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The Princeton union. (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, December 21, 1899, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1899-12-21/ed-1/seq-1/

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Land Agent.
flanufacturers of
PINE CREAM
S
IMBWWW***^
W. P. CHASE,
flanager.
CITIZENS STATE BANK.
(INCORPORATED) OF PRINCETON, niNNESOTA.
Paid Up Capital
Surplus,
J.J. SKAHEN. Cashier and Manager.
Pine Hardwood Lands, Meadows and Open Lands, at
Low Prices and on Easy Terms, for sale by
The Great Northern and
St. Paul & Duluth Railroad Companies.
For Maps, Prices, and any other information,
write to
M. S. RUTHERFORD,
^S$Q&$$S$QQS$SS$S$$$Q$$S$
$30,000
,5,000
A. General Banking Business
Transacted.
Loans Made on Approved Se
curity.
Interest Paid on Time De
posits.
Foreign
change.
^^^1(K^^^^i^^^^^^^^1^^^1^^^i^
I BANK O PRINCETON. I
S. S. PETTERSON, Pres.
T. H. CALEY, Vice Pres.
G. A. EATON, Cashier.
Doe a Genera Bankin Business.
Collecting and Farm and
Insurance. Village Loans,
Railroad Lands
Princeton, Minn.
\/\l/ \l/ \l/ vl/\/\l/ x/\l/ \l/ vl/\l/ vfe \li\/il/\l/ il/il/\|/\|/ \fc\|/\|/
1 Woodcock & Oakes, fc.ttSSf* I
5 2
BRIC
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA
Foley Bean Lumber
Company
Manufacturers and
Wholesale Dealers in
White Pine Lumber,
Lath and Shingles.
Also Sash, Doors, Mouldings and a Com
plete Stock of Building material.
*vvvvvvvv**vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvwvvvvvvv*%vvvvvvv IE. HARK LIVE STOCK COHPANY'
S HOLDS REGULAR
AT PRINCETON ON THE FIRST SATURDAY
OF EACH MONTH.
5 Fifty Good Young Horses and Mules Constantly on Hand.
Private Sales Dally.
Time Given on Approved Paper.
Office and Yards:
Woodcock's Spur
PRINCETON.
E. MARK, Auctioneer.
R. C. DUNN, Publisher. Terms $1.00 per Year. PRINCETON, MILLE LACS COUNTY, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1890
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
c. TAwabxrM. DM
0:
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Member of State Board of Medical Examiners.
Surgeon of G. N. and E. M. Ry.
U. S. Pension Examining Board meets 1st
Wednesday of each month at office over Pio
neer Drug Store.. Telephone 18,
Princeton. Minn.
T.u
ARM1TAGE, M, D
M. c. a, Q. a B. mm T. a
Office in Townsond's Block.
Hours: 9 to 12 A.M. SJtoilP.
Residence Kately house, near Roller Mill.
Princeton. Minn.
J.A.
and Domestic Ex-
ROSS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office in Carew Block,
Main Street. Princeton.
I L.BRADY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Offices at Princeton, Minn.,'and
306GloDeBldg., Minneapolis, Minn!
M.L.
CORMANY,
A TIORNEY AT LA W.
Office in Townsend1
Livery, Sale and Feed Stable.
E. D. CLAGGETT,
PRINGETON^^MIN^
SHOES
That fit and wear.
Everything for theone
1 I*
SOLOMON LONG
rTTTTTTTT'
R. D. BYER5,
Dealer in
fjeneral Merchandise
Have you QKA ip 0a
tried our OOv \3Cui
Apples from lp0 upwards.
Have you seen our all wool QQ/9
Buffalo Flannel at OOlsl
40c I
Our all wool, 54 inch dress
goods can't be beat at
Call on us for
Xmas Bargains,
THE
On Price Store
OH. BUCK O.J. CRAVENS
BUCK & CRAVENS,
Blacksmiths.
All kinds of Blacksmithing neatly
and promptly done. We make
specialty of
I HERMAN NEUMAN
4
$
-a
HORSESHOEING and
PLOW WORK.
First street. PRINCETON.
Special attention given to Horse
A shoeing and repair work
Wagon and Carriage work war
ranted to give satisfaction.
