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The Princeton union. (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, October 26, 1911, Image 3

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1911-10-26/ed-1/seq-3/

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Stewart
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$28.00
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THE GENUINE
A good sized oven, nickel
trimmed, high warming clos
et, made of best cold rolled
steel Warranted in every
way.
$28.00
STEWART
STOVES
P. P. Stewart
Heaters
We wish to impress upon you
the importance of buying a P. P.
Stewart Heater. It will reduce
your coal bill, and give you more
heat than any other stove made.
We have them in different sizes
and styles from
$35.00
to
$60.00
Evens Hardware Co.
PRINCETON, MINN.
One of These Barrels Filled With
Crown Gasoline
FARMER
We ^ish to advise ^ou that we have arranged with the Standard Oil
Co. for a carload ot Steel Barrels, which can be used for storage
tanks. These barrels ai^e for your use and should last a lifetime.
When empt\. load on to jour wagon, bring to town and we will fill
them with Perfection Oilthe Best Water White Oil on the market,
and you can get it from us at any and all times.
Rea the Following Description
of the Steel Barrels
Made from IK gauge STEEL, welded throughoutchimes reinforced
with 4 inch non bar2 inch bung and inch vent plug in one end,
gahani/eu both insido and outpainted black on outside A inch
BRASS L7]VEll FAUCET with each barrel. Take out \ent plug,
scrftv in faucet and \ou ha\e an ideal tank.
Notice the
Low Price
Place jour oider with us now. If you cannot come in, 'phone us
so we can set aside what you want.
George Newton
Evens Hardware Co.
C. H. Nelson
Mcllhargey Hdw. Co.
J. C. Herdliska
(P
8
One of These Barrels
Filled With 55 Gallons fl
of Perfection Oil for
$10.32
$13.35
R. D. Byers
A. E. Allen & Co.
F. T. Kettelhodt
Caley Hdw. Co.
Princeton Auto Co.
ing at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Henry Foster.
Elmer Dubuque spent a few days
last week visiting at Glendorado.
Arthur, Alice and Edna JLeander
spent Sunday evening at Krauze's.
Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Raiche, Elmer
Dubuque and Pearl Labbissonniere
spent Thursday evening at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Foster.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Orton entertained
a number of young people at their
home on Saturday evening and
proved themselves to be royal enter
tainers.
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Normandin and
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Rehaume drove
to Osseo and other points on Satur
day morning and returned Monday
evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Hartman and
daughter, Alvina, Mr. and Mrs.
Henry Hess and family and Rev.
Achtekirk spent Sunday with Mr.
and Mrs. Theodore Foster and family.
A number of the friends of Mr. and
Mrs. Henry Hess and family surprised
them at their home on Friday evening
to bid them farewell. The evening
was spent in singing hymns, and Mrs.
Hess and Mrs. Larson were the
organists. At 10:30 a deelicious lunch
was served and at 12 o'clock the
guests departed for home wishing Mr.
and Mrs. Hess success and happiness
in their new home. They have many
friends here and they will be greatly
missed by all. Rev. and Mrs. Lar
son and daughter, Beatrice, of
Princeton were among those in atten
dance.
BLUE HILL
The old Galbraith farm has a new
owner now.
Carpenter Bros, are hauling pota
toes to Princetoon.
Archie Hull was home from St. Paul
over Sunday. He is attending the
Jaw school.
Chas. Brande and wife and son,
Orrin, visited with H. Camp and fami
ly on Sunday.
The school board in the Camp dis
trict is installing a new heating plant
in the school house.
Miss McCormick attended a
teachers' meeting at Zimmerman last
Friday and Saturday.
A little daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Adams is seriously ill at the home of
her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. John
Fullwiler.
Miss Jesdahl, who teaches the Camp
school, has been having a three
weeks' vacation to give the kids a
chance to pick up potatoes.
That snowstorm on Sunday was a
reminder of what is coming later, and
the hard frosts we have had since
warn us to prepare for winter.
Hartman Camp and Frank Lavelle
were at Elk River last week testify
ing in the case of Schmeyer against
Alfinson for misrepresentation.
