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The record-union. (Sacramento, Calif.) 1891-1903, July 25, 1899, Image 5

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Agriculture
and
Horticulture.
The following news concerning agri
cultural and horticultural matters will
doubtless prove of general interest:
FACTS FOR FARMERS.
Fetaluma Argus: The fact is brought
out in a circular from the Department
of Agriculture that during the past five
years, of the total value of imports
Into the United States, 52 per cent,
have been of agricultural produce,
■while our exports of agricultural pro.
ducts have been only 09 per cent, of
the total export. The average value
of agricultural imports has been $370,
--000,000 yearly, of which nearly one
third is sugar, followed in order of im
portance by coffee, wool, hides and
skins, silk, vegetable fibers, fruits, tea,
tobacco leaf, wines, vegetable oils, co
foa, rice, breadstuffs, cattle, spices,
feathers, nuts, spirits and vegetables.
Except coffee, teas, silks and cocoa,
riaetically all of this produce that is
now imported could be produced *Uh
in these continental United States. It
Is at once apparent how much the wel
fare of the domestic farmers depends
upon the attitude of Congress toward
tropical produce. If it is to be ad
mitted free, then the amount of agri
cultural imports will vastly increase,
to the detriment of our fann
ers" interests. The exports of agricul
tural produce have exceeded the farm
im;cits during the past five years by
an average of about $380,990,060 an
nual'v while other exports have
amounted to $290,000.00*1 a year
against other imports of $210,000,000.
It is not complimentary to American
agriculture that more than half of the
Imports into the United States should
consist of farm products. th<; bulk of
Which can, should and ought to L-e pro-
Ichiced in this cj< ntry.
THE FRUIT SITUATION. 1
San Jose Mercury: If the prune
and other fruit growers of Californ'a
and the coast haven't the good sense to
ignore their petty differences and unite
in a common organization for the ad
vancement of the fruit industry, they
cannot have just cause for complaint
if they fail to re-efcive profitable prices
for their products, either fresh or
cured. The big commission and ship
ping firms have always been organ
ized against them, the refrigerator com
panies are organized against them. The
canneries have organized against them.
Now what do they propose to do? There
is nothing in the world to prevent them
from organizing and forming a combi
nation among themselves, and the
moment they do that they will be in a
position to control prices. Will they
do it, or will they continue to cut each
other's throats and to play in the
hands of the various combinations that
are opposed to them?
If the fruit growers of California or
of the coast were united this year they
would make more money than they
have made for any two successive
years in the past history of the fruit
industry of California. All kinds of
fruit are short everywhere. The East
ern apple crop, while larger than last
year, is far below the average. The
Eastern peach crop is practically a
failure In every State, and, according
to Professor Smith of the Michigan
University, a large proportion of the
peach trees in Michigan and other
Eastern States were killed by the ex
cessively heavy frosts last winter. So
it is generally throughout the fruit
sections of the Union, with the ex
ception of California. In Oregon and
"Washington, the prune crop will be
only about one-third, and the majority
of prunes grown there are not French,
but Italian, and they will be shipped
fresh. The California fruit growers
could "own the earth" if they would
only organize and work for themselves,
instead of for outsiders who are try
ing to rob them. Will they do it?
AGRICULTURAL LABORERS.
Scott Valley Advance: There is in
the fruit and grain-producing counties
the usual harvest-time complaint of the
lack of labor, while in all the larger
cities it is asserted that there are men
out of work, who want and need it.
The usual expedients are being tried
and a proposition was advanced a short
time ago to -import negroes from the
lower Mississippi to supply the de
mand. The question is one.
The fruit and grain seasons coming to
gether create a demand for labor dur :
ing two or three months that is alto
gether out of proportion to the rest of
the year. The result is that either the
land owners lose crops or if there* is
enough labor to handle them, after the
temporary rush is over there is noth
ing for the fruit pickers and harvesters
/to do the balance of the year. Neither
horn of the dilemma presents a whole
some condition for the State in gen
eral, which cannot afford to lose a con
siderable proportion of its crops nor
support a large number of idle men
during the balance of the year to be
on hand at harvest time. To bring
in a large number of outside 'laborers
would only Increase the difficulty, for
these men would have to be supported
in some manner and after the tempor
ary rush is over there would be no
steady employment tor a large number
of them, and In consequence the ma
jority would tramp the highways, prey
ing upon the people at large" in one
way or another.
BELGIAN HARES.
C. F. Burke, in Rural Californian:
Belgian hares have come to America
to stay. They are now revolutionizing
the fresh meat productions of the New
World, as they long ago did that of
the Old World. They furnish us an ar
ticle of meat food that for whiteness,
tenderness, juciness and delicacy of
flavor is unequaled by anything in ex
istence, except, perhaps, frogs' legs;
hence their great demand at the bes.
hotels in large cities, among expert ep
icures the world over, and at the lead
ing hospitals.
Now, to turn our attention from the
fjlnnrj Poison
V IWIHI W. K. Newman,
Staunton, Va. says: "I was afflicted
with Contagious Blood Poison, and
the best doctors did me no good.
In fact, I seemed to get worse all
the while. I took almost every so
called blood remedy, but they did
not reach the disease. At the advice
of ft friend, I then took S. S. S.,
and began to improve. I continued
the medicine and it cured me com
pletely, and for ten years I have
never had a sign of the disease to
•*•• to return."
S.S.S. r T„.Blood
(Swift's Specific) is the only remedy
which can eradicate Contagious Blood
Poison. It is guaranteed purely vegetable.
Book on self-treatment mailed free by
Swift Specific Company, Atlanta, Ga.
market value of the product to that for
home consumption, we view the most
interesting and far reaching phase of
hare breeding. Persons In the most
humble circumstances are enabled to
most cheaply/supply themselves with
the choicest delicacy in the land, as
th< rearing of them requires but very
little room.
