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The Garden Island. (Lihue, Kauai, H.T.) 1902-current, May 27, 1919, Image 5

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015411/1919-05-27/ed-1/seq-5/

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THE GARDEN ISLAND, TUESDAY, MAY, 27, 1919
Items of Interest to Our
Homesteaders
Dy G. W. SAHR. County Agent
Frank Crawford of Llhue has made
a discovery of a variety of garden
pea that does exceptionally well un
der Hawaiian conditions. The va
riety in particular favor with Craw
ford is the "Duke of Albany" and seed
may bo obtained from the J. M. Thor-
burn Meed Compr.ny of New York
City. An oberver of the variety can
see at a glance that the variety is be
yond a doubt the best cuited for our
conditions. It is a very tall growing
variety, requiring a trellis of six feet
or more In height to support the vigor
ous growth of the vines. Under Llhue
conditions good yields havo been se
cured from plantings made through
out the entire winter season from No
vember to March, and with a favor
able season the variety would prob
ably yield well even in tho summer
months though no record is avail
able of Its success during the summer
months. At a higher altitude or un
der more humid conditions the variety
will probably thrive the year through.
According to Mr. Crawford the va
riety takes about 100 days to mature
and yields for from four to six weeks.
The ptas are large and of excrllent
quality. Mr. Crawford ha3 raised the
variety for three years. He Import,
fresh seed every season, having found
that home grown seed docs not do as
well as the newly imported. Fresh
seed will not be available until Novem
ber or December this coming autumn
but home gardeners on Kauai ought
to get in touch with the seed company
mentioned above to be in line for
fresn seed when .t is available.
When it comes to coaxing the fami
ly cow to get the maximum flow of
milk, leave it to H. H. Brodle of Ha
napepe to deliver the goods. Mr.
Brodie spent considerablp time and
trouble worrying along a patch of
Sudan grass and alfalfa in order to
have the choicest feeds for his family
milk machine, and due to his efforts
he now has an abundance of highly
. nutritious milk producing feed for his
family cow. But that is not all, Mr.
Brodie believes in comfort for his
cow, and knowing the sensitive whims
of the animal he constructed a fly
catcher to be used before milking in
order to remove the flies from bossie's
back that she might rest contented
at the feed box while Mr. Brodie coax
es out the milk. The fly catcher con
sists of a net, similar to a butterfly
net or botanists specimen net. The
opening of the net instead of being
circular Is oblong In order to better
conform with the lines of the bovines
back. According to Mr. Brodie the
critter shows almost human apprecia
tion for the effort expended on her.
John O. Abru of Kalaheo Home
steads is considering numerous im
provements on his place at Lawat.
Abru has been running a good sized
dairy, supplying Kalaheo and McBryde
camp with fresh milk for some time
now. Abru has pulled him3elf out of
a bad hole financially and is now ready
to go ahead on a larger scale. Among
the improvements that he contem
plates is improvement of his pastures
with better pasture grasses. He also
contemplates purchasing a purebred
Holstein bull.
Abru's reports show that dairying
if carried on pdoperly can be made a
very sucessful undertaking. He has
worked under difficulties and over
come many serious obstacles, in his
light for making a living by means of
keeping a dairy. To-day he feels that
he has made a success of his under
taking, but he aims yet to have a first
class dairy.
R. D. Isreal and Elmer Chentham of
Upper Walpouli homesteads celebrat
ed the completion of the major opera
tions on their cane crops by taking a
few days vacation last week at Cheath
ams beach house at Niumalu. They
spent most of their time fishing at the
mouth of the Huleia River.
No other single business born of the
war has affected a greater number of
people than has gardening. Starting
from a mere nothing before the United
States entered the war, this form of
service grew in less than two years
into a new occupation, which counted
its followers by the hundreds and, In
the number of people employed, ex
ceeded any other branch of gainful
occupation, with the single exception
of actual farming.
The fact that such a vast number of
our people took up this work shows
that they appreciated the merit of it,
and is one of the reasons for the con
fident prediction that gardening has
come to stay. It is Something that
the people will not willingly let die.
Home food production will continue
because it has been found worth while
and, like other things which this war
has proved to be of value and benefit
to mankind, it will last.
War gardening will permanently
establish itself as a necessity because
its peace-time value fully equals its
war-time worth. This will be true at
all times, hut more particularly so
during the first five or ten years of
