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The record-union. (Sacramento, Calif.) 1891-1903, June 26, 1891, Image 8

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TURF TOPICS.
Jockeys Hereafter to Be Prohibited
Prom ISoltii-.fi..
BrOBBPSH KAH Hay, June 25. -After de
liberating three days the Board of Con
trol has come to the conclusion that in
the future jockeys who bet shall have
thoir licenses revoked. 11 lias also been
decided that the accident to St. Florianon
tho opening day was the fault of no one.
Jockey Edward Garrison's license has
been suspended indefinitely, but for
what reason tho board refuses to state.
RACING KVKNTS.
The track was fast. One mile, Eon won,
Stockton second, Stridoway third. Time,
1:40 3-5.
Six furlongs, Victory won, Air Plant
seoond, Charade third. Time, 1:15.
.Mile aud an eighth, Tula l.lackburn j
won, Odette second, Lizzie third. Time, j
I'M 4-5.
Miio and a half, Riley won, Raceiand
second, Potomac third. Time, 2:.">5 3-8.
Mile and an eighth, Loantaka won,
Bermuda second, Kenwood third. Timo,
1:562-5.
Miio and three-oighths,Masterlode won,
Tea Tray second, Lowlauder third.
Time, 2:2 a 3-5.
AT WASHINGTON rARK.
Washington- Pake. June 25.—The
track was fast. One mile, Racine won,
China second, Brazos third. Time, 1:41.
Mile and an eighth, Longshot won,
Quidosecond, Eli third. Time, 1:55.
Five furlongs, Cult Gunn won. Ban
ford second, Old Pepper third. Time,
1:()U.
Ouo mile, Lnbold won, Ed Bell second,
Forerunner third. Time, 1:425.
Mile and a quarter, Allen Bane won,
Sapahnetto second, Faleruo third. Time,
O:2U.
AT KANSAS CITY.
Kansas City, June 25.—The track was
fast. Fivo furlongs, Mamie B. won, Van
S. second, Bob i'axton third. Time,
1.0-i.
Fifteen-sixteenths of a mile, Castilian
won, Dewberry second, Pastime third.
Timo, 1:38.
Mile and a sixteenth, Dan Mack won,
Redsign second, May Hardy third.
Time, 1 :.*">_.
Nine-sixteenths of a mile, Althe won,
First Day second, Wascot third. Time,
fcs9§.
Beats, half-mile, Captain won the first
heat, Schoolgirl second, Manuihourno
third. Time, o:sl_>. Second heat Maran
bourne won, Colddeck second, School
girl third. Time, 0:51.1. Third heat—
Maranbourne won, Captain second.
Time, feslf.
Half-mile, American Boy won, Luci
fer second, Johnson third. Time, <hs2f.
AT HARTFORD.
Hartford (Conn.), June 25. —Free-for-
all, Rosalind Wilkes won, Mamorino
Maid second, Jean Vai Jean third. Best
time, 2:is.
Pacing, 2:1'" class, Marendes won,
Mamorino Banner second, Monkey Rolla
third. Best time, 2:17}.
Trotting, 2:50 class, Fannie Wilcox
won. Martha Wilkes second, Packer
third. Best time. 2-20_.
ON THE DIAMOND.
Results of Yesterday's National Leaguo
Games.
C_jßV______n>, June _">.—Pittsburg had
to-day's game well in hand, then lost it
on account of disastrous errors and Bald
win's poor pitching. Score: Cleveland, 9;
Pittsburg, 4. Batteries—Viau and Zitn
iner; Baldwin and Fields.
Chicago, June 25.—The game to-day
was dull and uninteresting, Chicago win
ning it easily by timely batting. Score:
Chicago, '.: Cincinnati, 2. Batteries —
Lubyand Bowman; Mullane and Clark.
Pi.ii.aiiki.imma, Jane2s. —The Bostons
went all to pieces to-day, their errors
proving very costly. Score: Philadel
phia, 17; Boston, -. Batteries—Nichols
and Bennett; Thornton, Esper and Clem
ents.
Nkw York, June 25. —The Giants were
in playing humor to-day. Score: New
York. '.*: Brooklyn, 2. Batteries—Rusie
ami Buckley; Lovctt and Daley.
TRIKINÆ.
Mioroseopists Find Infected lloj_rs at
Chicago.
Chicago, Jnne 25.—For several days
past expert microscopists have been en
gaged in the inspection of hogs slaugh
tered by Chicago packers,under the direc
tion of Secretary Rusk. Trichina- was
found yesterday, and the finding of more
during the day proved that many hogs
were infected. "In one way," said Pro
tessor Michaels, "the announcement that
a c have found trichinte may be unpleas
ant to packers and provo a source of
alarm to people who eat pork. Rut it
should also he remembered that the dis
covery proves the necessity of micro
scopic inspection of pork. Three days of
tion of pork under the microscope
has revea!ed more trichinae than I ex
pected to find. 1 do not care to inform
the press of the number of hogs we liave
found to be infected, lt might cause
alarm. We have found parasites in Chi
cago pork, and wherever it has been dis
coverod the meat of the hog has been de
ed."
Bitaof meat from 200 hogs were exam
ined yesterday and a force of microscop
ists will have the task of inspecting7oo
specimens to-day. As the corps of ex
aminers is increased the inspection will
beoome more general, until it will doubt
less affect the day's slaughter of hogs in
th.-yards. The Government lias appro
priated |200,000 for the work.
SUSPENDED FROM DUTY.

Special Census Agent Thompson Re- '
placed by Another Agent.
Wash ims ton, June 25.—Last evening
Frank 11. Williams, Special Agent oft
census in charge of manufactures, went
to Philadelphia by direction of Superin
tendent Porter to relieve Mr. Thompson, j
Chief Special Agent, of ftuther servia
connection with that particular branch.
it is stated at tiie Census Office that
Thompson's allegations that he or bis
sgentshad been unfairly dealt with and
required to expedite the work of collect
ing manufacturing statistics of the cn\
Philadelphia at the expense of accuracy,
axe absolutely without foundation. Porter
intimated that he would immediately
M-Spend Thompson from further duty.
Anti-Girl Society.
