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New Orleans daily crescent. ([New Orleans, La.]) 1851-1866, March 19, 1860, Morning, Image 1

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn82015753/1860-03-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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F 1m*A I3~ X on cotton 1 e..
TO. PLANTBBE AND KURCHANTS.
Ieo wit k.gd mw2g.auad tle.e.mIagys."t Ik.!kg cttoe.
Maohnsed * lWt~we dtea u c tCtc kwipe d ezae
kutkdwscbcettkdfWbae2!Ic. kntccepwkngckea. A
ammldogwadmacc ntmcc at! th. did m1lgrwt be kept et M
ci as ttik~4pa, ul k akul wibrk. 2.n. inta!t ., we icc
dhhllj cetl~. oac leek. t, cki nedru.
'Oceuat ale npak.mpece f 2. MSX*I(AN TI, I wt
take phuenM idtcai to the c 8 2.. I.cklc Its malt.,
Soda ct ppte do., a*, o tkat.f wae ctkw Ti tka myr b
Ordwufcraaee aetonr pueapyrl OWa cf par paced, wic
ubwsIddeeoawto atwumic,
F. BBLOBMn, Allst,
Ugd Oea FdPlea.,
JA6 !ptl MNe. Oleh.n
Biuter awd Cbhee.s.
T. D. COP dA O., df St.L , make p tat ofer -to
all New atork Gohn Bretod New York hw at New
York ltly poca the givng dealers In 1o Orleans end the
-Cagt the beeMt da. tnle and quicker mit a by the Gdlf.
Ohio Westers BSe e Botter and Cheeae Atancannati pride
ad Western very low atlm
BrueffBrother SHearer,
- .....................wraRE N S .....................T 4
New York.
avanosa or ran
CELEBRATED OVAL EYE COTTON HOES.
IMPROVRD PATTERN 0ANE IKIVLS
-nuns a61rs0 rto
A. P., BRUPB'S AXES.
WlTMobba trade supplied by the package.
SPA hMay clotg of HARDWARB , OUTLERY, GUNS
e., coleatlm.y on haed. Jil Spl.
Chs. Parre Champagne,
C000EaSOS TO MAX SBUTAINB 00.,
Pmt.pew ta he O em ot P Fran, 8Spln and Pauela; ;ala
to the eelebated Wellialo Club, London,
SILLERY. CABINET, IMPERIAL, ENGLISH OREAM
ING CHAMPAGNES, for t by the prsatpl Gmrocerad
hine Dtan.
m.Oader for direct Importation realed by
S. D. GRATIAA & CO.,
id Spm s Custombouse street.
Boots, Shoes and Brogans,
AT WHOLESALE.
Plna.atm.oa eppled wIth p D.tabeg hOOTS, S.NBe
BROGANS, Wool, Mexloe, Palm Leef, Btraw sad Ompay
HATS, at the lwesat mak. prie, by
FROST CO.,
No. 1. Mad street, New Or n.
HATS CAPg, ete.,
AT WHOLESALE.
We are ataatly reae.vli a general u.wtmeet of Silk gnd
!m, eainhs, FPaeas Leghoem, StBaw, Palm LI, BMeade
ad Wooi HATS, at the lowesmrket pdlce, by
FROST &S CO.,
ryll SpAW Magine gastra
Diseases of the Throat and Lungs.
]DR, . PRESTON ORANE
Woald rapeottlfUy announeo that hi loatio is gill the
m-a-old No. 14, new. No. 1b ST. JOSEPH STREET, bh
tween Camp nd t. Charl. where he will continue to
trea dgegesa ef the THROAT AND LUNGS by hi p.
alt d ueoeefl maethod of
INHALATION OF MEDICATED VAPORS,
In omeaiCioN with CONSTITUTIONAL REMEDIES. Dr. C.
will ho eontinue to admallster tha
ELECTROLYSES OR ELECTRO-CHEMICAL BATHS,
Whieh aaelady proaed so wmerflly etealoua oi
RHEUMATISM,
GOUT, LUMBAGO,
INTERMITTENT,
SREOULA,
A.,dll laoeoatos affectitns, gad tIl albgl gadui ale'. g froma Im
purities of the blood, or producead by tbhe preeeea of mlneral ha
the system. The Dr.l wills al give h ttentioe to deueaa of
the Eye eand Ear.
OmHe hours feom 8 A. inS.lI9 P. M.
Patketa abroad derl 9 of conplting Dr. C. by letter, wll
gddrea Box C, 49. dIP 2ptfParo&We
Fairbanks'
PR INT PAL SOUTHERN
tScale W arehouse,
AlPB DEPOT FOR
LILLIE'S BUROLAR AND FIRE-PROOF SAFES.
FAIRBANKS & CO.,
dl2 pti No. 9S Camp gtraeet
WILnes, Liquors, etc.,
NOS. 18 AND 16 ROYAL STREET.
A supply of CREM DE BOUZY CHAMPAGNE, in quarto
gad plots, outinuslly op hand, whbchlp equal t tthe bet that
omto thI market Als, other brands of inferlor quality,
TOPAZ SHERRY, OABINET SHERRY, SIERRA SHER
RY, GOLDEN SHERRY, DUFF CORDON SHERRY, AN.
(COR SHERRY, SPARKLING and STILL HOCK, Old nad
Fhe PORT WINE, MADEIRA AND SHERRY WINES,
BRANDIE--SM , of a! hePntage of 176l,172 anId ISM, and
thar banads. WHISKY, of all daecrptlons---Sotah, Irish,
Re sad Borboa n ALE sad PORTER, in pints and qgao&.
