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St. Tammany farmer. (Covington, La.) 1874-current, February 12, 1910, Image 1

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"The Blessings of Government, Like the Dew from Heaven, Should Descend Alike Upon the Rich and the Poor.
). H. MASON, JR., Editor. COVINGTON, ST TAMMANY PARISH, LA., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12, i9io. VOL. XXXV1 NO 12
IDE ABITACARNIVAL.
GRAND BARBECUE, PARADE, MASQUERADE BALL.
The Mystic Club Entertains Its Guests of the Carnival. Barbecued Meats,
Creole Gumbo and Bock Beer Served to the Crowds Free. The Ball
in the Evening at the Town Hall a Crush of Gay Maskers
and Merrymaker. Refreshments Were Served.
Last year Abita Springs participat
ed in Covington Carnival parade,
which was conceded to be one of the
best pageants ever exhibited in a
country town and which brought thou
sands of visitors to the "Ozone City."
The Abita contingent to this parade
added greatly to the success of the
Covington carnival and encouraged
the Carnival Club of Abita to further
efforts in behalf of their town.
While Abita is a town of but five or
six hundred inhabitants, its citizens
are enterprising and energetic, nor is
the civic pride which is so apparent in
public affairs confined to the business
men of the town. One of the chief
elements of success has been the active
part tarken by the young men, of
which the larger part of the Mystic
Club is composed.
When the Mystic Club was organiz
ed, less than a year ago, the avowed
purpose of the organization was the
upbuilding of Abita, and the phenomi
nal success of all its undertakings has
resulted from the attraction to its
membership of every citizen whose
influence and energy could add a new
spoke to the wheel of progress. In
consequence the membership of the
old Carnival Club was absorbed in the
Mystic, and the work of the two con
tinued in consolidated effort.
The program carried out Monday
was in accordance with the announce
ment of the Mystic Club that a free
barbecue and parade would be given
on the 7th of February and that all
who came would be provided for and
welcomed, but that admission to the
king's ball in the evening would be by
special invitation of members of the
Mystle Club.
There wia one oversight on the part
of the Mystic Club that threatened
serious interference with the festivi
ties of the day. Evidently the mem
bers of the Weather Bureau had been
slighted. The day was dark and
sombre. Hardly a streak of blue re
lieved the leaden sky, and try" as he
would old Sol could not get a glimpse
of what was going on beneath the
moist curtain that canopied the eaeer
throng below. Yet the rain held off
throughout the day, and while a light i
east wind brought a slight shower
about half-past nine in the evening, it
was not uitil early morning, when all
were housed after the enjoyment of I
the evening, that the rain drops man- I
aged to break loose.
The threatning aspect of the weather
was a great disappointment to the
many out-of-town visitors who had
anticipated the pleasure the occasion
would bring to them, and had made
preparations for a good time; but
withal the afternoon saw large crowds
gathering, who ,were regaled with
tempting barbecued meats and Creole
gumbo, pronounced by all to be most
delicious and appetizing, which they
enjoyed in the open air, with the green
pines waving above, and the soft,
brown needles carpeting the ground
beneath their feet. Many visitors from
Covington, Mandeville and surrounding
settlements were among the throng,
and as the time approached for the
arrival of the 3:45 train from Coving
ington, the N. O. G. N. depot was
surrounded by crowds awaiting the
arrival of the King and his suite.
This train also brought many visitors
from Covington and the towns above.
As the King alighted from the train
he was greeted with cheers from the
throng and muscic by tne band. The
gay colors of the carnival decorations
and the happy demeanor of the surg
ing crowds made a befitting' welcome.
At the-Town Hall the keys of the
town were delivered over to the King
with the following address by Mayor
Mutti:
In according you the freedom of the
town of Abita Springs, I cannot re
frain from calling your attention to
the advantages we possess in health
ful climate, healingwater and hospita
ble citisenship. Your Majesty will find
our hotels in secluded spots, buried in
the perfume of pines and ladened
with the ozone that gives health to
the body, brightness to the eye and
an appetite for the good things you
will find on the table [soto voce-I am
speaking of my hotel]. Our judges
are just; our law officers are discret
and alert; our merchants are honest
and liberal. No fairer women, no
truer wives e'er graced the homes of
honest men than in Abita. Your
Majesty has in thus honoring our
town, given to yourself an opportunity
for enjoyment that only comes to the
wise who know the way or have
learned the lesson, and we gladly wel
come you.
Mayor Mutti has been and is still is
quite ill, and his voice lacked the
usual strength given to his utterences,
but his interest in the occasion would
not allow him shirk any of the duties
of his office nor forego the pleasure of
extending a welcome to the guests of
the town.
