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The National tribune. (Washington, D.C.) 1877-1917, April 01, 1879, Image 1

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SSlo'ifhh, jrwnia dmMtoUu interests of the gatdimi md gibn of the kte war, amf a emioners of the glnited ghfyj.
Published b.y Tho
NATIONAL TRIBUNE COMPANY
Vol. II, No. 4.
WASHINGTON. D. 0.. APRTL. 1879. terms, fifty obntspeb year.
A.rf irf-ru- j .. ' Specimen Copies sent Free on Request.
""" a6trrdin tAtf9ru,, inthtar of our Lord, W3, in tft. Office oths Mr, tan ofthnaru,. at muhtntum, n. a. 4
W
Tho Shore of Tennessee.
Movo my arm-chair, faithful Pomp or
In tho sunshine, bright and strong,
1 or this world Is fading Pompov,
Massu won't bo with you long ;
And I fain would hoar tho south wind
Bring once more tho sound to mc
Of tho wavelets gontly breaking
On tho shores of Tennessee.
Mournful though tho ripples murmur,
As they still tho story tell,
Now no vessels float tho kannkii
That I loved eo long and wkle, :
1 shall llston to tho music
Dreaming i hat again I see,
An? AND Strives on sloop and shallop
Sailing up tho Tennessee.
And Pomp, while Massa's waiting
or doath's last dispatch to come '
If that KXtLED STAKIIV HANNKtt
Should como proudly sailing homo,
You shall givet it, slave no longer,
Voice and hand shall both bo froo
That point and shout to Union colors, -On
the waves of Tonnosseo.
Massa's borry kind to Pompoy
But old darkey's happy heru
Whore he's tended corn and cotton
1 or 'esc many a long gono year.
Over yonder Missis' slooping--
-.V? ono tuuls her grave like mo;
Mebbo sbo would tntes the ilowors
Sho used to love hi Tennessee.
'Pears liko sho wav watching Massa
If Pomp. boshU him stay,
Mobblo she'd remember bettor
Bow for htm alio used to prav,
Telling him that way up yonder,
white as snow his soul should be
If ho served tho Lord of Heaven,
While ho lived iu Tennessee.
Silently tho tears wore rolling
Dovn the poor old dusky lace
As ho stepped beside his master
Iu his longneeustomed place:
Then a sllonco fell around them
As they gazed on rook and tree
Pioturud in tho placid waters
On tho rolling Tennessee.
OMastor, dreaming of tho battle,
When he fought by Marion's side :
When he bid the haughty Tarloton
btoop his lordly crest of pride.
Man, ivmemboriug how yon sloopor
Once he hold upon his Jcnoe
Iia-o she luvod the gallant soldier
ltalph Vornalr, of Tennessee.
Still the south-wind fondlv lingers 4
'Mid tho veteran's silver hair.
Still tho bondmand close beside htui
Stands behind tho old arm-chair, "
While tho dark-huod hand upllftod
Shading eyes, lie bauds to see
Where the wo.diand, boldly jutting
TurnB aside the Tonnosseo.
Thus ho watohos cloud-bom shadows
Glide from troe to mountain crest.
Softly creeping, ayo and ever
To the lover's yioldtng breast ;
Hal above tho foliago yonder
Something flutters wild and freo,
MA8SA I MAS8A J IlAMiBLO-JAtt I
Tub i-jcAo'a Oomk back to Tknnkssbk.
Ponipey hold mo on your shoulder,
Help mo stand on foot onoo moro
That I may salute thk colons
As tlxQw pass my cottage door.
Horo 8,610 papers signod that froos you
Give a freedman'B ahout with rae-.
God and Union bo our watch-word
Evermore in Tennessee.
Then the trombling voico grow fainter
And tho limbs refused to stand.;
Qm?.Wor '? J?sahd tho soldier
Glided to that bettor land,
WHBN THK VLAO WJtNT UP THK IUVKR
Man and master both wore freo
wm,1!?-1? nMo ,ls singled
With tho rippling Tennessee.
