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The record-union. (Sacramento, Calif.) 1891-1903, August 08, 1891, Image 4

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MUSIC AND THE DRAMA.
Interesting Interview With Mana
ger Daniel Frohinan.
The Lyceum Theater Company in "The
Charity Hall"—Russell _ Comedians
in "Tho City Directory"— Lllllun
Lowis and Marie Hubert Frohman
—Stugo Notes.
The announcement that Daniel Froh
man's excellent Lyceum Theater Com
pany liave arranged to give one perform
ance ol' "The Charity Ball" at tho Metro
politan Theater, Monday, August 17th,
will make especially interesting the fol
lowing chat with Mr. Frohman, as to how
that play and its prototype and prede
cessor, "The Wife," came to be written.
"Five years ago," said Manager Daniel
Frohman, "when I was about to open the
Lyceum Theater, 1 was casting about for
an American play with which to open tho
new theater. I had invited a number of
American writers to furnish manuscripts
for a numbor of plays, from which tho
best was to be selected for the opening,
lt was strictly competitive and the prize
an honor that the beat writer might covet
—tliat of beiug the author of a new play,
produced by tlie company at the opening
of a new theater, upon which the future
of the theater depended, and with tlie
success of the play eitiier rose or fell.
"One ilay David Belaseo, who was asso
ciate, with me in the Lyceum as stago
_n_.T-.ig__, came to mo and .aid that he
and tha _ lillo had decided t- write a play
to enter into the competition. Winn I
learned that he was associated with De
______ 1 became hopeful of something su
perior.
"Belaseo had tlie necessary technical
knowledge ofthe stage, without which no
man can write a isuccessful play—I do not
say a great play, for the greatest plays are
not 'successful' financially. It is the
play of the middle register that is most
successful; the play in which tlie story is
told by the stage picture, not by the lan
guago'ol" the play itself—the play in which
the story ia told bythe picture, as tho
stories of Puck ar.d like publications are
told liy the picture, v. ith only enough of
words to explain their meaning. Belas
<■ D.B technical knowledge, combined vith
De Miile's literary art, enabled theni lo
handle a familiar subject in a new and at
tractive manner.
"The result of their efforts was "Iho
Wife.' It was selected out of a great
number, and others thought they had
written better plays, but we must be al
lowed to be the judges of those attributes
and qualities tiiat make the most popular
play. The company was selected and the
play proceeded,
"'The Wife" was not successful, though
the company was. It took too long to
reach the real interest of the play, the
strong climax, which i.s readied now in
the third act. A gnat deal of pruning
and cutting was dono until "The Wife' be
came what it is now, and ran for a year.
"The success of "The Wife' encouraged
Belaseo and De .lillo to attempt a second
play. Thej' had considerable difficulty
in determining upon the theme—the mo
tif—ot the play, and concluded that they
could not do better than to follow closely
the example of 'The Wife.'
"In selecting the molt/they, in consul
tation with me, said that they could con
ceive of nothing stronger than the con
ventional idea, a man's lovo ior a woman.
Then they sail, 'Let us make two men in
lovo with the same woman,'
"Having decided thus far they said,
'these two men should be brothers.'
During this consideration they had fre
quent consultations with me in my Study,
and 1 was thoroughly familiar with the
development and unfolding of the idea.
"When they bad reached the decision
of two brothers loving the one woman,
they decided that one of these brothers
should betray the woman under promise
of marriage, but both must lovo the
woman, and the motive that leads to the
abandonment, said they, must be a mer
oenaryone, one of _______ interest, thus
to prepare for the marriage of Dick aud
Phyllis without shock to the sensibility
of the audience.
"Then the thought of the woman com
ing .to the brother of her betrayer for
spiritual comfort, led them to make of
tnat brother a minister, and thus the cli
max of Phyllis casting herself at the feet
ofthe brother in the quiot sanctity of the
..' with its hoiy atmosphere was
built up; then the development of that
climax led. to the quarrel between the
brothers, in whicii the minister lays
the garb of his holy oiiice to de
mand reparation as man to man. The
interference of 'Angel,' with her 'Boys,
boys, which of yiiu shall I punish fbr
ag the other up?' recalling their
childhood and the remark of John, 'Now
1 understand the wisdom of God in de
priving our mother Of sight that she may
not seethe blush of shame mantle your
cheek,'the confidence of the little sister
and her appeal to the brother, 'You don't
know what it means to a girl—that sacred
of wile,'all this came as a natural
cons-.jin :
"Having thus decided upon their cli
max, prew rving througii it all the quiet
Ooe home life, they easily
constructed the first anil second acta
which lead up to it, and it is in this that
their art lie . The fault of the average
playwright lies in his beginning and
Leaving it to his characters to tell his
story, and thus it is that the successful
novelist is not a successful } daywright.
Henry James has tried repeatedly and
cann . mai.- ;l play. Howells has writ
ten several, but they aro not successful.
Thackeray, to whom we owe some ofthe
greatest characters in literature, conld
not make a play from his novels, while,
as haa been done in some instances, an
ordinary hack might take his stories and
easily construct a play. The similarity
of the two plays, "The Wife' and 'The
Charity Ball, is thus accounted for. In
'Tlie charity Ball' v.c bave the •
ters of the one referring to those of tlie
other, and in the last act of each there is
the incident of the loves of the two
young people. In the one the incident ot'
tho smoked g'ne-s. in the other the Ilag
Ut, The humor and tho movement
ol the ] T.ix B an similar.
•' I'he company was selected because Of
the stion- [ng personality of the
individuals, and with auy otlnr company
1 am DOt sure that these plays would
have been a success. The characters
throughout are type-; types in which are
recognized many char.-, ters, and it is to
this their success is due. The playa pre
serve the atmosphere of home life" which
peals to the American audience, and
without which no play is really success
ful."
"thi: city dirkitouy."
Russell's C ni,. d ana will appear at the
Metropolitan Theater in this city on
Monday evening. August 24th. The play
bad a Long and successful run at the
Californl i In San Francisco.
graceful, lithe, auburn (we don't dare
say red headed Amelia Glover, "The
1-ittlo Fawn," has been called by New
"York emus 'The poetess of motion,''
ana m that city upon her last appearance
created ■ furor thai caat a shadow upon
all the foreign importations who held lull
■way until this charming native danseua
became prominent. Burt llaverly as
"John Smith, Banker," will show all the
trials and tribulations of B much-married
man as they slum Id 1 .'shown. Burt was an
accomplished minstrel who has developed
into an excellent _fcroe*_________ Bessie
iand. the sweet-voiced Boubrette,
lias mado rapid strides during the past
!>, and classes with the \ery t>.st
■ ts, __uiou Weller and Kate Hart,
two of the "rosebuds," are new faces to
the Saoramento public. They are two
handsome girls with excellent voic
graceful bearing iv their various dances.
