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Western Kansas world. (WaKeeney, Kan.) 1885-current, August 01, 1885, Image 1

Image and text provided by Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015485/1885-08-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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"2T3-A.I&I,-Y" STJBSCBIPTIOIiT, $2.00.
SEVENTH YEAR.
Congressman Peters declares
that the lack of the asked-for increase of
service on some of the mail lines in Kan
sas is the result of incompetency on the
part of the 'Democratic administration.
Mr. Peters is a good locater!
Cleveland's order for the cattle
men to move ont of the Indian Territory
inside of forty days will probably affect
western Kansas favorably. These cattle
owners have to go somewhere. Of course,
some can go to New Mexico, others to
Colorado, and yet others to Wyoming,
and so on; but western Kansas is nearer
than any of these other localities to these
unfortunate, though wealthy, outcasts,
and she extends to them a cordial wel
come if they wish to como to help the
stock-farm bo m.
This is Democratic doctrine of
the true stamp. It comes from the
"Washington Poif, which is no Cleveland
hybrid: "There has never been but one
right and decent way to transfer the gov
ernment, and that is one which commends
itself to everybody. The six or seven
thousand offices contemplated in the civil
service Jaw should be left to the rules.
The rules piovide for caes of incompe
tency, insubordination or immoral con
duct. The remaining offices, moie than
one hundred thousand in number, should
be dealt with openly, fairly and coura
geously. They belong to the administra
tion, and the administration owes nobody
an apology for taking possession. The
people called the Democracy to govern,
and they expect them to do it. There is
no occasion for secrecy, stealth, accusa
tion no need for anything save absolute
assurance that changes shall be made in
the interest of the poople, of order and of
justice."
GENERAL GRANT.
The admirable sketch of the life and
death of General Grant, which we pub
lish in this number, is placed before our
readers with pleasure. This, however,
like all the sketches of this grei't man
which have preceded it, fails to locate
his place among the world's great com
manderst It is, perhaps, enough for us to
know now that he commanded the grand
est armies known to history, and that his
legions, as far as his personal supervision
extended, were uniformly successful.
That in the field of military genius he
was a Napoleon the First, we have no
reason to believe. It is, at the same time,
probable that Grant was the superior of
"Wellington and the most of the other
great commanders of modem times. The
most splendid courage, added to the par
agon of placid temperaments, placed
General Grant at the head of the na
tional armies, and sustained him at every
step.
A nation now mourns the loss of bird
who has been its central figure since the
death of Lincoln. His name will be a
perpetually-blazing orb for the future
guidance of the lovers of liberty.
CONVENTION CUES.
We attended the judicial convention,
and have a few remarks to make outside
of what will appear in the secretary's re
port of the proceedings. It was the best
natured convention which we ever at
tended. This feature was mentioned by
many of the attendants. This is ac
counted for partially by the fact that the
convention did not last long enough to
weary anybody, but there is a reason
backr of this: The convention was, gen
erally speaking, a representative body of
men, who met without prejudice against
any of the candidates.
The name of our judge will continue to
be Pratt. L. K. Pratt, the nominee of
the convention, looks young almost unto
boyishness. He is said, however, to be
thirty years old, and an able lawyer. His
standing as a man is excellent in his own
town and county. The Democrats will
probably have a candidate in the field for
judge, but the Republican nominee will
have a walkover.
E. A. McMath received upwards of
twenty votes on each of several ballots,
and made a decidedly good impression on
the convention. Shortly before the final
ballot about 3 o'clock Tuesday afternoon,
it looked like McMath stood a chance, at
least, to be nominated; but before the
time arrived to ballot for him Rathbone
and Pratt became the only contestants
for the time being. The Decatur county
delegation, by not voting promptly, saw
that it could decide the contest. It
icted. On the final ballot Pratt received
WA
34 votes; Eathbone, 29. On the ballot
just before, Bathboue hadTeoeived 80
votes and Pratt about the same number.
C. W. Smith, of Rooks county, had ex
cellent backing from his own county, but
he was unable to combine the south-side
influences in his behalf. A good many
Rooks county men vow that they will not
soon forget Patchen. They say that
Rooks county made him what he his, and
that he owed his support to Smith, who
had always been his friend.
George Stinson, of Phillips, had the
support of an elegant home delegation,
but, as wo had said before, it was to be
W. H. Pratt or nobody from that county
th's time.
