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The Garden Island. (Lihue, Kauai, H.T.) 1902-current, November 29, 1921, Image 4

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015411/1921-11-29/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE GARDEN ISLAND. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1921
THE GARDEN ISLAND
IssuecEvery Tuesday
KENNETH C. HOl'l'KK - Managing Bailor
TUESDAY ::::::::: : : NOVEMBER 2, 1021
EXTEXSIOX COURSE
The first number of the University of Ha
waii's extension course for Kauai people is
to be given nt Mokiliana Hall in Lihue next
Friday afternoon. To start the ball rolling
properly the university is sendiug Dr. Ro
ma nzo Adams.
Dr. Adams is a student of social and po-
litical economy, lie is a clear thinker and rea
soned And he has the power of presenting
his facts in a manner that interests and in
structs his audience. His lectures in Honolulu
are much in demand. And in Ililo the people
are calling again and again for more visits
from Hawaii's leading economist.
The University of Hawaii intends to give
us a well balanced extension course this year.
There will be men from all departments, at
various times, to keep us in touch with the
most recent developments in their several
lines of work. From economists to agricultur
al experts, all will help us. '
Let's turn out in force to welcome Dr.
Adams at his first speech Friday afternoon.
We will leave Ihe meeting with some new and
worth-while thoughts.
OUR GIRL RESERVE CORPS
Of great interest in any circumstances,
the work of the Girls' Reserve Corps, a branch
of the activities of the Young Women's Chris
tian Association, proves itself of particular
value in Kauai communities. It is, hi fact, a
vital supplement to home influences which
with us are often such as to give girls no
true comprehension of what American citi
zens and American homes should be. More
over, this work adds a personal touch which
our crowded schools can hardly even at
tempt. Reference to a special article published
elsewhere in this issue will show at a glance
that no more vital work is being undertaken
anywhere. We learn, with astonishment, that
all this is being done on the small annual
expenditure of 2,500 to 3,000. With the be
ginning of December, a Girl Reserve cam
paign will be organized for the collection of
this modest budget. Surely, the whole of Ka
uai is ready, heart and soul, to back such loy
al and constructive idealism.
DRUMMING IX HARD TIMES
The South Sea peoples have a custom we
are told, of drumming in the stars at eventide.
They beat their drums as the shadows fall
and the stars come out in response to the
rythmic resonance.
It is a pretty fancy and the result is
beauty and brightness.
Just now we of the western world are
drumming in the gloom. We are talking hard
times when we should be talking how to
avoid hard times.
We should be drumming in bright times.
Because we have been at the top of the
wave we djread the natural fall that must
inevitably follow. But that fall is only a reg
ular and beneficent part of the rise. For the
wave will not stay down. It will rise and fall
and continue so to do while the foundations
of the world remain.
I'eople of Uilo have no cause to be fuss
ed about hard times. There is plenty for all,
Nobody need worry. If the merchants have to
sell some of their goods bought at previous
times at a loss they are selling new arrivals
at a profit.
Prices of many things are falling. Nat
urally. War made demands that could not be.
answered by moderate means. But the war did
not ravage our coasts, wreck our homes, lay
waste our farms and vineyards.
This week a distributor of automobile
tires in Ililo announced a reduction of from
ten to fifteen. per cent. That isn't the point.
He made a song of it. He rejoiced that tires
were coming down in price.
The general stores make sales of goods
in surplus stock at greatly reduced prices.
They don't whine about the loss. They boast
of it. And verily they have their reward.
It isn't the merchants and manufactures
and producers that have the raven voices.
Often it's the public Having nothing invested
in business they can have nothing to lose.
But they profess to see hard times ahead and
close down hard on the cash in hand. Most
of the hard times we have comes from this
pessimistic attitude toward the future.
The future is what we make it. Drum in the
stars.
Let us accept our losses and count our
gains. Let us go on buying of each other as
we have done in the past. Then trade will not
languish. Money is only a commodity. It is
the medium flowing through the channels of
trade. Should everyone hold back the medium
the flow would stop.
It is the stagnant pool that breeds mias
ma. Drum in the stairs.
Have faith that the same stars are there
tonight that came forth to shine last night.
It is no more true of the stars than of this
thing we call trade. If we look for it and
drum for it and have faith in it and refuse,
to save our drums for fear we shall never
get another we shall enjoy the blessings of it,
as we have always done.
Sometimes the wave runs higher, some
times plunges lower but it never remain'
down. Neither can trade remain stagnant. It
moves best when the faith in trade is firmest.
If a large percentage of the people begin
to listeu to the whisperings of fear and hide
their dollars like the niggardly husbandman
they will help that much to make times hard.
But even such fears cannot stop the ac
tivities of civilization. Humanity may get
weak in the knees for a little time, but its
strength comes back, rising up from those un
fathomed depths of nature's never exhausted
supply.
The past tells us that prosperity is the
natural state of trade; that hard times is the
artificial state. Tt tells us that depression has
been ephemeral always. That prosperity has
been constantly progressive. The march of hu
manity is not backwards. The natural way to
walk is forward. The crab is not the symbol
of business, any more than he is the symbol
of civilization. We have the eagle on our real
money. The sun comes up every morning, no
matter how much we may fear to the contrary, .
The night is as beautiful as the day. in its
way.
Drum in the stars. Hilo Tost-Herald.