The possibilities of this wonderful
meat producer are not generally under
stood, Take one doe for one year, for
instance, and she will produce five lit-
ters of young during that time, rang
ing from six to fifteen to the litter
few does kindle less than nine, and the
largest litters sometimes reach fifteen—
but taking Xhe low average of eight,
that would make forty from the one
doe in the year. Now, supposing half
of each litter are does, which is gen
erally the case, your first litter of four
does will produce young twice before
the end of the year, making sixty-four;
added to those produced by the old doe,
we have 104; but that is not all, the
second litter of four does produced by
your original doe will be old enough to
produce one litter before the year
closes, making thirty-two more to be
added to the 104, making a grand total
of 180 from one doe in a year.
There is no one hardly but has room
enough for a pair of hares. A box two
or three feet square nailed up in the
coalhouse or stable, out of the way
of cats or dogs, will be accommodations
to start with. They are much easier
cared for than chickens, and have the
advantage of affording you with a nice
tender delicacy for the table every
month in the year. The Belgian hare
has the further advantage over chick
ens of not being subject to lice or ver
min of any kind. There are a great
many different opinions as to the ori
gin of the Belgian hare, but it is con
ceded by nearly all authorities that to
a few keen students of nature in Bel
gium are we indebted for the present
type of the Belgian hare. Much im
proved later by the English fanciers,
until finally a standard of excellence
was adopted, which has been accepted
by breeders as the latest and best, all
the world over. There are many peo
ple, even breeders, who still think that
the Belgian can be found in its wild
state in some countries of Europe. It
was to produce a domestic animal that
would resemble in its general appear
ance the real wild historic hare, with
all its graceful outlines, beautiful col
ors and size, that those scientific breed
ers set to work in their experiments,
and the result may be looked upon
with wonder. They did not begin In
a haphazard manner, but weighed well
the points of the different types of
rabbit which they thought most likely
to produce the desired animal. They
selected one for its shape, another for
its color, the next for size and weight,
and so on until finally the production
of a close counterpart of the wild hare
in all its fine outlines has been pro
duced; and they also found that It
would breed generally to its standard,
and here it may be said ends similar
ity, for their characteristics and habits
are entirely different. The wild hare
never burrows and only- breeds
twice a year, dropping her young ones
—rarely exceeding two — under some
shrub or bush in the open field, ready
to feed and their eyes open within
twenty-four hours from birth, while
the Belgian delights in burrowing, will
breed six times a year, if permitted,
with from nine to fifteen helpless young
in a brood, their eyes not open for nine
or ten days, and in every way showing
their common rabbit tendency.
A SNAKE FIGHT.
The Black Reptile's Victory Was
Followed by a Feast.
It was in Australia, and in the fall
of the year. My friend and I were
returning from a tour which had car
ried us far into the bush, as the for
ests of gum trees and scrub are there
called. We were walking through a
clearing, when the unmistakable rat
tle of a snake arrested us, and in a
few minutes we saw the beginning of
a fierce encounter between two dead
ly enemies—a blacksnake and a rattle.
These two branches of the snake fam
ily are hereditary and implacable foes,
though what was the origin of the
feud Darwin saith not. Between them
there can be neither fellowship, amity,
' compromise nor even armed neutrality.
War to the death is their unalterable
law from generation to generation.
The blacksnake is much smaller than
the rattle, but he is a terribly formid
able foe, and, as science is superior
to mere size or strength, he generally
comes out of the fray victorious. He
seems to "scent the battle (or rather
the rattle) from afar," and gives him
self no rest until he gains a point of
from which he can make a
sudden swoop upon the noisy foe. On
this occasion we did not see the black
snake until he leaped on the rattle's
throat, nor could we afterward make
out how he had got so near without
being seen. That power of silent,
stealthy, rapid movement gives the
black fellow an immense advantage
over the rattling enemy. It is that, in
deed, on which his hope of victory
mainly depends. Let the blacky by a
sudden leap grasp the throat of the
unwary rattle, and the chances are
he will never let go again "until death
them do part;" but if that first chance
be lost, and the two meet in fair fight,
after fair warning, the fangs of the
rattle are pretty sure to gain him the
victory.
In this instance no such misfortune
was the blacky's. He madejjjs spring
and got his grip of the throat, and
there he held on "like grim death."
With a fury that was sometimes awful
the rattle wriggled and shook and
'rolled and writhed. He leaped into the
air, twisted and tossed himself about,
banged his assailant down on the
ground, rolled on him and over him,
but all in vain. Blacky simply stuck.
Vothing could move him, nothing
tempt him or compel him to relax his
hold for a single moment. To have
done so would have been almost cer
tain death to himself; but, through all
the rearings, leapings, tossings, writh
ings and hissings of his victim, on he
held with a relentless tenacity that
was equal only to his love of his own
life and his hate of his foe's.
Thus for more than an hour and a
half the life and death game was kept
up without a minute's intermission,
and without any sign of weakening on
either side. Then we perceived that
the rattle's strength seemed to be giv
ing way, and all of a sudden he coiled
himself up and lay still, as if to die.
Whether it was from sheer exhaustion
or only a ruse to deceive his enemy,
a faint or feint, we were not sure. We
thought it was the former, but blacky
evidently thought otherwise. He un
derstood his enemy better than we did,
and did not mean to be tricked. Down
he lay by the side of the prostrate vic
tim, but with his teeth firmly set in
the now torn and crumpled throat.