Alo en haad, my maesl asporent of the btd
Wines and Liquors
i the mlrhek,wt wlh ell olb d on reaenabk t u eny
S . SEWELL T. TAYLOB,
Ipl N.o 1 anud 5 RBoyal tree
Ctgarts I Cgars I
Furchanrrs ll lw.yind i store 0n asortment of the well
knowe brnds--oienotdAd, Flor de Pljds., MerdlaeH , Flor de
Poscho, Redows Cborh e Prge, Know-Bomethlng, Wash.
lgton, Dos Hermau, Meo Hobono, etc., et., at the lowest
SP. PRATB & CO.,
oN btf 29 Commercial Place.
Dental Burgeon.
DR. GEORGE W. SBITH
Has removed from No. 177 Caenl street, to the oppoite side,
No. 23, one door from Rampart, where he will be pleased to re
velve his old frends, and others who may desire his professlonal
Services. o162htfkW
IWaU Paper. WalU Paper.
BATIMBACH ac EVERS,
6.a..................Chartres Street................ O1
Wholesale and Retail Dealers
French and American Paper Hanging.,
BORDERS, CORNERS. OAKS AND
MARBLES, In every varlety.
Psyrolotee attention paid to all work in thetoto. dle Sply
French Perflumery.
-JUST RECEIVED
By ship Fpnny Fern, fron Ilavre, a freh aeortment of
PERFUMERY, fron the bht Pares mnaufeotorls.
LION & PINSARD,
6 and a Royal Mee.
s16 bptr corner Blteile st.
Jonatn's Gloves, Joutin's Gloves
Jot recesled, a fresh nvoice of
GENUINE JOUVIN GLOVES,
Of a sllses and colos, for Ladie and Gentlemen.
Also, a verylarge assortmt otf
Belt and Bonnet Ribbons.
LION A PINSARD,
d bitf 64 and IS Royal street. corner BlenUllo.
hse Eastern Clarion,
PAULDINM1 MIS.
S. R. Adams, Editor.
A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER, heting the l&rgest eirulation
aof m country newspaper in the Sooth. Is very lepeotfly of
mad an adS isl medium to the Merhtsof NMw Or
ss. Anbtsfor New rltna-
A. B. BTRAWBRIDOE A CO.,
e8 Spit No. 2 Commercl Pl.
W " I . L Z DENTIST,
aW.OPPFIO and BEBIDENCE,
138 CaOondelet street.
1r1yAW cooner of Lafayette.
NEW ORLEANS. DAILY RE
PUBLISHED EVERY DAY, SUNDAY EXCEPTED, BY J. O. NIXON, AT No, 70 CAMP STREET.
VOLUME XIII. MONDAY MORNING, MARCH 19, 1860.
2T. 8. Powssed Co.,
JOBBERS OF
BILK, STRAW A.ND FANOY
SPRING GOODS, 1860.
We have n store our Spring and Summer StRok, eomp
ng, In prt
ILKS, MANTILLAS,
DRESS G OOD, LACE BSHAWLS,
RIBBONS, SKIRTS,
LACES, CORSETS,
EMBROIPERIES, ZEPHYR YARN
WHITE GOODS, SHETLAND WOOL,
GLOVES, HOSIERY, HABEIDASHERY.
traw Goods, of Every Description,
Trimmed or Untrimmed,
FOR WOMEN, CHILDREN AND INFANTS.
MIlUnery.
French nd American FLOWERS, BONNET STUFFS and
BLONDS, CRAPES, ILLUSIONS, and a geneOml ock of
-MHeetinmt buylog for CASH or APPROVED CREDIT
are sollded ton gu a l before punreha. , f*7 2plm
ar ro, wrant cotuhing
IF YOU WANT
FURNISHING GOODS.
war Men and Boys,
--Catll t
T*"E AICte T' J8MsPOatrv'M
--or
ALFRED MUNROE & CO.,
STORY BUILDING,
Conuer Camp and Common streets.
ferW 2tfAW
j.otice to Physicians,
PLANTERS AND ILAVEHOLDERS
CITY HOSPITAL,
BY DR, 0. ANFOUX,
EXOL YBIVELY FOR SMALL-POX,
On Elyslan FlSlds street,
Between Soldllne sad Jos" hlne dreet., New Orleas,
IS NOW OPEN FOR PATIENTS. ml Iplm
French Shirts, French Shirts.
CHARV.FS MA FUPACTYRE I
A botlltul usoortment of LINEN AND COTTON SHIRTS,
colord ad white, of all ds and in the latet styles., st
eelved by
LION & PINSARD,
54 nd 16 Roysl treet,
elS 2ptf Comer Bleanvle.
P. mftlard,
Nos. I ROYAL STREET AND I7 BIENVILLE STREET.
FURNITRE I fURNITURE I
SUPERIOR STATUARY, DINNER AND TEA SERVICES.
RICH CURTAIN AND FURNITURE GOODS.
MIRRORS. PLATED WARE, AND SUPER. CUT GLASS
I havI always o hand a large and extoeoive awritment of
FANCY GOODS, of dlret Impoatloon from Pars, eonMsling
ton pd of
RICH FURNITURB-FRENCH STILE, (made In my estsb
llhmesn0-whieh I in soy orepet equal to any ser
brooght to the United SRt,-ooh us Rosewood and Mhlo.
oy Bedroom, Parlor, Librhy and Dlnongroom Ste.
FANCY GOODS-Peoooldoa asd BSIsot Statuettos, Vasen,
Clok. Chsadelsbr, etc.: Daornted Dinner os To Solo:
Coot G0. Soondes, Platd Ware, Wlters, Cotono, Liqueor
Stands, ete., ete.