1 M.I.IAN ______
Lillian Lewis ta now styled not only
"Tin- Beautiful" and "The WeU Dressed"
but "The Lucky Lillian.'' She is rapidh
gaining the reputation of bein.; the Li_ck
ie . at ' <■ -.ty, aud in the oj) .ling
o- BOW tk ■ _\ bids lair tr> •
Emma Abbott. Miss Lewis will give the
initial perlormances in six now theaters
before January 1, 1 •__. The most impor
tant of these dedications will be the open
ing of the Xew Lansing Theater in Lin
coln, Neb., the building of which cost
$123,000. The formal dedication will take
place November 23, 1891, when Miss
l.owis will appear as Lenora in "Credit
Lorraine," by I_awrence Marston.
A COMING STAR.
Negotiations are pending for the ap
pearance in California noxt summer of
Marie Hubert _________ in "The Witch"
—Xew York's principal dramatic success
of tho past season. "The Witch" is6aid
to afford a complete change from the sur
feit of melodrama and farce-comedy that
have been rampant for a number of years.
In an editorial article tho New York
Herald pronounces "The Witch" and
"Alabama" the best plays of the year.
_______ NOTKS.
Sophie Eyre is to try another American
tour next season.
The latest musical farce-comedy is
called "A Dead Clinch,"
John Ernest McCaun has written a new
one-act comedy called "Sentenced."
"A High Roller" was tried at Troy on
last Tuesday. Il has no plot, but is said
to be a fair variety show.
Mary Irwin has bought one of tbo
Thousand Islands in the St. Lawrence
River, near Clayton, and called it Tolland
Island.
Patti will open her Bijou Theater at
Craig-y-Xo. Castle August 16th, and
Henry Irving is one of a large company
invited.
Henry V. Donnelly, of "Natural Gas,"
has returned from Mt. Clements miuus
twenty-eight pounds, but as frisky and
jolly as a young colt.
Boito's new opora "Nerono" is finished
and will bo produced simultaneously at
the La Scala to Milan, and at tho Teatro
Communale, Bologna.
Charles V. Scainon has a congenial
character in Russell's comedians, "City
Directory," (up to date) and in it has
scored a pronounced success.
"Ted" Piper will no longer be known
as "Ted." Since joining the Rose Cogh
lon company he distinctly desires to be
addressed as Mr. Edward Piper.
Miss Adele Palma has been engaged
for Rose Coghlan's tour. She was once
a member of the Vienna llcf Theater
and lately with Manager Amberg.
Blanche Marsden has just finished an
Irish comedy which she has named "The
Mulroys." It is the cleverest work this
clever young woman has yet done.
When "Sinbad" runs out its allotted
time at the Chicago Opera-house, it goes
to St. Louis for one week, and then direct
to San Francisco, for a run of six weeks.
Charles P. Hall, when in a gossiping
vein, recurs with pride to his many years'
successful service under the management
of M. B. Lcavitt, and it is a record to be
proud of.
Ime of tho new songs in the new Don
nelly and Glrard _ "Natural Gas" is
called "Sporty Boyß Without a Cent." It
is one of the cleverest yet introduced in
far. c comedy.
Beatrice Hamilton, who has been con
oected with the Chicago Opera-house bur
lesque for the last three years, lias made
quite a hit in the part of Lambrekin in
the "Tar and the Tartar."
John Russell says an actor is like a
frog, because tlie moment his head gets
above water it begins to swell. His anti
dote for this emergency is expressed in
tho lines of Richard IIL, "OIY witb the
head."
Prank Daniels, Tony Pastor, May Yohe,
Ralph Delmore," Lewis Baker, Sidney
Howard, Marshall P, Wilder. Margaret
Mather, < >.is Skinner and VV. M. Duulevy
an- on the deep blue ocean, homeward
bound.
J. K. Emmet will begin his season Au
gust 17th, in his late father's play, '*._.___
Fn Ireland." Mason Mitchell will be his
leading man, and the play will be very
thoroughly rehearsed by Max Freeman
beiore going on the road.
Leonore Snyder, the youngest prima
donna on the English stage, is an Ameri
can trirl, and is creating quite a furore in
London by her impersonation ofßeobec
in "Tiio "Xautch Girl," at the Savoy
Theater. Miss Suyder was born in India
napolis.
The San Francisco Music and Drama
has an excellent article on the work done
in this city by Manager Charles P. Hall.
That u;eutieman i.s undoubtedly entitled
to great credit for the class of amuse
ments he has furnished the people oi
Sacramento.
Dan Daly as John Smith, stage mana
ger of the Gaiety Theater, in the "City
Directory," presents a picture of the
ruling Thespian who is in hard luck in a
mostr.rii. .ic manner. He has severalnew
song-, eccentric dances and humorous
surprises that will astonish our theater
goers.
The artists who are to accompany
Remenyi on his tour through this country
next winter aro Miss Edith McGregor,
alto; William H. Fessenden, tenor, and
Mi'-s 1". < liff Berry, pianiste. Miss Alice
i.sty, the soprano, was to have joined tht
company, but has cancelled the engage
ment, and her successor has not been en
gaged.
COMMERCIAL.
BACRAMENTO MARKET.
S_______TO, Aueust 7th.
FRUlT—Lemons—Sicily, |B#_ -.0 ft box;
("alifornia, ?4_..; Limes, $ll(g.l2 %i box;
81 75_>2 ft 100; Bananas, $2 50@3 5o "?>
bunch ior Island; Cocoanuts, $7(§»_; Califor
nia Oranges—Blverslde, 83(_.;_ 50 ft box;
Pineapples. 00 cents each, 87 ft dozen;
Peaches, to* .oc ft box; Blackberries, Bi(<?.>
1 25 ficaseandfl 50 ft crate; Strawberries,
. 10 150 - caso; B. T. Cherries, 75c;
Apricots, s€_ 75c . bo_- Currant.., 50c ft box
ami $-(«._5 5o ft clust: Raspb-ii-CS, $I<£*l 25
V case; i .ami, 500 _Mfl 25 . box.
CANNED eooliS —Assorted table, $2c<_,
2 10; Apples, fl 60; A___X_s.fi 9o; Black
berries, $1 95; Cherries, S2 40. 2 GO; Cur
rants, .2 25; Gooseberrfes, si sor.i .(•;
Muscat Orapes. $1 55@1 Go; Plums, $1 CO;
Quinces. 81 9o; Raspi.crrlcs, f 2 70; Straw
berries, f 2 70.
lU.EADSTi:. FS— Flour, 08 ft bbl; Oat
meal, 10-_ sacks, lc ft _>; $3 75 "_ 100-lb
Backs; CormeaL white, $3 oO %- io-tb nsrVs;
yellow, f_ _sV2s_b sacks; Cracked Wheat.
