ancle Jimmy Gallagher, wlio
had held la Custom-house position, met
on Montgomery Btreet There had been
bad blood between the men, growing out
of some political transaction, and as soon
as they came face to face they began to
abuse one another.
There was nothing the matter witii
Gallagher's tongue, but there was with |
his pugilistic ability. Broughton had I
impediment in his fists, but ho !
bad in liis tongue; and as Jimmy was
rapidly doing him up at tbe jawbone
game. Nap became desperate and led out
liis right, getting homo on Jimmy's
smeller. Then thoy iuul it, rough-and
tnmble, aU over the sidewalk and the
cobbles, and it the police bad not arrived
when they did thero would probably
been a job for tbe Coroner.
"B-b-by go-go-golly!" sputtered
DghtOh, as they dragged him otf tlie
battered torm of poor Lncle Jimmy, "I
'low no s-s-such trash t-t-to insult me
o-o-on the street!"
The statement was recently made
m a San Diego dispatch that Charles
Cady, wlio is begging in the streets of
that city, painted the Bear flag and raised
U at Sonoma. William Baldridge of
Montioello, Napa County, in an interest
ing letter, stat< ■ the well-known fact that
William Todd, a nephew of Abraham
Lincoln*! wife, painted the Bear flag.
Baldridge did not go to Sonoma until
two days alter the party that arrested
Vallejo. When he reached Sonoma the
J'.ear Ihig was flying. lie adds this bit of
history about Cady:
"About three days after I went to So
noma a man camo in early in the morn
ing. He told me that he and Charles
were in Verba Boena and heard of
the capture of Sonoma and ere anxious
to get there, but the town was under
martial law, and no one was allowed to
it or oome into the place. Cady and
a boat In tbo night and ran up
, t Creek to where the town is. He
got a horse and went to Sonoma and left
yin Napa. It was four or five days
the flag was hoisted before they left
a. William Russell, who
oame across the bay with Cady, is in tho
Soldier's Home at Yountville."
At a Union meeting held at the
then "town" of Richland, down in
oklin Township, William Johnston
presided, and the vioe-Presidents were
Dr. Williams, D. De Gross. K. F. Aiken
and Dwight Hollister. S. W. Green and
1 .11. '.ray were Secretaries. B. E. How
ard reported a aeries of ringing Union
resolutions, concluding:
MJrth That there is no neutral i
ground, and those who profess nentralitv
add to the infamy of treason tho disgrace
oi cowardice."
band of"Union-lo\ ing Secessionists"
from Georgetown were present, and thoy
made such a kick over the resolution
that a prominent citizen moved to strike
n out which was done after a fierce
wrangle. In fact, the sympathizers with
the south bad a majority oi two. and they
adopted resolutions condemning the pol
icy of the Government and declaring that
California and Oregon should tako no
part in tho struggle.
One day a. c. Monson went to E
H. Crocker s law office to consult about a
lawsuit in which they and ii lawyer
named Frank McConneU were interested
McConnell laughed at some proposition
leby Monson, and the latter jr () t in
sulted. Soon the two were lighting, and
Crocker's ofliee furniture was badly
wrecked. Charley Torbert heard
racket, and rushing in he fonnd Mc<
noil holding Monson by the cravat In
front, and Crocker holding him from be
hind.
Monson called on Trobert to pull Crocker
off, which Trobert did, and while lie held
i
Crocker the other two resumed their
light. McConnoll got his pocketknife out
but had no chance to open it, so he jab
bed Monson in tho face with the handle,
cutting him severely. A crowd finally
came in and separated the belligerents.
A Republican County Convention
assembled on the 4th of June. A long
w rrangle ensued, the moment the conven
tion was called to order by A. A. De
Long, over the election of a temporary
Chairman. The nominees were S. S.
Holl, Francis Tukey and Wilson Flint.
E. B. Crocker, Rev. J. E. Benton, Geo.
H. Baker, Wilson Flint (who had with
drawn), Do Long and Lorenzo Hamilton
were the participants, the point at issue
being as to the proper manner of placing
tho nominees before the convention.
Several ballots were taken, and finally
Mr. Tukey was declared elected. C. P.
Huntington was a prominent member of
tho convention.
The first election for officers of
Lake County was held on the 3d of June,
1801. Prior to that time the territory was
a part of Napa County. The movement
for a division of tho county proceeded
from men of Breckenridge Democratic
sentiments, who thought that Napa was
altogether to "loyal" for them. Lakeport,
tho county seat, then had two small
houses and a blacksmith shop, and was—
according to the California idea —there-
fore entitled to be called a "city."
