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The Princeton union. (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, May 28, 1908, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1908-05-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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EIGHT TOJRADUATE
Seven Girls and One Boy Will Receive
Their Diplomas at the Opera
House on June First.
Rev. J. W. Heard Will Deliver Bacca-
laureate Address at Metho-
dist Church on Sunday.
Princeton's high school commence
ment exercises will be held at Brands'
opera house on Monday evening,
June 1. The exercises will begin at 8
o'clock and eight graduatesseven
girls and one boywill be presented
with their diplomas by G. A. Eaton,
chairman of the school board.
Those comprising the graduating
class are Marguerite Adelle Byers,
Laura Estelle Mitchell, Gladys Lu
verne Neumann, Sarah Estelle Schu
macher and Norma Van Alstein in
the Latin course, and Edith Adeline
Johnson, Ida May Schmidt and Henry
Edward Lenz in the scientific course.
The Princeton high school is one
of the foremost institutions of learn
ing in the northwest, and from its
halls many pupils have gone forth
into the world and succeeded in
various trades and professions. And
it may truthfully be said of Professor
Marshall and his instructors that they
are among the best that have ever
taught in the public schools of this
village.
A program of orations, readings
and vocal music has been arranged
for Monday evening's exercises which
is hereunder given in detail:
Up and Away Adam Gieble
CHORUS
Invocation
REV A SWERTFAGER
Oration with Salutatory Address
"The Decisive Battle of the Rebellion"
HENRY EDWARD LENZ
Swing Song Loche
MARGUERITE ADELLE BYERS, IDA MAY SCHMIDT
Class Prophecy
EDITH ADELINE JOHNSON
Reading "Jean "ValJeanandthe
Bishop "Victor Hugo
NORMA VAN ALSTEIN
Vocal Solo Selected
MR E E WOODWORTH
Class History
LAURA ESTELLE MITCHELL
Wiegenlied Frank
CHORUS
Reading Scene from "Thefrsonei
of Zenda' Anthony Hope
GLADYS LUVERNE NEUMANN
The Lonely Rose Heimes
LADIES CHORUS
Oration with Valedictory Address
Isabella of Spam
SARAH ESTELLE SCHUMACHER
Presentation of Diplomas
MR A EATON
Springtime Strauss-Palmei
CHORUS
Baccalaureate Sermon
The Methodist and Congregational
churches have arranged to hold union
services in the first mentioned place
of worship on Sunday evening, when
Rev. J. W. Heard will deliver the
baccalaureate address to the high
school graduating class. In addition
to the regular services a musical
program has been especially prepared
for the occasion by Mrs. H. C.
Cooney. The program is given
below:
PROGRAM
oluntary
Doxology Hymn Guide Me Oh Thou Great Jehovah
Prayei Rev Geo Swertfager
Anthem 'Dear Spirit Lead Thou Me Miles
Choir
Scripture Proverbs the Eighth Chapter
Anthem 'Anywhere With Jesus Jessop
Choir
Offortory
Vocal Duet 'Blessed Savior Thee I Love"
Mrs Cooney and Mrs Taylor
Hymn "Walk in the Light"
Baccalaureate Sermon Rev W Heard
Vocal bolo Just for Today Abbot
Mrs Cooney
Hymn Consecration
Benediction
One Sweetly Solemn Thought" Ambrosia
Ladies' Quartet
T. H. Caley Boys Touring Car.
Mrs. T. H. Caley and sons Harold
and Thomas went to Minneapolis on
Tuesday morning and will return
in a new automobile which Mr.
Caley recently purchased. The
machine is a fac simile of the one
owned by Mr.Ferrellone of the best
touring cars manufactured.
Congregational Choir Reception.
A reception, planned in the manner
of a surprise by the worshipers at the
Congregational church for Mrs.
Cooney and the choir, was given at
the residence of Dr. and Mrs. Cooney
on Thursday evening. The members
of the choir were present and they
were as much surprised as Mrs.
Cooney when the gifts in appreciation
of their work were bestowed. Mrs.
Cooney was the recipient of an elabor
ately carved cut-glass punch bowl and
the members of the choir were all re
membered with a token of esteem.