Then, after a quiet Interval, the one
• sided truce having come to an end, or
•the ruse having failed, the rattle rose
again and resumed the unequal strug
gle with the energy of desperation—
THE RECORP-tmiOH, SACRAMEKTO, TUESDAY. JULY 35. 1899.
a supreme struggle for life. Again he j
reared and rolled and coiled, and dart
ed up and down, forward and back
ward, carrying his enemy with him in
all nis contortions, trying by every
conceivable twist to get his fangs -nto
the merciless foe; but all in vain. Then
■we began to see in the poor victim re
newed signs of failing strength; but,
notwithstanding increasing weakness,
he struggled for a time continuously,
then intermittently, until, more than
two hours and a half- after the first
attack, the poor rattle gave up the
contest and lay down to die. This time
it was no ruse. The poor fellow was
done for, and within ten or fifteen
minutes after the mute surrender he
yielded up the ghost. But even then
blacky still stuck, and it was not until
the corpse began to stiffen that he for
the first time withdrew the nails which
had been driven nearly three hours
before into the sure place—the throat
of the unhappy rattle.
Then, the tragedy being ended, the
comedy began, and a comedy Indeed
'It was, at any rate to the two specta
tors. On the part of the victor there
was no sign of triumph, no dancing
around the prostrate enemy; but with
all possible staidness and straightfor
wardness the hero prepared for the
celebration of his victory. He began
by stretching and straightening out
the lifeless body, smoothing out every
crease and every wrinkle on its scaly
surface, with what intent we could
not even guess. He seemed to have
assumed the role of undertaker, and
to be preparing the corpse for decent
burial, magnanimous toward a brave
though defeated foe. Not a twist or
wrinkle was left upon the carcass from
tip to toe, from nose to outstretched
tail. Then, to our greater bewilder
ment, we saw that he was licking the
body from end to end, making straight
parallel lines of saliva along its en
tire length, which, with the rays of
the setting sun falling on it, exhibited
all its varied hues, and made us long
for its possession, that we might carry
it away with us. But the darky had
something better to do than indulge
a benevolent sentiment for our grati
fication. For ten minutes or more he
continued his preparations, until he
made four or five streaks of saliva,
which shone like satin ribbons, laid
horizontally on the dead body from end
to end.
Then blacky rose and shook himself,
and, having done so, took up his posi
tion at the head of his victim and
calmly gazed upon him, with the first
gleam of satisfaction in his bright lit
tle eye. We were still full of wonder
and conjecture as to his purpose, in
terment of some kind being the only
thing we yet thought of. Byt then
we saw him calmly open his mouth
to its utmost capacity and take into
it the entire head of the defunct rat
tler; then he gulped and swallowed;
then rested; then another gulp and
another swallow; and so on until he
had tucked into him the whole body,
a foot longer than himself; and then,
with the tip of the tail still dangling
from his mouth, he dragged himself
Into the scrub, and thence probably
into a gully, there to spend a month
or more digesting his ponderous meal,
and •'fighting the battle o'er again" in
blissful dreams. —Chambers Journal.
A woman prefers a man who wor
ships her to one who waits upon her.
PURE
AND
SWEET
And free from every blemish
is the Skin, Scalp and Hair
cleansed, purified and
beautified by
rSOAK
It removes the cause of disfiguring
eruptions, loss of hair, and baby
blemishes, viz.: The clogged, irri
tated, inflamed, or sluggish condi
tion of the PORES. CUTICURA
SOAP combines delicate emollient
properties derived from CUTICURA,
the great skin cure, with the purest
of cleansing ingredients and most
refreshing of flower odors. No other
medicated soap ever compounded is
to be compared with it for preserv
ing, purifying and beautifying the
skin, scalp, hair and hands. No oth
er foreign or domestic soap, however
expensive, is to be compared with it
for aU purposes of the toilet, bath,
and nursery. Thus it combines in
ONE SOAP AT ONE PRlCE
namely, 25c.-the best skin and com
plexion soap and the best toilet and
baby soap in the world.
soT. SS-^&ra^^
TUH DKUG A CHEIi. CORPV, Sou"rVs, Boitai
"All -boat m S-ln. Scalp TZA H&"tS&
I BIKE
BUGGIES.
j The Crawford Runabout is the most
complete and lightest running bike
buggy made. It has ball bearing
axles, ball bearing fifth wheel, ball
bearing shaft couplings, and is abso
lutely noiseless. Will send on install
ments—sso down and $36 per month.
A. MEtSTER & SONS,
908-914 Ninth St., Sacramento.
DRESS AND CLOAKMAKING.
MRS. FERRITER, FASHIONABLE
dressmaker and ladies' tailoring. 2221
O street. 'Phone Sun., white 746.
VETERINARY SURGEONS.
DR. C. L. M EGO WAN—OFFICE 1120 J St.
'Phones: Cap. 830; Sun. Red 407.
OTT Ne. 10
PHONE
FOR
CIGARS
El Belmont Cabal 12% c
La Rosa, first quality Cabal..l2%c
Gen. Arthur Perfecto, extra....l2%c
Gen. Arthur Cabal 10c
La Estrella, Gato ....10c
Conqueror Roth 10c
Buckeye Chief 10c
Zenda Boquet, Cab., ex 10c
Gen. Arthur B%c
Lillian Russell 5c
Tansill's Punch 5c
The Colonel 5c
Henry George 5c
Grand Master 5c
M. & D 5c
Simon Kenton 5c
Girl from Paris 5c
Jackson Square 5c
Park 5c
Manuel Dominguez 5c
A. B. Guar 3%c
Five Darlings 2c
U. S. 5s 2c
Lucke's Rolls lc
Havana Cigarros lc
La Belle Cigarros lc
We deliver as soon as 'phoned
*er, no matter whether it is' 10
cents Epsom salts or Jamaica gin
ger, a hot water bottle or an ice
cap, cigars, candy, soda water, etc.