WASHmoroa Pa.), June _s.—An anti
girl society has been formed among the I
leading students of Washington and Jef
ferson College. The object of the society
is to devise some plan Ly which more at
tention will he given to the college by the
Students, and not so much to tiie semi- !
nary young Indies. The members, npon
initiation, take a vow that tiny will not!
call upon any young woman more than
Once a week, [f this obligation should he !
broken the member must present a satis- !
factory excuse or be expelled from I
society. It is hoped by the professors of I
the college that th-_ may be a euc-
+.
\ bride was arrayed in her wedding
finery and 200 guests had aasembed at
Keyport, N. J., when sire rea ived a note
from the groom stating that lie couldn't
be present,as his wedding clothes didn't
fit him.
stt^lll Baking
U^L^Powdei:
Used in Millions of Homes—40 Years the Standard.
CAPITAL NOTES.
Survey!nc: Well Advanced on the Inter
continental 1-iiilvviiy.
Washington, June 25. —Advices re
ceived at the Intercontinental Railroad
Commission show thai two civilian sur
viving parties are now well advanced In
the work of surveying the country in the
vicinity of Quito, Ecuador, for the pro
posed railroad between North and South
America. Tho members of the survey
are aliord ed every possible facility in tho
way of promoting their work by the
Government oilicials of IScnador.
Acting Secretary Grant has just ap
proved The recommendation made by the
Fortification Board making a small allot
ment to defray the expense of survey in
connection with the selection of sites for
mortar batteries for the defense of Sau
Francisco. Tho most important recom
mendation which was approved wa.s that
the Chief of Ordnance be authorized to
construct some new twelve-inch riiies, of
forty feet length.
i Ihief Postoffice Inspector Rathbone to
day handed the Postmaster-General his
resignation, to take effect June 28th. July
Ist Rashbone is to be appointed Fourtn
Assistant Postmaster Geuoral.
As a result ofthe report of the board
which conducted tho recent tests ofthe
dynamite guns ofthe Vesuvius, the Navy
-department has decided to make further
tests.
IMMIGRATION.
Comparative Statement of Arrivals at
the Principal Cities.
WASHXNaTON, Juuo2s.—The Treasury
circular of statistic-,, issued to-day, shows
that during last May only 310 immigrants
arrived at the port of San Francisco, as
agaiust 430 during May. IbDO, but for the
eleven months ending May 31, 1801, there
were 1,529, as against 3,145 for the eleven
months ending May3l, 1890. The follow
ing table shows the arrivals at tho other
ports as compared with 1890:
Month ending Eleven Months
Poets. May 31, Ending May 31,
IBBL 1890. LBBL LB9O.
Baltimore 6,24j) 6,019 :sG,es4 24,781
Boston _; Charles
ton.. 5,201 5,1.V7 26,581 25,544
New Orleans 366 188 3,786 3,230
New York 68,414 66,165 893,239 324,975
Phila.lelpnia 5,.vi r>,ti_,t;> 22,900 r.*,*'24
Totals sv.iil 82,994 487,179 4ul,Goi>
Immigrants from British North Amer
ican possessions and Mexico are not in
cluded in the statistics of immigration,
owing to the absence of a law providing
for the collection of accurate data in re
gard thereto.
MYSTERIOUS CASE.
An Unknown Man Who Says Ho Was
Beaten and Robbed.
[Lincoln News-Messenger, June 23d.]
A strange case of supposed robbery and
probable murder is puzzling our officers,
aud causing no little excitement among
the populace of Lincoln. Sunday night,
near the hour of 12 o'clock, a man came
to the residence of H. Nader, a fanner,
about five miles from Lincoln, awakened
the inmates and applied for shelter, stat
ing that lie had been robbed of his blank
ets and terribly beaten over the luad.
Mr. Nader noticed that he was bleeding,
but thinking he was a drunken tramp
who had been engaged in ;i fight, refused
him admittance. Some of the employes
of tlie ranch had by tins time gotten ap,
and the man was taken to a straw stack
near by, and told that he could stay there
for the night.
Jn the morning he was found to be se
verely injured, and in an unconscious
eomiition. Word was immediately sent
to Deputy Sheriff Hall, and the man
brought to town. Dr. Finney was sum
moned and made an examination of his
wounds, finding that the skull was frac
tured in two places and that there were
eie. co distinct wounds on ins head. They
bo hnve been inflicted by the ham
mer of a pistol or some sort of ii -harp in
strument, giving weight to the th: ory
that the man had been knocked down
first and then beaten almost to death
while in a helpless state.
Ho was unable to utter a word, and
nothing was found on liis person except
a parse containing |13 60, which fact
makes the matter more of a mystery.
On his vest was found a watch-chain ring,
which is strong evidence that his watch
and chain were hurriedly jerked from
him.
Several parties identified the man, and
stated that he wa.s in Lincoln Sunday, in
company with a short, heavy-set Swede,
with a sandy mustache, and that they
were both drinking considerable liquor.
There is quite a diversity of opinion as
to how it happened, and various theories
are advanced, but the prevailing belief
is that the man was pounced upon and
robbed, Mid that while the party or par
ties were engaged in the work they be
came frightened and fled withont taking
his money. Hey. as taken to the County
Hospital.
Trespass on Timber Lands.
MaOISOB i Wis. ', June 25;— The State
Land Commissioners have, during the
last three months, been investigating the .
subject of trespass on timber Lands and
have unearthed great frauds. Millions
upon millions of pine timber have been
rut by various individuals off the public
lands with no authority whatever, *_,000,- ]
00** feet having been stolen from a single
township in the northwestern part of vie
i State within the past two years. The j
robbery has been going on for a dozen j
years, and the extent ofthe loss tothe
State is enormous. Much ofthe rascality
. cannot, of course, he traced, hut much of
it Is chargeable to responsible loggers,
who sold tiiuber to men wliere marks are
found on it.
Coinage of Silver Dollars.
Nkw Yo-tK, Juno 25.—a Philadelphia
special says: There ia great anxiety here
among employe^ of the United States
Mint. They fear it may be determined at
the Cabinet meeting at Washington to
morrow to stop the coinage of silver dol
lars. The Superintendent of the Mint
believes ttiere are not enough ail ver dol
lars already coined t<> redeetn all the sil
ver notes in circulation, but there is
enougb t<> meet all the public demands.
still, in' does not think ilu' coinage of
silver dollars will be stopped. There is a
large amount of subsidiary silver and
about |30 t OOO,OOO in gold to be coined as
boou as time can be found.
West Point Cadets.
W.isniNfi'mN. June '2"i.-As a result of
the recent examinations at West Point,
Moat of a total of no applicants have
admitted to the United States Mili
tary Academy, to form tlu. new class.