Attorney McMillan was made toast
master, and well did he preside over
'the festal board which was laden with
'A-
R. C. DUNN, Publisher. Terms- 81.00 Per Tear.
j***& f|~
ice cream, cake, fruit and other deli
cacies. It was not compulsory upon
Mac to offer a toast, but, in his dry
and inimitable manner, he threw one
off that convulsed the whole company
in laughter. Mac doesn't look like a
humorist, but you can't tell a man by
his looks. Informal music, both in
strumental and vocal, followed the
refreshments and a few good stories
were related. The irrepressible Will
Perrel, narrated some of his auto
mobile experiences and told how he
flattened out four dogs and ran his
machine over Chas. Keith's nigger
heads. As Will drew near the end of
his narrative se\eral of the party ex
cused themselves and proceeded to the
dining room for a grain of salt.
Doc. Small narrated a vaccination
storyDoc. is a born story teller,
anywayand when he concluded
everyone in the room had his or her
sleeve rolled up. They had all been
vaccinated.
Dr. Cooney then started to tell a
story of the dissection of a mummy
which had lain in an Egyptian cata
comb for 3,999 years, but he was im
mediately ruled out of order.
The event was one of those pleasing,
informal occasions where everyone
had a ratding good time. Beg pardon
for the word "rattling," but in the
sense used it is intended to mean a
joyous, mirthful occasion.
BESTORVHON OF CHARTER
Brilliant Ceremonies Held In Reinstate
ment of K. Lodge at Mllaca
Over forty Pythians from the
Princeton lodge went to Milaca on
Monday evening to assist in reinstat
ing the lodge at that place and to
work the three ranks of the order.
Members from other lodges were also
present, as were also Grand Chancel
lor DeForest Ward, Fairmont Grand
Vice Chancellor P. W. McAllister,
Minneapolis, and Grand Keeper of
Records and Seal Fred E. Wheaton,
Minneapolis.
The regulation routine was adhered
to in the restoration of Milaca lodge
No 130 and twenty-five members were
secured with which to start the new
organization. Princeton's work team
one of the best in the stateput six
candidate? through the ordeal of the
three ranks and immediately there
after the newly-made knights were
installed by the grand officers. At mid
night an intermission in the proceed
ings was taken and the visiting
knights were escorted to suppera
supper which had been prepared by
the wives of the Milaca K. Ps. And
it proved to be a feast fit for the gods
the ladies had evidently put forth
their best endeavors to entertain the
visitors in right royal style.
During the progress of the supper
the grand officers addressed the com
pany on the benefits of Pythianism
and their speeches were vociferously
applauded. Following the feast the
company adjourned to the hall, where
the work of initiation was again taken
up, and it was 4:30 o'clock on Tuesday
morning before the ceremonies were
completed.
The members of Princteon lodge No.
93 speak in high praise of the recep
tion extended to them by the people of
Milaca. They say that never in their
experience have they been so hos
pitably treated. Nothing was left
undone to make the K. Ps. visit
pleasant in a high degree.
A few of the boys returned from
Milaca by team, but the majority of
them came home on Tuesday morn
ing's tram.
Milaca lodge No. 130 had been de
funct for three years, and at the last
meeting of the grand lodge Grand
Master at Arms T. F. Scheen of
Princeton presented an application
containing twenty-five signatures for
the restoration of the charter of said
lodge. This is the first instance on
record where the grand lodge, in ses
sion, has received an application for
a new lodge or for the restoration of
a charter. In the official grand lodge
proceedings we find this mention:
"Bro. Scheen and the members of
Princeton lodge are entitled to no
little credit for their hard work and
commendable enterprise in bringing
about the revival of No. 130."
The Dance at Elk Lake Park.
Despite the threatening weather the
band dance and concert at Elk Lake
parkthe opening event of the season
was in every way a success, and the
boys cleared about $35. The selec
tions played by the band showed that
the boys are rapidly improving and
the orchestral music by Herb Ander
son's organization was excellent.
People were present from the sur
rounding country in large number
and Mr. Pratt did all in his power to
make things pleasant for the visitors.
Elk Lake park pavilion is the most
commodious in this part of the
country and its surroundings are pic
turesquely attractive. Other dances
and concerts will be given at the park
during the season.
^L^h'UJ^fam^sS^M i ^^u#A^^tS^l#^?&St? aM^*s^^^^%|^^a^&^
rw *^TSW
Exercises on Memorial Day Will Com-
mence in Court House Square
Precisely at 2 o'clock.
Rev. G. A. Swertfager Will Offer the
Invocation and L. O. Merriman
Deliver the Oration.
Extensive preparations are being
made for the due observance of Me
morial daySaturday next, May 30.
