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The Princeton union. (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, December 14, 1899, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1899-12-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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Land Agent.
CITIZENS STATE BANK.
(INCORPORATED) OF PRINCETON, fllNNESOTA.
W.P.CHASE,
flanager.
Paid Up Capital
Surplus,
Fine Hardwood Lands, Meadows and Open Lands, at
Low Prices and on Easy Terms, for sale by
The Great Northern and
St. Paul & Duluth Railroad Companies.
For Maps, Prices, and any other information,
write to
M. S. RUTHERFORD,
^^SS3$Q$QQQ$Q$$$Q$$$$$Q$
Woodcock & Oakes, w.
rianufacturers of
PINE CREAM
^(tM?MtW(tWMtMt\^
$30,000
5,000
A General Banking Business
Transacted.
Loans Made on Approved Se
curity.
Interest
BANK O PRINCETON. I
J. J. SKAHEN, Cashier and Manager.
Does a General Banking Business.
Collecting and Farm and
Paid on Time De
posits.
Foreign
change. S. S. PETTERSON, Pres.
T. H. CALEY, Vice Pres.
Q. A. EATON, Cashier.
Insurance. Village Loans.
SSSQQQSSSSSQQSSSQQ&QQQQSQQ
i Railroad Lands
Princeton, Minn.
iir /~v A. W. Woodcock
BRICK
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA
Manufacturers and
Wholesale Dealers in
White Pine Lumber,
Lath and Shingles.
Also Sash, Doors, Mouldings and a Com*
plete Stock of Building Material.
2 HOLDS REGULAR
Office and Yards:
Woodcock's Spur
Foley Bean Lumber
Company
PRINCETON.
E. HARK LIVE STOCK COHPANY
^TJCTIOIJ SptES
AT PRINCETON ON THE FIRST SATURDAY
OF EACH MONTH.
Fifty Good Young Horses and Mules Constantly on Hand.
Private Sales Dally.
Time Given on Approved Paper.
E. MARK, Auctioneer.
R. C. DUNN, Publisher. Terms $1.00 per Year. PRINCETON, MILLE LACS COUNTY, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1899.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
C.TARBOX, M. D., ""7"?~
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.^
Member of State Board of Medical Examiners.
Surgeon of Q. N. and E M. Ry.
U* S. Pension Examining Board meets 1st
Wednesday of each month at office over Pio
neer Drue Store Telephone 18,
Princeton, Minn.
T.
L. ARMITAOE, M. D.,
M. a C.,Q: a B. and T. a D.
Offloe in Townsond's Block.
Hours: to 12 A. M. 2 to 0 P. M.
Residence Kately house, near Roller Mill.
Princeton. ""Minn.
J.A.
and Domestic Kx-
ROSS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office in Carew Block,
Main Street, Princeton.
J.L.
BRADY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Offices at Princeton, Minn., and
306 Globe Bidg., Minneapolis, Minn.
L. CORMANY,
ATIOBNEY AT LAW.
Office in Tovnsend Block.
Princeton. Minn.
BUSINESS CARDS.
^HAPMAN[""& KALiHER,
BARBER SHOP & BATH ROOMS.
A fine line of Tobacco and Cigars.
Main Street, Princeton.
A.C.
SMITH'S
OLD RELIABLE MEAT MARKET
Is the place to get choice fresh and salt meats,
I deal in the best and my prices are reasonable.
First door west of Citizens State Bank
First Street, Princeton.
E.
A. ROSS,
UNDERTAKER.
Coffins and Caskets, from the cheapest to the
best grades always on hand.
An embalming fluid used which brings dis
colored corpses back to natural color.
Also-dealer in granite and marble monuments.
Princeton. Minn.
Livery, Sale and Feed Stable.
E. p: CLAGQBTT,
PRINCETON, MINN.
That fit and wear.
Everything Feet.
tried our
for the
SOLOMON LONG
D. BYERS,
Dealer in
I general Merchandise
Have sou. 35
ea
$2.25
Apples from upwards.