4 Opposite Oaley's Store.
Princeton,
Minn}
A FARMERS' SCHOOL,
The State Farmers' Institute Will Be
Held in Princeton Thursday and
%y Friday January 25 and 26.
Every Farmer and Stock Raiser Near
|(,Princeton Should Plan' to At-
4
Block.
Princeton. Minn.
BUSINESS CARDS.
*HAPMA & KALIHER,
BARBER SHOP & BATH ROOMS.
A fine line of Tobacco and Cigars.
Main Street, Princeton.
C. SMITH'S
9
0
OLD RELIABLE MEAT MARKED
Is the place to get choice fresh and salt meats.
I deal in the best and my prices are reasonably.
First door west of Citizens State Bank.
First Street. Princeton.
E.
A. ROSS,
UNDERTAKER.
Coffins and Caskets, from the cheapest to the
best grades always on hand.
An embalming fluid used which brings dis
colored corpses back to natural color.
Also dealer in granite and marble monuments.
Princeton, Minn.
tend Every Session.
The State farmers' institute will be
held in the village of Princeton, Thurs
day and Friday, Jan. 25 and 26, com
mencing at 10 a. ra. sharp. Every
farmer should -make his plans so that
he can be in attendance during the
entire session. Two days spent in at
tendance at a farmers' institute may
result jn the adoption of methods, the
value of which cannot be estimated.
At the, farmers' institute you will meet
those who have traveled the rough
and rocky road of experience, and they
will try to aid you in avoiding some of
the many difficulties they had to en
counter.
rv
Thousands and thousands of dollars
are annually lost in Minnesota to the
masses by not knowing the practical
methods of the most successful farm
ers,'jvhich are "guide boards" to all
otjhers, when heeded. All methods
that have proven failures should be set
up as "danger signals,'' to prevent
others from falling into the same
errors.
The State farmers' institute is our
traveling school of agriculture, which
brings to our very doors the experi
ences, means and methods for the best
known practical results. It is all free,
no collections and no charges.
At the close of the first forenoon
sesston, a very valuable book of over
850 pages (the Institute Annual), de
voted to agriculture, stock raising,
horticulture, dairying, sheep hus
bandry, swine husbandry, poultry
raising, domestic economy,, etc., etc.
Will be given free. This book is esti
mated by those who have carefully,
examined it, to be well worth from
$5.00 to $25.00 to those interested in
the subjects therein contained No
fariper should miss this gift. Ladies
and young people ai-e especially in-
yibe^jv..^.^ "_.
r^mwineSOta Stale farmers' ihstltutes,
supported by an appropriation for the
purpose, have become so familiar with
the thousands upon thousands of farm
ers of the State that it would seem
almost a waste of time to refer to the
merits they justly deserve. But there
may he some who have not attended
of these institutes, and are noteffect.
fully iaware of the good they are doing
over Minnesota, consequently we here
refer briefly to a few of the many fea
tures of the work.
The work aimed at in the institute is
of the most practical character, and
none but those who have .had the nec
essary experience are retained as in
structors.
The work on the farm will be duly
considered, from the proper tilling of
soil to the preparation of the crop for
the market. All the stock on the
farm will receive due attention in the
institute work, by those who will
speak from practical experience.
Breeding, feeding care and handling
especially considered in its varied
details.
That Minnesota is yet destined to be
come a practical fruit producing state
there is now no question. This work
at the farmers' institute will be repre
sented by one of great experience.
There is need of all the information
we can get to prevent the further
spread of hog cholera. Town boards
and health officers are particularly
urged to attend these institutes for the
good of the communities in which they
exert an influence.
The various crops of grain grown on
the farm will be duly considered for
the least injury to the'soil, and most
profit to the producer. All the useful
grasses wjll be considered, for their
value to the soil and feeding qualities
clover
especially.
The cultivation of farm crops in con
nection "j with a vigorous growth and
the destruction of "weeds," is a feature
of institute work that is of great im-
portance:'-"
Many hesitate to ask oral questions
and for all such the question box is
their source of information. Prepare
your questions in* writing at your leis
ure on what you want to know, and
put them in the question box then at
the proper time the questions will be
distributed to the parties in whose de
partment they properly belong, and
they will" be read and answered, so the
whole audience will get the benefit.