All of which I will sell low to clot out a heavy stook bfore
my departure for Europe.
lOrden from the country attended to with promptneso
stCOLZA OIL always on hand.
P. MALLARD,
r1p1 plm Nos. IS Royl d 7 BlInville street.
To Country .lWerchants.
RAYNE'S WHOLESALE SHOE WAREHOUSE,
No. 88 Magazine Street.
A LARGE STOOK
On Liberal Terms. selS Sope
H. P. Buckley,
8..................... CAMP STREET.................... 8
R-epeftfully ails attention to his NEW STOCK of fine
Englih and Swim
Watches, in Gold and Silver Cases,
of therflne mtebrl and workmalshlp, snofatoured to order,
or lated by himsel.
Fine Jewelry,
In 1ll the neswet ptterns of BREASTPINS, EARRINGS
BRACELETS, ets.
A Large Stock of Pure Silverware.
The whole of whch is uranteed to be Snserpsesd In qsal.
Ely, nd ti offered st eamoable pdes.
Watches, Jewelry and SBlveare made to order asd repatred.
de SpIn
Cahbnet .EWakers' and [Upholster.
era' Materials of every description.
tllt Corote, Heir Cloth, Shdes, Culoled Hair. Eamieled
Cloth, Curtan Goods, Cords and Tssels. Varnish, Gitmp and
ptrhes, Sprgs, Buttons and Twine, Glue, Picked and (om
son on, Conpheno and .oohol, Burning Fluid, Pe.en and
Oi Wall Paper, et.. at the Lowet Cash P , by
mN Splyr HEATH & CO., 75 Camp street.
Boots, Shoes and Hats.
We have into store and now lauding from ships rt, J.
Montgomery, Samuel Fales, Lady Blesngton, od the steam.
ships DeSoto and Granada.
AN EXTENSIVE ASSORTMENT
-or
Boots, Shoes and Hats,
--susur.
ONE OF THE LARGEST STOCKS
EVER OFFERED IN THIS MARKET.
To which we call ao tion of buers.
our oet k is, in part. oomprsed of the followg -
10,0l0 pai Reset Broga, for Plutaton use.
10,l0 .. Kip, Calf and Seal Broe
10,l00 .. Kip, Calf and Thiek End Boots.
M,00 .. Gr(an, Hnter and Plntea' Boots.
00,000 .. Lsdi.', Children's and asse' Shoe, of
every varey.
S..or oale o n lets l terms, by
JOHN M. GOULD & CO.,
ealo Spit osene streaLet
jirst Premium Shirts,
FINE BESPOKE MADE CLOTHES,
-And
GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHING GOODS.
WPRICES CHEAP AS THE CHEAPEST, Msd i
snes the WORTH give for the moeay, at
LEIGOHTON & BLANC'S
Comer St Charles and OCanl streem
N. B.-Clothiog and shirts made torde. r bt
i'r. ,t. Hr son,
FINE WATCHES, JEWELRY,
nIL ERWAKE, CUTLERY, GUNS.
FANCY GOODS, et, eta, etep
Je Sptf N. CANAL STREET.
Builders'
FURNISHIN I G 'WAREHOTUSE,
--aws-
NEW ORLEANS CHANDELIER DEPOT.
PRICES GREATLY BED UCZD!
Marble Mantels
CHANDELIERS AND GAS FIXTURES.
1001 MANTEL, Statuoy, from W.5to $1SK
80 MANTELS, Sttuary, from SOSrtoS..
0 M A ,WFT , Egyptian, from A to W 0.
100 MANTELS, Veined Itdllo, from to 75.
30 MANTELS, Iron, from $16 to 5.
Io MANTELS, Slate, from 20 toM.0.
Chamdellers.
W00 o'ANDEIERS, 6Lghts, tom $ to fL00.
N0 CHSANDELIERS, 4 L.ghts, fom 55 to 10.
2W CHANDELIEIR ights, from 5 to 10.
2(D CHANDELInES, 2 Lughts from 512 0 to
101 CHANDELIERS, Asorted, to lld.
100 CHIANDLIRS, for Hails. I to6 lght..
1021 CHIANDELIEE SHADES, Got GOts, aortod.
Gas Pipe.
100 feet GAB PIPE, from 2 to 4 ilohes.
S feet GAS PIPE, from s'o Iches.
3M.2 feet GAS PIPE, from oto 10 Inb
200 feet GAS PIPE, Asortod, OG.evashet
100 Ib. GAS PIPE FITTINGS.
Builders' Hardware.
DOOR L0DCKS, all kindS
MORTICE LOCKS, Plated.
BANK AND SAPS LO. SL.
SAFE LOCKS, of al kind.
SLIDING DOOR LOCKS.
SILVER PLATED TRIMMINGS.
NAILS, large ,sortment.
BUTTS AND HINGES.
BELL PCULLS.
VENTILATORS and Columns.
ORNAMENTAL RAILING CASTINGS.
Chndeliers and Gas LStumres.
tHavng made extensive arrangements with CORNELIUS k
BAKER, of Phladelpla, for the sal of thleir On Fitae and
Chtndeli's. I have opened in the rer of my Hardware Stere
arenna atreet, one of the large CHANDELIER BHOW
ROOS Iln the Utol Stest-where can be found at all times
tomplete supply of English and French, as well as AmeDocai
COHADELIERS, at priees much lower than usally sld 3
this cty. Tee per cent. adance will be added to the Philads
phe pris at retail. Trade supplied t whholesle prices. Over
twohundred different ptters of Ctandetlera now on hatd, va
ryg to ptles frome to 600. SomeveryhandsemeChane
lien, having four and osx ights, at 01 15, $18 d S0.