The greetings of the Mayor were
received by the King with all the
courteous dignity of his royal station,
who spoke as follows:
In accepting the keys of your town,
Mr. Mayor, I am not lacking in appre
ciation of the many advantages you
possess. The renown of the medicinal
properties of your waters have reached
me in far off lands. The virtue of
your ozonic atmostphere is world
famous. Of the hospitality of your
people I have good reason to know
since my arrival here, and I have
tasted of the luxuries of your hotels
[soto voce-I am talking about my
hotel now]. That your women are
as lovely in character as they are in
face and form is not unfamiliar to the
reputation of the Sunny South. But
I am surprised at the rapid growth of
your town, at the progressive spirit of
your citizens, when I consider that
only recent opportunities have given
you the means that make rapid prog
ress possible. I am surprised also, to
see that your merchants are hauling
freight by way of Covington instead
of from your railroad station, and I
assure you, had I been compelled to
come by freight, I should have gone
en to Covington and then footed it to
Abita. That I shall find pleasure in
your t6wn I am confident and in be
half of myself and my retinue I beg:
leave to thank you for yqur generous
consideration and kindness.
As the King passed Railroad Ave
nue he was presented with a bouquet
I of flowers by Miss Louise Duquesne.
In the line of the parade were Judge
A. 0. Pons, Grand Marshal, on horse
back. Carriage of the town officials
I in which were seated Mayor A. Mutti,
Treasurer John Distruel and Alderman
Charles Biggio, preceded by the school
children of the Abita Public school.
The King on his throne came next.
He was seated in the arch of a huge
crescent, whose silvery light shone
upon a huge bank of clouds above
which he was seated, a large winged
dragon crouching at his feet, and he
waved his greetings to the people with
his scepture, while he nodded his royal
head in recognition of distinguished
guests and prominent cititens.
The King's float was guarded by
three Indian chieftians on horseback,
lineal descendents of the Indian maid
whose life was saved by the wonder
ful waters of the Abita Springs when
all the medicine men of the different
tribes appealed to had been unable to
help her. These chieftains were Ralph
Abney, Walter Abney and Joseph
Lamousin, and their picturesque cos
tumes brought the mind back to the
time when the Indian arrow sought a
vital spot in the wild deer that roam
ed the surrounding forest. The stone
arrow-heads are frequently plowed up
in the newly tilled fields of nearby
farms.
"Shooting Star,", the title of the
float on which was seated the "Queen
of Abita," carried gently and swiftly
on the crest of a cloud heap. Like a
star, indeed, she fieked, in her cos
tume of blue satin. Waving her
wand, her charming little face peeping
above her blue costume, the light of
her smile like the light of a star in
the blue firmament-a "shooting
star," in reality was little May Brown.
"Dreamland" was a float gotten up
by Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Fountain, of
Covington. Its central figure was a
pyramid of flowers composed of
Marechal Neil roses, red roses and
lilies, which was surrounded by bow
ers of flowers enscored among which
were minstrels with string instru
ments playing sweet music to the
nymphs who dreamed life a wa y
amidst the perfume of flowers.
"Consumers Brewery," the float
gotten up by Joseph Elchinger agent
for the comyany at Covington and
Mr. Charles Biggio, of the Eagle Sa
loorP, of Abita, represented a golden
keg of beer, with silver hoops, resting
at the top of an ornamented mound.
In front was the sign "Eagle Saloon,"
Chas. Biggio, proprietor; at the back,
consumers Brewery, Jos. Elchinger
Agent.
The St. Tammany Banking Com
pany and Savings Bank, of Covington,
represented a bank scene, the cashier's
window in the foreground represent
ing a busy scene where the coin of the
realm was evidently keeping the
cashier busy with the prosperous rush
of business. The facade of the bank
was supported by Greek columns, and
the whole made an excellent showing
in the parade.
The "Country Barbershop" was
very comical and created a great deal
of amusement. It represented a bar
ber with an eye to business who was
on to his job. He lathered his cus
tomer with a huge brush and was not
particular how much lather went down
the throat. His attendant was kept
busy grinding monstrous shears and
razors, and numerous signs announced
that the L. D. Bondi barbershop was
the place to go to get a country hair
cut or shave.
Master Frank Brown presented a
very pretty spectacle with his deco
rated goat cart, which was driven
along as sedately as the King's chariot.
The last float was the "Minstrels"
which contained a pickaninny band and
otherwise carried out the designation
of its title.
Numerous maskers, clowns and
grotesque figures completed the pro
cession.
