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The record-union. (Sacramento, Calif.) 1891-1903, December 30, 1891, Image 6

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AMONG THE PUGILISTS.
Contest Between Joe MeAuliffe
and Patsy Cardiff.
THE LATTER DEFEATED IN THE FIF
TEENTH ROUND.
Austin Gibbons Defeats Andy Eowen
at New Orleans In Forty-Eljjlit
Rounds—Another ITltch In the Pro
posed Match Between Slavln nnd
Sullivan—Meeting of Thoir Backers
to be Held A_:ain Next Week.
Special to the Record-Union.
San Francisco, Dee. _9.—Despite a
steady doWnpour of rain, three thousand
people gathered at the new Wigwam to
night to witness the fight between Patsy
Cardiff of Minneapolis and Joe MeAuliffe
01 San Francisco. The Wigwam, which
is the headquarters ofthe Pacific Athletic
Club, had teen tendered for the occasion
to the California Club, under whose man
agement the event took place, as the lat
ter did not consider its own gymnasium
large enough to accommodate all who
might desire to witness the contest. Bet
ting on the event was at odds of two to
one in favor of MeAuliffe, as he had the
advantage of several inches in hight, and
was known to weigh nearly twenty-five
pounds more than Cardiff, whose weight
was announced by his trainer as 189
pounds. The purse for which the men
battled was $350 to tho loser. In
addition to the purse the men had been
advanced $-~>o each for expenses.
At!':_.'. MeAuliffe entered the ring, lie
was soon followed by Cardiff. Cardiff's
seconds were iiilly O'Donnell, I). nny
Needham and Jim Carr. McAulift'e's
were Martin Murphy, Con MeAuliffe,
Joe's brother, and Con Riordan. Hiram
< 00k was referee. Cardiff looked fleshy
in the region of the wind. McAulitfe's
fiesh appeared harder and firmer. Time
was called at 9:_7.
Bound I—Cardiff1 —Cardiff hugged the ropes.
Joe landed a corking right on the neck,
and after some feinting caught Cardiff a
left upper-cut in the face in the latter's
corner. Cardiff escaped by a duck, but
Joe landed a left on the head. Cardiff
essayed a left for the wind, but fell short,
and nearly fell down. Joe landed both
hands as Cardiff ducked, and the round
closed with a rush by the latter, who
reached Joe's nose lightly with his left.
Bound '-—Cardiff led his lett twice at
long range, aud essayed a right swing,
but failed to land. He appeared small
before the Mission giant, who pinned him
in the corners, and stabbed him fls he
ducked. Joe landed a couple of hot
rights on the jaw. After a rally Cardiff
seized MeAuliffe by .the leg, but at a
warning cry from the spectators dropped
il. He dodged a couple of swings cleverly
diving, but his rushing was ineffectual.
• Round •"—Cardiff ducked! a left drive
for the face. Joe pinned him against the
ropes, and the men broke fairly. A rush,
clinch and exchange of rib blows fol
lowed. Joe caught him in the face with
his left. Cardiff clinched, and essayed a
left for the head. The round closed with
a left drive glancing from Cardiff's fore
-1 I, which also sent Joe spinning.
Hound #—Cardiff broke ground, and a
rally near the ropes followed, Cardiff
going down from a right on the jaw. and
waa sent staggering on rising. Joe placed
his lett on Cardiff's head, the latter
swinging fruitlessly. Cardiff cleverly
ducked a left drive, but caught a left on
the forehead and a sounding right on the
rios. He tried hard to reach Joe's head
in the rally, but the Mission boy was out
of reach.
Round s—Joe landed a left in the ribs,
and caught Cardiff with a right in tho
back as lie turned. Cardiff rushed him
across the ring, but was sent back by
MeAuliffe, and an exchange of rib blows
took place over the ropes. Joe rushed
and fell through the ropes from the force
of his own left drive for Cardiff's jaw.
Both men wero weary, but MeAuliffe was
doing the most leading, and Cardiff was
ducking and clinching to save himself.
MeAuliffe struck him as the gong
sounded, but unintentionally.
Round b—Joe landed a hard right on
Cardiff's shoulder. The latter continued
to break ground, but MeAuliffe pinned
him to the corner and landed four hard
lefts in the Minneapolis man's face, stag
gering him. Cardiff jiow rushed with
his right, but he was groggy, and MeAu
liffe staggered him with lefts and rights
in the head.