The other cadets who have been turned
back from last year's oiass, who are to
join the new class in September, will
probably swell the total to ill. Among
chose admitted are Daniel Delaney and U.
11. Willoughby of California.
Cruiser Philadelphia.
Washikoton, Jnne 25.—Ordera have
gone forward to the New York Navy
yard for the preparation of two new
wooden masts for the cruiser Philadel
phia, to replace the three Bteel masts now
on the Teasel. The vessel ia found to he
topheavy as at present rigged, nnd rolls
to an uncomfortable degree unr:-.--; water
ballast i> carried.
«■ _
A horned rabbit is the cariosity of tho
day al Akron, <
SACBAMENTO DATLY lIKCOKO-tnrcOK, FKTPAY, JUSTE 20, 1891 .—SIX PAGES.
INGERSOLL ON ALCOHOL.
Forcible L_ane-.uaj_o Used by tho Great
Orator.
Colonel Robert G. Ingersoll was once
employed in a case which involved the
manufacture of ardent spirits, and in his
speech to the jury ho used the following
language:
I am aw aro there is a prejudice against
any man engaged in the manufacture of
alcohol. 1 believe from the time it issues
from the coiled ami pois<.nous worm in I
the distillery until it empties into the
hell of death, dishonor and crime, that it
is demoralizing to everybody that touches
it, irom tho source to where it ends. I
do not believe that anybody can con
template the subject without being preju
diced against the crime. All we have to
do is to think of tho wrecks ou either
side of tho stream of death, of the sui
cides, of the insanity, of the poverty, of
the destruction, of the little children tug- j
ging at the breast of weak and despairing !
wives, asking for bread, of the men of j
genius it has wrecked, the men strug- j
gling with imaginary serpents produced
by this devilish thing, and when you 1
think of tho jails, of the almshouses, of
the asylums, of the prisons and of the
scaffolds on either hand, T do not wonder
that every thoughtful man is prejudiced
against this vile stuff called alcohol. In
temperance cuts down youth in its vigor,
manhood in its strength and age in its
weakness.
II breaks tho father's heart, bereaves tbe
doting mother, extinguishes natural af
fection, erases conjugal love, 'dots out
attachment and blights paternal hope,
and brings premature age in sorrow to
the grave. It produces weakness, not
strength; sickness, not health; death, not
life. It makes wives widows, children
orphans, lathers fiends, and all paupers.
j It feeds rhumatism, nurses gout, wel
comes epidemics, invites cholera, imports
pestilence, embraces consumption. It
covers the land with misery, idleness and
crime. It engenders controversies, fos
ters quarrels and cherishes riots. It
crowds your penitentiaries and furnishes
victims to the scaffold. It is the blood of
the gambler, the element ofthe burglar,
the prop of the highwayman and the
support of the midnight incendiary. It
countenances tho liar, respects tho
thief, esteems the burglar. It vio
lates obligations, revert noes fraud,
honors infamy. It defames benevolence,
hates love, scorns virtue and innocence.
Ct incites ih;' father to butcher his help-
Less offspring, and the child to grind the
parricidal ax. It burns up men,consumes
women, detests life, curses God and de
spises heaven. It suborns witnesses,
nurses perfidy, defiles the jury box and
stains the judicial ermine. It bribes
voters, disqualifies votes, corrupts elec
tions, pollutes our institutions and en
dangers the Government, It degrades
tho citizen, debases the legislator, dis
honors the statesman and disarms the
patriot. It brings shame, not honor;
terror, not safety; despair, not hope;
misery, not happiness; and with the
malevolence of a fiend, calmly surveys
its frightful desolation, and, unsatiatod
with havoc, it poisons felicity, kills peace,
ruins morals, wipes out national honor,
then curses at tho world and laughs at its
ruin. It does that and more —it murders
the soul. It is the sum of all villainies,
the father Of crimes, the mother of all
| abominations, tiie devil's best friend, and
' rod's WOrst enemy.
LOWER CALIFORNIA.
lls It Falling Into the Hands of tho
Enprlisli i
[Bed Uliiil* Sentinel, June 22d.]
This is an important question and it re
mains for the coming years to answer this
ation. In 1845 James K. Polk, Presi
dent of the Cnited States, and James
Buchanan, Secretary of state, sent a
secret letter to Mr. Larkin, I'nited States
Consul, living at that time at the Mis
sion of Monterey. Tho purport of the
letter, which was one of secrecy, had as
its principle item the rumor that a large
concession hai granted to one
Father McNamara, a Catholic priest, and
this man was a British subject. Tiie con
cession was to contain 13,600,000 acres and
would have included the then supposed
best portion of Lower California, includ
ing the main rivers of this State. Mr.
Polk stated in his letter, which has been
published by Mrs. .Jessie Fremont since
the death of her husband, John C. Fre
mont, und this letter was among tho
private papers ofthe Pathfinder. This is
is an important fact, and should be taken
into serious contemplation, for this very
fact was the main cause why Mr. Polk
instructed Mr. Larkin. Consul, Mr. Gil
lespie and John C. Fremont to ascertain
all the knowledge, secretly, pertaining
to this enormous grant to tho Lnglish,
or Lnglish subjects.
We would ask why in 1845 Mr. Polk
could be so ver}- anxious as to cause him
to send from the department away ac:
an unknown country men to thoroughly
investigate this matter clearly, and
secretly claiming that th<> Monroe doc
trine forbade any English colony on the
Pacific Coast, and giving his reasons that
it was against this peculiar doctrine that
such colonies siiould be established ?
But who is anxious in 1891? Is Benja
min Harrison, President of the United
States, disturbed in mind to any < Icy roe*.'
or is James G. Elaine, Secretaiy of State,
worried over the enormous concessions
granted to an English syndicate of 74,000,
--< too of acres of lands—lß,ooo,ooo in Lower
California, 34,000 on the Cedeas Islands,
off the western coast of the peninsula, and
65,166,000 in Mexico proper?
Mexico owns the peninsula at the pres
ent time, but it looks as if In the future
England would get control of that rich
country and also of tiie northern portion
of Mexico proper, if Bomeone does not
awaken the people of Southern California
to the possible ownership of that coming
country. It is very strange that the
southern portion oft California is not wide
awake to its beet interests. If the United
States would enter into negotiations for
the purchase of Lower California, never
in the history of "booms" bas there been
such a rush to the southern counties as
would bs if such a thing should occur.
