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The Princeton union. (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, December 28, 1899, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1899-12-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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B. C. DUNN, Publisher. Terms 81.00 per Year.
^S\i/\M\tA*AMA*/
-21
A
CITIZENS STATE BANK.
OF PRINCETON, niNNESOTA.
W. P. CHASE,
flanager.
Paid Up Capital
Surplus,
posits
Fine Hardwood Lands, Meadows and Open Lands, at
Low Prices and on Easy Terms, for sale by
The Great Northern and
S Paul & Duluth Railroad Companies.
For Maps, Prices, and any other information,
write to
M. S. RUTHERFORD,
Land Agent. Princeton, Minn.
Woodcock & Oakes,
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA
Foley Bean Lumber
Company
Manufacturers and
Wholesale Dealers in
White Pine Lumber,
Lath and Shingles.
Also Sash, Doors, mouldings and a Com*
plete Stock of Building material.
IE. HARK LIVE STOC COnPANY
$30,000
5.Poo
A. General Banking Business,
Transacted
Loans Made cmAppioved fet
cuiitv
Interest Paid on Time Do-
Foreign
change
#fr^frfrfr*ft1MIHfrlEiK1MK'*
S. 5 PETTERSON, Pres.
T. !i. CALEY, Vice Pres.
G. A. EATON, Cashier.
BANK O PRINCETON,
J. J. SKAHEN, Cashier and Manager.
Does a General Banking Business.
Collecting and Farm and
Insurance. Village Loans.
I Railroad Lands
I
A. W.
W. H,
Woodcock Oakes
PRINCETON.
HOLDS REGULAR
AT PRINCETON ON THE FIRST SATURDAY
OF EACH MONTH.
Fifty Good Young Horses and Mules Constantly on Hand.
Private Sales Daily.
Time Given on Approved Paper.
E. MARK, Auctioneer.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
0/
JIT.
J.A.
in Dornestit, Ii\-
ROSS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office in Carew Bloob,
Mam Sticot PriocetoiK
J.L.
BRADY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Offices at Princeton, Minn., and
SOC Globe Bldg Minneapolis, Minn
iy| L. CORMANY,
yi TlORNE AT LA W.
Office in Townsend Block
Princeton, 'Jfliaa
BUSINESS CARDS.
CHAPMAN
& KALIHER,
BARBER SHOP & BATH ROOMS.
A fine line of Tobacco and Cigars.
Mam Street, Princeton
A C.SMITH'S
OLD RELIABLE MEAT MARKET
Is the place to getchoice freshandsalt meats.
I deal in the best and my prices are reasonable.
First door west of Citizens State Bank.
First Street. Princeton.
E.
A. ROSS,
UNDERTAKER.
Coffins and Caskets, from the cheapest to the
best grades always on hand.
An embalming fluid used which brings dis
colored corpses back to natural color
Also dealer in granite and marble monuments.
Princeton, Minn.
Livery, Sale and Feed Stable.
E. D. CLAGGETT, Prop.
*$.
iSHOES
That fit and wear.
Everything Feet.
PRINCETON, MILLE LACS COUNTYf|[X|NESOTA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1899.
IT
C. TARBOX, M. D., y,3(rtf
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Member of State Board of Medical Examiners,*
Surgeon of Q. N, and E M. Ry
S Pension Examining Board meets 1st
Wednesday of each month at office over pio
neer Drug Store Telephone 18,
Princeton, -f? Minn*
uJj W*
1
a c, $. a u. una
Office in Townsend's. JJloolf
Hours
0toKately
ILL-
L. ARMITAQE, M. D.r
&
T. a D?
13 A 8 to V.
Residence
Princeton
house,b near Roller Mill
Minn.
for the
SOLOMO N LON
R. D. BYERS, I
Dealer in
general Merchandise
Have vou tried our 35c Tea?
Z. Apples from tp.0 upwards
Have you seen our all wool QQnQ
Buffalo Flannel at OO^r
Our all wool, 54 inch dress Af\n
X. goods can't be beat at W
Call on us foi
Xmas Bargains.