Bound 7—MeAuliffe seemed slow in
baking advantage in the last round, and
the blows did not seem as heavy as
might be expected. He also failed to
rush matters at the beginning of this
round, and allowed Cardiff to work back
into the same old northwest corner,
where he again hammered him about the
head, Cardiff landing lightly on the ribs
or swinging his left fruitlessly for Me-
Auliffe's head. •
Round B—Cardiff's face was somewhat
battered as he came up for this round.
He got back to his old stand, and as Joe
Btaobed him with his left on the forehead,
he struck the latter a glancing blow also
with the left. MeAuliffe planted a cork
ing right on CardilFs jaw as the latter
essayed to duck, but a second attempt
was stopped by Cardiff's guard. Tho
latter neatly ducked the force of a left
swing and clinched, which, by tho way,
seemed to be his best hold.
Round 9 —Joe landed a left on the head
and a right on the ribs, Cardiff reaching
the stomach. The latter stopped a left
lead with his glove, but Joe got in a left
and right on the neck. Cardiff jumped to
the old corner, but had to run the gantlet
of Joe's left, which found his chest and
arm.
Round 10—Cardiff was now backing
around the ring, Joe still waiting an
opening to finish him with his right.
Cardiff ducked a left, and seemed satis
fied if he could bluff Joe into breaking
ground. He led his left for the head.
again falling short, and as the round
dosed ducked a left drive in a way that
caused the spectators to cheer. ■
Round 11—The fight un to this stage
had beeu devoid of the rushing tactics
that had been looked for by the sports,
and considerable money changed hands
on McAuliffe's failure to finish his oppo
nent inside often rounds. Cardiff ducked
a couple of lefts, but caught a hard one
on the head.
Bound 12—Joe essayed hia left for the
B, but missed, and after some parry
ing Cai diif dealt bim a couple of lefts on
tho chin, but received a couple of lefts
himself on the forehead that sent him
reeling. MeAuliffe failed as usual to
follow up this advantage. Cardiff
rushed, but MeAuliffe countered heavily
with the right.
Round IS—Cardiff came up as if be
expected to finish Joe. but the tatter got
bim back into the northwest corner and
they clinched. Cardiff got out and
landed a lett on Joe's chin, and they
went back to the corner. MeAuliffe did
not exert himself, and the fourteenth
round opened with Cardiff bluffing for
an opening.
Round 14 —After some sparring Joe
landed a left on Cardiff's mouth, tlie lat
ter now doing the most leading, and sev
eral times landed his left on Joseph's
chest. As lhe round closed MeAuliffe
stopped him with a left, and nearly
dropped him with a right on the fore
head.
Round lf>— Little was done in the first
of the round, but Joe suddenly dropped
Cardiff through the ropes with a left in
the mouth. Patsy stayed down eight
seconds, and when he rose he stood hang
ing with his left hand on the rope.
Urged by the spectators Joe rushed with
lioth hands, sending Cardiff through the
ropes on the other side of the corner and
nearly throwing him to the floor below.
It was claimed that the tight had already
been awarded to MeAuliffe, but if so the
yeferee's decision was not heard in the
SACHAME-NTO DAILY BECOBD-rXIOX, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 30, IS9I.—SIX PAGES.
excitement, and M^Auliffe's last blow
could not be called a I .ul.
FIGHT AT M W ORLEANS.
Austin Gibbons Defeats Andy Bowen
In Forty-Eifrht Rounds.
Xew Orleans, Dec. 29.—Andy Bowen
and Austin Gibbons fought to-night with
live-ounce gloves in the Metropolitan
Club for a purse of jJ-^OO. Both men
weighed in under 133 pounds. Both men
looked well on entering the ring. Gib
bons was the taller by several inches,
while Bowen looked a typical gladiator,
with shoulders and chest measurement of
wonderful dimensions for such a short
man. Professor John Duffy was referee.
Bowen entered the ring a: 9:07, and < *ii>
bons followed a few minutes later, amidst
tremendous cheering.
The first round ended without a blow.
In the second Bowen lan (led heavily on
Gibbons' shoulders and neck and got
away without punishment. Nothing
much was done then until the sixth,wben
Gibbons led hard, lauding on I'owen's
right breast and receiving punishment in
r'.iurn. He again led and landed heavily
on Bowen's body and neck.
Not much was done in the seventh, but
in the eighth < ribbons landed four times.
Bowen appeared anxious.
In the ninth Gibbons hit Bowen hard
on the stomach and Bowen countered
heavily on Gibbons' nock.