The Citizens' Staff of the G. A. R.,
an association organized for the pur
pose of relieving the old soldiers of
the burden of making arrangements
for conducting the ceremonies, is put
ting forth its best endeavors to the
end that the day may be appropriately
observed.
At this time there is every indication
that the turnout will be larger than
has been witnessed in Princeton for
many years. Not that there will be
more old soldiers in line, for the
heroes are fast joining the ranks of
the great army on the other shore,
but it is expected that more citizens
will enter into the spirit of the day and
observe it more religiously.
Decoration day is not a day which
IFSE
P ps
should be given over to sportsof
worldly amusements. It is a day of
mourning for the brave and as such it
should be observed. We find, how
ever, that it is often desecrated.
Young men attend ball games, dances
and other amusements. This is entire
ly contrary to the purpose for which
the day is set apart and should be dis
continued.
Let every onewhether he or she
be American born or notobserve this
day with due propriety. Let all pay
tribute to our soldier dead.
The Memorial services will be held
at the court house square on Saturday
afternoon, commencing at 2 o'clock,
providing the weather is favorable,
but if it should rain the court house
hall will be used for that purpose. The
program for these exercises follows:
PROGRAM
Son
PRINCETON, MILLE LACS COUNTY, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY, MAY 28, 1908.
PROGRAMFORMAY30MACHmERYORDERED
OUR HONORED SOLDIER DEAD.
WALLACE T. RINES
A. CALEY WHxfNLY
JNO WEDGEWOOD
W. H. SHAW
NOAH GATES
PHINE^S GATES
GEO W. BIGELOW
JOHN A. KELLY
ISAAC HEATH
E M. HEATH
A. J. STANLEY
THOMAS WILSON
M. GARLINGHOUSE
AUGUST BOYN
S. WHITCOMB
W. A. DAVIS
A PLUMMER
JOHN AUSTIN
MYRICK OLIVER WALTERS
W. DUNTON
MIKE RICE
I. H. ESTES
G. W. TAYLOR
ALEX MARTIN
S Choir
Invocation Rev A Swertfager
Song and chorus
Address
Son
0
Merrimanr Choi
Lincoln's Gettysburg Address A Norton
Original Poem "Boys of 61" Mr Walton
Song "America" Audience
Following this program a column
will be formed and the line of march
will be west to the corner of C. A.
Caley's residence and thence north to
the cemetery, where the graves of the
veterans will be decorated.
FORMATION OP COLUMN
E E. Jones Drum Corps
Princeton Band
Company G, N.
Wallace T. Bines Pest, G. A
Public Schools.
Civic Societies.
Citizens on Foot.
3PPSII$F cjj^ffp^
Directors of Princeton Co-Operatlve
Creamery Place an Order for
Necessary Equipment.
Capital Stock of Company Placed at
$75oo and Articles of Incorpo-
ration Are Drawn Up.
The board of directors of Princeton
Co-operative Creamery association
met at the opera house on Saturday
afternoon for the purpose of engaging
a buttermaker and receiving bids for
the machinery and other articles
necessary to equip the creamery. All
members of the board were present,
including Otto Henschel, the newly
elected secretary.
Before proceeding with the special
business for which the meeting was
called the advisabiilty of reducing the
amount of capital stock from $10,000
to $7,500 was discussed, and it was
unanimously decided to make this
change, Chas. Keith being selected to
draw up the necessary articles of in
corporation and file the same immed
iately with the secretary of state.
This action makes available the $1,500
subscribed by the businessmen of the
IFSJ PS
SILAS HOWARD
FARRINGTON
J? M. NORTH WAY
HIRAM MILLETT
C. SAUSSER
EDWARD LARKIN
REUBEN M. MAYO
HENRY APPLEGATE
BARRETT CARTER
A. B. SHUTE
W H. TOWLE
JOHN CORMACK
I S GOULD
WALTER CARTER
H. CLARK
E. KUHLMAN
GARLINGHOUSE
CHARLES H. RINES
ARTHUR F. HOWARD
CHARLES B. ROGERS
CORNELIUS H. CHUTE
JOHN McMINN
LEWIS LISKEY
JOHN BARRY
JONAS R. HILL
F
village.
Several letters from applicants for
the position of buttermaker were then
read, but as most of them failed to
state the salary expected they were
not considered.
Robt. Shaw thereupon made a mo
tion that L. E. Fox be hired as butter
maker, but as Mr. Fox had submitted
no formal application to the board
the motion was ruled out of order and
a messenger sent out to secure his
presence before the board. Upon his
arrival he made application and
stated the terms upon which he would
perform the duties required. E. G.