THE
One Price Store
O. BUCK O.J. CRAVENS
BUCK & CRAVENS,
Blacksmiths.
All kinds of Blacksmlthlng neatly
and promptly done. W make a
specialty of
HORSESHOEING and
PLOW WORK.
first PRINCETON.
HEMIMIEUUN
Blaoksmith.
i Special attention given to Horse- 1
shoeing and repair work.
Wagon and Carriage work war
ranted to give satisfaction.
A Opposite Oaley's Store
Princeton, Minn. 1
.^BkJL^^.^a\JL^^A
FARMERS'SCHOOL. State Farmers' Institute Will Be
Held In Princeton Thursday and
Friday January 25 and 26.
rery Farmer and Stock Raiser Near
Princeton Should Plan to At-
I' tend Every Session.
The UNION hopes eyerj farmer
within driving distance of Princeton
wijl arrange to attend the State farm-
erM institute to be held in this village
on)* Thursday and Friday, Jan. 25 and
26& The work of the institute is varied
to Conform with the needs of the dif
ferent sections visited, but the follow
ing is a schedule of interesting topics
whjch will probably be used in this
visage.
.fames Atkinson, of Ames, Iowa
agricultural college, will take up rota
tion of crops, maintaining fertility of
soil, sorghum as a hay 'crop, cultiva
tioli of corn, improvement of farm
crops, farm drainage, nitrogen gather
ing plants, sugar beets, etc.
5 M, Greeley, of Gary, S. D., agri
cultural college, will show what pro
fit| can be made in the sheep industry
ter care, fattening sheep for the
iket most profitable sheep for mut
and wool, selection of breeding
als, early development of lambs,
ring the sheep of parasites, clear
land of weeds and underbrush with
shlep,(
value of the rape plant for
sheep, etc.
Hon. A. K. Bush, of Dover, Minn.,
will represent horticulture, farmer's
garden, potato culture, small fruits,
possibilities of raising apples in Min
nesota, etc
&. W. Troy, of Glenville, Minn.,
will take up the feeding and care of
dairj cattle, creamerj management.
Minnesota's highest butter record in
thef United States and where she got
it, creamery difficulties explained, how
tojtmild and fill the silo, food value of
ensilage, how to dispose of the dairy
bped, steers at a profit creamery out
top report, etc
If^rs. Bertha Bahl Laws, of Apple-
tOjsfj Minn will take-up domestic
economy home life made pleasant at
little cost, helpful things a man can
p|tlg&othe house, things that reqUiie
'b^yfillMte! labor and save manv Hired
steps, little things that the husband
and children can do to relieve the
over-worked mother, rest the mother
needs and how it can be obtained, A en
tillation and how it can be arranged
by the inexperienced, economy of good
air in regard to health, how consump
tion, diphtheria and typhoid fever can
be carried by water and how to avoid
contagion, etc
Dr. J. Curryer. of Mankato, Minn.,
will represent the horse department.
Future prospects of the horse business,
different types of horses, deformities
of horses, three of the most valuable
lessons for the horse, to insure safety,
prompt action and reliability, three
essential qualities of a good foot and
three of its greatest enemies, the most
practical and common sense method of
properly fitting a collar, the natural
laws governing the actions of our
horses, cures for some of the bad
habits of our horses, humane treat
ment of the balky horse, water, grain
and hay for the horse at work and
when idle, intelligence of our horses
and their remarkable memories,* etc.
Supt. O. C. Gregg, of Lynd, Minn.,
is expected to be with the force, as.
well as other speakers to help the good
work along.
Everybody should attend the State
Farmer's Institute and get one of those
valuable books, estimated to be worth
from $5 to $25 by those who have care
fully examined them. They are free
to -those attending the first forenoon
session.
When the opportunity offers is just
the time to take advantage of this
State work and get the experiences of
these practical teachers and that great
book when they can both be had free.
THE CHRISTMAS TREE.
A Happy Time for the Little Folks Satur
day Night.