The hours for holding institutes
proper is from 10:00 a. m., sharp to
12:00 m., and from 2:00 p. in., sharp
to 4:00 p. nr. ^^Every hour will be rich
:^.^^iSk *&^&*3l^
in instruction. and should not be
missed. .j'
There will bo no' fixed programme,
but the Work will be confined largely
to the wants of the locality conse-'
quently the importance of being there
continuously. No fees or charges of
any sort are exacted. It is absolutely
free to all who attend.
Keith Won.
In the case of Mille Lacs Lumber
company vs. Keith tried here at: the
April 1899 term of the district etiurt
resulting in the dismissal of the action
by Judge Searle at the close of the
plaintiff's case, a motion for a new
trial was denied by the court and the
plaintiff appealed. The supreme court
on Dec. 15 files the following opinion
sustaining the ruling of Judge Searle:
"The Mille Lacs Lumber company,
appellant, vs. Charles Keith et al.,
respondent.
While K. was in the'plaintiff's em
ploy in the year 1884, he examined the
titles to lands in a certain county
which* plaintiff corporation then
claimed to own.' He then wrote a let
ter to in which he reported the title
of the plaintiff perfect to a certain
tract. He had no abstract of title
when making, his examination and
relied upon the grantor and grantee
reception books kept by the register of
deeds, as by law required. The con
veyances on record noted and entered
In these books showed plaintiff's title
to the land to be perfect, but as a mat
ter of fact there had been recorded,
but not noted or entered in either of
these reception books, a deed of con
veyance to one D., which rendered
plaintiff's title or claim of title of no
value. K. did not discover this and no
claim is made that he was negligent
in not discovering the record of such a
deed. Nor is it contended that he did
not act in perfect good faith when
searching.the records and when writ
ing the letter.
Eleven years after leaving plaintiff's
employ K., in good faith, bought the
land, with several other tracts, from
one S., who was supposed to .be the
grantee of D.,and obtained a convey
ance from him. In an action brought
by plaintiff against K. and also against
other persons to whom he had con
veyed, it is held that K. cannot be ad
judged to have been a trustee of the
land for the plaintiff on the ground of
the former relations existing between
them. Order affirmed. Collins. J.
Look Out For Trouble.
Dairy Inspector Chad bourne has
been warning the merchants this week
of the near approach of the time when
the new baking powder law goes into
A law was passed by the last
legislature requiring each can of pow
der to bear a label showing just what
ingrediemts are contained in the com
pound and providing for the prosecu
tion of dealers who attempt to sell pow
der without such labels. This law will
be put in force Jan. 1, and the food and
dairy department propose to rigidly
enforce its provisions. All the mer
chants in the State have had notice
and if they have not already complied
with the law they should do so at
once. It is understood that two firms
will fight the law and through chem
many merchants may get into trouble.
The fine is fixed at not less than $25
aqd imprisonment, is also provided for.
One of Pope's Good Things.
Indian Commissioner Jones is pre
paring a bill which will be presented
to congress for authority to pay
theone
Mille Lacs Indians the money ex
pended by them in the improvements
of the reservation. If this money is
paid over to the Indians they have
agreed to abandon the reservation to
the government. The Indians will
accept allotments on the White Earth
reservation or take up other public
land.Minneapolis Times.
"The money expended by the Indi?
ans in improvements of. the reserva
tion" is a huge joke but the scheme
will undoubtedly be pushed through
and Mora will have still another cele
bration while the money lasts.
Smallpox in Oxford.
Two cases of smallpox are reported
in the. town of Oxford, Isanti county,
and it is understood every precaution
is being used to confine the contagion
to the people now sick. Throughout
southern Minnesota the disease is
quite prevalent, and in some sections
a strict quarantine is being enforced
against the towns themselves. There
are also a number of cases in the Twin
cities, but little is being said about
them.North Brandt Revieie.
-ft
Fire Department Reorganized.
The meeting of the fire department
held for the election of officers 'occur
red laBt Saturday night and resulted
in a choice of anew staff of officials
clear through. Postmaster %Cordiner
was elected chief, although he pro
tested that there would doubtless be
man/times when lie'would be unable
^v^'i^^i^W'^W^W?!^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^'!