Len. Harris, who was then a Con
stable, and County Surveyor Cleal, who
who was known as "Majah" Cleal, had a
hot fight on Fourth street. Cleal sug
gested that one Southern man could
whip ten Northern men, and Harris ven
tured to remark that the Major had got
his figures reversed. Then they went at
it, and when the dust cleared away Har
ris was on his feet ready for more fun,
but the Major lay Hat—he wasn't in it.
On August 9, 1861, the ladies of
Suttervillo presented the Union Club of
that place with a beautiful flag. The
affair took place in front of Hastings
Hotel, whero a fine flagstaff had been
erected. Mrs. Lake made the presenta
tion speech, after which remarks were
mado by M. M. Estee, Dr. Powell, R. D.
Ferguson, Dr. A. B. Nixon, Wilson Flint,
N. Greene Curtis and others.
"Pete" Humrich was tho leading
hackman then in the city. One day the
horses attached to one of his carriages
ran away from First and N streets, and
made things lively along tho water front.
Tho driver was thrown from his seat and
nearly killed, a freight shed demolished,
and tho vehicle shattered into splinters.
The old original "Western"
Hotel, afterward known as the "Capital,"
a frame building on the northwest corner
of Tenth and X street —opposite the
present State Houso Hotel —was de
stroyed by tire on tho night of June 6,
1881. It was built in 1851, and was for
several years run by Joseph Sutton.
Tho Water Works building,
which was then, as now, used for City
Jail purposes, was in such bad condition
tliat the prisoners all had to bo removed
whilo it was being repaired. The old
rattle-trap has been a constant source of
expenditure ever since.
Peoplo wero hoard remarking
on Thursday last that the weather was
unprecedented for June, and that the
climate must be changing. On the 10th
of June, 1801, the Sacramento Valley was
visited by a heavy rain and hailstorm.
The First California Regiment,
recruited in the East by Colonol E. 1).
Baker, and which was composed mostly
of former residents of this State, went
into camp on Staten Island, New York,
on the 20th of May, 1861.
The first new barley of the crop
of 1861 was brought to the city on Juno
9th by A. Keithley, from American
Township. He had been the first to
market barley for the three preceding
years.
Timothy J. Kiley was on June 5,
1861, found guilty of the murder of
Angus J. Ross. The trugedy occurred
on or near what is now Colonel McNas
ser's tule ranch in the Pocket.
UNOFFICIALLY CONDEMNED.
Exports Seadler and Carle Find the
Water "Works Buildinc. Unsafe.
S. Carle, the builder, and architect
James Seadler made a thorough examina
tion of the old City Hall building yester
day morning, and they saw enough to
convince them that the structure is in an
exceedingly dangerous condition.
Tho front and rear walls are several
inches out of plumb, and tho iron stay
rods running through tho building have
sunk into the brickwork, showing the
terrible strain upon them. Cracks are to
be seen in many places in the walls.
They also found the timbers beneath the
roof of the building and the tank, which
they support, to be badly rotted.
The gentlemen will niake a report of
their examination to the Board of City
Trustees next Monday.
Mike Fessler was to* have been tried by
a jury in the Police Court yesterday, on
a charge of selling liquor to Indians, but
when tbe cases was called his attorney
stated that be had consulted all tho per
sons Bubpenaed as jurors in the case, and
all but ono said they did not desire to run
the risk of remaining in such an unsafe
building.
Judge Cravens excused tho jurymen,
remarking that he did not want them to
stay where lie was afraid to. The case was
continued'until Tuesday next, by which
time a temporary courtroom will bo pro
vided at !*W Front street.
Police Judge Cravens and City Attor
ney Hart will also have offices there, they
having made up their minds to tako no
more chances on their lives in the old
building.
.#.
Shoemakerville, Pa., has a pear tree
luO years old.
Both the method and results when
Syrup of Figs is taken; it is pleasant
and refreshing to the taste, and acts
fently yet promptly on the Kidneys,
iiver aud Bowels, cleanses the sys
tem effectually, dispels colds, head
aches and fevers and cures habitual
constipation. Syrup of Figs is the
only remedy of its kind ever pro
duced, pleasing to the taste and ac
ceptable to the stomach, prompt in
its action and truly beneficial in its
effects, prepared only from the most
healthy and agreeable substances, its
many excellent qualities commend it
to all and have made it the most
popular remedy known.
Syrup of Figs is for sale in 50c
and Sl bottles by all leading drug
gists. Any reliable druggist who
may not have it on hand will pro
cure it promptly for any one who
wishes to try it- Do not accept any
substitute.
CAUFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO.
BAN FRANCIBCO. CAL.
