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The Princeton union. (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, September 07, 1916, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1916-09-07/ed-1/seq-2/

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YAGE TWO.
mi
NTINUE
N WEST
Anglo-French Armies Gradually
Closing on Gambles.
SHATTE TEUTO N DEFENSE S
Russians Batter at Hungary's Gates
While Czar Hurls Legions at Ger-
mans from Pripet Region to Car-
pathian Passes.
London, Sept. 6.Gradually the
lines ot the entente allies are draw
ing more closely about Combles and
toward Peronne Farther and farther
their wedges are being driven into the
German lines both north and south of
the River Somme.
On a tront of about twenty-five miles
the French and British troops, sup
ported powerfully by their enormous
artillery arm, are still hammering the
German positions and sustaining, un
flinchingly, heavy counter attacks
Noi th ot the Somme to the east and
southeast ot Forest, the French drove
foiward their lines capturing the out
skirts oi the Anderlu wood, hospital
farm, and the Ramnette wood and
part of Marneres wood and a posi
tion on the load leading from Bouch
avesnes to Clery
Near Ginchy, to the north of Guille
mont, the British also continued their
advance, winning all the territory be
tween the Falfemont iarm and Leuze
wood and between that wood and the
outskirts of the town of Ginchy, which
they captured and have held since the
fighting of Sunday
South of the Somme the French
have taken the town of Chilly, situat
ed one mile west of the railroad lead
ing from Chaulnes to Roye, a line of
trenches east of Soyecourt and num
erous isolated positions between Ver
cmandovillers and Chilly.
Since Sunday the French alone have
taken on the Somme front 6,550 pris
oners and thirty-six guns.
Violent on Eastern Front.
On the Eastern front violent fight
ing continues from the Pripet marsh
region in Volhynia, through Galicia,
and up in the Carpathian passes
The Russians reported successes
mear Vladimii-Volynski and a con
Itinuance of their advance toward the
plains of Hungary through the Car
pathians
Berlin reports that in Galicia, in the
region of Brzezany, and near Fundul
QMoldowi, in the Carpathian region,
'heavy Russian attacks were repulsed,
in the latter district with heavy cas
ualties
In Eastern Roumania the Germans
and Bulgarians captured the fortified
bridgehead of Tutrakan and the Bul
garians the town of Dobric.
Petrograd reports the cutting down
of a Bulgarian outpost by Russian
cavalrv its first engagement with
the invaders on Roumanian soil.
Near Ognott in Turkish Armenia
violent fighting between Turks and
(Russians is taking place Both Petro
grad and Constantinople report suc
cesses here for their respective ar
mies
The Italians captured several addi
tional positions from the Austrians in
the Upper Vovi region of the Austro
Italian ^heater and repulsed violent
Austrian counter attacks
Aside from military activity there
has been no fightm? in the Mace
donian tneater
GRAFT JURORS DISAGREE
Deliberators Dismissed in Case of
Former Manitoba Officials.
Winnipeg, Sept 6.The jury in the
case of Sir Redmond Roblm, former
premier ol this province, and two
members of his cabinet, John R. Cold
well, minister of education, and J.
Howden, attorney general, charged
with conspiracy to defraud the prov
ince in the erection of parliament
buildings here, reported to Judge
Prendergast it was unable to agree.
The jury was dismissed
A Bonnar, chief counsel for the
government, filed twenty-three objec
tions to Judge Prendergast's address
to the jury, taking particular excep
tion to the statement that there was
less evidence against Sir Rodmond
than against the other two defendants
The case was given to the jury after
a trial which continued nearly six
weeks YEGGS BLOW THEATER SAFE
JRobbers Obtain $400 in Oshkosh,
Wis., Job.
Oshkosh, Wis., Sept. 6A safe in
the office of the Majestic theater was
blown open with nitroglycerin and
about $400 taken
Manager Rqy Cummins previously
had. removed about $1,000, receipts for
Saturday and Sunday, to another
place. The explosion, heard by sev
eral, was attributed to a tire or back
ifire of an automobile, and no report
was made to the police.
Car Strike Put Off Two Days.
New York. Sept. 6.After a confer
ence of union le'aders it was announc
here there would be no strike on
fthe s^Ub^ay and elevated lines of this
ltv *f6r**t least forty-eight hours.
GENERAL F0CH.