There i.s attacooed a large Ga PFilting Esthbllshmett,
her frm fiften to twenty men are eostantly employed i
titlng up hoses and stores for Gas, and pattio up P0xtt,5e
ins.erig prompt attention to all order for Pipe PFitres.
ALLEN HILL,
Builder' FumPt hleg Wosltehos,
Old No. 0, Nea 167 Setne L,
nIl lohawit rar of City f all, New Orlens.
Hubbard's
- I.X.L.
STRAIGHT NEEDLE DOUBLE LOCK STITCH
SEWING} MACHINETS,
The Lathst and the Best.
The aren the mot reliable, simple and durble Maehines e
placed befone the public. They sew from the orignal poolo.
(thns .ang the trouble of reiwiodbte,) and make s eelehbrted
Grover & Baker oitch, the STRONGEST MADE BY MA
CHINERY. Thy can be undetood and operted perfetly,
with very little hostruction.
A orlical and thorough examination s solicited, which we ar
confident will corroborate an our ttatement.
-us
--SS "ESONO-S- ,
Cheapest Double Thread Machine Ever Offered
IN THIS MAREZT,
-AT
MANUFACTURER'S PRICES, ONLY 361
And Fully Guaranteed.
-ALSo oS Axo-D
THE STAR SHUTTLE MACHIRE,
Equal in every respect to any Shuttle IMchines in the narket
nd sold for lea money. Call ad examine them.
WENTWORTH & DUKE, Agents,
fc2O 2pMoWeiSatf 90 Camp street, New Orleans.
How Strange it Is
That people will do what they ought not to do, and leave n
done thoee things which they ought to have done. Yet it is a
melancholy truth, and cannot be refuted. For exmple-we
know of hundreds who have had consumption lurking in their
very vitals, and drugged themi lvet nearly to death with a
whole hobt of would be remedies, and, we are sorry to say, often
Ignorantly deceived In getting the proper remedy by similar
ity of names. To avoid future mictakei, we wam every one to
purchse none but
Woodman's Cherry Expectorant.
It alone posesse the Intrinsic medicinal virtues of the Wild
Cherry In remoing each and every form of disease, and it now
etands preeminently distinguished by the learned medical eo
llet of Europe and America as the " one thing needful."
Prepared and sold by the prompdetopr,
WOODMAN & BEMENT,
And sold by every respectable Druggst in the world. ml8 6
Great Closting Sale of Dry Goods
AT COST:
HA(Ca-GE RTY BROS.,
DIRECT IMPORTERS,
No. 158 Canal street, Touro Balldings.
Having determined to bdng this eason's business to an u
usually early close, we would respetfuily call the attention of
purchaers to our extensive stoik of SEASONABLE, FRESH
GOODS, all of which we are poitively decidd on sellng out at
once at etoal prime cst, and respectfully request an examina
tion of our stock and prie on the part of purchaeere.
feil ?plm HAGGERTY BROS.
Ivory Tucklng Combs.
-JUST RE:CIEVEn
A beautiful assortment of
IVORY TUCKING COMBS,
In the LATEST PARIS STYLFS, by
LION & PINSARD,
64 and l Royal street,
ml2 2ptf comar Blenville.
Crockery, China and Glassware,
-AT
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL,
IN LOTS TO SUIT PURCHASERS, AT LOW PRICES.
By the Origlinal Pacrkage.
P. R. FELL & MARSH,
ml 2plnThSlMoWe 6 and 64 Graer tree
.)Madame LaBlanch,
THE GREAT NATURAL CLAIRVOYANT, PLANET
READER AND ASTROLOGIST OF THE
NINETEENTH CENTURY,
Reldnee.......................... 9 BaRen stret
M'ME LA BLANCH has mastered all the sience embraned
In the glorlin gift of prophecy, and has asitonished her many
thousand visitors from the rankls of the most resentabii citizens
In this city, by revealing the past, preent and future.
Unlike the many who eannt their Searei Power before the
world, M'me LrBlanch invariably gives satlsaetion to all who
consutlt her, and all acknowledge the tmthfulness of the revela
tions made to them.
As a irther assourance of really meritorious nacompllishmcnts,
MNme LaBlanoh ofieri as evidence to the public her diploma as
a graduated student in the several branehes of Anatomy, Sur.
I ry, ObLetdrics and a the various diseasen pecmiar to Women
and Children, and therefore her Clairvoyant powers, oined to
her medical abilitie, form a eafe guide to the alicted.
Remember, WhME LABLANCH s the only natural and trme
Clairvoyant and PFemle PhvlciM hnown at the preent time.
- Hour of emltation-Frm 8 A. . to 8 P. l
E The public will beA imind that M'm LaBhlch is the
geeatet Clairvoyant and Planet ead that hewer hdted our
city. Re~mdence and recepto mmu . mm t p1m
I have the ber to enform my poth, that wi hg-to t
povemtu a in my Store, I have tranfered the IRlAVING.
ROOM to the nat dmree. l that s ,me ttebs o l peld as
hertfor.
L B. BOIRON,
n Sptot 6 S Charles . eet.
TRIPLE-SHEET.
MONDAY' MOtiNG, MARCH 19, 1860.
A TAR3gp MOVE.
We clip the followisg from the New York Tr
bune of the 13th imet. The Tribune, it is well nigh
needless to add, almosh t as strong in favor of a
Protective Tariff as tlsh n favor of Abolition:
YeMterda, in the House of Representatives, Mr.
orll ~Of vmeront moved to susend the rules to
enable hIm to intreo e a Tariff bill substantially
like that presented yhim at the last sesson. The
motion failed-yea lin', aoys 69 (not two thirds.)