There was a happy crowd at Jesmer's
opera house last Saturday night when
the people of Princeton gathered to
enjoy the annual festival which
this
season always brings. The pupils of
the public school appeared in the
beautiful little cantata, "Snow White,"
and gave an entertainment which was
pleasing to every one present. Many
of the pupils displayed talent which
would have been considered creditable
by adults and the little ones took their
parts so utterly unconscious of the
large audience as to make them favor
ites before the footlights. The teach
ers, too. deserve great credit for the
manner in which the entertainment
was handled and the UNI ON hopes each
.-v^
succeeding Christmas will witness
these non-sectarian gatherings.
After the little folks had finished
their part of the program a mill of an
eighteentn century pattern was
erected on the stage and while the
wings of the old-fashionedV indmil
whirled in the Christmas breeze the
dusty miller ground out a grist of
presents for the expectant children.
The whole affair was a success and
reflected credit on all concerned. Let
us have more of these gatherings
where all the l'esidents of this little
Village meet on common footing.
There is nothing which can bring
about such results and promote neigh
borly interest in each other's welfare.
A. Word to merchants.
The merchants of Princeton had an
excellent object lesson in profitable
advertising last week when N. E.
Jesmer & Son announced their gift
sale for Friday and Saturday. The
first intimation that the public had of
it was when the UNION came out
Thursday noon, but the result of the
publicity was plainly apparent soon
after the store was opened for business
the next morning. All day long there
was a steady stream of buyers passing
through the aisles of the store and the
rush continued the next day. Of course
the UNION does not claim that all of
this rush wag occasioned by the ad it
published, but it has the satisfaction
of knowing that it was instrumental in
bringing a large number of visitors to
that store who would not have attended
the sale otherwise. The ad was the
idea of Mr. H. B. Jesmer and the
UNIO N was one of the instruments he
chose to use. Those of us who are
observant and ha\ watched methods
of the different merchants in this vil
lage have seen the Jesmers steadily
increasing the volume of their busi
ness from year to year. They have
advertised liberally in the UNION each
week and supplemented this with
liberal dealings For more than four
\ears no issue of this paper has ap
peared with less than a column to call
attention to the store and quite fre
quently it requires a page to hold their
announcement. If the Messrs. Jesmer
were not convinced that this money
(which by the way runs into the hun
dreds every year) was not profitably
expended do jou suppose they, as saga
cious business men, would continue
thiv expense? They are satisfied and
amount of space used.
What others have accomplished you
can accomplish if you take advantage
of jour opportunities as they have
done The new year is budding and
you should resolve to leave no stone
unturned in your endeavor to make it
a happv and prosperous one for you.
Get out of the old rut, study our adver
tising as you do your buying or any
other part of your business and you will
be surprised at the results which will
come from the expenditure.
The UNION does not urge people^to
advertise simply to "help the paper"
it has long ago passed that stage.
The UNION does not want a dollar of
any man's money unless it can give
value for the same. We like to do
business for the money there is in it
and we also like a good advertising
patronage, because it helps the town
and shows to outsiders that there is
business transacted here.
In this day of competition advertis
ing is as necessary as an up-to-date
stock. Subscribe for your trade publi
cations, they will give you valuable
pointers and show you the methods ap
proved by men who are successful in
your line. Profit by the experience of
others and remember that the secret
of successful advertising lies in keep
ing everlastingly at it.
Always to the Front.
The announcement recently made by
the Minneapolis Times that it had se
cured for exclusive use in the north
west, the New York HeraWs special
and unrivalled cable news service (at a
price which would stagger a less en
terprising newspaper), is but another
proof that it is at all times the leader
of the northwestern dailies and is de
termined to furnish to its readers the
very best reliable news obtainable, and
to publish it first at whatever the cost.
This new cable and domestic service,
together with the Associated Press
service and the Times' own corps of
special correspondents, places that
enterprising newspaper easily in first
place among the Twin City dailies.
The limes' readers can now be as
sured of just as complete and reliable
a service as if they lived in New York
or London. W congratulate the
Times on its enterprise.
A Pleasant Wedding.