Commands Allied Forces
South of the Somme.
VON HINDENBURGSEES
RETREAT OF GERMANS
Paris, Sept. 6.Field Marshal von
Hindenburg has arrived on the West
ern front for the first time since the
beginning of the war and is urging
his commanders to a more stubborn
defense along the Somme.
He witnessed the retreat of the Ger
man armies under British and French
blows in Sunday and Monday's fight
ing. It was the first great battle in
which the Teutons have been engaged
since Von Hindenburg was appointed
chief of the German general staff.
The Germans are fighting desperate
ly, but during the last twenty-four
hours have been pushed steadily east
ward by the impetuous French attacks.
General Foch struck south of the
Somme Monday, while the body of
Teuton reserves were preparing to re
sist another great smash north of the
river.
The French success on this new
onslaught equals the successes of the
British on the preceding day.
Soyecourt was occupied and, extend
ing their gains far to the south, the
French occupied the village of Chilly.
The outskirts of three other villages
were seized and about 3,000 prisoners
were taken
RUSS ASSIST ROUMANIANS
Large Force Will Join in Attack on
Bulgarians.
Rome, Sept 6.Russian transports
have landed a large Slav contingent
at the Roumanian port of Constanza
to aid in the operations against Bul
garia.
Part of the Russian forces already
have joined the Bulgars resisting the
Roumanian attack along the Dodrudja
front. Roumanians have entered the
Transylvania city of Hermannstadt,
which was evacuated by the Austrians
several days ago
ATTACKS SPIRIT OF FORCE
Hughes Condemns "Legislation in Ad
vance of Investigation."
Lexington, Ky., Sept 6.Charles E.
Hughes, addressing an audience that
filled the Auditorium here, condemned
"legislation in advance of investiga-
tion," and declared the United States
"had gone far toward the day when
we shall have action under pressure,
instead of in consideration of the
facts
Mr. Hughes' declaration apparently
referred to the act of congress in
passing the eight-hour bill.
"We have a new spirit abroad in
these recent days in America," Mr.
Hughes said.
"It is the spirit that says: 'Legislate
now and investigate afterward.' It is
the spirit of force. It is not Ameri-
can." CANNOT MELT GOLD COIN
English Defense of Realm Act Made to
Cover This Restriction.
London, Sept. 6.England's defense
of the realm act again has been
stretched. This latest stretch pro
hibits the melting down of gold coins.
The measure became necessary be
cause of the enormous wastage of the
nation's gold reserves caused by re
duction of gold coins for the manufac
ture of jewelry for which the excep
tionally high wages of war workers
have created an extensive demand.
Packer Leaves Fortune to Son.
Chicago, Sept 6.The bulk of the
fortunje of Patrick A. Valentine, for
mer vice president of Armour & Co.,
who died at his summer home at
Oconomowoc, Aug 21, was left to his
only son, Patrick A. Valentine. An
estate estimated at more than $10,000,-
00*0 is disposed of by the will. Young
Valentine, who is thirteen years old,
receives $1,000,000 outright at the age
of twenty-one and the remainder when
he reaches twenty-five.
SEEKS APOLOGY
FOR ATTACKS
Japan Demands Concessions
Throughout Oriental Empire.
UNITED STATES WILL INQUIR E
"Special Rights" Involved May Inter-
fere With American Policy of
the Open Door in Far EastLans-
ing Silent on Attitude.
Washington, Sept. 6.Sweeping de
mands, far more drastic than any pub
lished summaries have indicated, are
revealed in the secret terms being
pressed on China by Japan as a result
of the recent armed conflict at Cheng
Chiatun in Inner Mongolia.
Private dispatches received here re
veal that Japan seeks indemnities, an
apology and political concessions
throughout the whole section of inner
Mongolia and South Manchuria.
Four Formal Demands.
The four formal demands are quot
ed as follows:
OnePunishment of the command
ing Chinese officer involved in the
trouble.
TwoDismissal, with punishment,
of the other officers involved.
Three Instructions to Chinese
troops in Inner Mongolia and South
Manchuria not to interfere in any way
with Japanese troops or civilians,
and to publish this fact broadly.
Four-Recognition of "special inter
ests" for Japan in Inner Mongolia and
South Manchuria, comprising powers
of police and administration, prefer
ence in loans and the selection of all
foreign advisers, etc.
Concessions Sought.