The yeas conutaio 2 I uteean Democrats, 5 Anti
Le omptn pDemocatZiNorthnAmerican, (Briggs)
.South Americanes, ldB2a epblian ans. The nays,
with two or three e n.ptious, are Northern and
ounthern Demoerats Te only~~ i Republican who
voted against usens, was Mr. Spinner. Mr.
Mtrrini's bill almt t ard niden talprotection to
oaur iangu h ib and mechanicad in
dustry, this tep e thte Pederol Tresand.
Wlt notthi nliat vote opena the eyes oif e
friends of domele rrsenufacres and mechanic
ar throoghout the patry, and especially in Con
necticnt and Rlode auald, whose eleetors are soon
to meet atthe poll, to express their opinions upon
State and National qustions?
We are gratified that the roles were not e ns
pended, and rejoice in the conviction that no tariff
bill, having in view the plunder of the masses in
all sections of the country for the aggrandizement
of a few favored classes of overgrown monopolists,
who are now grinding to the point of strvation
thousands of poor white operatives in the Eastern
States, can pass at this sension of Congress.
The Southern people want no protection. The
Western people ask for no protection. All they
seek at the hands of the General Government is to
be let alone. They are willing to put the products
of their skill oad Industry in the fair field of com
petition, and let them abide the lot which their
merits, and the laws of supply and demand may
award to them. But they should protest, and do
most earnestly protest, against having their labor
clogged with burdens which enore exclusively to
the advantage of others engaged in different
branches of enterprise.
It is high time, in our opinion, that the prairies
of the West and the plains of the South ceased
paying immense annual tribute to Yankeedom. If
the labor of Yankeedom cannot stand on its own
merite-if it mnst be everlastingly bolstered up by
largesses wrung from the pockets of others-why,
let the labor of Yankeedomin g to the wall. And
so with the labor of all other sections of the Con
federacy. Any system that cannot exist by itself
and within itself, isnot a legitimate system-is not
founded upon honest principles of trade, and is not
entitled to encouragement, much less govern
mental protection. If the "languishing manufac
taring and mechanical industry" of New England
is unable to get along without the support of
taxes levied upon and patd by others, why, let it
languish into bankrrptcy, be sold out by commis
sioners of insolvency, and wound up as bankrupts
generally are or should be. That is all. If Gov
ernment is hound to sustain bankrupt manufac
turers and mechanics in one part of the contry, it
is bound to do the same thing in all sections of the
country. And, to rn the parallel still further, on
the assumption, for the sae of argument, that the
rule is a good one, and should be enforced, Gov
ernment ought to come to the relief of every " lan
guitohing" bank, railroad, canal, farmer, planter,
merchant, artisan, printer and producer in the na
lion. This simple illustration demonstrates the
ntter flimsiness of the pleas and arguments of the
protectionists.
The protectionists war upon the principles of
the age and the lights of the times. They would
not only put a stop to the car of progress, but
would ran it backwards. While two of the great
est and most enlightened nations of Europe -
France and England--are preparing to modify
their revenue systems, and are making great
strides in the right direction, which will inevi
tably result in something akin to free trade in
the Old World-the initiatory steps towards which
have been hailed with unmixed delight everywhere
-it is gravely proposed in this new and growing
land, with not one tithe of its resources developed,
to take a step backwards and adopt a doctrine
which our trans-Atlanutic neighbors are even now
repudiating. That Congress will ever thus stultify
itself, however, and prove recreant to its mission,
and endeavor to thwart the destiny of the country,
we have not the smallest idea. We have given re
ligious and civil freedom to the best portion of one
hemisphere, and will, we are firmly persuaded,
ultimately be the means of bestowing the bless
ings of free trade upon all the civilized nations of
the earth.
For our part we hope soon to see the day when
irrestricted free trade will prevail thronghout
Christendom-when all sea ports will be free-ports
-and when every shackle that now interposes to
prevent the free operation of commerce, will be
removed. We would have commerce as free as
the air of heaven and as unfettered as the billows
of the ocean. Then, what is meritorious will grow
and prosper as it justly should; and what is mere
tricious, will encounter a deservedly disgraceful
fate. When the period to which we have alluded
arrives, as it speedily will, a gloriously auspicious
era will dawn upon the whole Union, and especially
neon the Western and Southern portions of it.
MEXICAN AFFAIRS.
Itis an ingenious, and to a degree plausible the
ory, that the Church party in Mexico are desironaus
that that country be involved in a war with the
United States. This seems absurd at first sight, as
all American sympathy is known to be with the
Liberal and adverse to the Church party, but it is
not unreasonable to imagine that the latter is desi
rous of provoking war between the United States
and Mexico as a whole, rather than that this coun
try should go into alliance with the Liberals, when
its destruction would be certain. If the United
States can be aggravated into conquering Mexico
and holding it, of course the Church will be confirm
ed in the possession of their property, to deprive
them of which is the aim of the Liberals. The ca
pacity to take away property, to oust from legiti.
mate property right, however vast and unpopu
larly administered, is not provided under law and
Constitution in the United States as the Church
party well know. They desire nothing better
than that the country be brought under the direct
rule of the United States, and they fear nothing
worse than an alliance between this power and the
Liberals, which would enable the latter to rule as
well as triumph, and carry out the great and right
eous work as ameasure for the national welfare
and progress, of despoiling the Church and de
stroying its connection with the State as an au
thoritative branch of government. For reasons just
the opposite of these the Liberals desire the alli
ance of the United States as earnestly as the
Church party dread it.