Tlie Democratic party may make this a
"sliver" in their platform v Mr. f'leve
land cornea to the (Vont aaa candidate for
the Presidency. He would be sure ofa
"full hand" in the Golden State if he
would advocate the purchase of the penin
sula. We hope to hear from the papers
on this subject, and certainly from Los
Angeles County, and more particularly
from San Diego, which is so closely ce
mented with lho interests of Lower Cali
fornia.
Colonel Æsop Talks.
Colonel _f_BOp, who had recently gone
to Sard isio help King Croesus pull through
some political jobs, went out ior a stroll
up and down Broadway, the principal
thoroughfare of Bardic. When ho re
turned to the palace lie related to the
King the following story :
"An Ass met a Calf one afternoon.
" 'Aw, deafa boy,' said the Ass, 'you
look ill.'
" 'Yaas,' answered the Calf; 'caught a
dweadftil cold this mawning.'
** 'My, my!' said the Ass; 'did you sit
in adr;ii'i ?'
" 'Yaas,' answered tho Calf; 'sat wight
noah n fellah who whistled for his
dorg.' "
When the distinguished fabler had con
cluded hisstory, the KjUagsaid: •
•'...sop, some of your yarns are rather
hard to believe. Por example, I can
hardly Imagine assem and calves convers
ing one witli another."
"That brings me to my moral," said
-Esop. "iiicli men should Bee that their
Bons become no. asses ami calves."—De
troit Free l'ress.
Cremation In .Japan.
Cremation flourishes in Japan. Tokio
has six crematories, in which the bodies
ofat least one-third of the dead are incin
erated. In Jsss ii...-..; of the 8__,437 per
sons who died were cremated, and since
burial in the oity was forbidden tlie num
ber has been increased. According to the
style of cremation the price is £*.*. 7."), ?*_. or
|1. Sixty-six pounds of wood, which
costs approximately twenty-flve cents,
suffices for tlie reduction of a body in
three hours.
+.
When a piece of ice taken in July from
an ice house tilled the previous December
melted, a little fish was found swimming
merrily about in the water. A corre
spondent ol" Nature Vouches for this tish
story. **-
IN "EARLY DAYS. "
Picture of TJfo ft t Mokelurnno mil In
1851.
In the Century for June aro reminis
cences of the pioneer life by old miners
from which we take this incident:
In 1851 Mokelunme Hill was one of tho
worst camps in California. "Who was
shot last week?" was tho first question
asked by the minors when they camo in
Irom the river or surrounding diggings
i >n Saturday nights or Sunda\ s to gamble
or get supplies. It was very seldom that
tlie answer was, "No one."
Men made desperate by drink or losos
at the gambling table would race up and
down the thoroughfares, in single tile,
as boys play the game of "follow my
leader," each"imitating tho actions of the
foremost. Selecting some particular let
ter in a sign they would tire in turn, re
gardless of everything but the accuracy
oi tho aim. Thou they would quarrel
over it as though they wero boys playing
a game of marbles, while every shot was
likely to kill or wound somo unfortunate
person.
The gambling tents were large and con
tamed not only gaming tables but bill
iard tables. At one of these I was onco
playing billiards with a man named
U • A few feet from us, raised upon a
platform mado for tlie purpose, were
seated throe Mexican musicians, playing
guitars; for these places were always well
supplied Avith instrumental music. Tho
evening seldom passed without disputes.
and pistols were quickly drawn to settle
quarrels. Upon any outbreak men would
rush irom all parts oftho room, strug
gling to get as near as possible to the
se.ne of action, and often they paid tho
penalty for their curiosity by being ac
cidentally shot. While 11 and I wero
engaged in our cranio, we could hear the
monotonous appeal ofthe dealers, "Mako
your game, gentlemen, make your gamo.
Red wins and black loses." Suddenly
bang, bang, bang wont the pistols in a
distant part of the teut. The usual rush
followed. Rang, bang, again, and this
time the guitar dropped from tlie hands
of one ofthe unoffending musicians, who
fell forward to tho ground with a bullet
through his neck, ilis friends promptly
undertook to carry him past us to the
open air. Our table was so near tho side
ofthe tent that only one person at a timo
Could go between it and tho canvas.
II was standing in the way, just iv
the act of striking the ball with his cue,
when one of the persons carrying the
wounded man touched him with the re
quest that he move to one side. Ho
turned and saw the Mexican being sup
ported by tho legs and arms, the blood
flowing irom his neck; then with the
coolest indifference he said, "Hold on,
hold on, boys, till I mako this shot,"
then, resuming his former position, ho
deliberately finished his shot.
WITH AN ADDITION.
Tho Sick Man's Wifo Acts as a Min
ister's Interpreter.
A sick man sent forthe nearest spiritual
adviser. It so happened tliat the min
ister was a new Hedging just emerging
from the seminary, He was dudish in
the extreme. His coat waa cut in true
clerical style and his face bore the ex
pression of affected literary culture.
Going to the poor man's house he sat on
the edge of a chair, says the Insurance
Journal, toying with his hat and stroking
his downy mustache. Said ho to tho
dying man, after a long spell of silence
painful to all:
"What induced you to send for me?"
"You will have to speak louder,"
faintly replied tho sufferer; "I'm dull of
hearing."
"Whatinduced you to send forme?"
reiterated the clergyman.
"No use. can't hear. What does he
say, Mary?" turning to his wife.
And then in a loud, shrill and sten
torian voice tho woman replied:
"He says what in the duce did you send
for him for ?"
The Number of States.
There are forty-four now. and the new
ones are tho pakotas, Montana, Wash
ington, Wyoffling and Idaho. These
were created recently, and are the oiily
ones made since IS7.>, when Colorado Waa
admitted. At the beginning of the century
there wore sii teen States, tho thirteen
original ones and Vermont, Kentuck v
and Tennessee in addition. At the actual
beginning of the civil war, in April, 1861,
there were thirty-four States, West Vir
ginia, Nevada and Nebraska, besides
Colorado and tho six new States, having
been admitted since then.
i—a|i>
One-third of the students in Europe, it
is said, die prematurely from the effect of
bad hal tits acquired at college; one-third
<lie prematurely from the effects of close
confinement at their studies, and the
other third govern Europe.
women.