Besides the four "demands" are four
concessions which China is asked to
grant Japan without formal demand,
as follows:
OneThe Chinese army in South
Manchuria and Eastern Mongolia to
employ Japanese military advisers.
TwoChinese schools and colleges
to have Japanese military inspectors.
ThreeA formal apology in person
from the Chinese governor of Muk
den to the Japanese governor at Dai
ren and the Japanese consul at Muk
den for the Chang Chiatun trouble.
FourMonetary compensation to
the families of the Japanese killed, the
amounts to be settled by later nego
tiations
Secretary Lansing refused to com
ment on the dispatches or to outline
what might be the attitude of the
American government.
It is known, however, that steps
will be taken immediately by the state
department through Minister Reinsch
at Peking to obtain detailed reports
and learn the full significance 'of
Japan's act.
CHINESE DENOUNCE
JAPANESE DEMANDS
Peking, Sept. 6.The Chinese press
strongly denounce the Japanese de
mands made on China in connection
with the conflict between Chinese and
Japanese troops at Cheng Chiatun,
Mongolia, on Aug. 13, which resulted
in the killing or wounding of many on
both sides. The Peking Gazette says:
"The demajids of Barbn Hayashi
(Japanese minister to China), on
China respecting the Cheng Chiatun
incident have created profound dis
appointment.
"At th moment China was begin
ning to credit the Japanese with good
will, Tokio took a step which is unin
telligible except on the theory of con
tmunity of the Japanese policy as ap
plied against Yuan Shi Kai.
"That policy is aggressive, if not
predatory. China alone and single
handed cannot withstand its pres
bure/'v
The Gazette asserts that the de
mands threaten China's sovereignty
and urges the appointment of an in
vestigating commission composed of
representatives of the United States,
Great Britain, France and Russia.
Driver Near Death After Smash.
Cincinnati, Sept. 6.Gil Anderson of
Indianapolis, whose racing qar went
into a fence at the Sharonville speed-'
way, was pronounced in a serious, but
not necessarily dangerous condition.
Anderson sustained a broken leg and.
many bruises. Bert Shields, Ander
son's mechanician, probably received
a fracture of the spine, and physicians
hold out slight hopes for his recovery.
THE PRINCETON UNION: THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1916^-^
4*
WHEAT CROP YIELDS ONE
CENT PER GRAIN.
J* Great Falls, Mont., Sept. 6.
5* F. Perring of Clear Lake, fifty
J- miles fronixhere, estimates his
J* returns on his crop of 1 cent for 4
h every grain sown His rate of $-
I- yield this season has been 120
kernels per seed. Grain deal-
i- ers say Perring's yield is a rec-
4* ord. 4.
4. 4. 4. 4. 4. 4v4* 4*4*4*4*4*4*4*4*4*4
i ?tL i
FIRST AID IS
GIVEMALLMAN
Minneapolis Man Declares Tanlac is
the Only Medicine to
Help Him.
Minneapolis, Minn., Sept. 2,A.
Hallman, of Merriam Park, Minneap
olis R. F. D., is one of the hundreds
of people who have found Tanlac, the
celebrated new medicine, surprisingly
beneficial. Mr. Hallman gave a state
ment on August 22 telling why he is
so grateful to the new preparation.
"For a long time I was bothered
with stomach trouble," Mr. Hallman
said. "My stomach usually was in a
soured condition and gas often formed
on my stomach. I was frequently
bothered with heartburn. It was
difficult for me to keep food on my
stomach, especially in the mornings.
"I read in the papers accounts of
Tanlac's help for others and I decided
to give this new medicine a trial. The
gas has disappeared from my stomach
entirely since I began taking Tanlac
and for my other troubles'Tanlac has
proved very beneficial. I tried many
other medicines and none of them
helped me. I recommend Tanlac."
Tanlac, the Master Medicine is
especially beneficial for stomach, liver,
and kidney trouble, catarrhal com
plaints, rheumatism, nervousness, loss
of appetite and the like and is a fine
strength builder, giving health and
strength to weak, run down men and
women.
Tanlac is now being especially in
troduced and explained in Princeton
at the C. A. Jack Drug Co. store. Adv.
Will Be at Our Fair.