'The parade marched on Railroad
Avenue to Level Avenue; on Level
Avenue to Oak street; Oak street to
Main street; on Main street to North
street; on North street to Keller
street; up Keller street to St. Mary
street; then across to Railroad Avenue
to Level street and the Town Hall
where the parade disbanded.
After a reception to the officials and
high dignitarics the doors of the Town
Hall were thrown open and all were
invited to partake of the hospitality
of the Mystic Club. /Bock beer was
served to the populace, but only or
derly good humor prevailed.
Immediately. preparations w e r e
made for the `Carnival ball in the
evening. The large hail was put in
order, the stage gottedtryhd for the
reception of the King and Queen, and
for the very good time that followed
in the evening. By eight o'clock
maskers began to arrive and when the
King was announced quite a cr~owd
was in the ball room, which continued
to increase up to 10 o'clock, until there
was none too much ioom for the
dancers.
The King, surrounded by his court
iers, arrived at 9 o'clock and was con
ducted to the throne, while the clap
ping of hands and demonstrations of
pleasure drowned the music which but
a moment before had made restive
the feet that were eager for the dance.
The King chose for his queen Miss
Marguerite Lamousin, daughter of Mr,
and Mrs. Joseph Lamousin, a very
pretty and popular young lady of
Abita. The Queen's maid was Miss
Juan Abney, the charming daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Robt. C. Abney.
The coronation ceremony presented
a very pretty scene. The King, Mr.
L. Souchon, wore as costume of old
rose silk, with mantle of white bro
caded silk trimmed with royal purple,
worn over a jacket trimmed with lace
and gold with slashes of royal purple
in the back, and the crown jewels were
very expensive and handsome.
The Queen was handsomely gown
ed in white grandmother's swiss over
silk, with a mantle oL white Albatross
trimmed with silver braid, wore gold
ornaments, and looked every bit the
charming Queen that she character
ized.
Queen's maid of honor, Miss Ab
ney, wore a costume of pink chifforn,
handsomely made and very becoming
to her girlish beauty, and carried the
Queen's flowers.
Dukes and lords and nobles of the
realm of all degrees, with the ladies
of the court, gave to the masquerade
a brilliant scene that marked the
event as another of the successes
that makes the Mystic Club so popular
with the public.
Dancing was kept up until 2:15
a. m. Among the maskers who en
joyed the evening was a visitor from
Antlers, Okla., Mr. T. J. Lacroix,
who is the favorite candidate for sher
iff of Pushmataha County, Okla. .
A very pleasant incident was the
receipt of a letter by the president of
the Mystic Club from Miss Mary Big
gio, who was Queen of the Carnival
last year, expressing great interest in
the success of the Abita carniyal this
year and regretting that she could not
be with us. Miss Biggio is now a
resident of New Orleans.
Much credit for the success of the
parade is due to the work of Messrs.
Chas. Biggio, Frank Brown and E. B.
Moran, and thanks are due to the St.
Tammanny Banking Company and
Savings Bank and to Joseph Elchinger
for entering floats, to the citizens of
Covington who contributed money
and to the St. Tammany Railways and
Ferry Company for contribution and
for the 9:30 car. In the general ar
rangements incidental to carrying out
of the carnival program Capt. G. E.
Millar, Walter Abney, chairman of
the Barbecue Committee, Judge A.
0. Pons and Joseph Lamousin are en
titled to credit for the hard work they
did.
The Mystic Club will put on a night
parade next Mardi Gras, and an
effort will be made to eclipse any
thing heretofore attempted.
Tresspass Notice
All parties are hereby forbidden
under penalty of the law, to cutwood,
deaden trees, or otherwise tresspass
on my lands in this parish.
JACQUES PELLOAT.
* WANTED TO PURCHASE-Pair of
mules or work horses.
H. L. GARLAND.
EGGS FOR HATCHING -From
Barred Rocks of standard breeding.
I keep only one breed and, the best of
.that kind. Inspection invited. Price
$1 50 for 15 eggs. MRS. SEARS,
Phone 241. 1119 19th Ave.
SEND US YOUR ORDER
By Nail Telegraph or Telephone
Absolutely the Same Prices On
Teas, Coffees,
SPICES, ETC.
AS NEW ORLEANS OR EVEN NEW YORK
BEWAUSE OF THE ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC TEA COMPANY'S
350 STORES IN THE UNITED STATES
WE SAVE YOU THE FREIGHT
Green Coffee, per pound, IOc, 123c, 15c, 20c, and 35c. Roasted
Coffee, per pound, 15c, 20c, 25c, and 35c.
SAVE YOUR CHECKS.
F. C. FltzSimons, Covington. La.
Phone 131
SOUTHERN HOTEL CAFE.