Have you seen our all wool QQ/9
Buffalo Flannel at........ iJ&Xjt
40c i
Our all wool, 54 inch dress
goods can't be beat at
Call on us for
Xmas Bargains.
-THE
One PriceStore I
t
O.H.BUCK O.J. CRAVENS
BUCK & CRAVENS,
Blacksmiths.
All kinds of Blacksmithing neatly
and promptly done. We make a
specialty of
HORSESHOEING and
PLOW WORK.
first Street, PRINCETON.
HERMAN NEUMAN I
Special attention given to Horse-'
shoeing and repair work.
Wagon and Carriage work war
ranted to give satisfaction.
Opposite Caley's Store
Princeton, Minn.
C$ WT GET THEM.
Sections Sixteen and Thirty-Six in the
Milie Lacs Reservation Are
School Lands.,
Under Section Eighteen of the Organic
Act of riinnesota the Title Is
Vested in the State.
An article, taken from the St. Cloud
Journal-Pres$, appeared in the UNION
of, the 30th ult., which has given rise
to considerable misunderstanding. The
article in question stated that several
parties had offered filings with the
intention of securing homesteads on
lands in sections 16 and 36 in the Mille
Lacs reservation,.so-called. The arti
cle should have stated that the officers
of" the St. Cloud land office gave the
would-be homesteaders no encourage
ment whatever, but, on the contrary
informed them that the title to 16 and
36 was vested in the State beyond the
perad\enture,of a doubt.
There is not a shadow of a doubt
about' the State's title to sections 16
and 36 in the reservation. Section 18
of the Organic Act of Minnesota i*eads
as-follows:
"And be it further enacted, That when
the lands in said territory shall be
surveyed under the direction of the
government of the United States, pre
paratory to bringing the same into
market, sections numbered sixteen and
thirty-six in each township in said ter
ritory shall be and the same are hereby
reserved for the purpose of being ap
plied to schools in said territory, and
in the State and territories hereafter
to be erected out of the same/'
Subdivision one of section five of the
act authorizing a State government
reads:
VT-h-dt sections numbered sixteen
and thirty-six in every township of
public land in said State, and where
'either-pf said sections, or any part
thereof, has been sold or otherwise dis-
po^d^f, other lands equivalent there
to^andias contiguous as may be, shall
be^graited to said State for thev-use of
scbj0oisi'!
Subsequent legislation by congress
.prOvidejd that 'where settlers had
SPtB&itmoir^ectiQns 16 and 36, or any
part-thereof, prior to the survey of the
same, the squatters should be per
mitted to remain in possession of the
same, and the State would have the
right to select lands in lieu thereof.
The moment the Indian title to the
lands in the Mille Lacs reservation
was extinguished the State's title to
sections 16 and 36 attached, and cer
tainly the United States government
holds that the Indians' title to the
Mille Lacs reservation has been ex
tinguished, and that the lands con
tained therein are part of the public
domain. The State's title to sections
16 and 86 in the reservation cannot be
successfully questioned. The secretary
of the interior has held that the State
is not entitled to sections 16 and 36 in
the Red Lake reservation, but that is
an altogether different proposition, and
that decision has been appealed from
by the State, and the appeal is now
pending in the supreme court of the
United States.
The individual who wastes time and
money in attempting to secure a home
stead on school lands in the Mille Lacs
reservation is extremelv foolish.
Country Newspapers.
In view of the fact that very few
people have but a faint idea of the
amount of work required to get out a
newspaper, von a country newspaper,
the appended article from an ex
change will make interesting reading:
"One of our exchanges that has tak
en pains to look up the business has
arrived at the conclusion that there
should be no errors in the newspaper.