" ** ■ _■__■_— _y
Theccrmmon afflictions of women are sick-head
aches, indigestion and nervous trpublea. They
arise largely from stomach disorders. As Joy's
Vegetable Sarsaparilla is the only bowel regu
lating preparation, you can see why it is more
effective than any other Sarsaparilla in those
troubles. It is daily relieving hundreds. The
action is mild, direct and effective. We have
scores of letters from gratefsl women.
We refer to a few:
Nervous debility, Mrs. J. Barron, 142 7th St., S. F.
Nervous debility, Mrs.Fred. Loy, 327 EllisSt.,B.F.
General debility, Mrs. Belden, 610 Mason St, B.F,
Nervous debility, Mrs. J. Lamphere, 735 Turk St.,
Nervous debility, Miss R. Rosenblum, 232 17th
ct., 8. IT.
Stomach trouble!, Mrs. R. L. Wheaton, 704 Post
St., S. F.
Sick headaches,'Mre. M. B. Price, 16 Prospact
Tlace, S. F.
Sick headaches, Kfa M. Fowler, 327 Ellis St., B.F.
Indigestion, Mrs. C. D. Stuart, 1221 Mission St.,
8. F.
Constipation, Mrs. c. Melvin, 126 Kearny St.,B.F.
Jnii'c Vegetas3'e
dSarsapar.fla
Most modern, most effective, largost bottle.
Bame price, 11.00 or 6 for So.QO.
$ov £mle.
IJIOR SALE-A HALF JERSEY FRESH
milch cow with hoi for calf. Apply to P.
SULLIVAN, IOOs E street. )e26-6t»
tjX>_. SAJLE-TWE-N T V SUA RES OF TH E
'ientli Bertea of the Occidental Building
and Loan Association. . STEPHENSON &
HARTMAN, IOO*: Fourth atteet. joiv-lw
FOR SALE—A VERY HIGH' CORNER
lot SoxBo_.on Twentv-Qrst and P stroets,
Inquiro on the premises. Price*; $1,350.
jc3s-Gt*
ij^Oß SA 1 .E-A LODGING-HOUSE;ROOMS
all rented. Inqnlreat 109>_ X at. Je23-6t»
IjlOR SALE-A OOOD PIATFORM -g^BjNQ
' wagon ior sale cheap. Inquire at TELE
GRAPH STABLE Thirteenth and J stsjoAwi*
FOR SALE-A COUNTRY BLACKSMITH
shop on account of party engaging In other
bnsiness: las shop is oflered for aale cheap,
l-'or particulars apply to SCHAW. INGRAM,
RAD RER -v Co., 217 and 219 .1 street, Sac
rameiito. Jels-_2t*
I.iOR SALE—A GOOD ICE CHEsT, TEN
F foot long und eight feet high. Inquiro at
this oilice. ______
F~ OR SALE—ONE OF THE FINEST AND
largest saloons ft. the city: extra family
entrance: best lo v ation, stock and lease. In
quire at this oflice.
1:iOR SALE—THS WHOLE OR A HALF
' Interest in the International Hotel. Sacra
mento, . al„ with a long lease. Address W. A.
CAS W KLL mya-tf
rpOR SALE OR TO RENT ON LEASE—
r ten aerosol bottom land, one mile below
Washington, Yolo County; if sold will take
small payment down. Apply lo EDWIN K.
ALSIP il- Co., Heal Estate and Insurance
Agents, 1015 Fourth stroot.
wmm specific mixture
WITH THIS REMEDY PERSONS CAN
euro themselves without the least ex
; posure, change of diet, or change in appliea
! tion to business. The medicine contains not h
tins; that is of the least injury to tho constltu^
th-ii. Ask. your druggist for it. Prico. _?l a
bustle. SuF. V
|._?yal $10105*?^
Highest of all in Leavening Power. — JJ. S. Gov't Report, Aug. 17, 1889.
P'r^J Baking
ABSOLUTELY ra*£
COLFAX'S LATEST MYSTERY.
Moro Partictilnrs of tho Finding of tho
Dead Body on Sunday.
[Grass Valley Telegraph. |
From a lotter received at this ollico this
morning a few particulars are given of
the finding of the dead body ol a man
about three miles below Colfax, On the
Auburn road. The body was found by a
boy named Watts, a brother of the lad
who discovered the body of an unfortu
nate woman in a tent a short distance
below Colfax several weeks ago. Watts
went to Colfax and informed Constable
Dyer of what he had found, Dyer im
mediately making an investigation.
The constable found the body in a
small house facing the Auburn road,
about throe miles from Colfax. The body
lay on its back in a small room of the
house, which formerly belonged to Mrs.
Watts. Tho man appeared to be about 60
years of age, 5 feet 8 inches in hight, and
wore black -pants, black slouch hat, light
shirt and a fine pair of boots. Under his
head was a black carpel bag. On his
person was found two empty purses.
There were no signs of violence found,
owing to the badly decomposed state of
tho body. It had apparently lain there
about ten days. A razor and a razor
strop were lound near tho body. There
was also found a due bill from Darda
nelles ('ravel Mining ('ompany,due to L.
Landman, for labor, $225. Signed. John
McGillivary, Superintendent. Dated,
Forest Hill, 188 L
An advertising paper was found witli
tH*o name of John P. Zipf, druggist,
Forest Hill, printed on it.
Sutter's Saloon License.
A petition is in circulation in Sutter
Connty asking the Supervisors to refuse
to grant any more licenses to saloons. It
is being readily signed by the best citi
zens. For several years the license has
been92oo a quarter, and as a result there
are hut three saloons in the county. At
the last meeting of the Supervisors a
movo was made to reduce the license.
Thoso who have the petition in charge
hope to prevent any reduction, even if
their petition is not granted.—Marysville
Democrat.
"Familiar in Millions of Mouths
as any Household Word."
The Times, London.
J'THE QUEEN OF TABLE WATERS."
" The existing supply is adequate
for filling forty million quart bottles
yearly."— The Times, London.
SOLE EXPORTERS!
APOLLINARIS COMPANY, LD.,
LONDON ENG.
WENONAB COUNCIL, NO. 2,^^^
Degree of Pocahontas, mtv.s--*fiK_
TO-NIGHT at Bed Men's Ball, al «^*Sfft
8 O'clock. By order Of _*ar**-rrj_%
POCAHONTAS.