LOUISVILLE, KY. NEW YORK. N.Y.
SACRAMEXTO BALLY RECORD-UyiOlSr, SATURDAY JUKE 13, 1891.—EIGHT PAGES.
EVERYBODY'S COLUMN.
Correspondence of Interest to the
General Public.
[Under this heading the Kecord-Union
will publish short letters from correspondents
on topics of Interest to the general pnbllc. The
matter ln theso communications will be un
derstood to represent only the views of the
writers. All communications must l>e accom
panied by the name of the writer, not for pub
lication, unless so desired, but as a guarantee
of good faitti.—Ens.]
"An Old Crank" on the Sewerage
Question.
Eds. Record-Union: I was reading
the Record-L'nion's article about sewage,
and I says to Trypheynia, "I am glad the
papers don't drop the subject, for I have
noticed that the only way to reform any
thing is to keep harping on it. No mat
ter how much a thing is needed, or how
plainly it is shown, unless you keep
stirring it up it dies out in a little while,
and you hear no more of it."
"Well," says Tryphenia, "although
I'm a woman and don't understand
politics, I have got a little common .sense,
and the way you men go at a thing ap-
Sears to me, sometimes, ridiculous,
low, of course, it takes mony to do any
thing, and tho first thing you men do is
to talk about borrowing here, or borrow
ing there, or trying to get it in some way
so that you can leave it to posterity to
pay. Of course, this has to be done in
some cases, but there has been too much
of it done already here. That is what's
the matter with the city finances now.
You say you can't do this, and you can't
do that, because it isn't legal. Of course
you can't (or shouldn't) do a thing which
is illegal, but why don't you take tho
necessary steps to make it legal, and
levy a tax to raise the needed funds, and
do it in such a way that half tho tax
payers can't refuse to pay and leave the
other half to bear all of the burden.
"To my mind there is no better w Tay to
raise mouey for any public purpose than
by a direct tax, so long as the people can
raise the money to pay the tax. Of course
there is a limit, but when that is reached
something had better be postponed.
"The folly of the idea of borrowing
8100,000 of the Funded Debt Commission
ers is shown by their conditions, viz: To
raise tho assessment-roll from §14,400,000
to §18,000.000, and raise licenses, which (at
the present por cent.) would give just
about $100,000 more available funds. Why
not raise tlie amount on the present roll
by an additional per cent.? Of course, if
the assessment-roll is raised there will be
an additional per cent, for State and
county purposes; and if the per cent, ot
assessment is higher than in other coun
ties, that would be an injustice to Sacra
mento Countj".
"You men will learn in time that you
can't have anything worth having with
out pajdng for it, and you make so many
blunders that you often pay a good deal
more than you ought. Evidently your
drainage canal was a blunder. A woman
would see that the river, with its volume
of How ing water, is much better thau
any canal, and it is not far to salt tide
water. Few people below use water from
the river for culinary purposes, and they
can procure what they need from wells
without serious inconvenience.
"Your Funded Debt Commission was
another partial blunder. The idea was
all right in tho start (if I understand it),
that is to wipe out the debt with the fund
provided by law, by purchasing bonds,
and with the interest of purchased bonds
purchaso more bonds, cut infinitum. (Of
course, interest will wipe out most any
thing in time. It has nearly wiped out
Sacramento.) This was all "right, while
the commissioners could purchaso bonds
at low prices: but where the blunder
came in was this—when the outstanding
bonds could have been purchased at aO
cents on the dollar and refunded, it
ought to havo been done; now it is tno
late, and there is probably no better way
than to let tho commissioners go on until
tho debt is wiped out. Of course, a
woman can sec that this way of doing the
tiling has not relieved the taxpayers; nor
can it, until the bebt is paid"
Tryphenia walked away, and I forgot
to bring in my old argument, "You are a
woman, and don't understand politics."
Old Crank.
Saeramonto, June 12, 1891.
Less Country Deadfalls.
Eds. Record-Union* : Tho legality of
the action of our Supervisors in raising
the county liquor license has been ques
tioned. Whilo they reconsider, let us
remind them that the price named was
ridiculously small. Can they expect, by
the trifling tax of £30 per quarter, to re
deem our couuty from the indifference of
tho past and atone for the outcome, the
crimes that, to our lasting shame and
disgrace, have been heralded far and
wide ? Do they honestly mean to deter
| for one moment any country saloon?
j Some havo already suggested that they
I take out no license, give up their liquors
and make up tho loss on cigars and—re
venge. Gentlemen ot the county, take
courage!
Tiiis is an age and day worth living in.
Show yourselves worthy of it. It is a
day worth all tho sacrifice you will be
called upon to make —even the failure to
be re-elected. They are of little account
who would please everybody.