In the tenth Rowen got in a terrific
lick on Gibbons' ear, and in return re
ceived two hard blows on the neck.
In the eleventh Gibbons uppcrcut
Bowen and in the twelfth there were
heavy exchanges.
There was hard fighting in the thir
teenth, fourteenth and fifteenth rounds,
Bowen having tlie best (.fit.
In the Sixteenth Bowen landed hard on
the neck and jaw. First blood lor
Bowen.
The seventeenth was spent sparring for
wind.
Rounds 18 to 22 were decidedly lively,
there beinjj hard lighting. Bowen gave
the most oi his attention to Gibbons'
ne<k, and succeeded in delivering many
.tinging blows, receiving punishment in
return, but he evidently had the best of it
up to the end ofthe twentieth round. Tbe
twenty-first and twenty-second rounds
ended in Gibbons'* favor, Bowen receiv
ing hard blows on the neck.
From the twenty-second to the thirty
first honors were about even.
In the thirty-second there was heavy
fighting with honors easy, though Gib
bons appeared to have the best of the
hitting.
The contest was somewhat dragging up
to the fortieth round, when Bowen hit
Gibbons on the neck, then in the eye, and
finally a terrible lick on the nose", stag
gering him.
From tho forty-lirst to the forty-fifth
rounds, inclusive, there were many ex
changes of blows, with Bowen .appar
ently having the best of the body hit
ting.
In the forty-sixth round there was
sharp infighting, without serious results.
In the forty-seventh Gibbons hii
Bowen about the stomach, and a claim of
foul was allowed. Sharp exchanges fol
lowed.
In the forty-eighth, after some hard
blows, there was severe infighting.
After breaking away Gibbons hit Bowen
a heavy blow in the stomach. There
were more cries of foul, but not allowed.
Bowen was on the ropes and very groggy.
Tbe referee ordered Gibbons to his cor
ner amid tremendous cheering from
Gibbons' admirers.
The referee then decided Gibbons the
winner of the contest. Bowen was help
less on the ropes, and could not come to
time.
SULLIVAN AND SLAVIN.
Hitch in tho Proposed Fight Bet ••( v
tho Two S-Oflsgevs*
New York, Dee. 2P.—Tho representa
tives, backers aud a crowd of admirers of
Slavin and Sullivan met at the Herald
otiice this noon to arrange a tight between
the two men. lioth sides were willing
to put up their money, but they could not
agree. .Sullivan declared emphatically
thai he will not tight Slavin in tlie event
of the latter's losing his fight with Peter
.Jackson next May. The .Slavin contin
gent wanted to make the match whether
their man won or lost with Jackson, but
the Sullivan men would not agree to that
proposition. The matter was finally set
tled by Slavin agreeing to cable |his
backers at Monte Carlo for instructions.
The men will meet again at tbe Herald
ollice next Monday, by which time Sla
vin will have received the instructions
he has asked for.
OUR FOREIGN CARRYING TRADE.
We Ought to Be the Master Maritime j
Power.
Commerce has its "strategy" no less
than war. In war strategy depends on i
lines of operation and communication. '
At this time we possess neither for either
commerce or war. Our great rival con
trols both in every sense of the word.
This pitiable condition on the ocean is
emphasized by the contrast of our un
rivaled power, resource and enterprise
within our own borders. It seems in
deed the strangest anomaly of modern
civilization that tho most enlightened,
most ambitious, most energetic, most
productive, and internally most powerful
nation on the globe should be externally
among the weakest, most helpless and
least respected.
The sole remedy for this situation is
ships with seamen to handle them,
whether for peace or for war; whether to
carry out enormous exports and bring
our immense imports, and receive there
for the tremendous tolls which now flow
into foreign coffers, or to vindicate the
majesty and power of our rlajj abroad in
the world to a degree befitting our status
in the community of nations. There is
no lack of raw material, no lack of skill
to fashion it into the instruments of com
merce. We have the jrou and the steel;
we have the men to work them into the
finished forms of stately ships; we have
the money to promote the moat colossal
of enterprises by sea. All we need is as
surance ofa steady national policy of lib
eral and enlightened encouragement,
based upon a patriotic common consent, j
and elevated above the turmoils of politics j
or the squabbles of parties. One decade of I
such a policy would make us second only 1
to Great Britain on the high seas, either !
for commerce or defense; and two do- j
cades of it would bring us fairly into the 1
twentieth century as the master maritime
power of the globe.—Cnarles 11. Cramp, [
iv Forum.