TREGO COUNTY TRACINGS.
Served up by the "World's" Rustling
Reporters.
COLLYER CAWINGS.
Coli.yer, July 29.
Clerks idle. .
Trade slow.
Post-office moved.
Thistles in bloom.
Generous showers.
Whew! how warm.
Preparing for ha) ing.
Roasting ears in market.
Good demand for ranch property.
School land purchasers on tho alert.
The doctor's friend has appeared tjhe
cucumber.
A number of ladies witnessed the match
game of ball.
Mr. Brandenburg ordered quite largely
of nursery stock.
Our post-office is now back in its old
quarters, south of the hotel.
Mrs. Wm. Jennings, of Gove county,
paid Mrs. Fisher a visit on Saturday.
Mr. McCane finished unloading his car
of household goods on Thursday.
F. B . Strong, of Buffalo Park, came
down Saturday morning to watch the
game.
Now is the time to apply the knife to
thistles and rid the land of next season's
increase.
Land seekers have been in town almost
every day during the week; most of them
speculators.
Nellie Kessler, daughter of R. G. Kes
sler, was was quite sick last week, but is
much better now.
Exercise of both body and voice was
necessary on Friday to prevent the hawks
from seizing their prey.
B. O. Richards sold his homestead last
week to an eager .buyer for 8650. This
land lies a mile southwest of town.
Small improvements constantly being
made by the farmers plainly indicate that
hard times for western Kansas are mostly
past.
Rains last week were so numerous as
to become quite common. For a few days
we had both morning and evening
showers.
Services on Sunday were poorly at
tended, owing in part to the fact that two
weeks ago no service was held. A few
strangers added numbers to the audience.
A brother and a brother-in-law of Wal
ter Brown, of Kansas City, spent a few
days here in search of school land. O.
T. Birkeland showed his friends around
the country. '
Lost or Strayed The Westebn Kansas
Worlds, bound for Collyer. Information
of their whereabouts will be thankfully
received by the many subscribers who
were disappointed by their non-arrival
last Saturday.
Mr. Rockwell, as agent for the Topeka
nursery of Taylor & Co., was soliciting
orders on Tuesday, and found many of
our citizens quite interested in tree cul
ture. His specimens of fruit, preserved
in alcohol, proved a great incentive to
purchase.
A week ago unknown parties entered
Mr. Chase's house, north of town, and
managed to leave things quite disorderly.
stock -A-zaniisra- tieiiej ibjlsis of ottir HEsnDTJSTiE&iiES.
- KEEXEY, KANSAS, SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 3
Anyone wanting a job of black
smithing done should call on Charles
F. Malms, of Collyer, who is pre
pared to perform all branches of
blacksmith work, including the repairing
of farm machinery. You will find Mr.
Malms ready for business at T. K.
Phillips' old shop. 334-3
Considerable interest is manifested in
the base-ball game between the Wa-Kee-ney
and Collyer clubs, to be played here
on Friday. Many are preparing for tho
ball, which will close the pleasures of tho
day, who are not so much concerned with
tho match game. The proceeds of the
dance will be used to defray the expenses
ot the Collyer club.
It has not been ascertained yet whether
tho boxes they emptied contained articles
of value, as the family is at present in
Kansas City, but expected here next
month.
Aaron Hallenbeck spent a few days at
homo this wcok, returning to his position
at Hugo last evening. Mr. H. is a living
illustration of the Greeley adage, "Go
west and grow up with the country." He
is one of Colly er's early settlers, and
one who willingly undertook any kind of
woi k which circumstances offered. The
lesult is he has proved himself a compe
tent and faithful worker, and will soon
reap the reward in his promotion to a
roadmastorship. His friends congratu
late him on his success.
Last Friday was no exception to the
warm days w hich have pievailed of late,
and as tho sun was malting its descent
the clouds appeared above the horizon in
the north and west. By six they had twist
ed into shapes which had a tendency to
attract the attention and make tremulous
the nerves. At fiist heavy black clouds
seemingly rested upon tho earth, which
were divided horizontally by a twisted
wind cloud like a long whito robe, later
these were changed by tho black clouds
lifting sufficiently to permit their edges to
be painted fiery red by the setting sun,
tihe eastern end of the wind cloud break
ing from its rolled form into another
greatly resembling a cascade, while in the
thunder clouds above were two narrow,
parrallel streaks of white. During these
changes the wind had risen, and Aon the
opposite side of the heavens was also
cloud-covered, the force of the wind hav
ing been spent in hastening their journey
across the sky. Quite a heavy shower of
rain moistened the earth, and then the
blue sky, token of peace and serenity,
again appeared.