Guardians of our county, rise to the oc
casion ! Make glade the heart of many a
sufferer from the sale of liquors on tho
"home-stretch." Make the county li
cense not one cent less than £500 for the
year. Saloon men will not bo pleased
with you at any price, so give them
enough to growl about. By this act of
heroism you will gently invite these rest
ing ones, who sit under their wayside
awnings hoping each passer-by is very
thirsty, to seek another and an honorable
living. Then the hands now raised in
holy horror at Sacramento's dark crimes
will applaud you to tho echo.
Then it i.s to be haped tho city fathers
j will assert their manhood and out-do j rou
| in the city tax, if they would atone for
j past neglect to honest peoplo compelled
i to make homes in what is fast becoming
! a notorious city. If they are men far-
I sighted, progressive, possessed of adroit
i reasoning, with broad plans for Sacra
i mento's future, they will say to tho State
at large: "We arc sullicient for these
j things. The remedy in other cities has
j been an extremely high license. We
I will make our city license higher than
the highost." Then, whether prohibi
tion is before the people or no, whether
prohibition prohibits o r no, wo shall find
a deslrablo state of affairs.
It is absurd for business men to cry,
"Trade will decline if saloons are closed."
Let them sound a truer note, "put your
dimes into bettor food, better clothing for
your families, more books and a home."
Let tlio reputation of Sacramento bo,
fewer saloons to tho thousand than any
Calilornia city, and a class of people will
seek it—bad sewerage and all—who will
be desirable citizens, worthy a home in a
city thrice blessed.
Then it will be in order tor that class of
citizens who measure the business pros
perity ofa city by the numbar of saloons
it can support, to retire to somo city
cursed as we are at present, with one
saloon for every seventeen voters.
M. E. T.
Sacramento, June 9, 1891.
A Caso of Rapid Growth.
Eds. Record-Union: I see you havo a
department of your paper which you
call "Everybody's Column," and it looks
to mo as if everybody was trying to get
into it. I don't complain at all—indeed,
I rather like it. But in view of the stam
pede in that direction, don't you think
you should change tiie title of that de
partment and call it "Everybody's Col
jumns?" Tho ono you started with ap
j pears to havo outgrown its infant clothes.
James P. L.
Sacramento, Juno 12, 1891.
Brewery Stock.
In tho Superior Court yesterday Judge
Catlin issued an order transferring a
I number of shares of Columbus Brewery
stock from the possession of Fredericks
WahL guardian of the estato of Gustavo
Wild, an insane person, to Annie and
Chris. \\ ahl. Tho transfer was petitioned
lor by tho guardian. The stock had beon
civen to Gustavo Wahl beforo his mind
became unbalanced as security for a loan
of $1,200. Tho guardian doos uot now
wish to retain the stock.
<&hatiQfib ipailß for the 3£*fr gauac.
.S_A.TTJR.DjOIY),
Our Regular Sale of Special Lines.
"EXTRA INDUCEMENTS IN FOOTWEAR^
3^ See closing prices of TINWARE in Monday's ad.
SPECIAL PRICES ON ALL LINES FOR TO-DAY.
One case of Figured Challis at 3_c per yard
One case of Handsome Figured Lawns 3_c per yard
One case of Extra-fine Challis 6c per yard
IN FANCY GOODS DEPARTMENT TO-DAY.
43-inch wide White Embroidered Flouncing, in different
patterns, on swiss or fine lawn material ...35c per yard
Ladies' best quality of French Kid Gloves, black, in sizes
SJ and ss, extra long fingers, worth $1 80, f0r..35c a pair
Six-inch Steel Scissors 5e
FURNISHING GOODS TO-DAY.
Men's Gray Derby Ribbed Overshirts 40c
Boys' Percale Waist, fancy figured 19c
CLOTHING TO-DAY.
Men's Extra-heavy All-wool Cheviot Pants $1 95
Men's Summer-weight Cassimere Pants $2 OO
Men's $5 Dress Worsted Pants for $2 50
A line of Boys' Dark Brown Check Knee-pants Suits..sl OO
SHOES TO-DAY.