Hours 6:30 a. m. to 11:30 p. m. De
livery free. Prescriptions called for
and delivered.
EITHER 'PHONE NO 10.
FRANCIS S. OTT,
The Place to Buy Drugs.
Oflfl _f Cf- South Side
ZUU IV Jl., Second and X
Do Not Mistake the Store.
■SSSBBSSSSsBBSSSSSSSSSSSSsHBSsMBSsMBSSaSSSSSS*
MEETING NOTICES.
CALEDONIAN CLUB—SPECIAL j <_f \
meeting THIS (Tuesday)** X,
EVENING, Pioneer Hall; Im-wJJfjK
portant business. wap
H. K. M'LENNAN, Chief.
W. A. Guild, Secretary. It
FAIR OAKS RELIEF CORPS, No. 13—
Regular meeting THIS (Tuesday) AF
TERNOON, at 2 o'clock.
it ELIZA HIGGINS. President.
CALLED MEETING CONCORD a
Lodge, No. 117, F. and A. M.,
. THIS (Tuesday) EVENING, July XJT
25th, 7:30 o'clock. Work in third
degree. Visiting brothers cordially in
vited. T. J. HESSON, W. M. It*
SACRAMENTO REBEKAH mmm.
Lodge, No. 232, I. O. O. F. — __f Xt
Regular meeting THIS wDP
(Tuesday) EVENING, at 8 , * BT
o'clock. Initiation. A cordial welcome
extended to members of sister lodges.
M. LAVINIA KNIGHT, N. G.
Norabel Timblin, Rec. Sec. It
: LOST-FOUND.
FOUND—A PLACE TO GET YOUR
.shoes repaired while you wait. Shoes
made to order, $3.30 and up; boots, $6
and up. Boston Shoe Sbop, 511 X st.
TO LET Oil RENT.
TWO FURNISHED ROOMS, COM
plete for housekeeping; rent $6. Apply
Hibernia Hotel.
1526 D—A 4-LARGE-ROOMED HOUSE;
new; bath, pantry, electricity.
FIVE ROOMS AND BATH; NEWLY
papered; gas and electric light; No. 505
J street, up stairs; rent reasonable. Ap
ply A. J. POMMER, Ninth and J.
. jy23-6t
FIVE ROOMS AND BATH, NEWLY
papered; gas and electric light; No. 505
J street, up stairs; rent reasonable. Ap
- Piy A. J. POMMER, Ninth and J.
GO TO THE INTERNATIONAL, 322%
X street, for cool rooms. $1 week up.
1232 H—NICELY FURNISHED HOUSE
keeping rooms; bath, electric lights, etc.
1911 O ST.—TWO GOOD UNFURNISHED
rooms for housekeeping.
405% X ST.-NICE ROOMS, NEWLY
fitted and well furnished, to rent by the
day, week or month. Opposite Wein
stock, Lu'oin & Co.
GOOD CORNER STORE WITH OR
without rooms. Eighth and O. Rent
reasonable.
FOR RENT—NICE FLAT, 8 ROOMS.
815 N, will be vacant August Ist. Apply
to STROBEL, 411 J.
TO LEASE— FISHING RIGHT OF FlSH
erman's Lake, six miles from Sacra
jnentq_Applyjo CARL STROBEL, 411 J.
1428 SEVENTH-$7. THREE UNFUR
nlshed rooms; natural gas If desired.
807 H—A LARGE FRONT BAY-WlN
dowed room with use of bath.
920 M—3 BAY-WINDOWED ROOMS, Sin
_ gle a $5 bedroom.
FURNISHED AND PARTLY Furnished
housekeeping rooms. 1128 Ninth street.
THE EMPIRE HOUSE—NICE, QUIET
furnished rooms. 122 K. Mrs. A. Doherty
DAVIS BUILDING, 411 X STREET—The
handsomest furnished rooms in the city,
and run strictly first class; office rooms,
suites and single. Terms very reason
able. Open all night. Cap._;phoneJßo._
A SUITE OF FURNISHED FRONT
roorne, nice and cool. 1022% Fifth at.
1117 FOURTH ST.—NICELY FURNISH
ed housekeeping suites and single rooms.
AN 8-ROOM HOUSE WITH ALL MOD
ern conveniences. Apply 722 Eighth st
THE ST. ELMO, 613% J STREET. Nicely
furnished front roomß.
NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS AT FOR
, esters' building, 1 street 7th and Bth.
"HOUSE HUNTER" FREE. DO NOT
fail to get it. Published weekly (con
tains all vacant houses, flats, prices, lo
cation, also other matters). Capital-Sac.
Van Transfer Co. (incorporated). Fur
niture, piano and other storage. Call or
telephone for "Houae Hunter,* 906 X at.
1402 O STREET—FURNISHED ROOMS
lor housekeeping; no children.
901 EIGHTH—COOL SUMMER ROOMS,
nicely furnished; with use of bath. Ul
tered water, telephone, electric Ughts.
NICELY FURNISHED ROOM IN PRl
yate family $6 per month. 1416 4th si.
728 SEVENTH ST.—2 SUITES of House
keeping rooms; all furnished.
CALL FOR OUR NEW TO LET LIST.
OLSON & BROWN. 1015 Fourth street.
HAWLEY & PHILLIPS RENT HOUSES
and collect rents. 319 J street.
TO RENT—LARGE HALL, 40x60, SUlT
able for lodge purposes. Long lease will
be given to responsible parties on good
terms to them, with privilege to fit up
the hall to suit. For particulars inquire
at the "Record-Union" office.
NEW TO LET LIST JUST ISSUED BY
OLSON & BROWN. 1015 Fourth street
GET H. J. GOETHE'S PRINTED LIST.
1011 Fourth street
ALWAYS GET Wright & Kimbrough's
to let list, at 60? J. before you move.
