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The record-union. (Sacramento, Calif.) 1891-1903, June 13, 1891, Image 6

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6
MUSIC AND DRAMA.
Summer Amusements in the Great
Metropolis.
"Tom Sawyer"" Not a Succors—John li.
Sullivan and Duncan IJ. Harrison—
'•Tho Limited Mail-—General Stage
Notes.
A. P. Dunlop, writing from New York
under date of June 6th, says:
Tho season dies hard. Gotham has for
tbe last week been sweltering in mid
summer heat, and yet three novelties
were pushed forward for metropolitan
approval. Tbe most notable of theso was
a little gem in ono act by Nugent Robin
son, editor of 'Jnce a Week, and John
Ernest McCann, the poet, which Robert
Mantell used as a "curtain raiser." It is
called "A Lesson in Acting," and was
done for the first timo at the Lyceum on
Tuesday. It is a well-invented little
drama, written in pure and poetic Eng
lish, and possessed of more dramatic in
terest than any "curtain raiser" seen in
New York for a long time. The next
Mas a three-act comedy called "Miss
Manning,''written by J. B. Kunnion of
the Chicago Tribune, produced at the
Fourteenth Street Theater, but it did not
lit Miss Effle Ellsler, whose sufl'erings as
Hazel Kirk "nave been on exhibition all
over the country for so many years.
With Lotta as tho star, and a suitable
company, the play might be made to go
right merrily, which it does not now.
The third novelty was at Jacobs' Theater,
it was said to be the work of Mark Twain,
and was called "Tom Sawyer." The
play, if such it can be called, was a delu
sion and a snare. Mark Twain is liter
ally not in it. It is merely a variety
show, and very badly done at that. The
performance was a downright fiasco.
JOHN L. Sl I.LIVAN,
Tho so-called pugilist-actor, will appear
at the Clunie < toera House on next Mon
day and Tuesday evenings, backed by
Duncan B. Harrison's Company, in Mr.
Harrison's pretty Irish drama, "Honest
Hearts and Willing Hands." The play
is said to l>e a cha lining one, but no mat
ter what it is the houso will no doubt be
crowded just to see the famous slogger.
Everybody has heard of John, andevory
body warns to set' bow he looks.
"THK LIMITED MAIL,"
Is to be the attraction at the Metropolitan
next Friday and Saturday evenings. It
tells a story that is not particularly new.
There is a waif, a well-meaning old man,
who is temporarily in the power of a
scheming villain, a conductor who makes
love to the waif, a frolicsome boy who
annoys the lovers, a scolding old woman,
a witty Irish section boss, and two or
three minor characters. The scenes are
located in and around a railroad station.
Like lloyt's "A Hole in tlie Ground," an
attempt is made to satirize the people
who worry the ticket agent with unneces
sary questions. It is easy to see that the
author is a railroad man. and any man
who has spent a portion of his life work
ing for a railway company will recognize
tbe truthfulness of many of the scenes
represented. A telegraph operator, for
instance, will anticipate tbe love scene
between tlie soubreite and the juvenile
man which is carried on over the tele
graph instrument. The mechanical ef
fects, particularly tlie running ofthe lim
ited mail train across the stage, the wreck
of a band .-ar and the sawmill in motion
are sufficient in themselves to insure the
success of the play.
STAGE NOTES,
Fanny Davenport closed her season last
Week in Newark.
Leonora Bradley is slowly recovering
from a very severe attack of the grip.
Charles Warner, a well-known English
actor, lias been engaged by < diaries Froh
man.
Leonora Snyder has gone to England
to sing Leading roles at the Savoy Thea
ter, London.
August in Daly has bought tho Ameri
can rights to George de Ports-Richo's
"Alliouieiise."
Flit Raymond has signed with the Slo
cum Opera Company for a summer sea
son of ten weeks at Birmingham, Ala.
Frank McKee owns the right to "A
Hole in the Ground" for the next season,
and has engaged Charles Cowles for the
hading part.
Messrs. Sims and Buchanan are the
joint authors of a new play which has
neen bought by Edward Sothern for pro
duction in this country.
John Hare, a will-known English actor
at tb1' London < tarrick Theater, lias been
engaged by Charles Frohman for the part
of Martial in "Themiidor."
Bob < rraham will probably go out next
season as bis own manager In the "Little
Tycoon," and the season following in his
new play, "Larry the Lord."
Augusts Van Biene,a violinist of re
pute in England, i^ going to turn actor,
and will soon appeal in Liverpool as Rip
Van Winkle in l'lanquette's Opera.