?. , io-. sacks; 82 75 ft ioo-_ sacks
lominy. §4 ft 10-£> Backs: $3 75 ft 100-lb
Backs; _______ §2 7o ft 10-lb sacks; §2 5o
ft 100-St. Back .
VEGETABLES—Onions, SUversktns, 75®
85c ft cwt; red. s_@_se; E*g Plant, loc;
Tomatoes, .1 25 . box; Com—Field, fl,
sweet, 81 50 ft saok; Cabbage, 5« £650 p
100 tm: Carrots, 50(0,G0c ft 100 lb . Turnips,
new, 75c > isack: bunch vegetables, 12%. fj
doz; Parsnips, 81 1 50; Beet., 75cW$l;
Horse Radish. 10c v »'■; Garlic, 10c; Arti
chokes, 40_ 60c ft d >.-; Dried Poppers, 25__t
;;< cj Green I .as, common, 2@3c: do. sweet,
Potatoes, Early Hose. _o@sOc; IVcr
c 70; Burbanks, 70_.«-o_; Cenl
ct!; Celery, 75c |) i:u»; String
•1(<...c; . ummer Bquaah, 6c. Caiill-
Qower, $i v dos; Green Peppers, 7<<j;..cft_>;
Okra, 12}-,(.16<-; Red Cabbage, ; _ ft . .
DAIRY PRODUCTS-Duller-- Valley, 20 .
22c f _>; Fancy Petaluma, 2:; 1. -■••_ r_c. y th;
East* ra I'r.aiiicry. fancy, 21(<j}22c; packed in
Orkins,choice, 18_|25c, common, 12%A13C.
e_-C_se—-California, 11*-.. 12c; Young "Araer
i< a, l _'„ i. c: ____ei_ Cream, 15010 c; Lim
burger, _B@2oc; genuine Swiss, ;;2,_ _>*><•;
American sv, las, _ie: Martin's Cream, 17.,
l-.. Egga 2._}22c; Eastern, 19 __.__,
POULTRY—Dealers' prices: [ive Turkeys,
'.: 51 Re; gobblers, if _:.<-. dressed,
"• ■■; full-grown Chickens. B!_J5 '.- do/.;
young Roosters, 8 H*s ft dox: broiiers. 8 ■<_ 1;
tame Ducks, . i 5; ______ 85(§>5 50; Geese,
I 26 - pair.
iIAV, GRAIN ANP FFF.D-Oat Hay. $v
ten; Alfalfa, do. 81<>.12ft ton; ____,
8 .-*> . ton; Middlings, f22 . ton: Barley,
whole, paying 81 CM. I 16; rollea, 81
Wheat (cnoice milling), paying fl 50 .cvi;
Rye. fl 35; Tame Oats, #202 io; Corn, pay.
-5 ft cwt.
MEATS—Reef, sc; Mutton, o!v._v7c; Lamb,
'cc: Veal, large, 5 5%c; small, &*s(_} 7c; bogs,
uresaed Pork.*Bc; Hams—Eastern, 11
■;•; 15c.California.] 1% •: Bacon—Light Medium,
<>%-; selected, lOc*. extra light, 12>ac; extra
llgnt. lx_iel__. l .il; • 1 1,., c.
MISCELI__NEOt-_ — Reeds—Alfalfa, new
cro;., s ,-y •; Timothy, Enst< m. .@7'e; Pop
Corn, ear, .•-!<•: shelled, . ■•,.' ,c; Red
: Clover, 10■■■ i i>; l_d Ton, i; @7c y ft>. Nuts—
j Chile Walnuts, ivw. tl@l2c; California Wa.
I I j 12c; Almonds, new, 1 ; . \: c; l'ea
alltbmla, __Y7tr, ("astern, o- ,cj Lard—
I i alifornia. can.. n^A9c, F.islern. -;,.il(ir;
, Hiil. —Salt, light. *sc; medium _u-rs, (><■;
i heavy steers, sc; heavy cows, sc; dry, 9c;
Tallow, 3!_c.
SAN FRANCISCO MARKET.
San Fuancis. . August 7, 1891.
FLOUR-We Quote: ___ __t_ price* for
Family Extras, f_ 00® 5 £ bbl; Baker. Ex
i trus. ?l 90__>; Superfine, $3 _o@3 80.
LAT—Business is of quiet order, while
1 prl. .; !i .nib ('.. Starke. Quotable
SACRAMENTO DAILY BECOBD-U-SIOX, BATUBDAY, AUGTST S, 1891. — EIGHT PAGES.
ntsl 56\.{to$l 57}£ f. ctl for good to choice
shipping quality.
BARLEY—The firm feeling noted yesterday
was less pronounced to-day, though there was
no variation in values. Quotable at $1 10 to
fl 12>_ *etl for leed; new brewing, §1 15
ctl.
OATS—Quiet at unchanged rates. Quotable
at $1 45@1 55 $ ctl for old and $1 30@1 45
for new feed.
CORN—>«o business. Wequote as follows:
Large Yellow, 81 72V_31 75; small Yellow,
$1 7531 77%; White, $232 07,.; f* ctl.
CRACKED CORN—Quotable at $39@40
ton.
OILCAKE MEAL—Quotable at $30 «. ton
from the mills.
CORNMEAL—MiIIers quote feed at §38 50
389 50 ft ton: fine binds for tlie table, iv
large and small packages, 3^®4c _. lb.
SEEDS—We quote: Mustard, Brown, $2 75
33; Yellow, $232 50 fictl; Canary,2 . 4 <.3J£c;
riemp, 431V4C; Rape. $2(a2 50; Timothy,
4>*_3s-; Alfalfa, 5V a _.G>_e»tb; Flax, §2 50@
2.5 f ctl.
MIDDLINGS—SuppIy good. Quotable at
$20 50321 50 ft ton.
CHOPPED FEED—Quotable at §24325
f. ton.
HaY—Steadiness is tho feature. We quote:
Alfalfa, $11(_.12; Wheat, $ 12&14 50; Wheat
and Oat, $11*13 50; Barley, $11313; Clo
ver, Sllc-13; Wild Out $11313 50 ¥ ton.
STRA W—Quotable at 50365 c"^ bale.
11 OPS—Nominal at a range of 20^ 25c ft ft.
BRAN—Easy at current ligures. Quotable
at $18 50 a-lDli. ton.
RYE-Quotable at $1 35$ ctl for new and
$1 373__ for old.
BUCKWHEAT—NominaI at $1 25@1 50
GROUND BARLEY—Quotable at $24325
per ton.