WAIT TED.
WANTED—a\fEW PERSONS WHO
are willing toNsit as hypnotic subjects.
Good treatment assured. Call at once.
611 X street, room 1. jy2s-8t
RED CROSS EMPLOYMENT OFFICE,
1019 Fifth street, between J and X
streets, Sacramento,. Cal. Help furnished
the employer free of charge. Open even
ings; telephone orders at our expense.
'Phones: Sun, South 141; Cap. 145; res.
Sun, Black 995. R. R. MILLER.
A BARBER WANTED. 505 X street
WANTED—AGENTS TO SELL CAROB
ladies' skirt waist supporters and three
lines of towels. Apply at Sacramento
Home Supply Company, J, Seventh and
Eighth;
BRANCH OF FIELD'S LEADING EM
ployment Ag'cy, 1007 Fourth st., Sac'to.
Tel. Sun. red 986. Ranch and contract
work a specialty; all kinds of city and
country help furnished. Special rates to
all railroad points. Main office, Stock
ton, Cal. Tel. red 1744. A. W. Field,
—jfegPi_ J - W. Nicholas, Manager.
810-CHEMIC REMEDY CO.. 113 X,
Agents wanted. ,
JAPANESE CHRISTIAN HOME, REV.
Mrs. Bowen, 1315 Fifth street. Tel.
oik. 3567 Working students, general
_h_elp. Moral places only.
AGENTS WANTED FOR A SPECIAL
summer campaign. The "Saturday Ev
ening Post," established by Benjamin
Franklin in 1728, now published by the
Curtis/ Publishing Company, proprietors
of the "Ladies' Home Journal," is offer
ed to subscribers, for one year only, for
$I—the regular price is $2.50. This offer
is for the purpose of a quick introduc
tion, and will be withdrawn September
Ist. The regular price of $2.50 will be
maintained after that date. We will
give a good commission fOr every sub
scriber secured, and distribute $3,009 Sep
tember Ist among the 176 best agents.
$500 will be given the person sending the
largest numoer of subscribers at $1 each
per year. At this special low subscrip
tion price thousands can be easily se
cured. Address the CURTIS PUBLISH
ING COMPANY. PhUadelphia. Pa.
WANTED — SECOND HAND FURNl
ture. 1021 Fourth street Tel. Cap. 636.
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
CHAS. O. BUSICK,
Attorney-at-Law. 328 J street.
J. V. POWERS, ATTORNEY-AT LAW,
Sutter building, Fifth and J streets.
JOHNSTON & MURDOCH. Attorneys-at
law. Rooms 19 and 20 Ochsner building.
Chauncey H. Dunn. S. Solon; Holl.
HOLL & DUNN,
Lawyers.
Offices, Breuner building. 610 X street.
HOPKINS & HINSDALE. LAWYERS,
Room 33. Stoll building. Fifth and K.
HOWE & HOWE,
Attorneys-at-Law. Sutter building.
WILLIAM A. GETT,
Lawyer
Sutter, building. Fifth and J.
HIRAM W. JOHNSON
and
PETER J. SHIELDS,
Attorneys-at-Law
Rooms 24, 25 and 26, third floor, Stoll
building, southwest cor. Fifth and K.
FRANK D. RYAN, JAS. B. DEVINE,
Law Offices,
Sutter building, S. W..cor. Fifth and J.
PREWETT & HENDERSON, LAW
yers. 628% J.
WM. HENLEY,
Attorney-at-Law - - - 610 I street.
M. S.*WAHRHAFTIG, ATTORNEY-AT-
Law and Notary Public, 301 J street.
A. P. Catlin. A. L. Shinn. J. C. Catlln.
CATLIN, SHINN & CATLIN.
301 J street.
Arthur M. Seymour. Clinton L. White.
WHITE & SEYMOUR,
Stoll building, corner Fifth and X sts.
J. Frank Brown. Arthur E. Miller.
MILLER & BROWN,
Attorneys-at-Law—
-405% J street. Telephones, Capital 314.
Sunset. Main 314.
DENTISTRY.
DR. B. F. STOLL, DENTIST, THE
Ruhstaller bldg, S. E. corner of Ninth
and J streets. 'Phone, Sunset black 678.
DR. W. O. GIRARDEY, DENTIST—OF
fice 922 Fifth street, next to Sacramento
Bank. Capital 'phone 437.
ELECTRO DENTAL PARLORS, 702 X,
opp. the P. O. Extracting by electricity,
50c. Work at one-half price charged by
other dentists._VPhone, Capitalj2o.
DR. R. L. WAITS' OFFICE, 705 J ST
over Christianson & Co.'s market. Pain
less extraction of teeth by use of a new
anesthetic. Examination and consulta
tion free. Hours—B:3o a. m. to 7 p. m.
Tel., 933; red: res. 841 black.
DR ALFRED J. THOMAS.
DENTIST.
Successor to H. H. Pierson, 511% J s t.
Hours 8 to 5.
F F. TEBBETS,
*' DENTIST,
914 Sixth street, between I and J, west
side, opposite Congregational Church.
GROCERIES.
HAND-MADE FRUIT CANS, WAX AND
all kinds of fruit at WINGARD'S,
Twenty-fifth and O streets.
REMOVED—BROME'S GROCERY Store
from Eighth and O sts to Ninth and P,
where he will be pleased to see all his
old customers. 'Phone, Sun, black 533.
PURE PARAFFINE WAX FOR SEAL
ing jelly glasses, 15c; cherry plums for
canning only 2c a lb; jelly glasses, 35c a
doz: 10 bars soap, 25c; a fine coffee, 15c;
honey, 10c a comb; corn starch, 5c a
pkge; 5 lb can lard, 45c. PACIFIC
CASH STORE. Tenth and E streets.