In an average colum. there are 15.000
pieces -of type. An average country
newspaper sets about 200,000 pieces of
type, all to be picked up and stood
ritrht side up with care. These in
turn must be replaced in the case,
which necessiates the handling of
400,000 pieces of type each issue. Now,
in the first place, if the editor gets
correct information, and he writes it
properly, and the compositor sets it up
right, and' if the galley boy knows
enough to take a decent proof, and if
the proof reader marks the errors and
these are properly corrected, aqd if
the maker gets things in the right
place, and. if the pressman isn't too
careless, and the pres? doesn't mash
the letterswhy 'tis easily seen how
unnecessary are typographical errors,
and how .easy it is to run a newspaper.
If someone hands in ah article that
looks like a Chinese puzzle or a Heb
rew death warrant, and the publisher
is- holding his forms for the matter
and. the com'pdsitor gets a couple, of
words changed, then listen to the
howl. The contributor, gets warm
under the collar and says all kinds of
uncomplimentary things about your
rag. But such is life in a printshop'.."
Red Winy Republican.
A STRICKEN HERD.
Splenic Apoplexy Appears Down in Sher
burne County.
Several cases of spleriie apoplexy de
veloped last week in the herd of
W. P. Brenrian, who lives on the old
Healy farm in Baldwin. The first four
cows affected died within a few hours
after the appearance of the disease but
since- then no deaths have occurred.
Dr Neumann, who was called in the
case, took prompt measures, quaran
tining the farm and administering pre
ventatives to those of the herd display
ing symptoms.
The'disease is very contagious and
is also a very dangerous one, few cat
tle surviving if ooce affected, It is
caused by eating- decayed vegetation
and this appearance of the disease is
attributed to the fact. that the herd
affected had been allowed* to run
around the shores of) the lakes in that
vicinity^ where there is an abundance
of.decayed vegetation in the wash.
While 4t usually makes its* appear
ance among cattle first the contagion
will spread to Other domestic animals
and with equal fatality.
The disease is by no means a comr
mon one, there being but one previous
outbreak in this vicinity on record,
and that occurred about
ago near St. Cloud.
The State board of health has been
notified but nothing has yet been heard
from,that body.
seven years
MAKING IMPROVJEMENTS.
The Princeton Roller Mill Company Wiil
Have a New Steam Plant.
The Princeton Roller Mill company
has a crew of men at work on a new
building about thirty feet east of the
mill proper where it is planned to lo
cate a new steam plant. The building
will be 28x30 feet, one story high, and
built of solid, brick. The danger of
fire is considerably lessened by the ar
I'angement. 'The company proposes to install a
T^horse power plant, consisting of a
Beynotds-Corliss engine of the latest
-tqodel, a new boiler, heater, pumps,
etc., and the change will almost double
the power of the plant." /The
^iilbe^h^et^
drive, the rope being an endless affair
measuring about 750 feet.
The improvement necessitates the
outlay of considerable cash but the
company considers that it will be a
paying investment in the end.
Plans for Christmas.
The non-sectarian Christmas enter
tainment given last year was so thor
oughly satisfactory to all concerned
that it is proposed to repeat it this
year and arrangements have been
made to hold it in Jesmer's opera
house, Saturday evening, Dec. 23,
An appropriate program of exercises
is being prepared, that part of the
work being given the teachers of the
public schools. Those who attended
last,year will remember the teachers
provided a very pleasant and appro
priate entertainment and this year the
program will be equally good.
The projectors are keeping the plans
for the entertainment of the children
a deep secret, but assure the UNION
that the little ones will have a
pleasant surprise when the time comes.
These public gatherings are to be com
mended, for nothing so welds the
bonds of common sympathy as they do.
Last night the UNION was informed
that owing to sickness in the village
there was some talk of abandoning the
affair. There are a few cases of con
tagious sorethroat in town and if this
spreads the plans will be given up.
If, however-, there is no increase of
sickness everything will be carried out
according to program. Everyone
should lend a hand in this entertain
ment for it will be the means of mak
ing a lot of little folks happy, who
might have a very meager Christmas
otherwise. Let .those who are pro
vided for, give a little for the benefit
of their less favored neighbors.
Life Insurance.