(
Up To Snuff."
An exchange says: A genial observer of public men in
the United Statos is amused at tho public doxtority of those
anxious to servo as presidential candidates. If ho is a vet
erau, as well as a gonial observer, ho smilos as ho com
pares those 'prentice hands with tho master of Dolitical
adroitness, Martin Van Buren. pouuioai
looking upon politics as a gamo, Mr. Van Buren, plaved
it with ioreoasb and sagacity, and with the utmost good
nature. No excitement quiekoned his moderation Evan
tho most biting of personal sarcasms failed to rufflo a tem
per that scorned incapable of boiug disturbed
Onco while r. Van Burou, being the Vice-President,
was presiding over tho Sonato, Henry Clay attacked him
m a apoeoh freighted with sarcasm and inycotivo
Mr. Van Buren sat in tho ohair, with a qutet smile upon
his face, as placidly as though ho was listoning to the com
plimentary remarks of a friend.
Tho momont Mr. Olay resumed his seat, a pao handed
him Mr. Van Btiren's snuff-box, with tho remark
"The Vice-President sends his compliments to you, sir."
Tho Senate laughed at tho ooolness of tho man who was
up to snuff." Tho groat orator, sooiug that his efforts
had boon m vain, shook his fingor good-uaturodly at his
imperturbable opponent, and taking a largo pinch of snuff
returned tho box to tho boy, saying : 6 l
. "Give mv COmnlimnnbs tn flin VU.Ti.,n:,u..t j .. ..
vhni; T liira Mu ur.niv i.,i. i...... .kj'k-., .... :. sav
,- - ,, v. muu uuutui wian'uia poucios.
My Midnight Peril.
A THKILLINO SKKTCH OK BACKWOODS LIFK.
The night of the 17th of October shall I ever forgot
ltS mtohv darkness, tlmrnnrnf tha nttf.nm'nnl t?iir1 -K.,rt.,.l.
the lonely forests, and the incessant downpour of rain? 1
"TlilS COmOS Of Short CUtS." T mnttororl tn rnvrtnlf. n. I
I ploddtid along, keeping close to the trunks of tho trees
to avoid the ravine, through which I could hear tho roar
of tho turbulent stream forty or fifty feet below. My
blood ran cold as I thought what might be the possible
consequence of a misstep or a move in the wrong direc
tion. YYllV had I not boon Rnntnntorl fn Irrmn in 4-1, r,ir,Ui-
road ?
nold on ! Was that a light, or are my eyes playing mo
xaiso i
I stopped, holding on to tho low, resinous houghs of a
hemlock that grow on the edge of the bank, for it actual
ly seemed that the wiud would seize me bodily and hurl
mo down the precipitnus descent.
f It was a light, thank Providence ! it was a light, and no
ignis fatuus to lure me on to destruction and death.
"Hallo-o-o I"
My voice rang through the woods liko a clarion.
I plunged on through the tangled vines, dense briers,
and rocky banks, until, gradually ncaring, I could per
ceive a figuro wrapped in an oil-cloth cloak, or capo, car
rying a lantern. As the dim light fell upon his face I al
most recoiled. Would not solitude in tho woods bo pref
erable to the conipauiouship of this withered, wrinkled
old man ? But it was too late to recede now.
"What's wanting?" he snarled, with a peculiar motion
of the lips, that seemed to leave his yellow teeth all bare.
I am almost lost in the woods; can vou direct mo to
R station ? "
Yes ; R station is twelve miles from here."
"Twelve miles I
1 stood aghast.
" "Vno 'J
A. V.T
. Lin. J0a teli m? of an telter-l could .ohtain for the
night?" ' 'as;jr ,, : J ,& "
" Where are you going? "
"To Drew's, down by tho Maple swamp."
"Is it a tavern?"
"No."