Mrs. Leslie Carter will abandon the
dramatic stage for comic opera, and E. I>.
Price, her manager, will, by force of
circumstances, become an impressarto.
And now it is said that Pasqualina, the
Italian girl, who killed her lover and was
acquitted in New York, will go on tlie
HENRY UIHLEIN, President. AUGUST UIHLEIH, Secretary. ALFRED U3HLEIN, Superintendent.
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''SCHLITZ-BfilU" #JRttlLk,VlrJ_\W KkEL&k.* "SCBLITZ-PORTER"
ANNUAL CAPACITYC ONE MILLION BARRELS OF BEER
-scft//f2 Beer Is sold the World over andtyas a world^wl^tepatatfo/lfo^ befa^tße^Best^ltfsi warranted to be pure, wholesome
and palatable? and?brewed^mUfiesclitoestWss*_WQ^
stage in a play written around tho mur
der.
Minnie Palmer telegraphed to Rome for
John Rogers, and both are now in Lon
don receiving congratulations from
friends. Neither will be in a hurry to
return.
A new social drama by Robert Buchan
an, called "Heredity," is in active re
hearsal at the London Avenue Theater.
The leading characters will ho played by
Miss Fanny Brough, Miss Cicely Rich
ards. Mr. Fulton, Ivan Watson," Harry
Paulton and J. L. Shine. Another new
play by Mr. Buchanan has been pur
chased by Daniel Frohman for the Lyce
um Theater in New York.
The next absolute novelty to be pre
sented by Beerbohm Tree at the London
Haymarket Theater is to be an original
work upon a classical subject from a hith
erto unknown author. The production
will be upon a scale of great magnificence,
and is evidently regarded by Mr. Tree as
an experiment of great importance. His
autumn season will begin with a revival
of tiie "Dancing Girl."
"Hedda Gablcr" was not much of a
success in London after all, in spite ofthe
reports of its triumph which were cabled
repeatedly across the Atlantic. It ran
better than any other Ibsen play, but the
general public did not care for it, al
though it was advertised with great skill
and persistency. Tho story that Ibsen
was about to visit England to receive the
tributes of his worshipers is also void of
foundation.
Augustus Harris thinks that the timo
may have come in London for a revival
of the nautical drama, and has commis
sioned Henry Pettitt to write a new play
of that description, which will be pro
duced in Drury Lane Theater next Au
gust. The principal character will be
played by Charles Warner, who will thus
have a chance of proving tho legitimate
successor of T. P. Cooke. Other parte
will be played by Charles Gleiiny and
Miss Millward.
The principal members of the Theater
Francais will give a series of perform
ances in the London Royalty Theater
next July and August. Among the plays
to be presented are "Manage Blanc,"
"Pepa," "Les Petite Oiscaux." "Mar
got," "(Edipe Roi," and "Andromaque."
Among the actors will be Mounet Sully,
Coqueun cadet, Febvre, Laroche, Bou
cher. Leloir, Truffle, Jean Coquelin, Co
quelin aine, Miles, Reiehemberg, Dud
lay, DuMinil, Fayalle, Kalband Bertini.
SAN FRANCISCO STOCK SALES.
San Fkaxcisco, June 12,1891.
MORNING BOARD.
Ophlr 8 85 Union l 85
Mexican ...2 30_ 2 40 Alta 55@60c
G. &C 1 GO'" 1 TO Caledonia .45c
B.A B 2 80 Julia 15c
Con. Va B)i®B% Silver Hill i>oc
Savage l 60 Challenge 1 30
Potosi 4 00 Occidental... 85c
("hollar 2 35 Andes l 70
H. A N 1 80 Lady W 25c
Point 1 30 Scorpion 25c
Jacket 2 00 Benton l 50
Imperial _ Lsc N. 15. Isle 65e
Kentuck :j()c belle Isle 70c
Alpha 75c Queen 25c
Belcher 1 40 Com'wealth 50c
Coufidenco 53. N. Com. W s<. •
S.Nevada 1 10 Bodie 80e
Utah 70c Bulwer i.'.c
Bullion 2 35_.2 40 Mono 40c
Exchequer 55c Syndicate 5c
S. Belcher Gsc Peer 5c
Overman 2 o5 New York 15c
Justice 65c
AFTERNOON SESSION.