Neither is the Church party averse to a war, even
though it does not result in the holding or conquest
of the country; for in the diversion which it would
cause, and the joint action of all parties against a
foreign foe, they would hope to achieve the su
premacy, being the best organized and most united
in action among the factions. If the United States,
then, cannot avowedly aid the Liberal cause, it
should be very careful, however much it may be
tempted by aggressive acts, how it makes an issue
with Mexico. If we are obliged to take her cause
in hand we must do it as the MHLane treaty, which,
unfortunately, is unlikely to be ratified, eontem;
plates, as the allies of the Liberals, and not as ene*
mies of the country at large. And, indeed, recog
nising the latter as the constitautonal government
of the country, we cannot delare war withot de
claring it upon those we should and wtkh to be
friend; and in doing so we shall accomplish all
-mestiet which have attl4 em a 'ah of iii
The way to palish them is by aidlg osthel 1:
in striking at their root, he Chnre party.. I. Mp
eo is ever to be among thbe priesi o te
United States. she mot aot beoeme so while t
Church holds it vest pose.iosn and wide lehs
sovereignpower Were we to annex bQ; .day,we
would confrm the titles of the Church; pad with
that oppreslve burden upon her back Mexice
would improve little faster tha she has hereto
fore. The civil government would exercise no
more than a nominal authority. f we are 'everto
have Mexico, we must irst help the people of u.e
ico to purity the State; for as we get herso mnst
we keep her. We cannot deprive the Church-of
her vested rights. We, must help her people do.
that unpleasant but most essential work of whole.
sale robbery. When thereby rendered cleasly.and
wholesome, we may be ready to receive her into
the bosom of the Union; but until she is, we m~pt
loath and avoid her as the foulest of polltlcki
lepers.
A GOOD WITNh es.
In recent ssoes of the Creseentwe have taken
considerable voluhmnteer trouble to impart to the
laboring classes of the North the gratuitous inhor.
mntion that they are slaves, and considerably
worse off thanthhe black ,laves of the South, whoe
condition they so dolorously compassionate. Of
course we did not comfort ourself with the idea
that they would believe us, or that they would dis
play any gratitude for the pains we took, but that
they would, rather, spitefully resent our display of
interest in their affairs. Of course they did so;
but we can't see how they will be able to persist
in their view of the case when we put on the stand
so important a witness as one of their own proph
ete. We have been telling the insurrectionary
male and female shoemakers of Massachusetts,
who are in such vigorous rebellion against their
masters, that they were more abject slaves than
plantation negroes, and to, an Abolitionist preacher
of Massachusetts rises up to tell them the same
thing. We find the following report, in a ledig
Black Republican paper, of the remarks addressed
by Rev. Thomas Driver to a meeting of the female
strikers of Lynn:
The reverend gentleman was delighted with the
scene before him. He always liked the looks of
the Lynn girls, but now he was proud of them
linBut it made him feel badly to have them ground
down by the tyrannical bosses. They were cer
tainy worse o than the slaves of the South. He
had recently visited nine slave States; he had seen
the evils of slavery; he had preached to the mester
and the slave he had investigated the troubles of
the downtrodden African, and had come home a
confirmed Abolitionit. But, said he, with empha
s, I findthereare white as well as black slaves.;
there are slaves in this State and in this city worse,
far worse, In their condition than the black slaves
at the South. The only difference is, that they
can't satt you. Thank God for that! [Great sen
sation and applause.]
While enlightened and candid above his fellows,
the Rev. Driver is also a shrewd man, but we fear
a dreadful story teller. He puts in the saving
clause that he is still an Abolitionist, for obvious
reasons, and we find it utterly impossible for us to
believe that he is any such thing after visiting nine
States, and coming to conclusions which he is bold
enough to state as above. With a very worldly
sagacity, he ,lows hot and cold with a " Good
Lord I Good devil" ambiguity which is very cun
ning and very ludicrous. He is a smart fellow,
and will never get himself into any scrape without
providing a hole to get out of it.
The testimony of a few such witnesses of their
own stock as Rev. Thomas Driver would likely
make the boss Abolitionists uneasy, and clear the
vision of the masses, in whose eyes they have been
so long industriously engaged throwing dust, driv
ing them into the Abolition fold by spurring and
pricking their humanity with blood curdling tales
of the miseries of the poor slaves. One of their
own preachers bluntly informs them that they are
white slaves, and worse off than the objects of their
compassion, though they do congratulate them
selves on their unequalled blessed condition among
the peoples of the world. We say, "hooray for
you, Rev. Thomas Driver," though in telling the
truth you did tell something beside it.
Later from Havana. 0o
ARRIVAL OF THE STEAMSHIP IIABANA.
The steamship Habana, Capt. J. B. McConnell, n
from Havana, arrived here yesterday morning. w
Her Purser makes the following report: in
Left New Orleans on the 8th inst., and arrived di
at Havana on the 10th inst., at 10 o'clock, A. M.,
making the trip from city to city in 491 hours.
Left Havana at half-past 4 o'clock on the 15th.
On the night of the 16th enconntered very squally
weather from southwest; next day and night had
a northwester, with a heavy sea, which lasted
until we made the bar at 11 P. M. on the 17th.
Steamship North Star, from Aspinwall, arrived
on the 10th inst., and sailed same day for New
York. Steamship Star of the West arrived same B
day from New York, and sailed on the 11th for
New Orleans.
The Spanish steam frigate Beringuels sailed on
the 10th; destination supposed to be Vera Cruz.
Sailed March 11th, Spanish mail steamship Ber. g
ingcr, Ruez,for Cadiz; March 13th, steamship De
Soto for New York, at8 o'clock A.M.; March 13th,
British steamship Karnak, from New York and
Nasau, sailed on the 15th for same ports.