VOLUME XXIV. NO. 2.
to perform the duties incumbent upon
the chief.^ D, W. Spaujding ^as
elected assistant chief Fred Goulding,
treasurer Ernest Byers, secretary: W.,
G.
,ii,redrick^.focenjian
SHABOSHKUXG'S RETORT.
ltighop Whipple Tells How an Indian Agent
Failed to Convince the Wily Old Mille
Xacs Chief.
[tfrom Bishop Whipple's,"Lights and Shadows
ofoXongEpiscopate.*M .7..
The legislature had demanded theSfe
removal of all Indians from Minnesota^
and the authorities at Washington had
prepared a treaty by which the Chip
pewas were to relinquish their lands
and remove to a country north of
Leech lake, and a special agent was
sent to negotiate the treaty. The man
was without the slightest knowledge
of Indian character. He came to see
me and bagged me to help him make
the treaty. After examining the pa
per I said:
"The Indians will not sign this
treaty: they aro not fools. This is the
poorest strip of land in Minnesota, and
is unfit for cultivation. We propose
to tafce their arable land, their best
hunting ground, their rice fields and
their fisheries and give them a country
where they cannot live without the
support of the government."
The agent was angry and replied:
"If you will not help me, I will ne
gotiate it without your help."'
"You can try iji," I replied, "but you
will certainly fail.'"
He called all the Indians together at
Crow Wing, and made this speech to
them:
"My friends, your Great Father has
heard how very much you have been
wronged, and he determined to send
an honest man to treat with you. He
looked in the north, the south, the
east, and the west, and when he saw
me he said: 'There is an honest man.
I will send him to my red children.'
My red brothers, the winds of fifty-five
winters have blown over my head and
have silvered it with gray. In all that
time I have never done wrong to a sin
gle human being. As the representa
tive of the Great Father and as your
friend, I advise you to sign this
treaty at ouce."'
As quickly as a liash of lightning,
old Sha-bosb^kniigv-the liead chief of
the Mille Lacs band, sprang to his feet,
and said:
"My father, look at me. The winds
of fifty-five winters have blown over
my head and have silvered it with
gray. Butthey haven't blown my
brains away."'
He sat down, and all the Indians
shouted, "Ho! Ho! Ho!" That ended
the council.
Lost Their Creamery.
The new co-operative creamery
which was being constructed near
Longs Siding was destroyed by fire
last Monday morning and the circum
stances give grounds for the belief that
it was the work of an incendiary. The
contractors had not quite completed
their work, but a large part of the
machinery was in the building and
nothing was saved. The contractors
were protected against loss by a
blanket policy, however, and will im
mediately begin the work of rebuild
ing".
The UNION is informed that peace
and harmony do not prevail to any
great extent in the neighboi'hood and
of the principle causes of the
trouble is a division of sentiment in
this creamery matter. The matter
will be investigated by the insurance
company affected and if any evidence
can be secured, someone will be made
to suffer for Monday morning's fun.
J. Adam Bede sometimes says things
about himself which he would con
sider libelous if uttered by a contem
porary. Here is one of them: "We
join heartily with our 300 personal
friends in the Minnesota penitentiary
in regretting the resignation of War
den Wojfer, and they in turn will join
with us in making Gen. Reeve feel like
of the family. We hope none of the
boys will disturb him by coming in late
of nights. Gen. Reeve is a disciplin
arian, and the boys will be expected to
wear their uniforms. As a parting
word, be careful of your diet or you
may break out.*r
The annual sale and supper given by
the Dorcas ladies society last Friday
afternoon and evening was-a success.
The ladies cleared in the neighbor
hood of $145, and nearly everything
offered for sale was disposed i before
the evening was over. In many cases
orders for duplicates were taken.
When we receive ihe Ahoka Heraiil
this week we will be disappointed if
we do not find it set in type as large as
pica boldface. A grapevine dispatch
informs us that Editor Caswell, of that
journal, became the proud father of a
bouncing boy last Monday.
-f"
of. the Lose
company arid Adolpb Holm, assistant
John Claggett, foreman of the hotok
and ladder: Bert Sipes, assistant.
k,M
'Si A
A
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