TOT I. MISSES' Fine Kid Button, cork sole, C. S
last, square toe, low heel, extra fine (Sailer,
LADIES' Fine Calf Patent Leather Whole- Lewin & Co., makers), sizes 13, 13} and 1,
foxeJ Button Shoe, satin cloth top, French last, $3 50; sale price, .1 45.
square toe, low heel, turned sole, sizes 2, 2_\, MISSES' Straight-grain French Goat Button
3 and t>, $b; sale price, $3 45. Shoe, worked holes. C. S. last, opera toe, me-
LADIES' Fine Kid Button, flexible soles, C. dium low heel (Henderson & Co., makers),
S. and opera lasts, worked button holes, finely sizes 12 and 13, £2; sale price, 95c.
finished, sizes 2t05, D and E, $2 50; sale MISSES' French Dongola Button, satin fin
price, Si 55. ished, opera toe and heel, flexible turn sole
LADIES' Brocaded Satin Opera-toe Slippers, sizes n£, 12, 12$ and 13, .2; sale price, 95c.
silk bow on toe, opera last, turned sole, sizes MEN'S French Calf Lace and Button Ox
-2 to 4s; sale price, 70c. fords, plain and tip toe, pump sole, low quart-
LADIES' Serge (22 thread) Button Shoes, C. ers, sizes 5, ss, 6, o_f, 9 and 11, $3 50; sale
S. last, square toe and low heel, narrow price, $1 90.
widths, sizes 2, z\, 3 and 3s, $3 50; sale MEX'S French Calf Seamless Hook and Lace
price, $1 25. Shoes, plain French toe, hand sewed, kangaroo
LADIES' French Kid Lace Oxfords, ooze tan top, sizes 7, -jh and 9; sale price, S3 50.
quarters, patent leather tip, hand turned John- MEN'S Tan Goat Toilet Slippers, patent
son Bros.' manufacture), sizes 1, i{t, 2, 2_\ and leather trimmed and backs sewed, sizes oto
3s, B and C, $2 50; sale price, Si 2*. 9, $1 25; sale price, 65c.
===
To-day, (ireat Sale of Imported Flowers and Ladies' and Misses' Trimmed Hats.
Since the great break in prices of Imported Flowers we have received by express a
consignment of 88 dozen of the finest quality of French Flowers and Wreaths, which
will be on sale TO-DAY at about half the regular price. Among them are many new
designs. Also, all our large stock of Imported and Domestic Trimmed Hats will be on
sale at one-third discount from regular prices.
C. H. GILMAN,
RED HOUSE, SACRAMENTO.
3/fcU» ccUancovtß.
DR.ABERNETHY rS
I Cures CRAMPS and COLIC
■^S____*iEsS3 "It >s composed of the purest
ta_oߣbfßt materials, and represents the
i- /mm^v L Wl medicinal value of Jamaica
a?TfP*Potuffi Gmger in the highest .degree of
j j ■aJaffili Perfection."
WM. T. WENZELL,
>r ___^^^ | ] Analytical Chemist.
_» s^ Sold by Druggists and Wine
•^;- JOS. ft SOUTHER MASUFACTURWG CO.,
toteFWfflm San Francisco.
Baker & Hamilton.
—importers and jobbers of—
HARDWARE, IRON, STEEL,
COAL, POWDER,
Agricultural Implements and Machines,
BARBED WIRE, CORDAGE, BELTING.
Sacramento .California
jjleJ OGDEN ROUTEjgJ
®VVWVVC^ COJV (S«/lA>AC/C, >Co
WELCH S CAUFORNIA INHALER
11^^ — —s Sure Cure for Catarrh,
/sk7k- rVAYa rC*\. Bronchitis, Asthma,
U?«i^N. '-The Only All-night
_^^^_Ae^SL Inhalation."
•f*^i u^.'JJn Break up a cold ln one
»■ WW **^ \^f nigbt. Sure preventive
__„ 1 Jr for all infectious diseases.
For sale by all drug-
\ gists, or sent postpaid lor
Sr>y>~ \ p| 50 by the
WELCH INHALER ANP MEDICINE CO.
37 Second Street, San Francisco.
mrJ>-Uui.
TH WEAK MEN _£S£2
early decay, wartlnar weakness, lost maohood, etc,
I will wud a valuable trouti:« (Sfal^d) containing
fall particular* for home cure, FBEB of charge.
A spleti'lM ruedli-al work; sbould be read by every
man who is nervous and debilitated. Addresa,
Prof. F- C. FOWLISB. Mooduo, Conn*
jS.mtk.ng ijrm&e&.
SACRAMENTO BANIT
THE OLDEST SAVINGS BANK IN THE
city, corner Filth and J streets, Pacra
| mento. Guaranteed capital, 9500,000; paid
j up capital, cold coin.$300,000; loans on real
! estate ln California, July 1,1590, $2,898 442
-1 term and ordinary deposits July 1 1890*
$2,709,394. Term and ordinary deposits re^
eeived. Dividends paid in January and July
Money loaned upon real estate only. The
bank does exclusively a savings bank busi
ness. Intormation furnished upon apnllea-
U^ n X% » W' R TLEMAN, President. ,
_J^._RJtf^lLT^^^hier^_'
NATIONAL BANK OF & I ______ ft GOL
Sacramento, CaL—Founded 1850.