POTATOES—Receipts are ample for trade
wants. Garnet Chiles, . ..(_sse; Early Rose,
_0«_.50o in sacks and 4036&;- in boxes; Peer
less, 50360 c; Burbun_.s, 60_S$1 " t _ ctl; Sweet,
2>_3_siCfl ft.
* ONlONS—Quotable at . o®(ssc fl ctl.
DRIED PEAS—We quote: Green, §2 75 to
$3 for Eastern and §232 50 for Califor
nia; Blt.ck.eyc, $1 6031 05; Niles, £1 Sow)
1 65 fictl.
BEANS—We quote: Baycs, $3 20®3 30;
Butter, $2 7533; Pink, $2 8032 50; Rod.
S2 70 to §. 85; Lima, $3(0,3 lo; Pea, $;;@
3 25; Small White, $3% 3 U. '.'ctl.
VEGETABLES—Green Corn did not sell bo
high to-day. C_o__tb_. remain plentiful and
cheap, (Jroen Okra, 75385 c box; (Ireen
Corn, 75-©SI 85 "_. sack tor com mon and
20-._}_': v dozen for Bay; Cucumbers,
153200 per DOX for bay; pickling do, 35c «
ctl tor large and S><- S ctl for small;
(ireen Peppers, 85040 cfl box for Chile
and 50i\.$1 for BeU; Tomatoes, _.Q_ 200 y.
box for Vacaville and 26340 c for Kiver; Egg
Plant, 76c35l 9 box; Summer Squash, 20a
35c fl box for Buy; Turnips, 50(_7.">c fl etl';
Beets, $1 V sack; Carrots, feed, 50 .75c;
Parsnips, $1 25 ft ctl: Cabbage, 40360 c; Gar
lic, __»_efi ft; Caulillower. 75c ~? dozen; Dry
Peppers. 15320 c; Dry Okra, 20. 26c ft ft;
Marrowfat Squash, $15 ton.
FRUIT—Good fruit of all kinds is selling at
satisfactory prices. Fig* a;e unite scarce. We
quote prices as follows: Hucklebcrrus. _3
10c ft ft; Crab Apples, 50.", 75c ~r box; Black! ur
ranu. 60366 c%4 drawer; Grapes, 35360 cfl
box for bw_etw_ter, 75cg$l for Muscat aad
50c35l for black; white Nectarines, '.. le in
bulk to canners, 20og 10c ~_t box "to the
trade; Red do, 50375 cf) bo: . Watermelons,
$n> § 12%100: __ntaloupea,sl32 50 per case.
Figs, 75c _.l 25 V box; Black b rr.es, S3 503
4 oO perchest; Apricots, 30350 c_. box to tbe
trade, and 131>£c ft ft t<> canners; Peaches,
25350 cfl box anrt 25350 cfl basket: do,
Crawford. 25 a SOe V basket and 1.-. w. I>_•fl ft
to canners; Plums, 132 c ~fr ft to the trade and
%@Y._e %t ft to the canncr.-; Apples, 50e3
$1 25 ?> box; Raspberries, . 7(g,:i 0 cheat;
1 _-.__, 40.. 75c "f, box: do, Bartlett, 5t .•••.§l;
Strawberries, $639 f. chest for Sharpie, s;
Mexican Linus, 81'> '•<• box: Lemons, Sicily,
$839; California Lemons, $434 50 for choice
and §333 50 for common; Caliiornia
Oranges, $233 50; Tahiti oranges, $3 to
?3 50 9 box; Bananas, $£32 BO fi bunch;
'Ineapples, $ 1(3 5 _. dozen.
DRIED FRUIT —V.c quote: Apricots,
bleached, 838 c ~\_ !••: do, sun-dried, 5. 7c;
Peaches, sun-dried, 637 c; do. bleached, 738 c;
Apples. 9310 c for evaporated, 63 8c "for
sliced and 436 c tor quartered; (trapes, future
delivery, 3c ft; Prunes, SJ-i_ <.'•_!• fllb.
BUTTER—Trices of the better grades are
easing, which causes the common article lo
show more weakness. We quote: Fancy,
2 7-. to, 2._; __ood to ehoic ,213 2 6c; fa ir to good,
18323 C store lots, 1431 He f! B>; pickled roll,
22 -325 c; tirkin. 203 22%f, Eastern, 121-..
--17'/c lor ladle packed,and 19322j<_cf>._blor
creamery.
CHEESE—We quote: Choice to fancy newj
HctOl2c; tair to good, 9J<;©lo>_c; Easter::,
ordinary to tine. 11313 c V ft.
E Hfs —Quiet movement at old pries. \ .
quote as follows: California, rancli, 27>_3
30c; store lots, 17325 c; Eastern, 23324 c for
fancy, 20f.-i.2lc for good to choice and 16 • 19c
for common.
POULTRY—Trade is fair. Live Tur
keys— Gobblers, 16318 c; Hens, 14 _15cf> B>;
Roosters, $6'". 7 for old and -.5 5o 6 70 for
young; Broilers, S2 25 to £3 for small and
£3 5034 5o ior large; Hens, $637 50; Ducks,
£_ 5036: Geese, $l 25 .1 50 v pair.
CAME—Hare,sl 5031 75; Rabbits, §1 25
tosi 50; Doves, 76035 l . doaea.
PROVISIONS—We quote as follows: East
ern Hams. 13>j'. 14c; California refrigerator
cared Hams, 1_.tji.123/_c: Eastern _______
Bacon, 13. 4_sCalifornia Bacon, heavyand
medium, .._<. IOc; do, light, 12> v 3l3c: do,
extra light, I3_;lle; do, clear sides, 103
19J.C . ft>; Pork, extra prime. $14314 50;
do. prime, mess, $15*15 50; do, mess, $16
fe> 16 50; do. clear, $18® 18 50: do. extra
clear, $19319 50 %» bbl; Pig's Feet. $12 50
ft bbl: Beef, mess, bbls, $7 ;>(.f_^; do, extra
me. s, bbls, $S 5030; do family,;-; 113$ 11 50
?>. bbl; do, smoked, ll>_c to 1 ~$ ft: Eastern
_ird, tiei-ees. B>439>_c; do. 10-lb tins, 10- ( c;
do, 5-ft tins,lo%c; do, 3-ft tins, 10}-._e, Califor
nia Lard, tierces. 9' _ to 9j._c; do. kegs, 10<: do,
10-ft tins, 10Vi<a,10}_; ao, 5-ft tins, 10!.^
H.'_c: do, 10-ft pails, lo^ic; do, 5-ft pails, lie;
do, 3-ft palls, Hi-ie t* ft.
\V< )OL—Wc quote spring:
Foothill, _. lb 16318 c
Northern 18<_ 22
Southern, 6 month. 1 2 I 5
Southern, 12 months 12k,@15
Nevada 15318
Oregon, Valley 22_24
Eastern, light 1 6<a2o
Do, heavy 12315
Southern Lamb's Wool „__ -b(t_ll
SAN FRANCISCO STOCK SALES.