,, miG Ulge? J- could pay them
His oyes gleamed j tho yellow stumps stood revealed
onco moro. ' 1
" I guess so ; folks don't stop there."
" It is not far from hero ?"
" Not very ; about half a mile. "
" Thou make haste and let us reach it. I am dfenched
to tho skin."
We plodden on, my companion' moro than keeping paco
with me. Presently we loft the edgo of the ravine, Enter
ing what seemed liko a trackless wood, and keeping
",.. uu UUW1 tuw gnw gieamett littully through the
wet foliage.
It was a ruinousold place, with the windows all drawn
to one sido, as if the foundation had settled, and the pil
lars of a rude porch nearly rotted away.
A woman answered my fellow-traveler's knock. My
wmpuum wuwjjoj.tju j woru or two to ner, and sho turned
to mo with smooth, voluble words of welcome.
Sho regretted the poverty of her accommodations : but
I was wolcome to them, such as they were.
" Whore is Isaac? demanded my guide.
" Ho is not come in yet.'.'
I sat down on a wooden bench beside tho fire and ate a
few mjouthtuls of bread.
" I should liko to retire as soon as possible," I said, for
my weariness was excessive
w, uuly lhQ wman started up with alacrity,
ci tt T iU? y SiQS t0 pufc him ?" askod fcho S&'u
J OUilllt (Jul
" Put him iu Isaac's room."
"No."
"It's tho most comfortable."
"I toll you 'no.' "
But here I intoruptcd tho whispored colloquy.
I am not particular I don't caro where you lodge mo
only mako haste "
So I was conducted up a steep lnddor that stood in the
corner of tho room into an apartment, ceiled with sloped
beams and ventilated by ono small window, whoro a cot
bedstead, crowded oloso against tho board partition, and
a pine table, with two or three chairs, formed tho solo at-
vw. ..(.w .. ii! lliwilU.
IIM. . .
the table.
guide.
Iho woman sot tho lightan old oil lamp-on
Anything moro that I can givo, sir?"
"Nothitlir. thank vnn
m'i wllVr l0Ck hthJ? ra?minSi f yow Paso, I must
walk oyer to R station in timo for the sovou o'clock
ox)ress.
" I'll bo suro to call you, sir."
Sho withdrew, leaving mo alone in tho gloomy little
apartmont. 1 sat down with no very agreeable sonsation.
I will slfc down and write to Alice," I thought : " that
will sootho my nerves and quiet mo, perhaps "
I descended tho ladder; tin fire still glowed redly on tho
hearth boneath; my companion and tho woman sat uosido it
iu!lS 'Hl r "Jj a third person sat at tho table
OatUlff a Short. 8tnit. v In inniK.I.:, v. . ...i n.--.
uol shirt ud muddy trousers. '
I asked for writing materials, and returned to my room
to wnto ray wife.
" My dear Alice"
I paused and laid down my pen as I concluded tho words,
half smiling to think what she would say could she kuow
of my strange quarters.
Not till both sheets wore covered did I lay aside my pen
and prepare for slumber. As I folded my paper 1 hap-
j;ujiou w giauce cowam the, couch.
Was it the gleam ot a human eyo observing mo through
tho board partition, or was it my own fancy? There was
a crack there, but only black darkness beyond, yet I could
havo sworn that something had sparkled balefully at me.
I took out my watch. It was one o'clook. It was
scarcely worth while for mo to undress for three hours'
sleep. I would lie down in my clothes and snatch what
slumber I could. So, placing my valise at the head of my
bed, aud barricadiug the lockless door with two chairs, L
extinguished the light aud lay down.
At first I was wakeful, but gradually a soft drowsiness
seemed to steal over me like a misty mantle, until all of a
suddeu some startling electric thrill coursed through my
veins, aud I sat up, excited and trembling.