Saturday hours 10 a. jt. to 1 r. ar.
r. DIRECTORS AND SHAREHOLDERS.
g-O- **"£ga-gra 1,538 Shares
EDGAR MILLS, President 1,538 Shares
l^?s^? ?$k TK < v 'co-Pre.s. '256 Share!
£ K,*?£r Casbi«»- 351 Shares
C.. I. DILLMAN, Asst. Cashier.. 125 Shares
Other persons own 1,19s Shares
Capital and Surplus, $600,000.
*5- Chrome Steel Safe Deposit Vault and
Time Lock.
"IAUFOBSIi STATE BANJT
AND SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS
SACRAMENTO, CAL.
Draws Drafts on Principal Cities of the World.
Saturday Hocrs, 10 a. m. to 1 r. m.
OITFICKRS*
President. '...N. D. RIDEOUT
Vice-President FRED'K COX
Cashier. A . ABBOTT
Assistant Cashier W. E. GERBER
directoijs:
C. W. Clark, jos. Steffens.
Geo. CL Perkins, Fred'k Cox; -
N. D. Rideout, Nobjlan Rideout.
t W. E. GERBER. *■
FARMERS' AND MECHANICS' SAVINGS BANK
Southwest corner Fourth and J
Stroeta, Sacramento, CaL
Guaranteed Capital 9500,000
T OANS MADE ON REAL ESTATE. IN
l__ terest paid semi-annually on Term and
Ordinary Opposite.
B. U STEINMAN President
S^^rS-nA^IF- - Vice-President
D. D. WHITRECK Cashier
O. H. CUMMINGS Secretary
JAMES M. STEVENSON Surveyor
DIRECTORS:
B. U. steinman, Edwin X alsip,
C. H. CUMMINGS, W. E. TERRY,
Sol. Runyon, James McNasser,
Jas. M. Steven3on.
PEOPLE'S SAVINGS BANK.
T\EPOSITS OF ONE DOLLAR AND UP
SJ wards received and interest paid thereon
nr WM. BECKMAN, President.
Geo. W. Lorenz, Secretary.
CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK.
322 Pine Street, San Francisco.
PAID UP CAPITAL, $1,000,000. SURPLUS, $250,000.
directors:
CHARLES CROCKER ...E. H. MILLER, Jr.
R. C. WOOLWORTH President
W. H. BROWN Vice-President
W. ■■£. CROCKER Cashier
DO YOU use: a
TYPEWRITER?
We are sole agents for the best line made of
TYPEWRITER RIBBONS for all machines.
Tpyewriter Supplies of all kinds.
H.S.CROCKER&CO.
Wholesale and Retail Stationers,
208-glO J Street, - Sacramento, Cal
NO importation"
OF EASTERN, PENITENTIARY OR
cheap Coolie goods of paper material,
or those undprselllng our honest industry,
to ruin the city and State to chaos. Only
regular goods from flrst-class manufacturing
, houses, such as Hatha way. Sole & Harring
j ton, Boston; the United Vf'orkmen Company,
! San Francisco. Goods sold at prices beyond
i competition. United Workmen's Fine Calf
I Shoes reduced from S:. 50 to S3.
I myl2-tf M.KUEHNEL, 824 J Street. |
£ic*tel* an^ 5:-rotnxtra«t*.
STATB HOUSE HOTEL.
__________PJMBt^'l^^^]^^^^^y^^i>fe
pORNKR TENTH AND X STREETS. SAO
V. > ramento. Best family hotel ln the city.
Most convenient und desirable location. One
block from Capitol. Street cars pass ihe door.
■seal*, 25 cents. Free 'bus t. . nud from ths
hotel. ROOD A JOHNSON, Proprietors.
GOLDEN EAGLE HOTEL,
Corner Seventh and X Streets.
STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS. FREE 'RUS
to and fiom the ears.
W. O. ROWERS. Proprietor.
Corner Seventh and X Streets, Sacramento.
STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS. FREE' RUS TO
and from the cars. IJ. R. DROWN, for
merly ofthcStateJlouseHotel^
WESTERN HOTEL,
THE LEADING HOUSE OF SACRA
mento, Cal. Meals, 25 cent . WM. LAND,
Proprietor. Free 'bus to and from hotel.
DINING ROOM.