Ba* Fkamcisco, August 7,1891.
lIOBXIKa BO AUD.
Andes 1 2. Justice 50c
Baltimore 45c Mexican 2 70__ 76
Belcher _1 Go Occidental 1 25
Belle Isle. GOc Ophir._ 3 90<a>_ 95
B. _. B _3 65_3 75 Overman...2 10@2 15
Bullion 4 35^4 40.Peerless 15c
Caledonia __...._G5c Potosi 6> w 'c_ r, ■'•/_,
Challenge _...._ 30.S_vage. _2 OO
Choilar - 2 70S. B. & M I@l 05
C. C. dc V -_$_d 7S. Nevada 3 45
Com*wealth 40c L'nlou _ 95
(.'.Point .1 40 Utah 90®«6c
G_C 1 70{_.l 75 Weidon 5c
H. AN .2 10Y. Jacket...! Ssi_l 90
A____i_-OOK __s_lo_.
Sjhlr 425 Bullion 4 55£.4 05
exican 2 85@2 90 Exchequer- 90c
G. <_C 1 Ss(wl 90 S. Belcher.- 1 05
B. <_ B 4 20 Justice 50c
CC. 4 V 7H®7'. Union 2 90
Savaue 2 05 Alt. 75c
Choilar 2 7502 80 Silver Ilill 25c
Potosi fr^toti .. <.'hall_nge._ 1 35
H.A N 2 10@2 15 Occidental 1 20
C. Point 1 -10®1 45' Andes 1 25@1 30
Yellow Jacket 1 !>5 Scorpion 40(<_>45c
C. Imperial 15c Benton 1 50
Kentuck 40c F_ B. _ B 25c
Aloha l tO Baltimore 500
Belcher 1 55@1 GO Belle Isle GOc
Confidence 4 25 Com'wealth 40a
8. Nevada 3 40 Crocker 10c
Utah 95c
Out of Sorts
Is a feeling peculiar to persons of dyspeptic ten- {
deacy, or it r_ay ho caused by chimgo of climato, •
season or Life. The stomach is out of order, the i
bead aches or does not foel right, appetite Is ca- ,
priclous, the nerves seem overworked, tbe mind I
ts confused and irritable. This condition finds an
cxcellentcorrective in Hood's Sarsaparilla, which, !
by its regulating and toning powers, soon restores
harmony to the system, and gives that strength
of mind, nerves, and body, which makes one feel
perfoctly well. N. B. Be sure to get
Hood's SarsaparlSla
Sold by all dnijrcists. gl; sl_for__>. Prepared only
by C. I. HOOD _ CO., Apothecaries, Lowell, Mass.
100 Doses One Dollar
CAST YOUR _^^ OVER THIS.
*___W ■ _______-___-HUI WT,t*iOT h** ■s____|
¥* .ST 8. 81 W __W_V '*-:al->' .*_••■ °o Virt«_ cp< .____
Ys_ "\_l H f_-. fW( t'_.oi_, ____, piles. v»r ___!_,
_fca f_ Hl. »t_ _k^_> i*oc*''r '■ fc»_. .y__«* fat
_L . _>—B '-) ._f 1» --_ j ———__§ ___!• _l.pi.__,
»-iair .-_-____*■__■_■__j^ _>i______l book for ______-n,
I _xvl__ln« »hy __>___d_ <a__>t g_ -n__ _ ir*.-wi, p.-.»-_,:
fi ehroolc ilMi-Mi. »}■_, _-. l'_r_ _ r_u_l . _k____, lo» ol
I __•!_<-_ olMt, aypku-. tmii_t<__i I__[__, rwu'.u ot ___. or
■ __.<__. <_lc_ untU__l lot ssMTuae. l_,-.''iiu__. _• Ufcj _n
t__ Dt. LlEtltrS WOKDERFUL QERBAH IM.IOORATOI.,
_>e (___««t _B>_7 f» __>*• 90E-.r_.ln_ To prove lu m__t\
kl U_J bottle ust fre. Add., m, DR. UEBIQ .CO 4_ fie_.
■a. e_a _____ __. m sn w. wj_ at.. _______ at*. __ _.
SHERWOOD HALL NURSERIES,
Tlmotliy Hopkins,
MENLO PARK, SAN MATEO COUNTY, CAL
Carnations, Hoses, Chrysanthemums
and Cnt Flowers.
J_rSWEET VEX SEED A SPECIALTY.•_*
TO WEAK MEN ______
.erly decar, wasting v.-cain^sa, lost i_i___oo-, etc.,
I will sena n valttabl. treatise (jr>alo<l) contalrlnj?
fulipart.. 1 inrs for home care. Fit KB of charge.
A. splendid medical wor_; should ho read by .v.ry
man who Is n-rv. -«. nnd drMlltatod. Art-res.,
i K _•-*"- V *■• _•'-»•/!_,l_X_. I_o.du.Sl Cozta,
IttiaveUancouo.
SKIN DARK AS COAL
Eczema Afflicts a Wcll-Known Gentle
man. Pitiable Subject to Look
Upon. Suffered Terribly.
"Whole Body Covered.
Given np by San Frnnelsco Doctors.
Might Have Saved $600. as He
Was Cured lor $0 by
Cutlcura Remedies.
I have many times studied over what Cuti
cura has doue for mc: it has restored me to
good health and happiness, for before I tried
C_ti..ka ____a_E-___ I was irivcu up by all
the doctors lu San I'rauciseo; but if I had only
laken a certain gentleman _ advice and tried
Cuticura Re_ik_.i_:s sooner, I sliould cer
tainly have saved from $500 to $000. I was
a most pitiable subject ;o look upon with
eczema, and suilered terribly. 1 was almost
as dark as coal from my insupnpto my knees
on both legs, and after that it broke out nil
over my body; but after using half a dozen
sets of Ci'ticcra R_____sd__B I was perieotly
restored to good health, and have enjoyed tho
same ever since (which is for over two years).
A great number of people visit my establish
ment, and I have told hundreds of people what
Ccticura has done tor me, but have thought
that I ought to write and lot you know, so tnat
you can refer anyone in this county to me.
LOUIS JOHNSON,
Proprietor Marine Boat House,
Sausalito, Marin Co.. California.
Cuticura Resolvent
The new Blood Purifier, internally (to cleanse
the blood of all impurities and poisonous ele
ments, and thus remove the cause), and .Tti
t'l'KA, the great !.kin Cure, and Cuticura
Soap, an exquisite Skm Beautifier, externally
(to clear the skin ami scalp and re. .nre the
hair), cure every disease and humor of the
skin and Dlood, from pimples to scrofula.