Died of llis Injuries.
The fact was mentioned a week ago
that William E. Eastman. _ former resid
ing at Walnut Grove, had been danger
ously injured by being kicked by a horse
and that after taking to his bed pneu
monia had set in.
Yesterday Mr. Eastman died. He was
a native of Vermont and in his 64th year.
Ho Should Be Consistent.
Father—Come, Johnny, do as I bade
yon. Take off 3*oll r coat this instant.
Johnny—You ain't goin" to lick me, are
you?
"Certainly I am. Didn't I ull you this
morning I would pay you off for your
behavior?"
•'Yes, but I didn't think you'd do it.
You told the grocer and the botcher you'd
pay 'em off last week, but I know you let
up on them."
Russia is experimenting very exten
sively with the idea of using metal sleep
ers upon the railroads in that country.
DSPRICES
U<__lPowden
Used in Millions of Homes— 40 Years the Stan____**_l.
__^ filial jHtthUtg tyorviiev.
Highest of all in Leavening Power.—U. S. Gov't Report, Aug. 17, ISS9.
Af_S©LUTEJ_-f PURg
TRAGEDY IN TENNESSEE.
j TERRIBLE RESULT* OF A DO?»IES
TIC SCANDAL.
A Brother's Assault on His Sister
Loads to the Killing: of
Three Mon.
Speclai to the Record-Union.
Nashvii..... iTenn.*), Dec. 29.—Marion
'and Dave Beatty and Owinn CowuVn of
j Fentress County, on the Upper Tennes
i see, lio dead in their houses, and J"<l
-ward Harris, their murderer, is a fugi
tive from justice, wUh a reward offered
for his apprehension. Three months ago
Mary Beatty, a sister of two of the dead
men and a belle of the Upper Tennessee,
Fentress County, retired from society.
Then it became noised about that the
young woman bad become a mother.
The story waa substantiated some time
I after by the sudden arrest ot' Claiborne
Beatty, a banker and tue richest man in
the county, at the instigation of the girl,
hia daughter, who charged him witb be
ing the father of her child. This stirred
up a hornet's nest, and so fearful were
the .Jailer and Sheriff ofa mob that they
removed him irom jail and into another
county for safe-keeping, 'l'he neighbors
and friends began to take sides, some
with tbe girl and others with tlie father.
[ Finally, Beatty gave a heavy bond and
left the country, and Mary Beatty went
Ito live with some distant relatives, Hi
l ram Harris' family, who lived at Allardt,
' not far from Jamestown.
The Harris family, accompanied by
Mary Beatty, came to town Monday to
! do some trading and to appear beforo the
j Grand Jury to testily against her father.
! The J'putties were there with their friends
i and relatives. The court adjourned after
4 o'clock, and after making some pur
chases the Harris tamily and Mary Beatty
started home. When the Harris family
! left.the tour.house yard, (' winn Bowden
an 1 the Beatty brothers mounted their
j horses and followed them. When one
mile from Jamestown Marion Beatty
rode up to tlie side of the wagon and de
manded that the girl go home with him,
emphasizing the command with a cot on
her face with his whip. The girl re
plied that she would rather die than live
with him again. Beatty again attacked
his sister, when Harris pulled a revolver
and shot ali three men, and then es
caped.
lhc Realties have always enjoyed tha
respect of the people of the county, and
six years ago Claiborne Beatty was ■
State Representative. He was extensively
engaged in general merchandise and lum
j ber busine-..
Many believe the girl's story concern
j ing her father. She is an educated, strik
ingly handsome woman, about _<» years
I old, and enjoyed the esteem of every one
in the vicinity. Tlie report that Miss
! Beatty and young Harris were married
some time ago in Scott County is current,
but it cannot be confirmed.
WAKEMANS WANDERINGS
Whero Ho Will Travel During tie
Year 1S!)».
Edgar L. Wakeman, whose graphic let
ters descriptive of foreign travel have
been so interesting a feature of the Amer
ican press during the past five years, has
mapped out for 189_ an itinerary which
promises to bring even more interesting
scenes and people under his keen and
studious observation. Mr. Wakeman, a
handsome, stalwart man, makes his jour
neys in great part on foot, sharing in the
common life of the people of the countries
which he visits, and securing such thor
ough insight into their manners and cus
toms as could be obtained in no other
way. Oi all the men who are doing this
kind of work to-day he is unquestion
ably the best informed and the most
pleasing and graceful writer. He is a
poet, too, and bis prose, as well as his
verses, which he from time to time con
tributes to current publications, is full of
imagery and marked by strong poetic
feeling. The first four of Mr. Wake
man's letters of 1892 will tell of a tramp
across Portugal from Lisbon to Aya
monte. Roadside pictures of Portuguese
villages, peasant homes and everyday
provincial life will be painted with the
ssmo fidelity and charm which have
characterized the English letters recently
published in this country. Portugal is a
country famous for its past achievements
and it is outside the beaten lines of travel
and inhabited by a most interesting race
of people.