}M
W. H. LAFAYETTE, Proprietor.
BIN FIZ SAZARAC COCkTAIL.
Finest Wines, Liquor, Beer and Cigars.
Southern Hotel Block. Covington, La.
Mrs. Jean Labat's Dairy
Best and Purest Milk and Cream
Cheese in Town
Residence 831 Lee Ferry Road. Phone 212
Phone 83 Free Delivery
L.A.PERREAND
b GENERAL HERCHANDISE
FRESH GOODS, CHICKENS AND EGGS
Lockwood and New Hampshire Streets
FR1ED, F' FE
Pr ctical ,Jeweler.
Watches, Clocks, Jewelry
NEATLY REPAIRED
COVINGTON - LA.
D. I. ADDISON & SON
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
(Opposite the Baseball Park)
PHONE 169 - FREE DELIVERY
Chickens, Eggs and Charcoal always on band
Pyrography outfits and supplies at
Champagne's Drug Store.
We have on hand some fancy ar
ticles suitable for Euchre presents
that we are offering wbile they last
at 25 per cent discount.
SCHONBERG'S PHARMACY.
If troubles with indigestion, consti
pation, no appetite or feel bilious, 'ive
Chamberlain's Stomach and Liver
Tablets a trial and you will be pleased
with the result. These tablets invig
orate the stomach and liver and
strenghten the digestion. Sold by all
druggists.
FOR SALE-A beautiful new resi,
dence situated on Twenty-third ave.
four spuares from depot. Six large
rooms, bath and kitchen; modern con
veniences; fine stable. For particu
lars, address
DR. J. F. BUQUOI,
Ramsay, La.
FOR SALE-A few extra trees
from Louisiana Nursery. lemon, or
ange, plum, Dixie Special early bear
ing pear, fast growing shade trees, the
catalpa, box elder and sycamour. Ap
ply to MRS. J. R. M. DILLON,
Military Road.
1!!iTtr11ttmTm1tmmrnrnIrnTtitvrmm mM1tfl 1
THE COVINGTON BANK
wAND TRUST CDMPANY
HAS AMPLE FUNDS TO LOAN I
ON 6000 SECURITY I
IT ALSO PAYS 4 PER CENT ONI
ON SAVINGS BEPOSITSa~
If you wish to borrow money, or if you
have money to deposit, we will be glad
to talk the matter over with you. :
Uti1UWtlU~WLULU WWLMkItI t l IWWIWMl
Southern HotelOyster Saloon
E, Pl. SHELLING. Manager.
The best Oysters on the market.
Sandwiches of all kinds. :: .:
CO FLUATIONB PROFj
LIVERPOOL AND LONDON AND GLOBE
INSURANCE COMPANY I
LOSSES PAID UNITED STATES POLICY HOL.ERS
OVER ONE HUNDRED MILLION DOLARS .
Losses Paid in San Francisco Conflagration $4,522,905.00
Losses Paid in the Chicago Conflagration 3,239,491.00
Losses Paid in the 0ton Conflagration 1,427,290.00
Losses Paid in thetCaltiore arration 1,951,543.00
All Losss promptly adjusted and paid Ia tull
without dissout
* We represent, also, other leading cor
panies of the world,
We handle insurance in all its branches,
Fire, Life, Accident, Fidelity, Casualty, Plate
Glass, etc.. _
Don't be misled. It will pay you to see.us
before placing your insurance elsewhare.
NILSON, SEARS COMPANY, LIMITED.
Office Phone 26 Residence Phone 2,la
ALWAYS BOOST COVINGTON
Prescriptions fi .I
as competently as any
where on earth. We
have on hand the
STAND1RD
DRUGS.
and if we lack any
thing the doctor or
lered WE WILL NOT
SUBSTITUTE, BUT
GET IT FOR
You
SOOWN-TON1 ýýELBL#
Notice to Stockholders.
The annual meeting of Nilson &
Sears Co., Ltd., will be held at their
office, 321 Columbia street, on Monday,
February 25, 1910 at 4 o'clock p. an.,
for the purps ojeleeting officers and
such other bsess as may come be
fore said meeting.
GEO. E. SEARS, Secretary.
HIo f.rr
BIllIJAM Dli
5 '2 B O S TO N .
(Corner Cqurtbouse Al .)
The
People's
Building and
Loan
Association.
Do you want a homet
Do you wish an lavestment?
Call at eUT ouee, or phoe,.
Nothing too.large for us; not.S ;:
small.
o---.-
PEOPLE'S BUILDING AND) f.
or ASSOCIA TIP.
Phone 11...

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