Sugar market dull-transactions limited and re
ceipts moderate, operations mostly on the basis of h
9 rials for No. 12. Stock at Havana and Mantanzas,
135,000 boxes, being a decrease of 45,000 boxes, h
from same time last year. Exports from Havana
and Mantanzas 27,000 boxes and 3500 hhds.
There is a good supply of provisions of allkinds.
Lard in bbls. $16 75 and kegs $10 87, actual sales.
Freights, actual engagements to the United a
States at $2 30 per hhd. for molasses and $1 per
box for sugar.
Exchanges on New York, 21 premium, on New
Orleans, 41 premium.
Passed ship Glade at anchor at Poverty Point.
SKYBocraKS AMONG PIGEONs.-A few days since,
while the wild pigeons were flying in immense
numbers over the city, (says the Cleveland Plain
dealer) Mr. George N. Baker, proprietor of the
pyrotechnic establishment at the corner of Perry
and Superior streets, thought he would see what
efect his fireworks would have upon the feathered
tribe, and upon trial discovered a new field for
sporting gentlemen to humor their fancy.
Just as a large flock approached, he sent hissing
through their midst a half dozen heavy rockets,
producing a wild and Irrepressible consternation.
At once, the vast flock would change its course,
dividing in all directions, and in many instances I
great numbers would come to the ground and
alight; others would reverse their course, while
the greater number would come down within a few
yards of the ground, wandering about in wild con
fusion.
One heavy rocket bursting jest beneath a large
flock, and shootin$ out its hundred fery, hissing
serpents, had the effect to send the whole brood
flying upward until it was lost to the sight. In
many instances large numbers, diving in wild con
fusion to the earth, were captured by boys in the
a neighborhood.
s WourDn's nO FO3 A MoaxONW.-A man named
a Henry Heidalek, who had left his wife in Prussia
, and married another in St. Louis, drowned himself
L in a pond in the latter city a few days ago, induced
I. thereto byremornsefr the crtme he had committed.
A few daY previously he informed his wife and
isoe a. l .ftrleadathat he intended to put an end
t ilte life. and he committed the act witth the moast
e resolt determination, drowning' himself in about
dl three feet of water.
LWTasx POoK A T *l tsiO A
Of Z her o e ill. ' fee 0 ,1ge 0.
urn rta to a me Il .
***.4 .. wpe:. t he ..asp . e
bheet temei d l ekto" gs O oni
Wariyleedone54bwhiib e mlo teat l
"weleast on n e .
t·ioa l adrernim ' Ie tlPy;n ~ byea
can membase eaot n3 t
Helper ooklte d s, d a
to aHelper' booek,andne tswnatreeyor nd lfo
hexwet naatef teo vfoqu5 . t ,he ot
pnthr ra . is e hero o o - a.sen T,
moral facts. xIotwe twoI erdaket tese do-e
velopmenta is the a4dlases &lipe! lhs
North, ardthe a.'eseity,o ntepsttof d. h
otiexeiLtg heor aw and iahIats the eea
other dotesot faettaetio e.
The slaus thatheve reqieredte de.t of . -
wattomle Brown l alsed or a terrible exa .pl
not, Inadeed, to asumre the p e 'l deipetostion of
the slave, but to deter the pead tf ties, already
prepared to folloi. theb.oo oots.ee of thti
gladistorilhero. Speaking efthe arpr'a Perry
outbreak, we fnd a le~ding Abolitionist dbcllaing
from the pulpit the New Eni tj ae intimeat as to .
that ementd, asd as tdo eateriat ^ on of a own's
career, to the following unesqvocal and mensaucg k
words:a,
His scheme is no faiure but a sloanesaneom. P
* xey Fromthe murtycdon elBrown dets Na t
new ereof the Antilaery ore. To morel Igi.
tatlon will now be added utpb . argument, l
action. Other devoted nt iel follow in the
wake of Brown, vo.ldng hi err, and willt carry
on-taio foil renulthes iro work he sta a began h
Nothisg,e ar , cou lda mtore powerfully atiest
the necessity of tertib e reper of halh ren
in cases such as Brown's, thar teat pro.
claimed from a New England pulpit. This iseea
Is not the exclamation of one man; iti the echo
ofa publisentiment; itiewhat imse igld atraily
expect after the lavish of sympathj nlate North
upon the wretched hero of Harper's ferry, sod
the parade of the bratish e grit" wifth witar he
did his work of blood as admirahbt a# heroie
courage, His cold aseesolnattons havn been ex
plotted as evidences of 'psourgs " w nev t er -
quarter of the North h arve been heard exg te
of sympathy that one of nuch iheroe traits
die on the vulgar gallows.
The appeals made for the lIfe of O nwato i.
ifrown are understood toare been of the mteteze
treordinary character. They were not only pries
cted by the desperate and despfbee. arneeiis of
feanatiolam-theyaerea toaeforeddbythepettions
of pliantmen of all partlies, who id oonceived .a
weak and dangeros sentmentm of mercy or a mar
derer, who, as is too Often the ease with public a .
sassins, had managed to conceal a rMtignant sad
imbruted heart beneath a poor parade of martyr.
dom.
It I unfortunate, indeed, that much pooealr for
the life of a murderesr, cool and ediu t &1r
bloody work ans ileahery ltosheyeb jopeo et
by parties In thatrthwho alibsh to b othat I
cIrcles of fanatacam, for they attest a
sympathy ihnthat section with Aboli i
that cannot fall to excite and alarm the So ith. I
t not, indeed, ufficlent to arouse the feelisga of al
patriotic men In the Union, when staid Deaiodorat
presses could have been found recommending that
the life of the double-dyed murderer of Harper's
Ferry shohld be spared, for fear that death might
elevate him to the honors of martyrdom with the
opposite political party? Has it, indeed, some to
this, that Northern men will parade as a martyr a
common murderer, whose crime had merited death
under every code of lawas in the world? Has it
come to this, that they will crown and glorify a
wretch with the blood of Southern ctizens smoking
on his garments? Let them do It, if they dare!