Mexican 2 50 Silver Hill 25c
Best A 8.._ 3 05 Challenge 1 35
G.A C 1 G5 Occidental 85c
Savage 1 65<__»1 70iLady W 25c
Chollar 2 36 Andes l 75
Potosi 3 85 .3 90 Scorpion 25c
11. AN 1 80 Benton 1 50
l'oint 1 10 Eureka 3 7.~>
Jacket 2 00 Prize 15c
Imperial 1 5c Navajo iOc
Kentuck 35c Belle Isle t.5@75e
Alpha 7;.> c Queen
Utah 60c Com'wealth 65c
Bullion 2 ::. r> N.Comw'alth 80c
Exchequer 55c Delmonte 25c
S. Belcher 70c bodie 80c
Overman—2 05@2 li Bolwer 45c
Justice 650 Mono ioc
Union .:>. Peer lOc
Alta 55(^70C lowa 1 5c
Julia .".20c N.Savage 35c
<►-
Australia has now 4,750,000 of people,
L 500,000 more than the population of the
American colonies when they declared
their independence, and the same as Ire
land at the present time.
Hood's Sarsaparilla
Ja a peculiar medicine. It is carefully prepared
_srom Sarsaparilla, Dandelion, Mandrake, Dock,
f^psissewa, Juniper Berries, and other well*
jnown and valuable vegetable remedies, by a
peculiar combination, proportion and process,
jiving to llood'B Sarsaparilla curativo power not
possessed by other medicines. It eifects remark
ablo cures whero other preparations fail.
Hood's Sarsaparilla
Is tho best blood puriller beforo tho public, r*
eradicates every Impurity, and cures Scrofu'.a,
Salt Rhenm, Boils, Pimples, all Humors, Dys
pepsia, Biliousness, Sick Headache, Indigestion,
General Debility, Catarrh, Rheumatism, Kidney
and Liver Complaints, overcomes that tired feel
ing, creates an appetite, and builds np tho system.
Hood's Sarsaparilla
Has met peculiar and unparalleled success at
home. Such has become ita popularity la Lowell,
M;i-^., when it is made, thai whole neighbor'
I hoods aro taking it at the samo time. Lowell
druggists sell moro of Hood's Sarsaparilla than
of all other sarsaparillas or blood purifiers,
Sold by druggists. _J1; six for j1.5. Prepared only by
CL I. HOOD & CO.. Apothecaries, Lowell, Masi
100 Doses One Dollar
SACRAMENTO DAILY KECORP-ITNIOy, SATUEDAY, JUKE 13. 1801.— EIC4HT PAGES.
HERETICS AND HERESIES.
Rev. Heber Newton has shied his castor
into the ring of the theological contro
versy with the air of a fighter who pos
sesses both courage and skill. The con
test is one wiiich will command the atten
tion of tlie whole civilized world. —Kansas
City Journal.
The agitation of tho questions growing
out of the creed of the Episcopal Church
can result only in good to that denomina
tion. No harm ever comes from such
controversies as have been caused by tho
preaching of Dr. Brooks, Dr. Newton
and Dr. Briggs.—Memphis Appeal-Ava
lanche.
It is tho professors of theology who
raise doctrinal questions and throw
doubts on divinity aud the truth of the
Bible. The earnest preacher, who wants
to do good and who attends to his busi
ness, never has doubts and troubles that
lead to argument and discipline.—New
Orleans Picayune.
Dr. Bridgman has become an Episco
palian. Thus fadetb the hopes ot those
who had looked for the founding ofa new
Baptist-Universal!st denomination. Dr.
Bridgman has not yet received apostolic
ordination, but after that he will proba
bly be as stanch a close-communionist
as ever. —Brooklyn Citizen.
Bey. Heber Newton defined his posi
tion among Episcopalians and Rev. C. H.
Park hurst explained his attitude toward
the Presbyterian standards in the ser
mons in New York on Sunday. Both
eminent clergymen virtually said to the
"ultra orthodox" brethren of their re
spective denominations, "If this is heresy
make tho most of it." —Cleveland Plain
Dealer.
If Rev. Charles A. Parkhurst of the
Madison Square Presbyterian Church,
New York, brings to Detroit such lively
opinions as he expressed in New York
Sunday, he will drive the anti-Briggs
party into taking detinito action. Prince
ton Seminary will not relish being re
ferred to as anchored to a graveyard, no
matter whether the charge is true or false.
—Detroit Tribune.
If the church eventually measures up
to the lines of Parkhurst, Briggs and
Newton, that will not be their vindica
tion, but will be a reproach to them that
they did not wait untii the church arrived
there. To run ahead of their mother and
throw stones at her because her pace is
slow and careful may be "liberal" anil
may be "free," but it is of all things the
most untllial. —Brooklyn Eagle.
lt is exaggeration to call tho present
movement in church circles a panic,
though it is correct to designate this as a
season of activity in religious matters.