Alter these letters will come two de
scribing a week in Morocco, and these
will be followed by a letter from Gibraltar
telling of the famous fortress and its sur
roundings. Majorca and Minorca, the
Balearic Islands, will next be visited,
and then Malta and its people and their
Life, manners, customs and superstitions
will be described. Three letters telling of
Italian rambles will follow, and then
forest travel in Galicia. This is the north
easternmost province of Austria. Its pe
troleum fields, their workings, and peas
ant workmen and the home life and cus
toms ofthe Polish, Ruthenian and Tatras
peasantry of this seldom visited region
will be attractive subjects for Mr. Wake
man's pen.
Returning to the British Isles, Mr.
Wakeman will tell ofsome of tlie men
and women and places familiar to Ameri
can readers. Altogether, tho readers of
the Record-Union will travel with Mr.
Wf^f"**** 1 ■**** there could be no better
guide—through some of the most inter
esting towns and regions tho Old World
can show. And they will do this not as
strangers might, but learning the secret
of the people's lives, as close friends
would do, and gaining from history and
tradition the charming story and senti
ment that cluster about the old places
where humanity has for so many hun
dreds of recorded years lived and loved
and joyed and suffered and fought and
died.
THE FARMERS* ALLIANCE.
Will Its Noblo Mission l>e Destroyed
by Politicians.
It is a melancholy thought that the pure
purposes and principles ofthe Farmers'
Alliance should be thus abused by selfish
politicians who have crept into its secret
counsels. There was nothing wrong or
unjust, unpatriotic or unwise, in this or
ganization as it was first established.
Neither was it weak in its iulluence on
public policy. It was a powerful organ
ization for political resistance to political
wrong and injustice. It was inspired
with the thought in which the higher
liberties of the people have often had
their birth—the redress of grievances. It
was made necessary as a means of resist
ance to legalized monopoly, to legalized
tax-robbery, to trusts that sprang up
everywhere to choke down business ri
valry and honest competition and to the
accumulated advantages given to corpora
tions and great combines by the legisla
tion of the country. It was the rir^t grand
effort of the farmers to combine in resist
ance to others who had combined for ag
gression upon them; ancl its future, if it
is destroyed by a misplaced confidence in
its political leaders, will result in weak
ening, if not in dissipating, an influence
that would otherwise have blessed the
country. The sincere defenders of the
people against the aggressions -of
monopoly, trusts and combines, armed
with the control of taxation and finance,
will miss tlie powerful support of the Al
liance, when its noble mission has been
degraded into a disreputable hunt after
oihce.—.Senator John T. Morgan in Fo
rum.
Cured cf Neuralgia.
Lottie L. Derean, East View, West
chester Co., N. V., writes:
"I have been a great sufferer with pains
in the back of my head, worse than any
headache. I could not reach it with in
ternal medicines at all and during the cold
weather I have suffered excruciatingly.
I finally thought I would try an A1.1.
--roeiv's Pi.as. Kitr.i.piied to the nape of my
Deck. In less than half a day the pain
entirely ceasjed."
A Wlilnise.tl Woman.
Housekeeper—How long did you re
main in your last place?
Applicant—Sure I left in wan day.
There was no pla/.in' the today at all.
''Whimsical, was she?"
"Indade, she was that. The first night
sho complained because I boiled the tav,
and tbe very next morning she com
plained because I did not boil the coffee.
Then I left."—New York Weekly.
Q I g*\ IS
G § >^_
Head-Jl|l
Aches. *^_S_f
Sick-headaches are the outward indications of
derangement* ol the stomach and bowels. As
Joy's Vegetablo Sarsaparilla is the only bowel
rejrulatiin; prc.>aration f Sarsaparilla, it ls seen
why it is the only appropriate Sarsaparilla in
sick-headaches. It is not only appropriate; it is
an absolSfb cure. After a course of it an occa
sional dose at intervals will forever after prevent
return.