Ephraim Yager, wife and daughter
of Milaca are visiting Mr. Yager's
sister, Mrs. John Hull, and other
relatives in Blue Hill. They will re
turn to Milaca today.
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Thompson of
Minnetonka Mills drove up and spent
a few days visiting Mr. Thompson's
parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Thomp
son, last week, and enjoyed a few
days' duck hunting.
GLENDORADO AND SANTIAGO,
Miss Emma Rusiness of Minneapolis
is home on a visit.
Miss Alma Wold is spending the
week in Princeton.
Miss Emma Anderson of Santiago
is assisting Mrs. Ed Odegard of Glen
dorado.
Misses Emma Johnson and Ethel
Magnus were Princeton visitors on
Monday.
Oscar Wicktor of Santiago held an
auction last Saturday and disposed of
his stock and machinery. We under
stand he will go west.
Nearly all farmers are through
digging potatoes, and on an average
the crop was excellent. Potatoes
have been dug weighing 4 and 5}
pounds.
Mr. and Mrs. O. Knutson and fami
ly departed last week for Granite
Falls, where they have purchased a
farm. A farewell reception was given
Miss Selma Knutson by the Lutheran
congregation last Sunday. She has
acted as organist at the church for a
number of years. Their many friends
are sorry to see them go, but wish
them Godspeed in their new home.
Minnesota Bred Horses
They are herea couple of carloads
of the best horseflesh ever placed on
the market in this or any other town,
including mares with colts by their
sides and some of the very finest farm
and general purpose horses obtain
able. These horses were selected by
my representative, who covered
hundreds of miles of country in order
to secure just the kind of stock that
the farmers in this territory are look
ing for. Every animal is Minnesota
bred, is young, and as sound as a
dollarthe sort that is bound to sell
rapidly. So if you are in need of a
team or a single horse for any pur
pose whatsoeverhorses that will
prove satisfactorycall at my barn
in Princeton and make yourrselection.
41
tf
THE PRINCETON UNION: THURSDAY, (OCTOBER 26, lSli.^r^^T
Aulge Rines.
Pastor Arrested for Murder.
Rev. Clarence Bicheson, pastor of
the fashionable Baptist church of
Cambridge, Mass., is occupying a
cell in the Boston jail charged with
murdering Miss Avis Linnell, a
former fiancee, by administering to
herpretending that it was a head
ache remedycyanide of potassium.
Miss Linnell was found dead in her
apartments at the Y. W. C. A. rooms
in Boston. Richeson was arrested in
the home of Miss Violet Edmands, an
heiress whom he was to wed on
October 31. The warrant for the
formal arrest of the preacher was is
sued after William Hahn, a druggist
of Newton, Mass., had positively
identified him as the man to whom he
sold a quantity of cyanide of potas
sium, Richeson telling the druggist
that he wanted to kill a troublesome
dog. He was arraigned at a prelimi
nary hearing, pleaded not guilty, and
the case was continued to October 31.
The police asccribe two possible
motives for the crime, either one of
which would make the case almost un
paralleled in American criminal an
nals. The first is that, fearing Miss
Linnell might interfere with his ap
proaching marriage to Miss Edmands,
the heiress, Richeson set about to kill
the girl the other is that he purchased
the drug for Miss Linnell in order
that she might end her own life when
she learned the man she loved was to
become the husband of another.
Take Notice
It has frequently come to my at
tention that much recklessness in the
handling of household goods has
occurred at fires in this villagethat
excited persons, including boys, have
rushed into houses and caused much
damage by sheer carelessness. Frail
articles have been dragged forth and
thrown into the yard or street without
any necessity, and much needless loss
has consequently resulted to the
owner or insurance companies. The
damage resulting to furniture at the
Douglas fire was but one instance of
this. I therefore give notice that here
after such practice must stop. Per
sons assisting at a fire must be
governed by the instructions issued
by the chief of the department.