Tho activity is in the line ofa search for
truth, and a greater than any modern
theologian has said: "Ye shall know the
truth, and the truth shall make you free."
Keal religion has not and never had any
reason to fear the truth, —Troy Times.
In asserting that the church is in a
panic, Dr. Heber Newton did not really
exaggerate tho condition of unrest which
prevails in the religious world. The
spirit of agitation which has become in
fectious in ecclesiastical circles renders ii
difficult to prophesy what tho end will
be. The contest between faith and rea
son is becoming more active and is ex
tending to all denominations.—Kansas
City Star.
While the Presbyterian General As
sembly is to take up the Briggs case and
in a spirit that promises a drastic dealing
with it. it postpones the question of re
vision and votes down summarily further
effort at union with the Episcopal
Church, which had been moving along
with some show of interest and impor
tance. Altogether there seems to bo a
disturbed condition in the churches.—In
dianapolis News.
CURRENT NEWSPAPER WIT.
Tho difficulty in this cold world is that
too many fellows want to stand with their
backs to the lire. —Bradford Record.
When a dressmaker doesn't give hor
customers tits, the customers give the
dressmaker fits. —Louisville Journal.
Bridget —I'm cleanin;. the stove wid
this black polish. The missis told me to
use elbow grease, but I've looked all
around and couldn't lind any.—Munsey's
Weekly.
Guest —How is this? My bill this time
is 84 a day, and last December I had the
same room, and it was only $3 a day.
Clerk—Yes, I know; but the days aro
much longer now. —Boston Courier.
"Where are you going, my pretty
maid?" "Out to the Zoo, kind sir," sho
said. "May I go with you, my pretty
maid?" "They might detain you, sir,"
she said.
Teacher—What was tho fate of Lot's
wile? Scholar—She was turned into salt.
Teacher—What for? Scholar—For look
ing back to see if tho woman who just
passed her had a seal-skin or a plush
■aeque.
Vabslcy—l wonder what next? Thero
has been a machine invented for sticking
bills. Madge—I wish some fellow would
invent a machine for paying them. —In-
dianapolis Journal.
.Mrs. Meadows—There's too much
water in this milk to suit me, Patrick.
Patrick —Well, ma'am, I can't help it.
There's been so much rain this last week
that llu- cows ls all water-soaked. —Mun-
sey's Weekly.
Madge—I know I am right. I'll bet
the drinks that 1 am. Timmins—I would
take you up, but Ido not drink. Madge
—Oh. don't let that stop you. I'll agree
to drink both drinks myself, win or lose.
—Indianapolis Journal.
Tourist—Can you tell mo tho best way
j to get into ti at cemetery over there on
I the hill? Native —Well, boss, deys sev-
erial roads gwine dat er' way, but, 'bout
de surest way ter get dar, I reckon, is ter
die.—Harper's Weel^y.
Miss Wilkins—Ah, what a change one
little woman can make in a man's life.
Mr. Smithers—Exactly; and what a heap
ot change she requires while doing it.—
Brooklyn Life.
Mr. Pulliam (about to propose)— Miss
Sanford, I am now going to say what I
wanted to say an hour ago. Can you not
guess from my eyes what it is ? Miss
Sanford—Do you mean "good-night?"
You look sleepy.—The Epoch.
Hospital Physician—Was this man run
over by an engine? Ambulance Driver —
No. He went alone Washington street
asking everyone ho met if there had
banana stand taken by tho Government
on the Italian question.—Indianapolis
Journal.
Mrs. Homily (after church)— How did
you come to preach on backsliding, dear
est? You said at breakfast that you
were going to preach your sermon on
proianitv. The Key. Dr. Homily—l had
intended to, my dear, but my collar
button got down my neck when I was
dressing for church.
"Have you any photographs of your
children, Mr. Peck?" asked a friend of
the Hon. Alpheus Peck. "I should say I
had," answered Mr. Peck; "I'veabout a
bushel of them." "Why, Alpheus!" ex
claimed his wife. "Well, haven't we?
Haven't we photographs of all four of
them, and don't four pecks mako a
bushel?"— Detroit Free Press.
ANIMALS IN WATER.
Whore the Millions of Creatures in
Drinkinp: Water Como From and
How They Should ho Disposed of.
"I cannot understand the carelessness ot
people." This remark was made by a leading
New York chemist who was just making an
analysis for the Board of Health.
"Take the subject of drinkinp. water for in
stance. What sensible man or woman who
ever held a glass of water up to the light felt
that it was pure ? Even a near-sighted person
can see that it is full of vegetable and animal
matter. In the city, where water is allowed
to accumulate In tanks on the top of the roofs,
naturally the bottom of the tank becomes
covered with black mud. In the country,
wells are simply draining* from the surface
water, outhouses,often irom barns and Btabk s.