Mrs. E. J. Brazii.e. K. of R. It*
AHMORY HALL ASSOCIATION.—THE
annua! meeting ofthe stockholders ofthe
Armory Ilall Association will be held at the
'armory on MONDAY EVENING, Joly 6,
1891. al «:3o o'clock, for tiio election ofa
Board of Directors.
E. H. McKEE. President.
W. I. Wai.lack, Secretary. je;_2-td
panics**-.
WANTKIi-llimK KEEPER, ONE Wll<»
understands stenography. Apply at
Offlce of CALIFORNIA TRANSPORTATI' >N
COMPANY. je26-2t
1 EXPERIENCED WAITRESS WANT ED
li Immediately. Apply at TREMONT
HOTEL, Mrs. P. Brydlng,proprietress.je26-2t«
SITUATION WANTED—BY A YOUNG
woman, to do general housework. Inquire
aj 'ill 1. ..i street, upetairs. je2<"-2i*
rAPANESE BOY Wants SITUATION TO
-J do cooking and housework. Address .) AP,
this office. je26-3t*
OFFICE i;> »V WANTED^ENQUIRE AFTER
10 O'clock at office of DR. BRUNE,
Eighth and J streets. °Je2s-2t*
BOYS WANTED AT M. CLARK *s. 902 X
st reet Je2s-2t»
WANTED-A GIRL TO DO GENERAL
housework at 1811 H. street. je2s-
AGENTS WANTED-MVE, ENERGETIC
agents for new and fi-st-selling books. Call
at Western Hotel, room 20U, between s and 9
A. m. and 5 and 8 c. m. Je24-4t*
AGENTS WANTED—FREE PREPAID
_\ outfit to energetic men; several of our
salesmen have earned from §70 to §100 a
week for years past. P. O. Box 1,871, New
York. Je23-4t*
VtrANTED — A COMPETENT MAN ~AS
VV foreman, to take charge of planing mill.
AddressC.C.BLAIR, Stockton. jel<j-2w*
TO PHYSICIAN WANTING A NICE
cheap home and good practice in Yolo
County, can get the same by addressing me
for terms. I. N. HODOIN, Woodland, Cal.
je9-tf
"IXTANTED —100 HEAD of stock to
\V ranch; fine feed; 8 miles from Sicra
mcnto on Yolo side; terms, §1 25 per month.
Inquire of EDWIN K. ALSIP & CO. or on
farm of J. H. ZACHARIAS. je3-sw*
WANTED— FIVE GENTLEMAN, WIDE
awake, with good address: salary or
commission. Apply to THE SINGER M ANU
FACTURING CO., 703 J stieet.
TTTANTED—MEN FOR FARMS, VINE
\V yards, dairies and all kinds of labor;
women and girls for cooking and general
housework: plenty of work for desirable help. '
Apply al EMPLOYMENT OFFICE, Fourth
street, X and L.
____________________________________________________
goat— (Jrounfc.
LOST-BETWEEN X*JSTREET AND HlC.ll
laud I'ark, jpli'O in currency. The finder
will be liberally rewarded by leaving it at
1005 Fourth street. lt
STRAYED-FK; >M SPRAGUE RANCH, ON
Freeport road, a black heifer. The tinder
will be rewarded by returning to J. GEBERT,
Twentieth and O streets. jelU-tf
f£o get ov agent.
110 LET—HOUSE ON THIRD STREET,
between Q. and R; six nice rooms, large
yard with fruit trees ana statue. Inquire at
304 J street. S. ROSES .'ELD. je-'fyfit
Q(\{\ N STREET—TO KENI -UPSTAIRS
Ol't" of Uve rooms; partly furnished; no
children. Je26-Bfc*
mO LET-A HOUSE WITH GOOD BABE
_I mint; in alley, .1 and ____, Thtrteentb and
Fourteenth. Inquire at 719 Lstreet. )e25-tf
TO LET—IN A PRIVATE FAMILY, TWO
_| furnished rooms with board. 1502 G
street. je2s-6t*
HOUSE TO LEI'—COTTAGE OF FIVE
rooms, closets, gas, bath, hot and cold
water. Inquire at 12j35 i street. je23-6t*
T7 O R RENT — NICELY^tTr^NLSHED
jC front rooms, single or en suite, tor light
1 ■housekeeping. Apply at 727 J street. jp_!<K't*
HOTEL OF~100 ROOM-CTaLL FUR
nished, full of boarders and roomers, to
tease] best location. Inquire at 1007 Fourth.
FURNISHED ROOMS AT CENTRAL
House from §5 per month upwards; Also
family rooms at low prices. HORNLEIN
BROS., Proprietors.
mo LET—THREE TENEMENTS, THREE
JL rooms each; also one house, eight rooms,
partly furnished (suitable for lodging or board
, lug-house); also, some rooms, furnished or un
furnished, suitable for light housekeeping.
For particulars apply at WOOD YARD, 4011
-street. All cheap rent.
(numeral jttotfece..
MUSICA L AND SOCIAL. AT THE SIXTH-
Streel fif. E, Church, FRIDAY B\ EN
ING, June 2Glh. Icecream and cake will be
served. it*
DX. F. G. FAY HAS RKMOYEH TO His
new residence, 1800 G street. Office, eor
nei Seventh and J streets. je2s-3t*
T>EWARD—f2O REWARD PAH) FOR
J_\ conviction or information that will lead
to conviction of parties stealing this paper
from dours of subsc ri bers. m y _-v
"^SACRAMEMX) FAXKT^^"^
THE OLDEST SAVINGS BANK IN THE
city, corner Filth and J streets S-icr-t
mento. Guaranteed capital, *500,000- naid
up capital, gbld coin S800.000; loans on real
estate in California July 1,1*90, 5*2,by5,44_.
-term and ordinary deposits, July l iH9o'
&2,?00,3y4. Term and ordinary deposit- to
ceived. Dividends paid in January and July
Money louned upon real estate only The
bank does oxclnsively a savings bank busi
ness. Information furtt!*hed upon appliea-
NATIONAL BANK OF 0:11. MILLS . CO.
Saoramento, Cal.—Founded 1850.
Saturday hours 10 A . .m. to 1 r. m.
*£HrsM T%&& VioPros. 250 Shares
£*•£«£- SWf-f*-. Oilier 351 Sh .. res
C.i. DILLMA-N. ASst. Cashior.. 125 Shares
Other personsown 1,198 shares
Capital and Surplus, *$000,06b.