Jno. M. Cox, of 735 Turk Street, San Franeiscc
writes: "I have beeu troubled with attacks of
sick-headache for tbe last three years from ono to
three times a week. Some time ago I bought two
bottles of Joy's Vegetable Sarsaparilla and havo
only had one attack since aud that waa on tha
second day after I began using it."
iBUy & Sarsaparilla
@g ggt or itcnt* #
FOR RENT—LARGE. WELL-FURNISHED
room, with or without board, at 1 823 II
-' __ d3Q-:»t*
rpO RENT-AT :niB H STREET, FTVE
1 rooms op stairs. Inquire at »22 J st. d29-<3»
rpo LET —HOUSE ON THIRTEENTH
X street, between Oand P. Inquire.. M. A.
BURKE, 1:.'!..1 ur 13U5 Pstreet. d29-6t*
mO LET-TWO ROOMS SUIfABLE E"K
X housekeeping. Apply at 13-0 M st. _29-tf
rpo LET-FURNISHED SUNNY FRONT
J. rooms; also, for housekeeping, at 705 M
street. d.S-st*
rpo LET-TWO FURNISHED ROOMS IN
JL private family. Inquire al4 I. St. d24-.t*
rpo LET —A SUITE OF
JL parlors and kitchen for housekeeping.
Call at 916 or 91 t>y_ Seventh street, between I
and J. d22-tt'
TO LET—FURNISHED ROOMS, WITH
or without board. 1417 Twelfth street,
d22-10t*
rpO LET—THE TWO-STORY BRICK
X stable (fireproof) on part of lot 7 (60x80),
o and P, Fifteenth and Sixteenth Btreet.;
large enough for eighty tons of hay.and con
tains six stalls. Inquire of JOSEPH REEBE,
next door east, on P.
rpO LET—NICELY FURNISHED FRONT
X room; references required. 120S Ninth
street.
FU RNISHED ROOMS, WFTHOUT BOARD,
at International Hotel, 320 to 32. X
strtet. W. A. CASWELL, Proprietor.
ijIURN IBHED ROOMS AT CENTRAL
House, from §5 per month upward ; also,
family rooms at low prices. HORNLEIN
BROS., Proprietors.
j>or _iale.
IX)R SALE—OiI EXCHANGE FOR OTHER
' property, a lot 00x100, with neat cottage
ot seven rooms. Address J. DONLEY, 10a 1
Tenth street. d2(i-tf
FOR SALE~OR TO RENT-THE UNDEItV
signed otters for sale or to rent her ranen
in Yolo County, on the Sacramento River
about eight miles above the town of Washing
ton. It contains nearly four hundred acres of
first class bottom land, and will produce
grain, alfalfa and vegetable! of all kinds in
(real abundance. The property will be leased
ior lrom one to rive years on rMsonable
terms. For particulars inquire of Hoil <_
Dunn, 920 Fiuh street, Sacramento City.
SARAH McKEAR NEY.
FOR SALE-THE VALLEY BRAND CoN
densed milk, by all retail grocers. Ask
for it. dit-iui*
F)R SALE. OR WILL EXCHANGE FOR
farming land—K;o acres (about SO acres
in full bearing trees; PiactrCounty land, S--ve-n
miles from Loomis Roc-lin i\nd Roseville,
four miles lrom lolsoin; good house ot 11
r KMXIS, rtn'.ei lasi year for 81,500. MILLS <_ ,
Hawk, Ttilrd and J streets, Sacramento.
FOR SALE—LOTS 40 OR SOxIOO FEET,
north side of I' street, between Twentieth
aad Twenty-first streets; oneof the finest loca
tions In the city—above ali possible floods. W
E. CHAMBERLAIN. 1(0.8 M street.
FOR SALE-ONE OF THE FINEST AND
largest saloons to the city; extra family
entrance; best location; stock and lease. In
quire at this ofhee.
P>R SALE. OR TO~RENT O^^LEASE-
Ten acres of bottom land, one mile below
Washington, Yolo County; if sold will take
small payment down. Apply to EDWIN j;
ALSIP .v ("o Real Estate and Insurance
Agents, 1015 .ourth streat.
Is to Fair Prices on Ail Goods We Point to Our Success.
The Silk Department, with its splendid values; the Dress Goods, with its
cutting prices all along the line; the Gloves, where we control the very best
makes, together with our wealth of Leather Goods, Fans, Notions, Trimmings,
Laces, Handkerchiefs, Ladies' Neckwear, Shawls, Furs, Art Needlework and
Materials, Umbrellas, Hosiery and Underwear —all these form a matchless
array of attractions and our prices are the very lowest in the city. We
claim that we deserve your confidence, and we intend to pursue the same
honorable methods and reasonable prices as heretofore. To maintain your
favorable opinion shall at all times be our highest aim.