Is it any wonder it is impure? Is it any
wonder people get sick from drinking it?
Some people boil the waler, and whi!e this
may kill the live germs, it docs not remove
them nor remove the vegetable matter which
may be In tlie water and which i.s often
poisonous. Tne safest way for any one to do
is to mix a little pure whisky with the water
and thus wholly counteract all evil effects
which may he in any water however impure.
Doctors advise this and science confirms it.
But, only the purest whisky should be used
and Bully's Pure Malt is admitted both by
doctors and scientists to be the purest of ail
modern whiskies. Besides fortifying the
system against disease, it also tones np,
makes the sluggish blood circulate and re
places weakness by strength."
l^atlrcmb <£tmc @. able.
SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY
[PACIFIC SYSTEM.]
JUKE 7, 1891.
Trains I,eave and are Dae to Arrive at
Sacramento:
LEAVE TRAINS RUN DAILY. ARRIVE
6:30 A Calistoga and Napa 11:15 A
3:05 P Calistoga and Napa ' 8:40 P
12:50 A ...Ashland and Portland...! 4:20 A
4:30 P Deming. El Paso and East 7:00 P
7:(;0 P Knights L'd'g A M'r'svillcj 7:25 A
10:50 A Los Angeles j 9:35 A
Ogden and East—Second;
12:05 P Class i 2:25 A
Central Atlantic Express!
11:00 Pj for Ogden and East ! K:l5 A
3:00 P Orovlllc 1 10:30 A
3:00 P Red Bluff via Marvsville, 10:30 A
10:lo A ...Redding via Willows..- 4:00 P
2:50 A San Francisco via Benicla 11:40 A
4:35 A San Francisco via Benlcia 12:35 A
6:30 A'San Francisco via Benicia. 11:15 A
8:40 A San Francisco via Benicia 10:40 P
3:05 PSan Francisco via Benicia, 8:40 P
*10:00 A Sin Francisco via steamer 1 £6:00 A
10:50 A San Fran, via Livermore! 2:50 P
10:50 A! San.lose • 2:50 P
4:30 P Santa Barbara 9:35 A
6:15 A Santa Rosa 11:40 A
8:05 P Santa Rosa 8:40 P
8:50 A Stockton and Gait 7:00 P
4:30 P, Stockton and Gait 9:35 __
12:05 P Truckecand Reno 2:25 A
11:00 P Truckee and Reno 8:15 A
(5:30 P Colfax and way stations! 2:30 P
6:15 A Vallejo ! 11-40 \
3.-OS P VallHo 1 fj,:4o P
*6:35 A .Folsom and Piacervllle..! *2:-10 P
_*:>:10 PiJFolaom and Piacervllle 1*11:35 A
'Sunday excepted. fSunday only. . Mon
day excepted. A.—For morning. P.—For af
ternoon.
RICHARD GRAT, Gen. Traffic Manager.
T. 11. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent.
wr liquor Habit*.
erjiarßF wo#w n/£FF. rs<urrc#£cuj&
b»hmi(ES GOLDE& SPECIFIC
It eau be given in coffee, tea, or i n articles of foe,
1 without the knowledge of patient If necessarj
it is absolutely harmless and will effect a permi
nent and speedy cure, whether the patient is
modenuef.iiukeroran alcoholic wreck. ITI\~~
Elt FAILS. Itoperates so quietly and with ro
certainty that the patient undergoes no lntc
venience, and soon his complete reformetloc
I effected. 4S pace book free. To be had of
j fOSEPH HAHN' &. CO., Fifth and J Streets]
CAPA7~~WuIeYI """
The Earliest Fruit Land in the State
Equal in ill Respects to the Famous Vaca Valley, lick it Adjoins.
uisrF SR.E;cE:E)E;2srTE;E) thrums
I>INTEREST ONLY FOR FIVE YEARS AX 7 PER CENT.^J
Capay Valley is situated in Yolo County, about 90 miles by rail from San Francisco,
and is traversed in its entire length by the Woodland, Capay and Clear
Lake Railroad, tlie distance from Esparto to Rumsey being 21 miles.
The Capay Valley Land Company is offering the
most fertile lands in this beautiful valley upon terms which
enable the purchaser to pay for the land out of its own
product, viz.: Interest only for five years at 7 per cent.