"Monte Rolfe, the famous English
aviator who came here to make flights
today certainly made good his word
to have everyone sit up and take no
tice. He started from the reservation,
made a circle over the city, then
worked in toward the business district,
and when he was over the city seemed
to be flying in circles so small that
it appeared as though he could not
possibly make the turns without tip
ping over the machine. Then he shot
up and up, and up, almost out of sight,
then came down in a spiral dive, to
within a few feet of the town, and
flew away again like a streak of
lightning.
"Rolfe says his machine is very
fast, in fact faster than he cares to
have it, but he has had to fly so con
tinuously that he cannot find time to
change it. He describes the machine
as a bucking broncho, says you've got
to hold her in, or she'll sure run away.
"The flights were witnessed by
everyone in the city, and pronounced
by those that claim to know, as being
better than looping the loop."Los
Angeles, Cal., Times.
Corn Statistics.
The August 1 forecast of the corn
crop in Minnesota was a yield of 77,-
200,000. This is from an acreage of
25 to 30 per cent smaller than the crop
of last year, which produced 62,-100,-
000 bushels. The forecast for the en
tire United States is 2,780,000,000
bushels. La*st year's production was
3,054,535,000 bushels. Minnesota is
gaining 15,100,000 bushels, though
the whole country is losing 274,535,000
bushels.
Are you reading your own
Union, or do you bdrrow it
from your neighbor? Sub
scribe to-day!
uMiniiimimimiiiiiimuiir iiMimiiiiiinimm
PAYETTE'S
Popular HAS
Priced HE
Photos TAKEN
Please YOUR
Particular PHOTO
People YET?
Come in and arrange for a
Sitting To-day! The Latest
Creations in Photography are
Always to be found at The
PAYETTE STUDIO
Princeton, Minnesota
muiiiiiiuiitiiiiii
BLACKSMITHING
I AND WAGO N SHOP
j Good Work and Prices Absolute- 1
'ly Right.
S IS
Special Attention Given to
Horses With Sore Feet I
I J.A.MADSEH
North of Postoffice
Princeton Minnesota
?%S-jk^^ '^iJri^f2te^Sffc4/^^ ^*&$f'Jrtt$
I Farm Mortgages,
Insurance, Collections.
sc
First National Bank
OF PRINCETON, MINNESOTA.
PAID UP CAPITAL, $30,000
A General Banking Business
Transacted.
Loans Made on Approved
Securtiy.
Interest Paid
posits.
Foreign and
change.
S. S. PETTERSON, President.
T. H. CALEY, Vice President.
J. F. PETTERSON, Cashier.
H^X* K*X*X^^
Princeton State Bank
CAPITAL $20,000
Doai a G*nr&l
Banking Business
INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS
Security State Bank
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA
Capital, $32,000 Surplus $4,000
JOHN W. GOULDING, President G. A. EATON, Cashier
smm K**t%amKKKi
1 FARMLANDS FARM LOANS
ricMillan & Stanley
Successors to 4
n. S. RUTHERFORD & CO.
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA
We Handle the Great Northern Railway Co. Lands.
FARM LOANS FARM LANDS
h^4^^^^^^4^^^^^^K^K4^4^4^4^^
Pierson & Blocker
(Successors to L. C. Hummel)
Fresh and Salt Meats, Lard,
POULTRY, FISH and GAME IN SEASON.
Both Telephones
South ftialo Street Princeton, Minn.
pimmmm?nmmmmmm?mmmmmmmmmmmmK
Dressed
Lumber
You'll find no BARK on our Lumber, although we do 3
E a good deal of BARKING about it. We have the 3
r stock and feel justified in the BARKING. When you3tf
E: want the best lumber BARK up this tree 3*
E AND YUU'LL FIND IT =3
Rudd Lumber Co.
BffiS-
On Time De-
Domestic Ex-
I
ji
if
i
ii
J.J.SKAHEN,
Cashier.
If? II' i|i
Is Like a Dead Dog! 3
THE BARK 3
Is All Off! 3
GEO. A. COATES, Hanager 3
iuiiUUiiUUliUiUiUiUiUiUiUiiUiUiUUliUiUiUtUUlUUUUlS yy*yiy*yiyi*y*yv*-raHi*yaYf ytTtT1T|:|
A. C. SMITH
Prime Heats ot Every Variety,
Poultry, Fish, Etc.
Higest Market Prices Paid for Cattle and Hogs
MAIN STREET, PRINCETON
3
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