Busch, another applicant from Apple
ton, Wis., was also present, and upon
a secret ballot being taken to determine
which of these two should be engaged
Mr. Fox received 6 votes and Mr.
Busch 2. Mr. Fox was therefore
engaged.
Mr. Fox is a first-class buttermaker
who understands every detail of the
business, and there is not the least
doubt that he will give entire satisfac
tion.
The selection of an equipment for
the creamery was the next thing taken
up and three representatives from as
many firms were present to dilate
upon the superiority of their wares
and to submit bids. The firms repre
sented were A. H. Barber & Co.,
Chicago Creamery Package Manu
facturing Co., Minneapolis., and
J. G. Cherry & Co., Cedar Rapids,
Iowa. It was agreed among them
selves that each salesman should be
allowed twenty minutes in which to
speak his piece, and at the conclusion
bids were submitted on the equipment
list furnished by Mr. Fox as follows:
A. H. Barber & Co., $1,438.90
Creaery Package Manufacturing Co.,
$1,525.00 J. G. Cherry & Co.,
$1,350.00.
After due consideration the board
decided to accept the bid of the
Creamery Package Manufacturing
company, the equipment to be fur
nished by that concern having been
deemed the most substantial. It was
stipulated that the equipment must
arrive here on or before June 15.
With favorable weather, says Mr.
Jaenicke, the constructor of the build
ing, there is no reason why the cream
ery should not be completed within
four weeks, or three weeks from next
Saturday.
Paid up stock aggregating over
$1,500 has been taken, and this, with
the $1,500 contributed by the business
men of Princeton, is sufficient to give
the creamery a good start. There
will be no difficulty in disposing of
more stock and there are a great
plenty of available cows to insure the
success of the undertaking.
Now farmers, stick together and
wijh concerted action put your
shoulders to the creamery wheel
make it spin along in the van of prog
ress.
MRS. CHAS BECK
Dies at the Home of er Father, T
Johnson, in Bemidji,
Mrs. Edna Eveline Beck, wife of
Chas. Beck, died at the home of her
father, L. F. Johnson, in Bemidji on
Friday, May 22, from tuberculosis.
She had resided with her father from
the commencement of her sickness, a
little over a year ago, but had not
been seriously ill until within a short
time of her death.
The remains, accompanied by L. F.
Johnson and Chas. Beck, the father
and husband of deceased, arrived here
on Monday morning's train from
Bemidji and were conveyed to Spencer
Brook, where funeral services were
conducted by Rev. Marshall in the
Chapman school house upon the after
noon of the same day. The interment
took place in the Mitchell cemetery
and the funeral was attended by many
friends of the young woman who had
passed to that realm where suffering
and trouble abideth not.
Edna Eveline Johnson was born at
Spencer Brook on April 27, 1888, and
was twenty years of age. She passed
her girlhood days at Spencer Brook
and about six years ago moved with
her father to Bemidji. In October,
1906, she was married to Chas. Beck
of Spencer Brook and, with her hus
band, took up her residence in Duluth,
where she remained until attacked by
that dire malady, consumption. She
is survived by a husband, an infant
child, a father and four brothers.
Mrs. Beck possessed a most cheer
ful disposition throughout her sick
ness notwithstanding she fully realized
that her life was slowly ebbing away.
Her kindliness and other good
qualities made her many friends where
soever she went.
"Leaves have their time to fall
And flowers to wither at the north wind
breath,
And stars to set but ail
Thou hast all seasons for thine own, O Death'
Death of Mrs. Atkins of Elk River.
Mrs. Virginia S. Atkins of Elk
River died at her home in that village
on Friday last, of heart trouble, Her
death was quite sudden and un
expected at this time, although her
health had been failing for a couple of
years past, and the family did not ex
pect her to live through the summer.
Mrs. Atkins was born in Illinois
more than 65 years ago and was one
of the early settlers in Princeton, com
ing to this place as a bride with her
husband, the late H. M. Atkins, in the
spring of 1862, and residing here until
the fall of 1873, when the family re
moved to St. Cloud. In the spring of
1876 the family again removed to Elk
River, which place has since been her
home, Mr. Atkins dying there in the
fall of 1893. Mrs. Atkins was the
mother of ten children, four of whom
survive her, namely: Sinclair E.