A. M. Davis, Chief.
Stolen From Hotel
On Tuesday night between 10 and 11
o'clock a fur-lined overcoat and pair
of pants belonging to Albert Manke
and a blue worsted coat, pair of shoes
and suspenders belonging to Louis
Wagner were stolen from a bedroom
in the Commercial hotel. A stranger
engaged and paid for a room on
Tuesday evening but did not occupy
it, and it is supposed that he carried
off the articles missing. He is de
scribed as being about 5 feet 8 inches
in height, with black hair and mus
tache and weighing about 165 pounds.
Wahkon Vetes for a New School Site
Wahkon people are determined to
have good public school facilities.
At a special election held on Monday
the vote was practically unanimous
on the proposition to provide means
for purchasing a suitable new site
upon which a spacious and modern
school building will be erected next
year.
MARKET REPORT
The quotations hereunder are those
prevailing on Thursday morning at the
time of going to press:
POTATOES.
Triumphs 60
Jiurbanks 50
Ohios b0
Rose 45
GRAIN, HAY, ETC.
Wheat, No. 1 Northern $1.00
Wheat, No. 2 Northern 97
Wheat, No. 3 Northern 93
Wheat, No. 4 Northern 89
Wheat, Rejected 82
Oats 37(3)40
Barley 73@96
Flax 1.92(3)2.22
Rye 79@84
Wild hay 6.50
Tame hay 10.00
LIVE STOCK
Fat beeves, per ft 3c 4c
Calves, per S 4c 5c
Hogs, per cwt $7.00 $7.50
Sheep, per ft 3c@4c
Hens, old, per fi 8c
Springers, per ft 10c
MINNEAPOLIS.
Minneapolis, Wednesday evening.
Wheat, No. 1 hard, $1.11 No. 1 Nor
thern, $1.10 No. 2 Northern, $1.09.
White Oats, 46c No 3, 45c.
Rye, 93c.
Flax, No. 1, $2.37.
Corn, No. 3 Yellow, 73c.
Barley, 68c@$1.18.
9
We guarantee that Copenhagen Snuff
is now and always has been absolutely
pure snuff, that it complies with the
laws of every State and all federal laws.
American Snuff Company, 111 Fifth Ave., NewYork.
{E Wool Fleeced Blankets-
Main Street,
|mfnmfnmmH!mmmmmtmmmmmmmn?mmmm^
(Comforters and Blankets1
S= Large Sanitary, Silkaline Lined Comforts ~f
1 $3.50 $2.50 $1.25 I
E Wool Blankets, 12-4 and 11-4 2
Cotton FJieeced Blankets
$6.50 $5.50 $4.50 3
$3.25 $2.75 $2.50
$2.50 $1.75 $1.50 75c 50c
E Also Sanitary "All in One Bat," 72x84
I $1.25
F. T. KETTELHODT
gr Princeton, Minn. 3
^UliiiilUUlllllUUiiUliiliiUiUiiUUiUiiUilliUiiliUiUiliUiiiil
DID IT EVER OCCUR TO YOU?
Did it ever occur to you that perhaps you are making a mistake by not getting
our prices before buying lumber, sash, doors, etc somewhere else You are old
enough to know that there is a mighty big difference in the quality of every one of
these articles, just the same as there is in tea and coffee And that there is
always more or less difference in the prices, too Then, as you can always get
the most and best here at the lowest prices why aren't you making a mistake by not
buying here From where we sit looks as though you were passing up a good thing
CALEY LUMBER CO.
BENJAHIN SOULE, Manager
^**^"^^"**"^****iM**^*^ ^|^WMl^^^^^^i^M^MrMMMl^ll^rv*N^m
G. H. GOTTWERTH,
Dealer In
Prime Meats of Every Variety,
Poultry, Fish, Etc.
Highest market prices paid for Cattle and Hogs.
L. C. HUMMEL
Fresh and Salt Meats, Lard,
Poultry, Fish and Game in Season.
Both Telephones.
Mala Street, (Opposite Starch Factory.) Princeton, Minn.
Ads in The Union Bring Results
Tf^f
Princeton.
*rrimn'*'*jrt.ifn ir^j~

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