the great reco'.idtniction period, for
during t!vat period the matter of food
production will be of the most prest
ing importance. It will be on a par
with many of the other enormous re
construction problems that ft.ee- the
world. It will require the continued
application of broad thought and ef
fort.. There will be no decrease in
the demand for food, in fact the de
mand will really be greater, than it
was during the days of actual conflict.
The post-war need for enlarged gar
don production offers to the Hawaiian
plantations an opportunity, through
the encouragement of gardening
among their employes, not only to be
of help to the Territory but also to
benefit themselves. The employe who
can be induced to become a gnrdener
becomes straightway a more worth
while employe.
The contented worker is usually
one who enjoys a comfortable living;
and gardening, by virtually ao.ding to
the employe's income and providing
him with better food then he can buy
in the market, tends to make him con
tented. Money that would otherwise
have to be spent for food can be used
for the purchase of small luxuries. Of
no less value is the recreational fea
ture of gardening. The toller in the
hot sugar mill, especially cr.n find no
avocation that will build him up phy
sically and refresh his energies as
gardening will. Duty to both the Ter
ritory and his own corporation de
mands that every plantation manager
should do his utmost to stimulate gar
dening among his employes.
War Savings 1
Stamps
'
4
Lihue Branch
Bank of Hawaii, Ltd.
Thrift
Stamps
$6,000 in Purses
w i be given in 3 -Day
HORSE RACING MEET
at the
TERRITORIAL
FAIR
Honolulu June 9-14
Original 6-day program
is now to be concen
trated into 3 big days,
as follows: J!
MONDAY, JUNE 9
Four furlong Free-for-all Purse
Six furlong Free-for-all Purse
Three furlong Hawaiian Hied,
Two years Purse
Polo Pony Free-for-all ..Purse
One Mile four-foot liunlle Free
for-all Purse
Four furlong Hawaiian Bred,
Free-for-all Purse
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11
Free-for-all trot or pace: 3 in 5. ..Purse $1000
Four furlong, Oflieers and (ientle-
nien... Purse 50
?8 Mile Polo Boy, Sr Cup
Races will lie ten (10) pound.-
Free-for-all run
8150
mo
150
50
150
150
Ladies, one-half mile Cup
One mile Free-for-all running.. Purse 750
with 8150 added if tiack record is broken.
s Mile Polo Boy, Jr. Cup
Six furlong Free-for-all Purse 1500
Individual high jump Free-for-all. Purse 50
SATURDAY, JUNE 14
2:15 Class trot or paee; 3 in 5.... Purse 85(X)
Seven furlong, running Free-
for-all... Purse 300
Six furlong, Hawaiian bred
Free-for-all Purse 2J
Six furlong, Japanese Free-for-all. Purse !5()
l! 2 Mile running Free-for-all Purse 500
Six furlong Free-for-all Purse 100
Lelow scale of weights in all
nmg raeeH.
ROBERT HORNER
Chairman Racing Commitree.
EDWIN H. PARIS, Chairman
J. WALTER DOYLE, Exec. Sec.
303 Hawaiian Trust Bldg.
Honolulu
Waste Baskets
not merely holders of waste
paper but
Nemco
Expanded Metal
Waste Baskets
Bigid rather than loosely wov
en; attraetive, fireproof and
practical. Will out-wear a
dozen of any other kind.
Hawaiian News Co., Ltd.
Young Hotel Building
Honolulu
CALIFORNIA FEED CO
I.I.MlTKli.
Dealers i n
Hay, Grain anu Chicken
Supplies.
Sole Agents for
Inti'i iiatiiHial Murk. Poultry Fond
Biid other wix-Haltie. Arabic for
coolinjr Iron KouIh. IVtahmia In
cubators mid ItroiMlcr.
King's Spjxiaj. Chick Food
P. O. Box 452. Honolulu
HOTEL LIHUE
(The Fairview)
Twenty-t,o elegant rooms
In Main Building
Three Airy Cottages
Cuisine unexcelled in country
districts
W. H. Rice, Jr.,
Proprietor
4
Koloa
Plantation
Store
Who! esate and Retail Groceries
Dry Goods of aU Descriptions.
General Plantation
Supplies.
"We have not studied
cost nor economy as
we should, either as
organizers of indus
try, statesmen, or as
individuals."
. President Wilson.
But there is yet time
to start to save and
that time is NOW.
J J
Bishop & Company
Sving Deprt merit
WAIMEA BRANCH
KAUAI
Regal
The national
Shoes
For men and
Women
Regal
Shoe
'y Ci
ke$au oiore
Fort Ami Hotel!
HONOLULU
Nawiliwili Garage
Successors to C. W. SPITZ
.. A'; VOCKETT, Manager
NAWILIWILI, KAUAI TELEPHONE 494
Automobiles to all Parts of Kauai,
all hours, Day and Night
AUTOMOBILES AND LIGHT
MACHINERY REPAIRED
FORD CARS, McFARLAN, 8TANLEY STEAMER, LOCOMOBILE.
COLE, REO, CHEVROLET (except Model "490") AND SAJON, alto
REO, COMMERCE, LOCOMOBILE AND MORELAND TRUCKS.
We carry a complete stock of U. S. L. Batteries and Battery Parts
also Automobile and Tire Accessories.
A COMPLETE LINE OF FORD PARTS
Goodyear Tires and Tubes
The best in the Market of the Money.
EAR
NAWILIWILI GARAGE, Asenta for Kauai.
Crril(li H tcktSncr & M
T
t
r
t
t
t
i?
Silva's Toggery, Honolulu.
- -4. 4.
ELEELE STORE
JJ. I. SILVA, Prop.
BRANCH, STORE
KALAHEO HOMESTEAD
4
A
ALWAYS LEADS IN LOWEST PRICES ON
Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes,
Mens Furnishings, Cigars and
Tobacco, Notions of all kinds.
MAIN STORE, ELEELE.
PHONE 72 W.
i
X
4-
.;

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