THE UNDERSIGNED HEREBY AN
nounces that he will open the Interna
tional Hotel Dining-Room on June Ist, and
conduct it in a most satisfactory manner. Ar
rangements can now he made for regular
boarders, [mj 28-tf] E. L.FXJNK, Proprietor.
THE SADDLE ROCK
Restaurant and Oyster House
FIRST-CLASS HOUSE IN EVERY RE
spect. Ladies' dining-room separate. Open
day and ni-ht. BUCKMANN & CARRA
UHER, Proprietors. No. 1019 Second street,
between J and X, Sacramento.
RACIEIC HOTEL,
Corner X and Fifth Streets, Sacramento.
CENTRALLY LOCATED AND CONVEN-
Ient to ull places ot amusement. The best
family hotel in the city. The table ulwavs
supplied with the best the market affords.
Street cars irom the depot pa«s the door every
five minutes. Meals, 23 cents.
C. F. SINGLETON. Proprietor.
TREMONT HOTEL,
MRS. P. BRYDING, Sole Proprietor.
NEWLY FURNISHED AND RENOVATED
tine family hotel: a well-supplied Table
airy rooms; terms moderate; accommodations
excellent. 112 and 114 .1 street. a»i-___£_l__
HOTEL RHEIN,
1009 nnd 101 l J Street.
THE ABOVE HOTEL WILL BE OPEN
and ready for business THURSDAY.
June llth.
JeMf JOHN RUEDY, Proprietor.
ST. DAVID'S,
715 HoVard Street, near Third, San Francisco.
A FIRST-CLASS LODGING HOTEL, CON
taining 200 rooms; water and gas in each
room; no better beds ln the world; no guest
allowed to use the linen once used by another
a large reading-room; hot and cold water
baths free. Price of Rooms—Per night 50
and 75 cents; per week, from «2 upward.
Open all night. R. HUGHES. Froprletor
*»-At Market-street Ferry take Omnibus
I^^ qfjtrectcars for Third and Howard.TTS
BROOKLYN HOTEL^
BUSH STREET, BETWEEN MONTOOM
erv and Sansome, San Fraucisco, con
ducted on both the European and American
plan. This Hotel is under the management ot
Charles Montgomery and is tho best Family
and Business Men's Hotel in San Francisco
Home comforts, cuisine unexcelled, first-class
service, highest standard of respectability
guaranteed. Board and room per day Sl 25
to ?2; single room. 50 cents to Sl per nicht.
* ree coach to and from tho Hotel. TTSa
If
London and Berlin Medical Dispensary.
DOCTOR WILLIAMS'
JBICIL AND SlitKil dffICES,
612 X Street, Sacramento, Cal.,
FOR THE PROMPT CURE OF ALL
Chronic and Private Diseases, Dis
eases of Manhood, Dlsestses of Women,
etc. Sexual and Seminal Weakness,
Nervous Dehllltv. THnrnnno ofthe Stoni
uch. Diver and Kidneys nnd all "Weak
enlnp: Disenses, Local and Chronic Af
fections POSITIVELY' CURED.
Consultation and Examination Free to Patients.
Country patients troated with unfail
ing success. Il unable to call, write for
circular. myJ7-lm.jp
Waterhouse & Lester,
—DEALERS IN—
Iron, Steel, Cumberland Coal, Wagon
Lumber and Carriage Hardware.
709, 711. -U3. Tl5 J St., Sacraniento
SHERWOOD HAU NURSERIES,
1
Timothy Hopkins,
MENLO PARK, SAN MATEO COUNTY, CAL
Carnations, Roses, Chrysanthemnms
and Cut Flowers.
4S- SWEET PEA SEED A SPECIALTY.-**
THE WEEKLY UNION 3 THE PAPER
to send to friends In the East.
.trtfihtcnmUle fjjgjjgjjgg;
ilUc IUHEIRR
THE TAILOR Jfe
MAKES TH E BEST CLOTHES v ." P
ft 25 PER GENT LESS J^
THM ANY OTHER HOUSE. t*Ay:,\
SLITS lade to QrierfiGni §20
PAN TS Made to Order from §5 Xl
FINE TAILORING IHi
AT MODERATE PRICES
*S"*RulesforSelf-Measun«nient^. I IjH
ar.d Samjilcs of Cloth sent lrco^^Jy|l',:ss^
No.6ooJSt.,cor.Sixth
SACRAMENTO.
t BEFORE ORDERING YOUR
SPRING SUIT, Call on
GABEL the TAILOR
42tf J STl__3ET 0
SACRAMENTO.
1000 PAnERfTsVsELECT Uom.
SUITS TO ORDER from
$15.00 Up.
PANTS TO ORDER from
$3,50 Up:
trotting *strtUt<m*f.