A luminous softness seemed to glow tnrough tho room
no light of the moon or tho stars was ever so penetrating
and by the little window I saw Alice, my wife, dressed
in floating garments of white, with her long, golden hair
knotted back by a blue ribbon. Apparently she was com
ing to mo with outstretched hands and eyes full of wild,
anxious tenderness.
I sprang to my feet and rushed towards her; but as I
reached the window the fair apparition seemed to vanish
into tho stormy darkness, and L was left alone. At tho
SaillO illStanh tllO rnnnrh nC n. nicfn! cnnnrlni T nmilrl eno Mia
jagged stream of fire abovo the pillow, straight through
rtr " wuere, cen seconds since, my head had lain.
u ithan instantaneous realization of my danger, 1 swung
myself over tho odga of the window, jumping some eight
or ten feet into tangled bushes below, and as I crouched
there, recovering my breath I heard the trainpof footsteps
into my room.
"Is he dead ? " cried a voice up the ladder the smooth,
deceitful voici of the woman with the half-closed eyes.
" Of course he is," growled a voice bade ; that charge
would havo killed ten men. A light there, quick ? arid
tell Tom to bo ready."
A cold, agonizing shudder ran through me. What a
den of midnight murderers had 1 fallen into I And how
fearfully narrow had been my escape ! "
With the speed that only mortal terror can give i rushed
through the wood, uow illuminated by a faint glimmer of
starlight. I know not what impulse guided my footsteps.
I never Shall know how m:mv 'timns T nmttsntl tnv iwvn
track, or how close I stood to the ravine j but a merciful
P.-ovidence encompassed me with a guiding aud protecting
care, for when tho morning dawned, with faint, red bars
of orient light against tho stormy eastern sky, I was close
to the high road, some seven miles from R .
Oncost the town, I told my story to the police, and a
detachment was sent with me to the spot.
Aicor much searching and mauy talse alarms we suc
ceeded in finding the ruinous old housot but it was empty,
our birds had flown ; uor did I recover my valise' and
watch and chain, which latter 1 had left under my pillow.
" it's Drew's gang," said the leader of the police, "and
they've troubled us these two years. I don't think, though,
they'll come back hero just at present.
Nor did they.
But tho strangest part of ray story is yet to como. Some
three weeks subsequently I received a letter from my sis-,
ter, who was with Alice iu her English home a letter
whoso intelligence filled mo with surprise.
"I must toll you something very strange," wrote my
sister, that happoued on tho night of the 17th of October.
Alice had not been woll for some time ; m faot, she had
been confined to her bed for nearly a week, and I was sit
ting beside her reading. It was lato ; the clock had struck
ono, when all at ouco she seemed to faint away, growing
white nndjrigid as a corpse. I hastened to call assistauca ;
but all our efforts to restore animation were in vain. I
was just about sending for the doctor, when hor senses
rotumed as suddenly as they had left her, and she sat up
iu bed, pushing up her hair and looking wildly around
her.
"'Alice,' I exclaimed, 'how you have terrified us all t
Are you ill ?
k Not ill,' sho answered, but I feel so strange. Gra
de, I havo been with my husband ! '
"And all of our reasonings failed to couvinco her of tho
impossibility of her assertions. Sho persists to this mo
ment that sho saw you aud was with you on tho morning
of tho 18th of October, Whoro aud how she cannot toll,
but wo think it must havo boou in a droatu. Sho is bet
ter now aud I wish you could seo how fast she is improv
ing "
This is my plain, unvarnished tale. I do not protond
to explain or account for its mysteries. I simply relate
tacts. Let psychologists unravel tho Jabyriuthical skein.
I am not superstitious, neither do I believe in ghosts,
wraiths or apparitions, but this thing I do kuow that al
though my wife was in England in body, on tho morning
of the 18th of October, her spirit surely stood before mo
in New X ork in the moment of tho deadly peril that men
aced mo. It maybe that to tho aubtlo instinct and strength
fc m. ,nuo uwij xuvuuu uuugs aro possiDio : but Alice
Huroly saved my life. . N
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