NEVER SINCE WE HAVE BEEN KEEPING
tj_m:_b_e^s3i_ j i_,j_.s
Have we had better values than we are now r offering. Our stock is a splendid
assortment of everything desirable in quality, and our choice of handles is
an exhibition in itself. We carry a large stock for both ladies and gentle
men in the most durable mateiiais. The prices are from the lowest to the
highest and too numerous to quote. The demand is just now very con
siderable and we invite inspection.
WATERPROOF AI RIBI GOODS.
These arc an essential appendage to ladies' attire just now, and fortu
nately we arc prepared for the prevailing large demands. We have some
most inexpensive but reliable goods, and we have also some first-class
articles at extremely moderate prices.
GOSSAMER CIRCULARS —Children's. 85 cents
each; Ladies', in dark wine, from 5i upward; Ladies' Macintoshes, in all
sizes, cemented and stitched, warranted waterproof. We carry an excel
lent choice of Ladies' Bl.ack Surah Silk and Fancy Colors and Checks, rang
iug from So to 527 each, which are superb.
CLOAKS AND JACKETS.
We have made up our minds to sell and to sell cheap, as we shall need .
space. We are oil'et ing just now several lines at cost price, and the people
arc right after them because they cannot be seen elsewhere.
_P?^ Mail Orders Carefully Executed. Samples and Priecs Free on Application. *%X
__r f A miiMpt** i^lffi s_ '/^iC/%
tt o? j CJjr l/7^)tA\Q2^ LJ
Corner Fifth and J Streets.
AGENTS FOR BUTTERICK PATTERNS.
GATTMANN tx WILSON'S
_-__sr_^"a" ______
C^l_Lj^3j-!\.__ES-Z
CLE/iRANCEI
Our first day's sale of Ladies', Children's and Misses' Garments
was a success. The bargains are too many to describe, but the ap
pended list will give a good idea ofthe INCOMPARABLE VALUES
we are offering.
THE PRICES MUST SELL
AND KEEP UP THE SALE!
ONLY
PLUSH NEWMARKETS, seal loops, quilted satin linings, 58 to 00 inches long; Icb C)(~\ OO
regular price, #35. |*s!p_-_^V>y \JKJ
ONLY
SEAL PLUSH SACQUES, seal loops, satin lining, sizes 38 to 44; regular 1 <j> A £5 OO
price, 530. j*Cp 1 O KJKJ
SEAL PLUSH DOUBLE-BREASTED REEFERS, 29 inches loug, collar and ONLY
facing of genuine gray kimmer, fox, mink and astrakhan; regular cbC) £3 OO
price, $_■/ 50. *p2-i QJ \J\J
ONLY
SEAL PLUSH KIP JACKETS, 28 to 30 inches long, with rolling plush|cb A£2 OO
revers; regular price, £25. I^p -L O UU
ONLY
SEAL PLUSH JACKETS, with vest, ordinary length; regular price, 515. I& 800
ONLY
BLACK CHEVIOT REEFERS, revers sleeves and collars edged with black| cb A £^> OO
astrakhan. \<p 1 O KJKJ
GR.AY AXD BLACK CHEVIOT JACKETS, collars and revers trimmed with|cb A Q^ O
French coney; regular price, Sl7 50. -L _^ C-) \J
ONLY
BLACK AND GRAY CHEVIOT REEFERS, trimmed with light muffloon fur; |cb A £2> f^ f\
regular price, $22 50. | >^P JL O QJ \J
LADIES' BLACK CLOTH JACKETS, in kersey and cheviot, with braided |<b
sleeves; regular price, $12. | >vp w C-) KJ
OUR PATRONS AND THE PUBLIC ARE INVITED TO VISIT OUR CLOAK DEPARTMENT.
COUNTRY ORDERS SOLICITED.
C_^A.T-l?n_a-lA.n_T3_T &c WILSOIT
601 J Street, Sacramento.
rpHE YV-MEET AT THE RESIDENCE
I of Miss Elsie Schubert, Eleventh and 1>
streets, Wednesday eveniug, December 30th.
11 *_
OC. F.—INITIATION, NOMINATION
. and election of officers at Sacramento
Council THIS EVENING at 7:30 o'clock.