The only condition imposed is, that a reasonable pro
portion of the land purchased shall be planted to fruit
trees or vines. Land may be bought without this con
dition on payment of 20 per cent, cash and remaining
80 per cent, at the end of five years, with interest annu
ally in advance at 7 per cent. The various tracts owned
by the Capay Valley Land Company have been subdi
vided into 10 and 20-acre lots, which are for sale at
prices varying from $50 to $150 per acre. Similar un
improved land in Vaca Valley has recently been sold at
$400 and $500 per acre.
These Capay Valley lands are, under the most favor
able climatic conditions for the prosecution of profitable
fruit growing, and the locality has proved itself to be
one of the earliest in the State. The grape crop of IS9O
from the company's vineyard at Cashmere was picked,
dried^ and shipped to Chicago and Philadelphia before
the Fresno County grapes were ripe.
The railroad passes through all ofthe tracts owned by
the Capay Valley Land Company, thus insuring excel
lent shipping facilities; and land may now be purchased
in the immediate proximity of either of the following
stations: Capay, Cadenasso, Surrey, Guinda, Sauterne,
Cashmere or Rumsey.
At many of these places fine orchards of the choicest
and earliest varieties of peaches and apricots may already
be seen, and durinu the coming season considerable ad
ditional acreage will be planted out. One of the recent
sales made by the company was that of the Tancred
Tract, containing 600 acres, to a colony association.
This tract has been subdivided into forty holdings, all of
which will be planted to fruit trees this season.
The fine orchards on the Guinda Tract, where 400
acres have been so!d, are especially worthy of mention,
and it is a significant fact that several of the blocks are
o^ned by successful Vaca Valley fruit-growers, who ex
pect t3 make their earliest shipments from here.
FOR MAPS AND ALL INFORMATION REGARDING THE CAPAY VALLEY LANDS,
APPLY TO OR ADDRESS
WlxL H. MILJUS,
Fourth and Townsend Streets, ~ SAN FftANCTSCO.
pi cal <£<state. (&tc.
A RARE OPPORTUNITY
Good Agricultural Land for $10
to $20 per Acre.
The Pacific Improvement Company has re-,
cently purchased twelve thousand acres of
land in the heart bf Tehama County, for the
purpose of promoting subdivision and settle
ment. This land embraces lands from first
class Sacramento Valley agricultural land, to
land of fair average quality, and is offered at
from $10 to $20 per acre, ln subdivisions of
40, 80,120,160 and 320 acres.
The terms upon which these lands are offered
are especially attractive. They will bo sold in
subdivisions, as above indicated, by the pay
ment of interest only for three years, at which
time the purchaser can begin the payment of
principal by paying the first of five equal an
nual Installments. Thus no part of the prin
cipal 19 to be paid for three years, and then
the purchaser ls to have five years hi which to
pay five equal annual installments, with in
terest at the rate of ? per cent, per annum,
making payment^ extending over a period of
eisht years. Intending purchasers are as
sured that this is an opportunity to purchase
land of fair average quality at $10 per acre,
and good agricultural land at $20 an acre,
with other grades of land at prices to corre
spond between these figures.
The assertion is trequently mado that good
lands, suitable for general farming, and es
pecially adapted for fruit-growing, cannot bo
had in California for less than from $60 to
$100 an acre. An examination of the land
subject of this advertisement will prove to
home-seekers that this ia an opportunity for
the purchaso of good agricultural land at $20
an acre, and for qualities grading down to fair
agricultural land at $10 an acre, on termß of
payment which should make the disposition
of these lands to actual settlers a result easy of
accomplishment.
The primary object of the purchase of thi*
body of land was the breaking up of a large
holding for the purpose of promoting its set
tlement in smajler quantities and its devotion
to diligent husbandry.
For further particulars, call upon or ad
dress WM. H. MILLS,
Land Agent of the C. P. R. R., Fourth and
Townsend streets. San Francisco. Cal _
!. cntt&nrjj.
F. F. TEBBETS,
DENTIST, 014 SIXTH «T..|BP5|ES?!_
between I and J, went side,ff?wraHH________
opposite Congregational Cht»rch. M>*-QuuLX?
DB. W. C. BEITH.
DENTIST, LINDLEY BUILD- JoB____S___
inp. southeast corner Sev-4VfHß______|______
enth and J streets, Sacramento. **UJJ_YJj^
C. H. STEPHENSON,
DENTIST, CORNER SEV-aeagggEfe
enth and J streets, Kacra-rfWraSSHK
mento. *t^3Tgg_^
•^Tflfff A' Chicken lAce Kilter.