Saturday began with a heavy fog, con
cealing all distant objects from view, but
before noon it had disappeared and the
heat rapidly increased until by afternoon
even base ball players might have been
satisfied. The match game between the
Buffalo Park second nine and the Collyer
club took place at the appointed time,
with results as follows:
COLIiTEB CIiUB.
123456789 10 Mai
Joe Shorten 010000010 0 2
GeoArmrod 010000010 0
Mike Ryan...... 110000010 0
Rob Power 1000000100
Hoi Colby 1010100100
JSiebert 000000000 0
C Connors 0000000100
P Richards 000000000 0
Wm Montgomery 0100000100
Total 3410100700 16
BUFFAiO PARK CLUB.
Binger. 000001000 1
2
0
2
4
2
3
3
2-
9
McCoy 0000000000
Geo Shafer 0000020000
TBSloey 010102000 0
Catherans 0001010000
Shoun 000101000 1
CCowser 000001100 1
Parkes 00010000 01
Listnberger 0001010000
Total 01050 9100 4 20
The people of this vicinity were greatly
surprised last Thursday to learn that our
accommodating railroad agent, J. W.
Kyle, had been discharged without any
cause being assigned. For a longtime
the public, especially that portion con
nected with the railroad, has been aware
that one man in this town was doing all
he could, and using all the influence he
had, to get Mr. .Kyle removed from his
positions as R. R. agent and postmaster,
but a railroad official denies that his in
fluence has effected the desired result.
It has, however, had tthe natural conse
quence of causing many to express their
sympathy with Mr. Kyle who might other
wise have thought it unnecessary. Mr.
Kyle accepted the position of night agent
here in-1882, and during the years since
invwhichhehns performed the duties of
R. R. agent, postm aster and justice of the
peace, hehas been found thoroughly
honest in all his business transactions,
and has been accommodating even to his
own detriment. Mr. Pumphrey, late
night agent at Buffalo Park, has accepted
the agency here, and entered at once upon
his duties, surprising a few the first day
bv his strict adherence to railroad ordeis.
W. C.
BANNER BUGLINGS,
Bannek, July 21.
I was so bnsy last week locating home
seekers that I did not have, time to bugle
anything from Banner not for their
money, as X would have people believe,
for I will say, and I believe XjWill believe
it, that I make no money of land seekers
more than he does off cattle hunters. I
will just say in regard to X's strictures in
the Ripples in tho World of the 18th
inst, that it shows on the face that he
was too blue to write anything else. I
always thought he had blue blood, but
the Ripples have shown that he is blue in
ever' fibre, and that he is trying to make
other pcoplo blue. Well, fair, 'most any
body would be blue if he had lost as
many cattle from eating loco and starva
tion as he lost last winter. Now, sir, all
this tempest in a teapot is of no conse
quence. I say emphatically that farming
is a success in western Kansas. If I
plant corn, I plant it to raise a crop of
corn. It I succeed, is not that successful
farming? I have repeatedly done this.
When I sow millet, and it makes a good
crop of hay, isn't that successful farming?,
1 have never failed to raise good millet
when I have put the seed inTthe ground.
I never failed to raise good sorghum,
turnips and melons, and I Eeldom fail to
raise good potatoes, cabbage, and many
other things too numerous to mention.
Is that successful farming? And there
are others in this neighboihood who have
not for the past four years failed to raise
bountiful crops. Do you call that suc
cessful farming? There is quite a differ
ence between successful farming and
disposing of the produce of the farm
after it is raised; and there is but one
way that we can dispose of it that will
pay, and that is to feed it to stock, and
even X, looking at it with his blue eyes,
admits that stock-farming will pay. That
is all I ever claimed. We have stacks of
feed rotting in stack yards, because we
didn't have sufficient stock to eat it. X
is a young man whom I have the highest
regard for, and he is capable of writing
much abler letters than I am- as soon as
he gets well of the blues. I would say to
X, as we both arrive at the same con
clusion, let us shake hands, and quit, and
invito people to como and see for them
selves what we are raising.