Sold everywhere. Price, Cuticuka, _ Oe.;
Soap, 25c; Kksolvknt, $1. Prepared by the
Potter Drug a>d C____icai_ Corporation.
Boston.
4_. Send for "How to Cure Skin Diseases."
RA HV . 'Skiu anti Scal _ Purified and beautified
uA.ii Ofty Cuticura Boat. Absolutely pure.
'$$fc MUSCULAR STRAINS"
«j*sG*J3feAnd pains, back ache, weak kid
ifiSgjgJ"" neys. rheumatism and chest pains
JSJQ?O^ relieved in one iniimto by the
* _► Cuticura Anti-Pain Plaster. I
The first and only instantaneous pain-killing
plaster.
_________ ttnmn3 *_.OU*VC_.
""CALIFORNIA"STATfE BANK
AND SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS
SACKAMENTO, CAL.
Draws Drafts on Principal Cities ofthe World.
Saturday Hour., 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.
officers:
President N. D. RIDEOUT
Vice-President FRED'K COX
Cashier. A . ABBOTI
Assistant Cashier W.E. GERBEB
DIRECTORS:
C. ft. Clark, j os . Bteffi.ns,
Gko. C, Pbrktwh, Fksp'k Cox
N. D. Rideout, Norman Rideout,
W. E. Oerp.er.
SACRAMENTO BANkT
THE OIiDEST SAVINGS BANK IN THE
city, corner Fifth and J streets, Sacra
mento. Guaranteed capital, 9500,000- paid ■
up capital, pold coin. $300,000; loans oa re_l :
estate in California, July l, 1891, 53,106,408, !
term and ordinary deposits, July 1, 1891, '
S3.<J__,s2l. Term and ordinary deposits re^ I
ceived. Dividends paid in January and July. !
Money loaned upon real estate only. Infor- I
matlon furnished upon application to
W. P. COCEMAN, President.
Ed. R. Hamilton, Ca-hier.
NATIONAL BiNK ® D. a ______ 4 Cft
Sacramento, Cal.—Founded 1850.
Saturday hours 10 a. k. to 1 p. m,
directors and shareholders.
D. O. MILLS 1,538 Shares j
EDGAR MILLS, President 1*538 Shares !
S. PRENTISS SMITH, Vlce-Pres. i>so Shares
FRANK MILLER, Cashier 351 Shares
C. F. DILLMAN. Asst. Cashier.. 125 Shares
Other peisonsown 1,198 Shares
Capital and Surplus, §000,000.
**. Chrome Steel Safe Deposit Vault and
Time Loel^
FARMERS' AND MECHANIcFsAVINGS RANK
Southwest corner Fourth and J
Streets, Sacramento, Cal.
Guaranteed Capital §500,000
X OANS MADE ON REAL ESTATE. IN
JLj terest paid semi-annually on Term and
Ordinarv Deposits.
B. IT STI.I_.MAN_. President
EDWIN K. ALSIP Vice-President
D. D. WHITBECK Cashier
C. H. CUMMINGS Secretary
JAMES M. STEVENSON Surveyor
directors:
B. U. Steinman, Edwin K Aesip,
C. H. Cummings, W. E. Terry,
Sol. Runyon, Jamks McNasser,
Jas. M. Stevenson.
CROCKER-WOOLWORTH RATIONAL lAM,
3 _2 Hne Street, San Franc-Isco.
PAID OP CAPITAL, $1,000,000. SURPLUS, $250,000,
directors:
CHARLES CROCKER ...E. H. MILLER, Jr.
R. C. WOOLWORTH. President
W. H. BROWN Vice-President
W. E. CROCKER Cashier
PEOPLE'S SAVINGS BUI
Of Sacramento.
DIVIDENDS FOR THE TERM ENDING
June 30, 1891, are now pavable. Rate
per annum on lerm deposits, {_% per cent., and
on ordinary deposits, 4 per cent. ______
made on real estate only. All communica
tions promptly answered.
WM. BECKMAN, PresidenU
OfQ, W. Lore.vz. Ci. hler.
SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPAN.
[PACIFIC SYSTEM.]
AUGUST __, 1891.
Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at
Sacramento:
LEAVE ! TRAINS RUN DAILY. ARRIVE
6:50 Ai Calistoga and Nana j 11:05 A
3:05 Pj Calistoga and Nana 8:10 P
12:50 AL.Ashlnndand Portland...! 4:.0 A
4::.0 PjDemiiiff. El Pasoand E__| 7:00 P
7:00 P Knights L'dlng<_Orovillel 7:40 A
10:50 Ai Los Angeles 1 9:35 A
iOgden and East—Second'
j 11:50 A Class 2:25 A
ICentral Atlantic Express
11:00 Pj ior Ogden and East i 5:25 _
3:00 Pj OrovlUe 10:30 A
3:00 P;Red Bluff via Marysville' 10:30 A
10:35 A|... liedding;viaWillows.... 4:00 1
2:50 A San Krancisco via Benicla 11:25 A
4:35 A .an Krancisco via Benl.ia 12:30 A
6:50 A San Francisco via Ben tela 11_>5 A
5:40 A San Krancisco via Benicia 10:10 l:
3:05 P San Francisco via Benicia S:10 P
♦10:00 A San Francl.co viastearner' (6:00 A
! 10:50 A San Fran, via Livermore. 2:50 P
: 10:50 A San Jose ! 2:50 P
4:30 P Santa Barbara j 9:35 A
6:50 A Santa Rosa ! 11:05 A
3:05 P' Santa Rosa i 8:10 P
8:50 A Stockton and Gait j 7:00 P
4:30 P Stockton aud Gait 9:35 A
11:50 A, Truckee and Reno 2:25 A
11:00 P Truckeeand Reno 5:25 A
6:30 P Colfax and way stationa 2:30 P
6:50 A Valioio ! 8:10 P
3:05 P Vallejo j
•8:20 A Folsom and Placerville.. *2:40 P
♦12:15 P.Folsom and Placer villc * 10:20 A
•4:45 P ..Folsom »8:00 A
♦Sunday excepted. tSunday only. jMon
-.lay excepted. A.—For morning. P.—For af
j ter noon.
RICHARD GRAY, Gen. Traffic Manager.
T. 11. GOODMAN. General Passenger .Went.
I
WOMEN AND GIRLS WANTED
: Saeramento Packing and Drying Co.,
SIXTH AND G STREETS.
au6- 3t
i_AIIIF.L MIMA VISTA.
ri .HIS EXQUISITE RESORT IN THE
L si.rras (altitude 3.500 teet) ivill bs kept
op; n ii;i October. First vacancy of the re_v
■__, Angus! __. lijucni-eeni Scenery, pine
forests, purest water.abundant fruit. Address,
i _ith references, MONTA VISTA.