IlSLock m 0 stefcl Sufo deposit Vault-ahd
AND SAFE DEP6sfT VAULTS
SACRAMENTO, CAL.
Draws grafts on Principal Cities ofthe Wdtid.
Sattrpay Ho rug, io*__. m/to I'p. m.
offlcees:
Presiclent >. N. D. RIDEOFT
Vice-President „ FHEDK COX
Cashier _ A. ABBOTT
Assistant Cashier W.E. GERBER
MRECTOBS:
C.W.Clark, Jos. BTEF-'i»jg,
Geo. c. Fp-Kiars, E3-_.E*ifCr>x,
N. D. Riijkout, Norman Rideott
; W.. EjGKR^BB^^
FAKMERS' AND MECHANICS SATO BANK
Soutlwvest comer -Fourth find J
Streets, Sacrnmento, Cal.
Guaranteed Capital <5500>000
LOANS* -MADE QN REAL FSTATE. IN
terest paid som.-am_i.ally on*/ Term hnd
Ordinary Depo_lt_.
B. U STEINMAN , ..President
EDWIN K. ALsIP ; Vice-Prcllflmt
D. I). WHITBECK . QuSSB
c. h. cummings .....::.7:;;BjwS_s
JAMES M. STEVENSON BtrvSo?
DIRECTOR.. :
B. U. Steinman, EnwsK Alsip,
C. H. C-0-uminos, W..E. TEftRY
601.. RVMYON, JAI.RP UONA-BBL
Jas. M. Stevenson.
■ ' ■ * - ■■■ —••—■— i .', .
PEOPLES SAVINGS BM
DEPOSITS OF ONK DOLLAR AND UP
waids received and Interest paid thereon,
WW. BECKMAN, President.
Geo. W\ Lokenz, Secretary.
«l^^i»tll^lONAL bank:
322 Pino Stroet, San Frnnolsco.
FAID UP CAPITAL, $1,000,000. SURPLUS, $250,000.
directors:
CHARLES CROCKER ...E. H. MILLER. Jr.
R. C. WOOLWORTH President
W. H. BHOWN -Vice-President
W. J. CROCKER Cashier
fruits, ?^tcc^a, 3Jrocmce, <&tc.
W. R. BTRONG CO.,
headquarters for
jP_.lfa.lfa Seed, -Etc
tag* Oregon Potatoes In Lots to Suit.
B. GERSON & CO.,
WHOLESALE
Fruit, Prodace and Commission Merchants,
SACRAMENTO, CAL.
P.0.80x 170.
vsr. h. wood & co.,
Wholesale Dealers and Shippers of
Calitoruia Fruits, Potatoes, Beans,!
BUTTER, ETC.
Nos. 117 to 135 J Street. Sacramento.
CURTIS BROS. & CO.,
General Commission Merchants,
Wholesale Dealers in Fruit and Produce,
308, .110, 313 X St., Sacramento.
Telephone 37. Po_t.ofare Box 335.
EUGENE J. GREOORY. FRANK GREGORY.
GREGORY BROS. CO.
SUCCESSORS TO GREGORY. BARNES A j
Co., Nos. 126 and 128 J St., Sacramento, j
wholesale dealers in Produce and Fruit. Full j
stock:, of Potatoes, Vegetables, Green and
Dried FrultP, Beans, ____»_&_, Butter, Eggs,
Cheese, Poultry, etc., always on hand. Orflera I
fllled at LOWEST RATES.
EBNER BROS.,
116-118 X Streot, Front and Second,
Sacramento,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEAL- !
ers in Wines and Liquors. Agents for tha j
celebrated Poinniet-y and Greno Champagne.
M. CRONAN,
230 X St., nnd 1108-1110 Third St., j
Sacramento, Cal.,
IMPORTER AND WHOLESALE DEALER I
in Fine Whiskies, Brandies aud Chain*
ygne. . j
JAMES WOODBURN,
No. 417 X St., Sin ramento, Ctil.
IMPORTER AND WHOLESALE DEALER
in Fine Whiskies. ..randies, Wineo and
Liquors. ThanblnK my old friends and
patrons for their former patronage. I solicit a
continuance of the same. All orders will be
oromotlv and cheerfully filled-
FELTER & CO.,
IMPORTERS OF AND WHOLESALE
dealers in Wines, Liquors and Cigars,
411 Rattery St., San Francisco.
_f_**r Represented in Sacramento by F. W.
BAILEY, M2O X street. Tolenas Water
Agency. jel7-lm
CAPITALnPHARMACY.
J. S. O'GAL LAG MAN,
Druggist and Apothecary,
Corner Sevontii and X St_>.
Telephone 199. Under* Capital Hotel.
teMtd&v
HAMMER'S GLYCEROLE OF TAR
For Coughs and Colds.
rA SPEEDY AND RELIABLE CURE.
Fourth and X streets and all Sacramento
drugiiists.
FUR THB INTERIOit OF CA___FOR_n_
the RECORD-UNION ia the best to adver
t-tise in.
i SSfJ fftttf*g San**.
" .'••~~yiiT^.mm .. i*i .■"■ ir_T^-_t__---_J___[|
A CAPAY COLON!
Busy Fruit-Growers ia a Pretty
Yoio Valley—Tancred and It 3
Adjoining Farms.
TN THE SPRING OF LAST YEAJI
Robert A. and Neal D. Barker a?soclatecf
themselves with William McKay, all of-.Oak«
land, with a view of searching out a sultabla
location in which to engage ln the profitable.
occupation of fruit-crowing. After vlsitm-c
many looalitles, they decided on the Capay
Valley, Yolo Couaty, and the Rhodes t.aet
at Tancred.
Negotiations were opened with the Capa*
Valley Land Company, owning tho tract la
question. With W. H. Mills, tho General
Agent of that company, they arranged for th*
purchase of about 220 acres of foothill land.
This being more than they had thought Q__
taking for their own use, they spoko to a
numberof friends about lt, with tho result
that the tract was divided among the follow*
Ing people: B. L. Hickok, 40 acres; W. T.
liarnctt, 20 acres; N. T. Grcathoad, 20 acres;
Mrs. L. Greithead. 20 acres; W. McKay, 20
acres; N. D. IJarker, 20 acres; 1.. A. Parker,
20 acres; J. P. Brownlee, 20 acres; E. 11. Has.
Lett, 10 acres; Joseph Barker, 10 acres; A. W.