Good interest is kept up at the Sabbath
school. The attendance is good.
The school house question is being
agitated in this school district. Some
want it moved to one place, and some to
another. I suppose the question will be
decided at the regular school meeting.
New settlers coming in all the time.
We have lots of good land to locate them
on yet, and I am always happy to show
good land to good men. Come to see
or address,
J. Cantbel B.
Three Themes.
The sheep business, comprising both
the wool and mutton produce, is one of
the greatest industries in tho United
States.
In hot "weather all the unconsumed
food should be frequently swept away
from the chicken coops, as it soon sours
and acts like poison if taken into the
crop.
Scotch farmers hold that cut straw is
better for the dairy when newly threshed,
and therefore they thresh each day
enough fodder for the next day's con
sumption. You're Right.
Dodge City Times.
Agriculture is the grand underlying
basis of communities. In itself it is most
profitable when not an exclusive pursuit,
but when endowed with conditions that
make it the foundation of other indus
tries. The vast agricultural resources,
coupled with the growth of live stock of
a great future for southwestern Kansas.
885.
A,
H. BLAIS,..
Land Attorney and Ral Estate Agent.
CONTESTS A SPECIALTY.
Wa-Keenbt - - Kansas,
JOHN A. KELSON,
Attorney at law
AND
Loan Agent
U. P. Land Ayent for Trcyo, Gra
. ham and Ness Counties,
WA-KEENET, - KANSAS.
Stock Eanches a Specialty.
Parties meaning business request
ed to write me.
VAKES HOUSE.
- Wa-Keeney, Kansas -
2 Stories ; 100 Feet long
BUILT OF STONE.
RATES REASONABLE.
I make the Comfort of my Guests my Study
W. F. PAGETT, Proprietor.
STEBBINS & DAY,
LAND AGENTS
Have For Sale
100,000 Acres
OP
RAILROAD,
DEEDED,
& SCHOOL
LAND.
ALSO
Many Cheap
ANDI DESIRABLE CLAIMS.
RUN
Regular Excursions
From Illinois, Indiana, Iowa
and Missouri.
Parties having land or any
kind of property
FOB SALE
Will do well to call on us, as
we will
BUY,SELLOREXCHANGE
For Anything.
Office first
door south
office,
of World
Wa-Keeney, Kans.
susTQ-IjIe: codptt, 5 czzErcrsL
DUMBER 23,
f . B. BIMELD,
UNDER TAKER,
A5TD DEALEB IN
Undertakers Goods,
Furniture ,
Sewing Machines,
Musical Instruments
Jewelry,
Spectacles,
Eye Glasses,
Plated Ware,
Wagon Work & Wagon Material
I can secure, on favorable terms, by
order, any article which I may not happen1
to have on hand.
CHAS. PETERSON & CO.,
Real Estate jai,-
Collyer, Trego Co., Kansas.
AGENTS FOR-
Union Pacific Railroad Lands in
TREGO, GRAHAM,
Man ai G u v 8
COUNTIES.
J.H.BAKER, H. P. 6. G. SHULTZ, Attj,
Land & Emigration Co.
HOMESTEADSjiMBEfl CLAIMS,
Deeded Lands aid Towi Lots
BOUGHT AND SOLD,
LOCATING A 3PE0IALTY.
Will attend promptly to all Legal
Business before the Courts
and U. S. Land Office.
Correspondence Solicited.
WA-KEEKEY, KANSAS.
. X O0BOXM. VMM WnM,
QSBORH 4k MOXKOZ
Attoraeys-at-Law & Real Estate ltgeab
W4-KXINKT, KANSAS.
D. H. HENKEL,
REAL ESTITE & LOAN AST.
LOCATING A SPECIALTY.
OFFICE AVrrtf OSBOEX & iCOifROE,
WA-KEENEY, KANSAS.
$106,000 TO LOAN!
On KKeal Estate at 8 per cent. -
fcJFrT I blow for j
KMcKnight Bros.,
KThe Land Agents,
HjR Wa-KeeneyyKs.
BBf Branch Office At Ip
5 Clay Center,Ks. 'j
HK School Land and i&
bV Deeded Land
y gJ For J Sale. Jg3
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