Ask your dealer for it, or send for Free Circular to
Petaluma Incubator CovPetaluma^CaL
THE WEEKLY UNION IS THE STAR
weekly of the Pacific Coast.
HE VERY LATEST DISPATCHES "WILL
be found in the RECORD-UNION.
Too much stress cannot be laid upon the great ad
vantage to the fruit-grower of being in an early locality.
In most cases it makes the difference between success
and failure. The industrious orchardist of Capay Valley
may rest assured that he will derive all the benefits gained
by the first fruit shipments of the season, and that 20
acres of this rich land, when the trees are in bearing,
will yield a handsome and assured income.
The Capay Vailey Land Company has an agent re
siding in the valley, whose duty it is toshow the various
tracts to land seekers.
Four townsites have been laid out in different points
in the valley, viz.: Esparto, Cadenasso, Guinda and
Rumsey. Town lots may now be purchased at,reason
able prices and on easy terms.
The enterprising and flourishing town of Esparto is
situated at the lower end of the valley, and $1:25,000
worth of substantial buildings have already been erected,
including a fine four-story brick hotel, two large brick
blocks and waterworks, with pipes laid in the streets,
besides extensive warehouses and numerous residences.
The town has a postoffice, school-house and a weekly
paper, and the fine railroad depot contains telegraph
and express offices.
. Postoffices have also been established at Guinda>.and
Rumsey. This latter place, situated at the head of'the
vailey, is the present terminus of the railroad. The
comfortable little hotel makes excellent quarters*, for
hunters as well as land-seekers.
The advantages enjoyed by the settler in Capay XTal
ley may be thus concisely summed up: •
A soil of great fertility, yielding bountifully of every
crop.
A soil and climate which will ripen all kinds of fnijt
d vegetables earlier than anywhere else in the State.
anA climate perfectly adapted to the curing of raisins and
drying of fruit without the aid of artificial evaporators.
A location that is central and close to markets. Railroad
• communication which enables shipments to be made
j quickly and cheaply. Lands which are sold cheaper
j and on better terms than anywhere else in the State.
$uctnc«» (ffarfr^.
* DRS. PENDERY A- BAINBRIDGE,"
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. OFFICE,
rostoitice Building, comer Fourth aud X
streets. jeti-tf
C. SUTER.
THIRTEENTH AND J STREETS. MANU.
facturer of wire doors, windows and lur
niture, which aie in stock; also, mill-work
made to order. myl4-'Jm
MRS. MARION BTIRLING, mT D..
LATE LADY PRINCIPAL OF DUFFERIN
Medical College for Women, and Superin
tendent of Women's Hospitals and Dispen
saries ln Northern British India. Diseases ol
women and children a specialty. Office, room
7, Odd Fellows' Te;upie.
H. F. ROOT. ALEX. NEILSON, J. BK.ISCOL.
ROOT, NEILSON & CO.,
UNION FOUNDRY-IRON AND BRASS
Founders and Machinists, Front street,
between N and O. Castings and Machinery
of every description made to order.
GUTHRIE BROS.,
PRACTICAL PLUMBERS, STEAM AND
Gas Fitting. Roofing and Jobbing. Terms
reasonable. 127 J street.
A. MEISTER,
CARRIAGES, VICTORIAS, PHAETONS,
Buggies and Spring Wagons. 910, 912,
914 Ninth street, Sacramento.
S CARLE
SUCCESSOR TO CARLE '& CROLY, CON
tractor and Builder. Orders solicited and
promptness guaranteed. Othoe and shop,
1124 Second stieet, between X and L.
D. J. MANNIX,
CONTRACTOR OF PLASTERING. KAL
somining and repairing in all its branches,
lusulating bf steam pipes and boilers a
specialty. Center pieces, bracket!, and all
kinds of plaster ornaments for sale. Resi
dence, 2215 O street, shop, 1220 J street.
LEE HAYS,
WELL BORER AND TANK BUILDER,
tin, sheetiron and copper work, plumb
ing, gas and steam fitting, Jobbing, etc. 1214
J street. ap3-3in
v- . — -
STONE MASON.
CEMENT AND ARTIFICIAL WALKS
laid, in all colors, at lowest prices. First
elass work guaranteed. A. BOITANO, No.
719 Alley, between M nnd N, Seventh and
Eighth streets, Sacramento, Cal.
SALT.
T>Y NEW PROCESS—BEST IN THE
JD World. Samples free. Address E. P.
FIGG. 1110 Fourth St.. Sacramento. my27U
WM. M. SIMS,
ATTORNEY' AND COUNSELOR AT LAW.