ROSS S.
| QTANDARD; RECORD, 2:Cr,. (IN NITM,
kp brrs \vin t«> R i Voll i„ w.aia^e's Trotting
| Krister No. 10.)
. KOSS S., 2:25, by NntWOOd, flrst
i dam by stat*-of Maine, 2:40, i>v 81mpeon*a
Messenger by Wlnthrop Messenger, son ol
X? pY*;fwe£Ser« 8«» nd dam by McCraokm'S
Black Hawk.
Koss S. has the fastest record Of any Nut
wood stallion on th>; coast,excepting DawiL
2:1 H%, and u« a sire will prove to oe tho oqnnl
of any son of Nutwood. His tirst foils, now
3-yvar-oh!s. are v. r\ promising, and three «»i
them will drop in the 2:30 lb. this I
nothing happens them, as two can now show
a 2:30 gait, and the tlnni can trot a mile In
2:50. Hoss s.and i.is cc.its can be seenal
j of the undersigned, where all can so«
that he lea sire of size, color, st] le and speed.
DESCRIPTION—ROSS 3, is a rosewood
bay, 16 bands high, weighs 1,150 pounds.
very Stylish, good inane and tail, legs and
feet, plenty ot bone and muscle, and a splen
did lone nee':.
TKItMS—KOSS S. will stand at 976 for the
season.
PAY CAR
Is my name; my site is Ross S., record 2:25,
by Nutwood,record 2:18%; mydamlsEtolkr,
by Sultan, record 2:24, siro of StambOOL
record 2:11; my great dam is Katie Did. ths
dam ot Inex, record 2:30. [am 3 years old,
15., hands high, splendid bl<>o.i bay in color.
heavy black mane and tad. the best or less
and feet. lorn, neck, good head, well set on,
can trot a 2:40 gall in an easy way. I am tha
, only staillon In the Slate Standing for publki
I service that combines the blood of the two
j great sires, Nntwood and Sultan. I win »>.
| allowed to serve fifteen approved mares for
§oO the season, al Worth Ober's Training
tables, Sacramento Race Track. Good mares
Kent to lived To in. ■ will have tbe best of care.
ful bandllng and kept ba any way wished.
Accidents orescapestd owner's risk. Addrese
all communications to
"WORTH ORER, Owner,
mr2l-Sm 618 Twe ity-thlrd st., BacramentOw...
NUTWOOD JR.,
3NHE FAMOUS STALLION. WILL STAND
. the season at At. UICELTURAL PARK.
rice, (30 for season.
mr2l-3m R. 11. NASON. Pronrletor.
QttbKXt<xtuev».
*
JOHN MILLER
(Sueecssor to Fritz & Miller),
UNDERTAKING PARLORS,
QA,*- X STREET (OOD FELOWS' TEM
.I \f' I pie). A complete stock of Undertaking
Goods always on hand. EMU ALMING A
SPECIALTY. Telephone No. 186.
J. FRANK CLARK,
UNDERTAKING PARLORS,
1017-101!) Fourth St., Sneramento.
} EMBALMING A SPECIALTY. GEORGE
_j H CLAKK, Fnn«'ral 1 nrector and County
Coroner. Telephone No. 184.
W. J. KAVANAUGH, Undertaker,
No. 818 J St., bet. Fifth and Sixth.
ALWAYS ON HANI) A LARGE ASSORT
ment of Metallic and Wooden Caskets.
Hunal Cases, Coffins and Shrouds furnished.
.'-oftin orders will receive prompt attention on
ihort notice and at ths iowest rate*. Ofliee
open day and nn_nt. Telephone No. 305.
J\a\>e you SnwKtd
in your pipe?
lfitof,tryitan^
you will usejto
otfjer fobaceo.
I pdLzHh'b inmost
donvenieut, * p acKa§e^_
•n«-SALE - flr-ALI -BfAIERS^
; Mamifadurcd b| J. B. PACE TOBACCO CO.
KILGBRE & C©.,
AGENTS FOR
Studebaker Bros.
WAGONS, CARRIAGES,
BUGGIES and CARTS.
The latest stylos nnd the host mado
vehicles In tho world.
Pacific Gas Engine,
The leading and only successful
Gas Engine in the market.
1000, 1002,1004, 1006 X Street,
SACRAMENTO.
A~[ Q "T SfcREET, MANUFACTURES OP
4rJ.O Fino Home-made Candies and leo
Cream Soda. my.!l-6m
D. JOMINJSTO tSI & CO. s
(Successors to A. J. Johnston A Co.),
BOOK AND JOB PRINTERS,
410 J Street, Saeraideate. _____;.f
5

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