1 au^-.1 l _ch Flat P. ... C__
Cap ag yoUcy gano
— ______ | ■ ■ .' as ■ — ■ —•_. ~ * ' " **
CAPAY VALLEY!
The Earliest Fruit Land in the State
Efiial ii All Respects to tie Famous Yaca Valley, Whicii it Adjoins.
UNPRKCEBENTEB TERMS.
ONLY KOR KIVE YEARS AT 7 PER CENT.«__J
" —■- -1 — ■■ ■ - ' ■ ■'- __■___■
Capay Valley is situated in Yolo County, about 90 miles by rail from San Franeiseo,
and is traversed in its entire length by the Woodland, Capay and Clear
Lake Railroad, t he distance from Esparto to Rumsey being 21 miles.
The Capay Valley Land Company is offerin . the
most fertile lands in this beautiful valley upon terms which
enable the purchaser to pay for the land out of its own
product, viz.: Interest only for five years at 7 per cent
The only condition imposed is, that a reasonable pro
portion of the iand purchased shall, be planted to fruit
trees or vines. Land may be bougjht without this con- -
dition on payment of 20 per cent cash and remaining
So per cent, at the end of five years*, with interest annu
ally in advance at 7 per cent. The various tracts owned
by the Capay Valley Land Company have been subdi
vided into 10 and 20-acre lots, _______ are for sale at
.prices varying from $50 to $150 per- acre. Similar un
improved land in Vaca Valley has recently been sold at
$400 and $500 per acre.
These Capay Valley lands are un der the most favor
able climatic conditions for the pros<_:ution of profitable
fruit growing, and the locality'has proved itself to be
one of the earliest in the State. Thegrape crop of 1890
from the company's vineyard at Cashmere was picked,
dried and slapped to Chicago and Philadelphia before
the Fresno County grapes were ripe.
The railroad passes through all of t3ie tracts owned by
the Capay Valley Land Company, tlhus insuring excel
lent shipping facilities; and land may now be purchased
in the immediate proximity of either of the following
stations: Capay, Cadenasso, Surrey^.Guinda, Sauterne,
Cashmere or Rumsey.
At many of these places fine orchards of the choicest
and earliest varieties of peaches and apricots may already
be seen, and during the coming season considerable ad
ditional acreage will be planted out. One of the recent
sales made by the company was that of the Tancred
Tract, containing 600 acres, to a colony association.
This tract has been sub divided into fo: ty holdings, all of
which will be planted to fruit trees this season.
The fine orchards on the Guinda Tract, where 400
acres have been sold, are especially worthy of mention,
and it is a significant fact that several of the blocks are
owned by successful Vaca Valley fruit-growers, who ex
pect t_> make theu earliest shipments from here.
FOR MAPS AND ALL INFORMATION REGARDING THE CAPAY VALLEY LANDS,
APPLY TO OR ADDRESS
"T IVyT" T" T "Tv _/I — I—T1 —T "T _ *
W J__L ____. 2> _] 11_, I_, _d .
Fourth' and Townsend .'Streets. . SAN FRANCISOO.
_\x_csl _£-_tate* CRc.
—■-- 1 •—1
ARAREOPPORTUNIT-
Cood Agricultural Land for|sK>
to $20 per Acre.
The Pacific Improvement Company has" __w
cently purchased twelve thousand _cre_ of?
land in tho heart of Tehama County, for the
purpose of promoting subdivision and sef tie.
ment. This land embraces lands from flrst
class Sacramento Valley agricultural land., to
laud of lair average quality, and is offered, at
from $10 to $20 per aero, ln subdivision); of
40, 80, 120,160 and 320 acres.
The terms upon which these lands are off. red
are especially attractive. They will be sou Iln
subdivisions, us above indicated, by the _ ity
ment of Interest only for three years, at v-_ Ich
time tlie purchaser can be^ia the payment, of
principal by paying tbe flrst of five cquaban
nual installments. Thus no part of tbe pi tn
clpal is tobe paid for threo years.and then
the purchaser is to have flvo years in whteti to
pay Ave equal annual installments, with-ix.
terest at the rato of 7 per cent, per annum.
making payments extending over a period of
I eight years. Intending purchasers are __
I aured that this ls an opportunity to purehj__
i land of fair average quality at $10 per aare.
i and good agricultural land at $20 an __r%
with other grades cf iand at prices to- con o
apor.d between these figures.'
The assertion is frequently made th ,-t goi> _
lands, suitable for general farming, and es
pecially adapted for fruit-growing, cauno. ne
had in Caliiornia for loss than from $60 to
$100 an acre. An examination of tho l:_ad
subject of this advertisement will prove to
home-seekers that this is aa opportunity for
tho purchase of good agricultural land at $30
; an acre, and for qualities grading down to feir
i agricultural land at $10 au acre, on term* of
payment which should make the disposition
uf tfc. s.- land.s to actual settlers a result o__;r __
accomplishment.
Ibe primary object of the purchase of t»_i_
body of land was the breaking up of a large
Lolding fo v tho purpose of promoting its- set
tlement in sm.illor quantities and its devoJios
V> diligent hnsbaudry.
For further particulars, call upon or a_
-1 __-8 WM. H. MILLS,
Land Agent of the C. P. It. R., Fourth and
Towns.nd .tr.-. t. . B__ _ _-_eis< _•. Cal.
1 —— :
Baker & Hamilton,
—IMPORTERS AND JOBBEItS OP
HARDWARE, IRON, STEEJ*m,
COAL, POWDER,
Agricultural Implements and Macliks,
BARBED WIRE, CORDAGE, BELTING.
Sacramento _..Callfot __la
FRIEND & TERRY
Lumber Company,'.
MAIN YARD AND OFFICE, 1310 SEO
ond street. Branch Yard, corner T- __lfU_
I and J streets.
i Waterhouse & Lesrter,
—DEALERS IN—
Iron, Steel, Cumberland Coal, Wagon
Lumber and Carriage Hard \. acre.
! 709, 711. 715 J St.. Sacrament©
[____mi¥^_H s]
T * ORDERB FROM THE COUNTRY PROMPTLY- l-K-ED 'j]
Too much stress cannot be laid upon tlie great ad
vantage to the fruit-grower of being in an early locality.
In most cases it makes the difference between success
and failure. The in*lustrious orchardist of Capay Valley
may rest assured that he will derive all the benefits gained
by the first fruit shipments of the season, and that 23
acres of this rich land, when the trees are in bearing,
will yield a handsome and assured income.
The Capay Valley Land Company has an agent re
siding in the valley, whose duty it is to show the various
tracts to land seekers.