R. NOBEL, PLAZA GROCERY. SELLS
jnst as cheap as anybody. 931 I street.
BOARD AMD LODGING.
THE LULL HOUSE, SEVENTH AND I
sts.—Nicely furnished rooms -with or
without board; home cooking; splendid
service.
820 EIGHTH ST.—ROOM WITH GOOD
board. MRS. M. E. HESSER.
ARCHITECTS.
WM. MURCELL, ARCHITECT AND
builder, 1406 Eleventh street.
F. H. SCHARDIN, ARCHITECT, BREU
ner building. X st.. bet. 6th and 7th.
BUSINESS CARDS.
MRS. A. REAM, LADY UNDERTAKER
JIISJ_ st. Tel. 991 white; day_and_n! g ht:
NEW FRENCH DYEING-CLEANING
Works; prompt and best work, j nu-
CHE2. 713 L street
ROOT, NEILSON & CO., UNION
Foundry; iron and brass founders and
machinists, Front street, between N and
O. Castings and machinery of all kinds
made to order. H. F. ROOT. ALEX
NEILSON. J. DRISCOLL. LII,A
CURTAINS DONE UP. 65 CENTS A
pair and upward-; fine flannels laundered
without injury to> the garment. French
Laundry. 912 L. Tel. Sunset 922 black.
MUSIC AND ART
AN OLD-ESTABLISHED HOUSE —
Kohler & Chase—Established ISBO!—
Largest piano and music house west of
Chicago, Nos. 26, 28 and 30 O'Farrell
street, San Francisco, and 721 X street,
Sacramento. Agentsafor Kuabe, Blasius,
Fischer, Kimball and other leading
makes. Prices the lowest, Terms the
easiest. Pianos to rent. Tuning done
by trained workmen.
PIANO-TUNING —LEAVE Orders with
! Grafmlller & Heath. SIS J. Paul Schoen.
FOR SALE.
FOR SALE—CAMPING OUTFIT, OR
would trade wagon for cart; also 700 prs.
ladies shoes for sale or trade, sizes 2 to
3. 304 X street, city. jy2s-2t
CHICKEN RANCH NEAR OAK PARK,
easy terms, $600. Ten acres 5 miles east
of town, small payments, $600. RAND
& CO., 1024 Fourth street.
FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN, 3 HOUSES,
2011, 2013, 2015 O street; now rented; sell
all together or singly. Inquire 2015 O.
LATH, JUNK AND SECOND HAND
furniture at E. Hawes. 1121 C street.
10% ACRES FIRST-CLASS UNIMPROV
ed place at Florin, cheap, or for city
property. LAWTON & CO., 1010 Fourth
street.
FOR SALE— A GOOD FAMILY HORSE,
suitable for phaeton or surrey. Perfect
ly gentle and reliable. Address P. O.
_Box 127, Sacramento. Jy2o-7t« _
IRON COLUMNS AND IRON DOORS.
Inquire C. W. DAILEY, Fifth and X
_streets, or Chris Welsel, 2818 O street._
SMALL LODGING-HOUSE IN A FINE
location. Address M. H., this office.
NEW HAY, 40c PER HUNDRED. C. E.
_ADAMS, 1106 J streat. _____
20 HEAD OF HORSES, SUITABLE FOR
all purposes; try them before you buy;
a. few camping outfits. Cal. Feed Yard,
Twelfth st, bet. I and J. Auction sales
every Saturday.
3EOPND HAND FURNITURE BOUGHT
_and sold. W. J. Mlllgate, 1004 J st.
FOR SALE OR RENT-GASOLINE EN
gines. 1 to 6 H. P.; steam, 1 to 30 H. P.;
and pumps. Machine Works, 2720 M st.
TAMALE HUSKS, 4c PER POUND. 1610
street.
FOR SALE—BLACKSMITH SHOP. AP
ply 1116 Second street.
CHEAP! 4 SPRING WAGONS, 2 PHAE
tons, 1 hack and 6 work and driving
horses for sale at Kent Bros.' Stables,
1617 Third street. .
6,000 FEET OF 2, 3 and 3% INCH
wrought iron pipe, special low price;
also two eight-horse upright boilers.
Sac'to Pipe Works, near Pass. Depfet
CITY REAL ESTATE.
CHOICE BUILDING LOTS—
$120, 40x80, Q, 29-30.
$175, 40x80, Q, 25-26.
$200, 40x160, W, 12-13.
$200, 40x160, C, 23-24.
$500, 40xS0, P, 24-25.
40x70, O, 11-12.
10 per cent, down, bal. installments.
H. J. GOETHE, Installment Home
Builder, 1011 Fourth street.
FOR SALE—S2,3OO—HALF Block of Land
in Sacramento, 1 block from street car,
good house and barn on same; cash or
installments. JAMES FARRIS, JR., 611
J street. /
W. P. COLEMAN, REAL ESTATE Sales
room, 325 J street. P. BOHL, Manager-
Money to loan in any sums at low rate
of interest. Insurance and renting
houses a specialty. For sale- -487 acres.
150 of which is bottom land, balance
high land; will be sold at a very rea
sonable price.
FOR SALE.
Fine residence, modern improvements; a
nice home on I street.
New house of 5 rooms, finest resident
block on X street. $3,500.
House of 5 rooms, modern, on Twelfth
street. $1.550.
3 houses, lot 40x160, rents for $32; a bar
gain; on P street, $2,300. _
KROMER, WISEMAN & WULFF,
323 J street.
COUNTRY REAL ESTATE.
$550 —IN OAK PARK, WELL LOCATED,
new cottage, 4 rooms; lot 40x150; terms,
half cash, balance monthly or quarterly
installments.
A tine grain farm, 150 acres, within 1%
miles of city; excellent soil, good crops.