The members of the Petterson fam
ily and a few of the immediate friends
of the contracting parties gathered at
the home of John F. Petterson Christ
mas night to witness the ceremony per-
VOLUME XXIV. NO. 3.
formed by Rev. David Donovan which
united 1h lives of Miss Serena M.
Petterson and J. Sivert Anderson.
Both the contracting parties are well
known in this section, the bride hav
ing grown to womanhood among us.
She is a talented musician and a highly
accomplished young lady, whose:
friends are a legion. The groom was
for a time a resident of this village,
where he was employed at the Great
Northern depot and later went to
Cambridge where he held a position
in a bank A few weeks ago he was
placed in charge of the new Mille Lacs
County bank at Milaca The many
friends of the contracting parties unite
in wishing them a long life of unal
loyed happiness
A. BAD F1RK.
Mora Had a 915,000 Fire L,amt Tuesday
Morning.
Word was received in this village
Tuesday morning of a serious? fire
which visited Mora shortly after mid
night and wiped out buildings and
property valued at $15,000. The fire
originated in the store of Oscar Sundin
which was totally destroyed with all
its contents and for a time it looked
as if the entire business portion of the
village was doomed. The fire was
finally got under control, but hot until
the Serline block and the furniture
store of R. W. Safford were destroyed
with their contents. Mr. Serline oc
cupied the second story of his building
with his family. Everyone escaped
but their clothing and household goods
were destroyed. The new postoffice
building was reduced to ashes but
there was time for the postmaster to
save all his fixtures and the stamps,
mail matter, etc and the office has
been transacting its business as usual
in another location The lire was di
rectly across the street from the Kan
abec County bank but the wind was
favorable and it escaped damage
Came Near Burning
irfj, i^x, notlonly-the fuseofbut the fuge box as
s^w^tfirisljy^tn^a'rly^ntre^ ^^^^^^z-^
The handsome residence of M.
Campbell narrowly escaped destruc
tion by fire Tuesday morning through
the short circuiting of an electric wire
The kitchen light had been switched
on and off so often that screws in the
socket had become loosened and in at
tempting to tighten them while the
current was on Mrs Campbell created
a short circuit of an unusual strength.
The wires were ''arked*' and melte1d'tDm
wel and some
tlya
wr*H
*W
mn|fo
some of the molten metal
dripped down on some clothing hang
ing in the closet where the box was
located Perhaps an hour afterward
Mi Campbell noticed a smell of smoke
in the house and an investigation
located the cause. The closet door
was closed and the fire had not begun
to blaze so she was able to extinguish
it easilj Most of the clothing in the
closet was charred and rendered use
less, but Mrs Campbell considers her
self fortunate to escape with so slight
a loss. No one should attempt to fix
his lights or fixture when the current
is on. Call the superintendent and he
will make all necessarv repairs with
out danger of fire
A blaze which made things inter
esting for a few moments that it lasted
occurred atScheen's confectionery last
Friday afternoon The north window
was decorated appropriatelj for the
season and one of the principal ma
terials used was cotton batting. In
the window was a mmature railroad
with a locomotive which used alcohol
for fuel and in some unaccountable
manner the cotton became ignited and
in a moment the whole window was
ablate. There was some lively hust
ling for a minute or two, but before
the fire got a fair start the window
was stripped and the decorations were
thrown into the street The large doll
which was to be given away Saturday
night was destroyed and several other
goods burned and damaged, but the
principal loss came-
fa-As-TV^ f-
from the cinders
and soot which covered the entire
stock. However, the tenants of the
row had a very decent scare and are
very glad that things were no worse.
Scheen's loss will be fully covered by
insurance.
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Arnhold was badly scalded last week
but will probably recover. Mrs. Arn
hold had just poured out a panful of
hot dishwater when she was called to
another part of the room for a mo
ment, leaving the baby sitting' in her
carriage near the table. The little
one managed in some way to reach the
pan and tipped it into her lap. Her
abdomen and limbs were badly burned
and though her injuries are very pain
ful she is apparently recovering and
aside from several bad scars will soon
be all right.
E. Mark has a swell outfit for his
new livery and his prices are reason
able. Give him a call when you want
a team.

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