Four townsites have been laid out in different points
in the valley, viz.: Esparto, Cadenasso, Guinda and
Rumsey. Town lots may now be purchased at reason
able prices and on easy terms.
The enterprising and flourishing town of Esparto is
situated at the lower end of the valley, and $125,000
worth of substantial buildings have already been erected,
including a fine four-story brick hotel, two large brick
blocks and waterworks, with pipes laid in the streets,
besides extensive warehouses and numerous residences.
The town has a postoffice, school-house and a weekly
paper, and the fine railroad depot contains telegraph
and express offices.
Postoffices have also been established at Guinda and
Rumsey. This latter place, situated at the head of _he
valley, is the present terminus of the raihoad. The
comfortable little hotel makes excellent quarters for
hunters as well as land-seekers.
The advantages enjoyed by thc settler in Capay Val
ley may be thus concisely summed up:
A soil of great fertility, yielding bountifully of every
crop.
A soil and climate v/hich will ripen all kinds of fruit
d vegetables earlier than anywhere else in the State.
anA climate perfectly adapted to the curing of raisins and
drying of fruit without the aid of artificial evaporators.
A location that is central and close to markets. Railroad
communication which enables shipments to be made
quickly and cheaply. Lands which are sold cheaper
j and on better terms than anywhere else o the State.
$u«itte_(* C_ «_r_>«u
DRS. PENDERY & ____T__BRIDGE,
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. OFFICE
Postoffice Building, corner Fourth and K
I it_._ i_s-tf
A. MEISTER,
CARRIAGES, VICTORIAS, PHAETONS
Buggies and Bpring and Fruit Wagons!
too. 01-j, m-t Nintn street. Sa-ramento.
DR. W. F. WIARD
HAS REMOVED HIS RESIDENCE TO
1610 O street. Office—Masonic block j
sixth and K streets. jyH'-lin
iH. F. ROOT. ALEX. NEILSON, J. DRISCOI* !
ROOT, I-E.LSON _ CO.,
UNION FOUNDRY—IRON AND BRASS
Founders, und Machinists, Front street, i
I between N and 0. Castings and Machinery !
of every ue__ription rnacic to order.
GUTHRIE BROS.,
PRACTICAL PLUMBERS, STEAM AND
Gas Fitting. Hooting and Jobbing. Terms
reasonable. 127 J street.
S. CARLJ_,
SUCCESSOR TO CARLE & CROLY, CON
tractor and Builder. Orders solicited and
promptness guaranteed. Otlice and chop,
I 1124 Second street, between i_ and L.
BTOI.E MASON.
'•■ /.EMENT AND ARTIFICIAL WALKS
_j laid, ln all colors, at lowest price. First
; _uss work guaranteed. A. BOITANO, No. ,
! 719 Ailev. betwei u M and N, Seventh and
: Eighth streets. B____o«__. G__
JOHN D. SH3ARER & SOU,
ARTIFICIAL STONEWALK CONTRACT- I
ors. Latest (it.-sigiis and ftrst-oliiss work.
I Estimates furnished for residences, wood or
! iron t'oundatiov.s. .mii-tr
&enii&xv\£.
i =■■ ■ .
F. F. TEBBETS, ______
DENTIST, 914 SIXTH ST., _f_SS££?s.
between I and J, west _id' (f^-'-^lsl?^%ak
I ?PP° site Congregational Church.^-Uj-XXjCy
DR. W. C. R____H\
DENTIST. LINDLEY EUILD-
ing, southeast corner Soy-'!^_ae__B_.
i enth und J ..treets, Sacramento.
C. H. ST__PHE_?io_«\
DENTIST, CORNER SEV- oB___t______.
enth and J streets, Sac ra- .r\i-__B-__-_L
p(n__e-_t3___er_t.
(Successor to Fritz «$: Miller),
UNDERTAKING PARLORS,
'■ _\f\X R STREET (ODD FELOWS" TEM
•HM pie). A complete ,_ock of Undertaking
! Goods always on band. EMBALMING A
: SPECIALTY. Telephone No. I_6.
J. FRANK CLAR__T
j UNDERTAKING PARLORS,
1017-101D Fourth St., Sacramento.
EMBALMING A SPECIALTY. GEORGE
H CLARK, Funeral Director and County
j Coroner. Telephone No. 134.
W. J. KAVANAUGH, Undertaker,
No. 513 J St., bet. Fifth and Sixth.
ALWAYS ON HAND A LARGE ASSORT
ment of Metallic and Wooden Caskets,
i urial Cases, Coffins and Shrouds tarnished.
.'■'Mn orders will receive prompt attention on
jhort notic. and at thc- lowest rates. ot_ic_
open dav aud niiint. Telephone No. 30..
! n .HE RECORD-UNION ANI' WEEKLY
■ _L UNION, clean, reliable, largest in circuia.
; Uon.
glcfttovst) Witxc, gteer, (Btc.
EBNER BROS.,
116-118 K Street, Front and Second,
Sucramento,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEAL*
ers in Wines and Liquor.. Agents for the
celebrated Pommory and Greno Champagne.
M. CRONAN,
880 K St., and UOS-1110 Third St.,
Acramento, _____
IMPORTER AND WHOLESALE DEALER
In Fine Whiskies, Braudlc.. and Cham
yagne.
.JAMES WOODBURN,
No. 117 K St., Sac ram. nto, Cal.
IMPORTER AND WHOLESALE DEALER
in Fiue Whiskies, Brandies, Wines and
Liquors. Thanking my old friends and
patrons for their former patronage, I solicit a
continuance t,l th. same. All orders will be
oromntlv and olieerAiU.. f___t
%,llovxxc\3& -at-gctm,
t ■ — . ________ ,-_
WJ!. M. SIMS,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW,
Lindley Building, rooms 5 and 6,1000
Seventh street, cor. J. Sacramcato. Cal. Jel-tt
a. _. A-Sxi.r.
* TTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW.
.. P. O. box, 528. :___i!ic_to,OaL l're-_!ii
Baldwin Eotei.San Fi_nci.-.-0.a7 -\v.\*
CHAUNCEY n. nt_fN. S. SOI^ON HOLL.
HOLL & DUNN,
LAWYERS.— OFFICES, 9:10 FIFTH ST.,
Sacran-_i!o. Tc-lephon. No. 14.
CHARLES K. o___t_jr,
* TTORNEY AND COUNSELOR- AT-LAW.
A OFFICE--420 J street, Sacramento, Cul.
Notary Public.
A. L. HART,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.-OFFICE, SOUTH
west corner Fifth and J streets, Rooms
12.13 and 14, snttcr bulldlna.
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i-SE*^™ Flea 4t> Chicken Liee Killer.
j Ask your dealer for it, or ;»ti:u for Free Circular to
■ ___al___a Incubator Co.. Petaltana. CaU

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