$3,300—1n Santa Rosa, Cal., choice loca
tion, lot 75x150; abundant fruit; house of
10 rooms and bath; all in good condi
tion; will exchange for Sacramento
property. MILLS-GALVIN CO.,jMl_J 1 _
BARGAIN!—3OO ACRES OF LAND IN
El Dorado, only five miles from three
towns and the railroad; 240 acres under
cultivation; all fenced and cross fenced
with pickets and wire; 12 acres in or
chard; a good 1% story house; 2 barns,
one new with harpoon fork; a black
smith shop; 8 buildings on place; 8
horses; 7 head cattle; 9 hogs; 100 chick
ens; one 4-horse wagon; 1 cart; 1 dump
cart; 1 cultivator; 2 harrows; 1 disk har
row; 1 hay press; 2 Buckeye mowers; 2
Tiger rakes, and at least 100 tons
of hay in stack; abundance of wood and
water. This property is well worth $8,
-000. If you want a ranch, do not miss
this- $4,500 takes it; 60 days only. Call
or send for list of bargains. RAND &
CO., 1024 Fourth street.
PLACER COUNTY FRUIT LANDS.
We are leaders in lands in this, the ban
ner fruit county, of Northern and Cen
tral California. We have a large list of
Improved and unimproved places. Tracts
from 10 acres up.
A Special Bargain—A 10-acre tract, ad
joining Penryn, 9 acres in choice fruits,
1 acre in alfalfa, house 5 rooms, wind
mill, stable, etc. Owner returned to
England and we are now offering this
desirable tract at less than one-half the
cost and value. HAWK & CARLY, 1014
Fourth street.
20 ACRES FRUIT LAND FOR SALE OR
for carpentry work. 1232 H.
WHEAT RANCH FOR SALE; EASY
terms. H. J. GOETHE. 1011 Fourth
street. .__
FOR SALE—SACRAMENTO RIVER
lands. MILLER & BROWN, 405% J st.
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.
DR. G. HENRI KSON, 900 J ST. HOURS
10 to 12, 2 to 4 and 7 to 8; Sundays, 1 to
3. 'Phones. Sun, north 181; Cap. 1000.
DR. H. S. McGAVREN, 426% J ST.-
Eye, ear, nose and throat.
DR. C. A. HAINES, OSTEOPATH, Stoll
building, rooms 8 and 9. 'Phone, Cap. 72.
DR. P. R- WATTS, 1006 EIGHTH ST.-
Office hours 10 to 11 a. m., 2 to 4 and 7
to 8 p. m. Sundays, l to 2 p. m.
DR. COREY, 900 J. BOTH 'PHONES.
Catarrh, chronic and skin diseases.
REMOVED —DR. SILVA HAS RE
moved to his new office, rooms 1 and 2,
Oschner Building, next to Postofflce.
DR. C. MEALAND, 719% K-'PHONES
Sun. red 931; Cap. 308. Office hours—lo to
12, 2 to 4 and 7 to 8. Res. 1217 O. 'Phones.
| umjwhlte_s2l; Cap. 308. '
DR. C. O. CARTWRIGHT - OFFICE 913
X st. 'Phones, Sun, white 581; Cap. 369.
DR. PENDERY—OFFICE, 808% X street.
'Phone, Cap. 824. Residence, 1013 I street.
Residence "phone, Cap 728. Chronic dis
eases of women and children a spe
cialty. .
DR. FAY, 627% J: TEL. GUN. RED 934;
10 to 12 a. m., 2 to 4, 7 to 8 p. m. Res.
1729 G. Tel. Cap. 309. Sunset, blue 31.
' PALMISTRY.
READINGS AND LESSONS GIVEN
from 10 a. m. to 10 p. m.; Sundays, 10
to 7 p. m. Learn to use your powers
and influence those you love, also to
cure diseases and habits by taking les
sons in hypnotism. Begin now. Dr.
Turman, 611 X st. 'Phone. Sun, red 615.
PERSONALS.
MADAME MARTINEZ, PALMIST AND
card reader. 725% J street.
rARPET CLEANING! FITTED AND
laid by Wm. Higbie (late With Wein
stock. Lubin & Co.). Prompt work. Or
der by 'phone. Sun. 946 black, or mail to
residence, 1914 L street.
GENERAL NOTICES.
EXPERT SEWING MACHINE REPAIR-
Ing; also supplies. W. F. DEN NINO,
1110 J street. Tel. Red 911.
CHEAPEST SOLING ON EARTH.
_ Gents, 46c; ladies, 35c; at 1011 J street.
PHILIP G. MAGISTRINI, WHO WAS
with Eckhardt's gun store for seven
years, is now associated with Charles
Flohr, at the old stand, 1024 Sixth St.,
near K. He will be glad to see all hia
old friends and acquaintances or others
in need of expert gun and bicycle re
pairing. The name of the new firm is
_ FLOHR & MAGISTRINI.
WE HAVE ALWAYS MADE IT A
point to engage the best gunsmith,
locksmith and bicycle repairer to be
had. We therefore nave engaged Henry
Vetter, recently from Chicago, where
he was with Montgomery, Ward & Co.
He has worked at the gunsmith trade
33 years. We guarantee that he can do
better work than any gunsmith wo
have had in our employ for many years.
Our prices are as reasonable as ever.
_ W. H. ECKHARDT. 609-611 X street.
LADIES' UNDERWEAR AND * SILK
dresses manufactured at lowest rates.
. SUIE SING CO., 613 J street.
RAG CARPET WEAVING; OLD Carpets
made into rugs. Mrs. Johnson, 1214 Ith.
DAVIS BROS., PAPER HANGERS AND
decorators, etc., removed to 917 N st.