Lindiey Building, rooms 5 and 6,1009
Seventh street, cor. J, Sacramento, Cal. jel-tt
aTj7& ELWOOD BRUNER,
A TTORNEYS-AT-LAW, ROOMS 5, 7 AND
9, Postoffice building,Sacramento.apsilm
CHAUNCEY H. BUNN. S. SOLON UOLL.
HOLL & DUNN,
LAWYERS.— OFFICES, 920 FIFTH ST.,
Sacramento. Telephone No. 14.
CHARLES H. OATMAN.
A TTORNEY AND COUNSELOR-AT-LAW.
■ A OFFICE—42O J street, Sacramento, Cal.
Notary Public.
A L HART
ATTORNEY r-AT-LAW.-OFFICE. SOUTH
west corner Fifth and J streets, Rooms
12,13 and 14, Sutter building.
THOMAS W. HUMPHREY,
A TTORNEY AND COUNSELOR-AT-LAW,
_c\_ southwest corner Seventh and J streets,
Rooms 7-8. Sacramento. Cal. Notary Public.
S4 BUYS A CORD
OF OLD LUMBER WOOD, OR $6 A TON
of Coal at the C. O. D. YARD, Fourth and
streets.
THE RECORD-UNION LEADS ~AJjTIN
the interior of California.
tyrapocral*.
mm proposals.
ON MONDAY.JUNE 29,1891, BETWEEN
the hours of 7 and 8 P. M.. staled proposals
will be received by tho city Board of Educa
tion at the ollico ofthe Secretary, room 10.
Odd Fellows' Temple, for:
FIRST.
Furnishing 250 cords (more or less) of four
foot wood, delivered, either white, blaclc or
live oak, second growth, the price of each
kind to lie stated. Also, 25 cords pine or
cedar.
SECOND.
220 reams twcivi>-pound cap.
25 reams twelve-pound letter.
25 reams six-pound note.
IoM xx.'i envelopes.
5M XX.i envelop s.
300 gross 104 (iillotpens.
60 dozen quarts first quality writing fluid,
blue black (state make).
25 dozen B. B. erasers (state make).
400 boxes German slate pencils.
50 gross penholders.
I 10 gross lead pencils (Eagle, Graphite or
Dixon).
200 gross chalk crayons.
s<> gross No. 11, 50*gross No. 3CP, 100 gross
No. 16 bands.
do/en small bottles red ink.
Samples of paper, envelopes andjpenholders
required.
Tlie Hoard reserves the right to reject bids.
(». XV. EULEWlNE,President.
A. Hart. Secretary. jevlw
PROPOSALS.
State Prison Supplies.
QEALED PROFOBALS WILL BE RE
(7^ eeived at the office of the Cleric at State
Prison. San Quentin. until 10 a. ar.. (SATUR
DAY, 13th day ot June. 1891, and at the
office of the Clerk at Stat;- Prison, Folsom,
until 9 a. s\.. SATURDAY, 20th day of June,
1891, at Which times and places they will tie
opened in presence of bidders for furnishing
and delivering supplies tor said prisons, con
sisting of Subsistence Stores. Forage. Fuel,
Clotiiing, Medicines, Lime, Cement, and other
staple Bupplles from July 1. 1891, to June
30, 1892, inclusive, on conditions: as per
printed schedules which will be furnished
upon application at either of tho*above
offices.
No bid will bo considered unlessjonado
upon said schedules, nor unless accompanied
by the certified check therein required, nor
from any other parties than bona-nde de:tiers
inthe classes ot articles ro be furnished.
Each bidder must accompany his bid with
a certified cheek upon some well known^uad
responsible banking house for at least 10'p< r
cent, of the a mount, puya ble to Chas. Sonntag,
President Of said Hoard, of his bid. condi
tioned that the bidder will enter into a con
tract upon notice of acceptance as require'cl by
law.
Bids foreithcr Prison must be marked separ
ately.
All payments made on Contracts will b^
paid in Cash, or Controller's Warrants.
Bidders will carefully follow the conditions
ofthe schedules.
The Board reserves the right to reject any
and all bids, as the public "inter .st may re
quire, and to order any quautity over or
under the amount specified.
. .. _ CHAS. SONNTAG. President.
J. X . Ellis, Clerk. my27-tojcl;.
NEW PUBLICATIONS.
" DOWNFALL OF A POLITICIAN,"
By Hon. Bell Eli.
SO CENTS.
BOOKSTORE, 525 J St,
**- Headquarters tor Art, Fashion. Dra
matic and Daily Eastern Papers. New Books
received dally. Send ior Catalogues. Rooks
exchanged. Postage stamps accepted.

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