The attempt to make a martyr of so vile and re
pulsive a thing as an ssassin will never fail tore- 1
coil upon itself; and the party that devotes the
name of Ossawatomie Brown to Immortalty and
writes it upon its banners, however it may succeed
in its treasonable designs, will only be sunk more
deeply, by such efibrts, in the moral eloth of in
famy and loathsomeness.
Itrust,dearC., yonwill notregard thertlections
I have made as tothe execution of the law Ina caes
such eas that of Brown as uncharitable. I taqt I
am not a stranger to the Christian sentments of
mercy. Standing in need, in my own poor, altnfl
human nature of the forgiveness of Him who seeth
the thoughts of our hearts, I feel my duty to exer
else charity and meroy towards my fellow men.
But there L a limit to mercy; t is not Iieene; it is
a thing beautifuhl, when It Ih dispensed within the
boundaries of justice, but despised when lavished
without distinction or degree. It is a tiice blessed
gift to the weak and penitent; but it Itbut foolish
ness to the hardened wretch, and encouragement
only to the impenitent to go on in crime. For the
wholesale murderer, for the man who was not
driven to a particular crime, but wantonly sought
to assassinate a whole people-for the unfeellng,
unrepentant, defiant assassin, with the red signs of
his craft scarcely faded onhis garment, still athirst
for murder, and still preaching to his fanatical fol
lowers the baptismof blood,there could be no such
beautiful word on earthas mercy.
'Sut Idismiss personal discussions of the ontbreak
of John Brown; I dismiss any canvassing of his
character, or of the justice of his fate. The subject
and the sequel of this outbreak are too grave to be
treated on such issues. The events taking place
around us have a deep, abiding signiicance, cur.
r passing all persenal and local interests, and Ianvolv.
ing, as I believe, the near fate of the Republio.
We of the South, have seen, my dear ftiend, that
the event of the Harper's Ferry outbreak, has
clearly placed the responslibllity of the asatte
nance of-the Union wIth the North. We have ben
looking to the North for efforts to maintain that
Union. We have been looking to it to put dowa
the murderous fanaticisem that lfrowns down upon
rs- btdeettheh etasten.
Wt dtat shernteslaowi is his Sebr bnds,
AsIeye thstsecohemsllil eruesepsa
I, Ftsshte, sea,. Aad et h Mit
Instead of witnessing, however, patrletlo efforts
on the part of the North In this terrble crisis, we
and an outpouring of sympathies for the heroes of
the intersectional war, and a new kindling of the
Ares of civil strife. The crid is, indeed, terrible.
The question of the preservation of ourOonstita
tional Union, is, we repeat, transferred to the
North; and when, in this new situation, of things,
we fnd the terrible excess of Brown, instead of
being ochastised by publio sentiment, hailed in
many quarters with acclamations of glory; its
hero apotheosised, and the pulpits of New
England prostituted to do him honor, there seems,
indeed, but little hope left for the Unlon, and that
I solemn contract made in it "to insure domestle
s tranquility." The consseqencesarewith th North
Let that be understood, above all other leoso of
I the times. If the people of that section will no
now abate their fiaatical war upon the rights 4aa
lives of the Southern people; If they wll pe igh
I in the demolition of her Instatlatlos, and in te
violation of all the fraternal and peaeeht oblige'
tionsof the Constitttin,if ihey Wistillgo tonia
their treasonable work, with their pepetualdes.
rag
ilk:
pldadotir. -+
Jy ha, wi¢ r
it tow 1tipl3~jrQJJ
bothe "iat
uaaocnta~·
t Leii. ,tA .
lavra
of the.tmno
bis Is ofBi ? ' ,
Spa I.a+ *wlawr h~t~
0thi nlfn tthe
The ulip Ade!s
bile. S 8 e puuapb
the sene sy, beaulle New
days irons IV, n r
Teu auel~Aeo
The te :il e tes44e O
Iear, arrived theI
of the l5;6h eabsr vt-,od .
theasgoel
The U. U..tehpCmdy eMs tt
ftt~cosa~g.,c
remained a few t icdf[
obtain stores fromn thae.pa$
The U. S...
H. Badd, ten daysrm s rd
inst.
Capt. G. W.Fiiodsd tC.T
West, will take qhegga% td .
ately proceed is the
where they will bihe g i t
oontlnutngthe trtsglulen of
and the adjaentet re.
The ship S H. Mallornv
sail for Uverpoel Qj*on
The ooboonwrTjdeqa
the Biest; fir winalf~r
Tb..h . 44r:,.
pet h twakthamj = ti
i bak ay C~eeoet io
Toies frea thtedo dlhis eacpe.isq msu$.
TharomoweaPr4thsw al tar ,he
ao ived ispaa --t
E tityBadeeisopab ofo ls)#ý8
Bpree aet
.e l telv ibsr, 7S?; chi
aB brig T.W. Rowandj .5. Ttal ii , U
TIM bqU. aIngu 1 -OWepe tr .a
't cotton from the diBb~et en o tu~a~as a
bgldn ht Mechanic Sb'Sshe~rlsIe
i. col . sa b& ws s; ar
f ndm ei'hed woel L
ours aTholi~p!Ir;·bmw aiiraCmc
rprone o i. an
a at NWOR. - iahf a
r aou bQO1-iiere$ rsen, ei ls,

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