Atkins, chief land clerk in the state
auditor's office at St. Paul Blanche
E. Atkins, instructor in methods at
state normal school in St. Cloud
Eunice M. Atkins, for past two years
principal of high school at Grange
ville, Idaho, and who just accepted a
position as principal of a girls'
school at Erzeroom, Turkey in Asia,
and! expects to leave for that far-away
place about July 1st next and Ruth
E. Atkins of Elk River. All of the
children were present at the funeral,
which was held at Elk River on Tues
day of this week, being delayed until
that time awaiting the arrival of the
daughter, Miss Eunice, from Idaho.
i ^it^*^p^fIP^^W^I? MINNESOTA
HISTORICAL
SOCIETY,
VOLUME XXXII. NO. 23
MEMORIAyjMESS Rev. J. W. Heard Preaches an Able
and Impressive Sermon to the
Members of G. A. R.
He Pays Glowing Tribute to Heroism
of Veterans Who Fought in
War of the Rebellion.
Union memorial services were held
at the Methodist church on Sunday
morning, and the majority of the
members of Wallace T. Rmes Post
142 were in attendance at the obser
vances arranged especially in honor
of their departed comrades. The
church was prettily decorated with
flowers, foliage and flags, while the
standard of the Grand Army of the
Republic stood forth in bold relief,
producing a very pleasing effect.
Rev. Geo. A. Swertfager of the
Congregational churcn read the scrip
ture lesson and offered the prayer and
a chorus of forty voices rendered
selections of an appropriate nature.
The services throughout, which
ended with an able patriotic sermon
by Rev. J. W. Heard of the Methodist
church, were particularly impressive.
Mr. Heard's sermon, in verbatim,
follows:
Text, Mark 14, 9: "Verily I say
unto you wheresoever this gospel shall
be preached throughout the whole
world this also that she hath done
shall be spoken of for a memorial of
her."
You recognize this text as a part of
the scripture story just read. The
characters are entirely human and
modern: The cold proud hypocritical
and discourteous Pharisee at whose
table Jesus sat the woman who saw
the Pharisee's heartless mhospitality
in neglecting to provide water and
ointment for the footsore traveler,
according to the common practice of
the day. Hastening home she seizes
her precious box of ointment and, re
turning, breaks it and pours upon the
head of our Lord. Her tears prove
the genuineness of her love. The un
sentimental critics, chief of whom is
the miser Judas, so solicitous, sud
denly, for the poor for whom they
cared not at all. The situation calls
for a true, chivalrous, gentlemanly
man and Jesus rises to the occasion
in a rare and beautiful tribute:
"Wheresoever this gospel shall be
preached throughout the whole world
this also that she hath done shall be
spoken of for a memorial of her."
You well know the prophesy has
come true. I tell this story today as
it has been told many times. Millions
of people have heard it and read it
and know it by heart, and it will be
known by millions yet to come. This
woman's simple act of love and ador
ation, done without a thought of fame,
is an immortal thing. It was not the
intrinsic value of the gift. Modern
men whose names will be forgotten a
generation hence have given vastly
more.
But here is one, who according to
Jesus'explanation, foresaw his death.
"Against the day of my burying hath
she kept this. With rare spiritual in
sight, such as the coarser materialis
tic disciples knew nothing of, she saw
the true aim and purpose of Jestis and
knew that, if he pursue it to the end,
it led straight to the cross. Her
anointing and her tears are the con
secration of her own life to her Lord
and seem to say"Master I am ready
to die with you."
On this Memorial Day Sabbath it
is our custom devoutly to take our
stand beside the soldier's grave. He
may have been killed in battle or died
of wounds or from natural causes, but
to everyone we pay the tribute Jesus
paid to the woman. "As long as this
republic shall last, so long as history
shall be read, this that the soldier has
done shall be spoken of as a memorial
of him." And some modern Judas
will stand there too and cry, "Why all
this fuss about the old soldier?"
"Why all this waste of pension
money?" We will not stop to show
the animus of the criticism nor the
hard miserly heart from which it
comes. Think rather of the underly
ing meaning in every soldier's grave
through our land! The soldier's
grave and the woman's tribute to
Jesus and the Christ upon the cross
all stand for the same great common
place principle. We talk and preach
it so much more than we practice it so
the mere mention today may sound
like "cant." But when the world sees
a true genuine unpremeditated prac
tice of this principle such as we saw
in Princeton the other day we recog
nize it as the divinest thing in human
life. It's a little thing to diea
coward can die, but it takes a man in
whom is the spirit of God to give him
self, his dearest and most preciou*
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