In this age when the cost of frater
nal insurance is so small, every man,
with a family depending upon him,
falls short of his duty if he fails to pro
vide this protection for them in case Of
death: and many thousands of helpless
widows and orphans would be left des
titute were it not for the noble work
and timely help of the fraternal bene
ficiary societies. If you are not in
sured, now is the time while strong
and healthy. In a few days or a few
weeks you may be unable to" pass the
medical examination. If you are now
insured and desire more protection,
there is none better than the Modern
Samaritans. The fraternal features of
the order are alone worth all it costs
to carry a $2,000 certificate *v'
VOLUHE XXIV. NO. 1.
A LITTLEJ. R, TALK
A Newspaper Story of a Proposed
Railroad to Anoka and the
Twin Cities.
The Great Northern Is Talking of Giv-
ing Princeton a Day Train Ser-
vice Once More.
The Minneapolis Times of Tuesday^
contained the following article con
cerning railroad accommodations from
Princeton:
"A company of prominent local men
has been organized to build a steam
railroad from Gamden Place in North
Minneapolis to Princeton, Minn., a
distance of sixty miles. Woric will be
commenced in the spring, and the com
pany will guarantee, to the people of
Anoka and Princeton and the- other
towns that will be reached the early
completion of the line and at least two
trains eaeh way a day.
^'The company is prepared to spend
$25,000 on the line. From Camden
Place to Anoka it will probably run
over the roadbed that has been in part
finished by the promoters of the Min
neapolis and Champlin electric line,
and, after reaching Anoka, it will run
to the northwest, taking in a large
number of small towns on the way to
Princeton.
"The line is being built primarily
for passenger service, but it is ex
pected that after it is in running order
freight will also be carried.
"The gauge will be the same as that
on the regular railway lines, so that if
it is found desirable cars may be
switched to the old lines and brought
right into the city.
"The line will be in no way con
nected with the street railway com
pany of this city, but will be owned
and operated by persons not in any
way interested in the street railway."
A Princeton man who was in the city
the first of (the
vr r&i
week reports that it
was rumored there that the new com
pany were talking of using gasoline as
a motive power with an equipment
similar to those used so successfully in
California. This furnishes a cheap
power and the engines are capable of
this seems a little too good to be be
lieved.
The business men of Princeton will
give the road their support and the
.village will do its share toward mak
ing- such a line possible.
TALKING OF TRAINS.
Mr. Hill May Give Us a Day Train Soon on
the Old Line.
Yesterday morning Agent Rice was
busily engaged in Interviewing the
business men of the village, his work
being to discover what hour would suit
most of the patrons of the road for the
arrival of a day train. The company
is considering the advisability of giv
ing us a daylight service, but Mr.
Rice was not able to say when such a
service would be established. He did
not know whether it meant that the
day train would be changed to the old
route or whether a new local train
would be put on for our benefit. If
such a service should be given us the
night train would probably be run over
the cut-off.
Princeton considers its mail service
the mosi important thing so any train
which will give us our eastern mail
some time in the forenoon and an in
terval of a couple of hours to allow
time to prepare correspondence in re
ply will be acceptable.
Of Interest to Pensioners.
The pension department has adopted
a new rule" which makes it absolutely
necessary for pensioners to take their
certificates to the notary or magistrate
who executes their quarterly vouchers.
The number of the certificate is no
longer inserted on the vouchers at the
pension office, but must be written in
by the magistrate when the voucher is
executed. This, therefore, makes it
absolutely necessary to take their
certificate. It is quite likely tha*t for
some time this new ruling will cause
some delay at pay day, for there will
be many who will forget all about
^heir certificates and will have to wait
until they can go. back home after
them as there is a heavy fine waiting
the magistrate who executes the
vouchers, if he is caught at it.Red
Wins Bepublican.
James MeKenzie returned the first
of the week from an extended trip jn
the northern" wilds of this State. Jim
says that he never had a better trip so
far as the weather was concerned, as it
has not been cold enough to make
sleeping out doors uncomfortable. The
crew were also able to travel by water,
doing away with hard tramps and. hard
packing.
IS
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