AM ERIC AX CIT1ZEXSIIIP i
Who are entitled to the name of Ameri
cans? This is a question that involves a vast
multitude of people from every nation on
earth. I'eople who have come to America to
better their condition. People who have fled
from the autocratic oppression of European
rulers to find a home in America, where they
could live in freedom and in the enjoyment
of privileges that were denied them in the
land of their bijrth.
To be an American citizen is a privilege
that every resident of the United States
should cherish. It means America first, and
that from whatever country a person Ojr his
ancestors may have come America should oc
cupy the first place in his thoughts.
American citizenship may have been
granted to an individual but he is not a true
American until he can think "America First."
When he left his native land to make a home
in America he left behind him the ties that
bind him to every allegiance to his old home
land, and he cannot be an American citizen
until he acknowledges those ties to have been
completely severed and he has come to think
and act American.
No true American citizen can have a di
vided sentiment. There can be no hyphenated
American worthy of the name. He is an Am
erican citizen or he is not. If he is an Amer
ican citizen and worthy of the name he will
think first of America and will take no pride
in his foreign ancestor', and until he can so
think and act he is not a true American; for
the true American must have the national
spirit and be proud that he is an American,
and also a desire to make every other man,
whether native or foreign, as good an Ameri
can as he is himself.
Aliens we have with us in every city and
in every town, and it is our duty to make
them into American citizens by showing
them the benefits of out citizenship, our com
radeship and our institutions.
Every worthy alien should be made to
understand that he may become an American
citizen, and that when he becomes one of us,
America should be first, and that when Am
erica is first in his mind that he is one hun
dred percent Amurican.
WHERE AM ERICA XS ARE MADE
Let us not forget that the school house
is the safeguard of the nation; that it is the
"melting pot" that is reducing all refractory
elements to a common base; refining and
adding the pure gold of scientific truth and
turning out a jfroduct that is nearer one hun
dred per cent American than is possible to
produce in the environment of our cosmopol
itan citizenship. The product of our school
houses is strictly American. From the school
house the child of the alien curries home an
ever increasing knowledge of Americanism
to be imparted to the adult members of his
household.
JAS, F.
Company, Limited
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
STOCKS, BONDS,
No. 125131 Merchant St
P. O. Box No. 694 Honolulu
CALIFORNIA FEED CO.
LIMITED
i
Dealers in
Hay, Grain and Chicken Supplier 1
SOLE AGENTS FOR
International Stock, Poultry Food
and other specialties. Arabic tor i
cooling Iron Roofs. Petaluma In- y
cubators and Drooders. A
King's Special Chick Food 1
P. O. Box 452 Honolulu
Honolulu Paper Co.
Limited
Wholesale Paper Dealers
and Stationers.
821-823 Alakea Street
HONOLULU, HAWAII.
HOTEL LIHUE
(The Fairview)
Twenty-two Elegant Rooms
in Main Building
Three Airy Cottages
Cuisine Unexcelled in Coun
try Districts
W. H. Rice, Jr.,
Proprietor ,
Don't Get Scared!
The present day sugar world Is In a panic. Everyone, It seems,
Is dropping sugar securities and trying to unload the enormous
surplus of raws now overhanging the market. It Is only a short
time ago that our high priced market Invited the world's su
gar with the consequence that it became glutted and the price
of raws and sugar securities dropped.
This Isn't the time to be scared that was two years ago. The
present situation calls for a cool head and courage. The clear
headed Individual will accumulate sugar stocks. Otherwise we
are likely to emerge from this depression with such a cur
tailed production that sugar will again hit peak prices.
Sit tight hold tight and don't get scared.
WATERHOUSE
TRUST CO., LTD.
HONOLULU
TERRITORIAL MESSENGER SERVICE
TAKES ORDERS FOR ALL KINDS OF
Dry Cleaning and Laundry Work
SEND BY PARCEL POST TO
1112 UNION ST. - HONOLULU
Save Your Clothing
ECONOMY demands that the expensive shirt, the fine gown
or the suit be laundered, cleaned or dyed only by
THE METHOD EXQUISITE
of the
FRENCH LAUNDRY
and DYEING AND CLEANING WORKS
J. ABADIE, Prop. Honolulu
(Send the package by Parcels Post)
EE
KEEP YOUR PICTURES IN
PHOTO ALBUMS
It presorvos thorn tor future en
tertainment. Complete new assortment from
35c to $10.25.
Special Attention to Orders by
Mall
HONOLULU PHOTO SUPPLY CO.
Everything Photographio
1059 Fort Street -. . Honolulu
Koloa
I Plantation
j Store !
Wholesale and Retail Groceries
j Dry Goods of all Descriptions 7
? General Plantation 1
T Supplies J
The Bank of Hawaii Ltd.
LIHUE BRANCH
IiAXKIXO HOURS :
9 A. M. TO 3 P. M.
Exchange
Do you want
to send money away?
If you do, let this
bank handle the
transaction for you.
We can remit money
by check or cable
to any part of
the world.
THE BANK OF BISHOP & CO., LTD.
Waimea, Kauai.
Kapaia Garage Co,
Exclusive Kauai
Agents for
U. S. TIRES
AND
Automobile M o t o r cy c I e Gas
Engine and General Repairing
VULCANIZING
Tel. 228 - - - P.O. Box 236
Kapaia, Lihue
m
ft
33

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