THE SAC'TO COFFEE HOUSE IS THE
neatest, cleanest and nicest place to
get your cup of coffee, with good cake,
rolls or ham and eggs. Don't forget tha
number.. 515 X street.
SUPERFLUOUS HAIR REMOVED BY
electric needle. Miss Ea.ton._929_JK_
JOHN F. COOPER.-PARTIES HAVING
business with him please call at the Of
fice Capital and Sacramento Transfer
_Van and Storage Company, 906 X street.
JAMES FAR IS, JR.—REAL ESTATE.
insurance and collection agency. 611 J.
_W. W. Whitney, Mgr. collection Dept.
PROF. COLLINS STOPS FALLING Hair
and grows it on bald heads. 401 J st.
BON-TON BARBER SHOP, 1128 J ST.
Shaving 10c; haircutting 15c; O. K.
shampooing, 15c, and clipping 10c.
PIONEER PICKLE WORKS. 1720 L ST.
Manufacturer of pickles, vinegar, etc.
OUR WORK SPEAKS FOR ITSELF. IF
you have electrical work to be done, get
O. A. HOIT. 821 J street.
TRUNKS! TRUNKS!! TRUNKS!!!
Before you buy one get our prices. Sac
ramento Trunk Factory, 507 J st. JAS.
LONGSHORE, Prop. 'Phone Cap. 727.
VIA VI OFFICE, 712 J, OVER DRUG
store. Physician in charge. Free con
_sultation, 2 to 5, 7 to 8.
DR. T. WAH HING, 707 J ST. HOURS—
7-9 a. m., 1-4 and 7-9 p. m. Tel. 334 blk.
FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED—GEO.
Cowles (2), Plumber. Hot water circu
lation a specialty. 1022% K. Tel. blue 168.
JOHNSON, WILSON & CO.—SACRA
mento Foundry and Machine Works,
corner Front and N streets. Brass and
Iron castings, model making and ma
chine work. All on short notice. Work
guaranteed.
FINANCIAL.
A RELIABLE LICENSED PLACE TO
borrow money on watches. Jewelry and
diamonds; strictly confidential. 419 X,
Metropolitan Building. Old gold bought.
$5,000 TO LOAN ON CITY PROPERTY
at a low rate of interest. P. O. Box 562.
SACRAMENTO BANK—Money to Loan
on approved real estate security. Fcr
information, please apply in person or
by_lj*ter. ____
THE BEST PLACE TO BORROW Money
on your valuables is at STEINMANN'S,
1012 Fourth street. Strictly confidential.
Terms Reasonable.
MONEY TO LOAN ON VERY BEST
terms, WRIGHT & KIMBROUQH. 607 J.
MONEY TO LOAN—H. J. GOETHE, 1011
Fourth street.
BANKING HOUSES.
»
NATIONAL BANK OF
D. O. MILLS & CO.
Sacramento. Cal.—Founded 1860.
DIRECTORS:
D. O. MILLS. EDGAR MILLS,
S. PRENTISS SMITH.
FRANK MILLER President
CHARLES F. DILLMAN Cashier
U. 8. Bonds Bought and Sold.
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS. $600,000.
CALIFORNIA STATE BANK,
SACRAMENTO.
Does a General Banking Business.
SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS.
OFFICERS.
FREDERICK COX President
GEORGE W. PEUTIER....VIce President
W. E. GERBER Cashier
C. E. BURNHAM Assistant Cashier
DIRECTORS:
C. W. Clark, Geo. W. Peltier,
Frederick Cox, Joseph Steffens,
Peter Bohl, Adolph Heilbron.
W. E. Gerber.
SACRAMENTO BANK.
THE OLDEST SAVINGS BANK IN
the city, corner Fifth and J streets, Sac
ramento. Guaranteed capital. $500,000:
paid up capital, gold coin, $400,000; re
serve fund. $51,000; term and ordinary de
posits, $3,068,719; loans on real estate Jan
uary 1, 1899. $2,077,407. Term and ordinary
deposits received. Dividends paid in Jan
uary and July. Money loaned upon real
estate only. Information furnished upon
application to
W. P. COLEMAN, President.
Ed. R. Hamilton, Cashier.
FARMERS' AND ME
CHANICS' SAVINGS BANK.
Fourth and J streets, Sacramento, Cal.
LOANS MADE ON REAL ESTATE.
Interest paid semi-annually on Term and
Ordinary Deposits.
B. U. STEINMAN President
DWIGHT HOLLISTER....Vice President
C. H. CUMMINGS Caahler
W. E. J. BAUGHMAN
Secretary and Surveyor
PEOPLE'S SAVINGS BANK.
Sacramento, Cal.
Paid up capital
Reserve and surplus.... 100,000
DIRECTORS:
Wm. Beckman, J. L. Huntoon,
Wm. Johnston, E. J. Croly,
Geo. W. Lorenz.
Loans made on real estate. Interest paid
•eml-annAally. _
WM. BECKMAN, President
George W. Lorenz, Secretary.
LONDON AND SAN
FRANCISCO BANK.
fLIMITED.)
Authorized Capital W 5OO - 0 ??
Capital subscribed and fully paid. .2,450,000
N. D. RIDEOUT Managing Director
QUSTAV FRIEDERICH Cashier
ARTHUR L. BLACK...Assistant Cashier
HEAD OFFICE, 71 Lombard St., London.
SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH, 424 Califor
run str*?_t
PORTLAND BRANCH, Chamber of Com
merce building.
TACOMA BRANCH. 1156 Pacific avenue.
Bankers—Bank of England, London
Joint Stock Bank (Limited).
Agents in New York—J. P. Morgan &
C This Bank is prepared to grant letters of
Credit available in any part ot the world
and to transact every_ description of
Banking and Exchange Business.
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