\ isiting members welcome.
- „ _. Mils. I. MARSH. ('.
_i . 11. Dkxtos. Secretary. It-
MEMBERS OF OWOBSO TRIBE,
No. 39, Inip'd O. R. M., are re- :=M__F_
guested to attend the last meeting of _k«P__
the term TO-NIGHT. Imporu.nt 35_**~fi_
bnainess. lv*] John hantzman, Sachem.
ENDOWMENT RANK. KNIGHTS <ffc '
. of Pythias, win meet W~DNEB^_l__.
Da. EVENING, December 30th, at 7^®?
o'clock. z*5**
d29-2t* GEO. W. LORENZ, Secretary.
•VTOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 111 VT THE
JLi annual meeting of stockholders of the
Germania Building and Loan Association of
tne city of Sacramento, for the election of
tnree Directors and ior such other business as
maybe brought i>efore it, will be fceld at its**
office. 1011 Fourth street, Sacrameuto Cal
on MONDAY, January 11, lS92,at 7:3(>' p. m"
L. NCUBOURG, President.
11. J. Goethe, Secretary. d25-2w
<*.Z.i\ C\i\(\ TO kOA-N ON REAL ESTATE.
_>OU.UUU Apply to ISAAC JOSEPH, f,31
X street. d2--:_:
"IJOW TO BECOME A MEDIUM IX
J.X your own home." Send 20 cents
(stamps; t>r details. DX. CLAIK, 13. Eddy
street, San Francisco,CaL diB-im
BICYCLES BOUGHT, SOLD. RENTED OR
exchanged. A good Singer safety, one
bo. _ and Ordinary cheap. MELVIN, 71. K.
DX. T. WAH HING, ENGLISH AXDCHI
nese Physician and Surgeon, graduate of
Hongkong Medical College. Office in room _y,
Postoffice Building. dl-lrn
STRAYED OR STOLEN — FROM WlV
ters' ranch, Freeport road, on or about the
17th Of December, two bay horses,oneslightly
knee-sprung in one leg: return to WINTERS'
RANCH or to T. D.'SCRIVER'S STABLE
and be rewarded. Xt*
gfttttttgfr,
WANTED— A GALVANIC BATTERY IN
good order, if cheap. Address BAT
TEBY, this office. d3O-2l
TXT ANTED—A SITUATION AS~ Bom _\.
W keeper, collector or salesman; salary
moderate; no objections to traveling. Ad
dress C. A. VIEMEISTER, 1010 Fourteenth
street, city. d3O-6t*
WANTED-STEADY EMPLOYMENT OF
any kind by a young man 23 years old.
Good references. Address W. J. P., this ofhee.
d 30-6t*
TIT" ANTED—A GIRL TO DO GENERAL
_VV_housework._ Apply at IH3O P st. d_>: 1*
\\T ANTED—AGENTS FOU TOWN AND
VV country, SAN FRANCISCO ENLARG
ING COMPANY, 916>_ J street. d29-2t
WANTED— A DINING-ROOM GIRL AT
the LULL HOUSE, Seventh and I
Btreets. d29-.'i
WANTED —BY AN EXPERIF.NCKD
salesman, in a first-class gents' famish
ing goods house; eun give the best of reteie ac s.
Audre.s J. 8.. Postoffice. d29-3t«
WANTKD —BY AN EXPERIENCED
butcher, a situation to work in a butcher
shop. Address W. J., this office. d.b-St*
WANTED— A LADY WIBHE9 POSITION
as housekeeper in a widowers _unil|r;
city or country. Call at 1112 Fourth street.
•_^;_ {i!
INFORMATION WANTED BY MARY
Clark of Williamstown, County Loath,
Ireland, of the whereabouts ol the daughters
of Nancy Lynch Piunkett of Pulbrock >;
banan, County Louth, Ireland. They will
In ar something to their advantage. Any in
formation regarding the same can be left with
MLS. MINNIE O'NEIL, 1304 14 street. iSac
ramento. d24-6t*
TITAN'TED-FIVE GENTLEMEN, WIDE
VV awake, with good uddiess; salary or
commission. Applvtothe SINGER MANU
FACTURING COMPANY, 509 J street
rxTANTED — MEN FOR FARMS. VINE
>> yards, dailies and all kinds of labor;
women and .iris for cooking aud general
hcusawork; plenty of work for desirable help.
Apply at EMPLOYMENT OFFICE, Fourth
stieet. X and L.

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