Kelly, 10 acres, and Frederick Kolly, 10 acres.
So far this had been merely a private yen*
turo of the gentlemen above named, but in
talking up the question of dividing the land]
already purchased, it was found that so many
more would like to Join it than the area of tho
purchaso would admit of, that it was sug-.
gested on all hands, "Why not get some moro
laud and divide it up ln tho same way?"
Tncn followed the Idea of a stock company Ua
take hold of a larger tract and arrango for tha
cultivation of the whole of It, after subdividing
lt according to the requirement!, of tho sub
scribers. A provisional board was formed, a
prospectus issued, and finally, on tho sth ofl
June, 1800, tho Western Co-operativo CoN
onizatior and Improvement Company wa.
duly registered and proceeded to business,
with the following officers: President, Will-,
iana McKay; Vice-President, M. P. Brown;
Directors—H. C. Ellis, Charles Brooke and
R. A. Barker; Secretary and General Manago
Neal D. Barker; C. E. Snook; Treas*
urer, First National Bank of Oakland.
The balance of the tract, ;>73 acres, was pur
chased. A contract was entered into for tno
purchaso of a large number of truit trees,
vines, etc. This early purchaso of tree* wm
the means of saving between §:i,OOO and
SI.OOO to the company, the prices in somo
cases having moro than doubled since then.
Tho ideas which the prospectus set forth
have been but slightly modified and tho
progress of the company has been uninter
rupted. Those who wont Into it douhtineiy
have become enthusiastic, and almost all tha
members arranged to set out all tbeir lands- la
fruit trees, etc., tho first year. Consequent!>
in this, the tirst season, some 40.000 "tiers
and between 20.000 and 30.000 vines will bo
planted.
The satisfactory working ofthls schemo has
had the elfect of attracting considerable at
tention to the work of the Colony Company,
and a number of peoplo are now desirous of
Joining in with them. An additional 200
acres have been added to the sixty acres
originally purchasod.
Foe tne company is predicted a very bright
future, as well as for tho beautifnl valley li\
which their operations are conducted. How
this marvelous littlo garden has come to bo so
long neglected is a puzzle to every one who
has visited it, but one thing is very sure, and
that 18 that this neglect wili never again ba
felt tn the valley.
The fruits set out are mostly of the standard
varieties--peachcs, apricots, Bartlett pears,
prunes. U^s, raisin grapes, etc., while along
both sides of the avenues, throughout the
tract, walnuts will throw their grateful shad-t.
A considerable number of citrus trees are also
being set out; quite a sufficient number to
demonstrate thnt these fruits can be success
fully grown in tho valley, about which the
colonists appear to have no doubt, provided
proper care is given to the young trees. Neal
D. Barker, General Manager of the company,
resides on the tract, and to his caro is to ba
ascribed much of the success of tho venture.
Mention should be made of the town-sit©,
about which there is a pleasant innovation
which might with profit bo followed by more
ambitious places. A small park of some three
acres has been laid out right in the center ol
the town. This park it is proposed to beautify
by planting tn it frbm time to time as many
Of the beauties and curiosities of tree and
shrub life as may be obtained by diligent
search and a wise expenditure of money. It
is not expected that Tancred will ever bo a
} large and busy city, but it is thought that it
j can be made a very jpleasant little pluee to
! dwell ih.
A petition has been circulated recently and
I very largely signed, asking the county to ac«
j e_pt Island avenue, on the colony tract, a • >■>
I county road, ancl to build a bridge acrosn
Ciiche Creek at this point, in order to give tho
-ftttlel's on the cast side of the"c/eek access to
Tancred Station. The Tancred colonists aro
quite willing to give the necessary right of
way, and are very desirous of having a bridge
there, as the colony __.__<__ extend along both
sides of tho stream. It is thdught that it
would be a very wise expenditure of publio
| money to grant them this very necessary Im-
I provement, as the operations of such com
panies are of widespread benefit to the whola
county and State. Tho attractions and com*
j forts of the cities are well _:nowi_, but to
' those who are willing to settle on the land and
chow that the country also airords attractions
and comforts, and ways of making money
pleasantly, every inducement should bo hfld
forth.
The following is a list of the principal mem*
bers of the Tancred Colony, with the. number
! of acres owned by each, and a fact worthy of
•mention is that in each contract or deed is
sued by the Colony Company there is a pro
vision that no intoxicating liquor shail ever
be manufactured or sold on the land. Tho ap
parent success of the enterprise shows that
I tiie ideas and plans of the colony, as set forth
in the prospectus some time ago, are not lm*
! practicable: C. T. Hull, Berkeley, 5 acres; W.
P. Hammond, Oakland, 14 acres; O. S. Kas
son, .san Francisco, 11 acres; Jos. Barker, 10
acres; A. W. Kelly, Kincardine, Ont., 6 aJrcs;
IN, I. Greathead, 5 acres; R. G. Greathead,
Oakland, 10 acres; R. A. Barker, San Fran
cisco, 10 acres; N. D. Barker, Tancred, 10
acres; Dr. K. Favor, San Francisco, 27 acr*j
J. P. Brownie., Kincardine, Ont., 9 acres; W.
T. Barnett, Berkeley, 5 acres; M. P. Brown,
10 acres; Chas. Brook, Sr., Oakland, 10 acres;
W. C. Boutelle, Berkeley, 20 acres; Mrs. '_£-
A. Crellin, Oakland, 5 acres; C. H. Peach,
Tancred, 5 acres; H. C. Ellis, Oakland, 10 acreij
J. Vanstone, Winnipeg, 10 ac.-cs; E. A. Vaa-
Btone, Tancred, 5 acres; E. Wadsworth, Sao
xamento, 6 acres; M. A. Thomas, Oakland, a
; acres; James. Graham, San Fraucisco, 11
acres; A. Stark, 12 acres; J. Stark, 10 acres}
Mrs. M. Vrooman, 5 acres; C. E. Snook, 10
acres; C. T. Greathead, 12 acres; Wm. Mc-
Kay, 5 acres; Mrs. Wra. McKay, Oakland, S
acres; Mrs. E. C. Wooley, Brooklyn, N. V., IC
acres; Mrs. H. Beckley, Oakland, 5 acres; T.
A. Marriett, 5 acres; J. C. Harrison, Tancred.
'6 acres. The land reserved by the Colony
Company, including townsite, consist,; of c_t
I .acre... *fel6tfd__*w

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